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tv   100 Days  BBC News  March 16, 2017 7:00pm-7:46pm GMT

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hello and welcome to 100 days. president donald trump's second travel ban goes the way of the first — blocked by us courts. the order stopping arrivals from six mainly muslim countries has been halted by federal judges on the grounds of religious discrimination. the president attacksjudicial overreach and promises that in the end he will get his way. we're going to fight this terrible ruling. we're going to take our case as far as it needs to go — including all the way up to the supreme court. the white house puts forward what it's calling a "hard power budget" with more money for the military and big cuts for diplomacy, the environment, housing and the arts. the uk government says there will be no scottish independence referendum before brexit. theresa may says now is not the time for the vote, but the first minister of scotland calls it "undemocratic" and "unacceptable. " history may see it as the day that the fate of the union was sealed. in the netherlands the prime
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minister mark rutte loses seats, but will likely return to power — after seeing off the challenge of geert wilders. eruption on mount etna in sicily. hello, i'm katty kay in washington, christian fraser is in london. for the second time in two months, federaljudges have blocked president trump's attempt to impose a travel ban on six mainly muslim countries. earlier this month, the white house issued a new travel order which removed some of the more contentious elements from the first one. - but two judges, one from hawaii another from maryland, took the unusual step of referring back to the president's comments during the election campaign — evidence they said that his order was still designed to discriminate against muslims. donald] trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown on muslims entering the united states,
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until our country's representatives can figure out what the hell is going on! later in the campaign, mr. trump backed away from his call for a total muslim ban. but thejudge in hawaii appears to conclude that mr. trump's true motivations lie in those earlier remarks. at a rally in nashville the president said the ruling was terrible. this ruling makes us look weak — which by thewaywe no longelarl! believe me! just look at our borders. we are going to fight this terrible ruling, we are going to take our case as far as it needs to go, including all the way up to the supreme court. we are going to win, we're going to keep our citizens safe and regardless, we're going to keep our citizens safe, believe me.
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the presidents critics have wasted no time in drawing attention to his problems. senator elizabethe warren tweeted this: well in the last hour the white house communications with us to discuss is legal professorjonathan turley, from the george washington university. is this religious discrimination, the travel ban? frankly, i don't think. case the travel ban? frankly, i don't think - case law the travel ban? frankly, i don't think. case law supports the think the case law supports the opinion. the ninth circuit made the! on due process. this is based ruling on due process. this is based on different courts. so in some ways this is opening up a new legal front. but the case law doesn't really favour the court that much on something like this. and the court was light on - analysis. it was
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was light on case analysis. it was long on the rhetoric and discussion of the president's campaign state m e nts of the president's campaign s - of the president's campaign statementsegéeé statements made by statements and statements made by his aides. that is usually not something that courts place so much ézfl/eii " something that courts place so much ,,fcp,: on. i something that courts place so much eipfg; on. you have said in something that courts place so much gig??? on. you have said in the emphasis on. you have said in the past that you don't agree with the travel ban, now stick your legal hat back on, is there a legal case to be made do you think, they have used the campaign rhetoric of the president to back up their case, is there do you think another legal case to be made or not? well, i tell you, i would have to bet on the president on both due process and on eyesiéeee fee. l254; 2. e. eeeeex .,.4 -,. religious clauses and the religious clauses and establishment. the case law is strong here, it is interesting that each of the decisions basically ignores the other counts, focuses on if? and ignores the other counts, focuses on e and different ignores the other counts, focuses on if? and different aspects. i ignores the other counts, focuses on e and different aspects. i didn't one and different aspects. i didn't find the opinion that convincing. what i felt was convincing was the administration needs discipline and
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people are saying things public they undermining their case. but a are undermining their case. but a lot of courts would be uneasy in having a case of this importance l:ll : lee: ll ll..l '%.—:.:..l—é:..l—..l.l. turn llll l llll ll ll.l lllllllll turn on campaign statements. particularly campaign statements that you noted went back and forth and were fluid. - ban was and were fluid. this ban was supposed to come into play today and supposedto come—interplaytodayand = it won't. talk us through a bit now it won't. talk us through a bit of the, what goes on from here, the $— of the, what goes on from here, the timetable l . of the, what goes on from here, the gig table of. of the, what goes on from here, the gig table of how long will the ban time table of how long will the ban be frozen and how long will people who want to get into the united states, how long will they have to get in? well the fist step would be for the administration to move to the ninth circuit, hawaii is in the circuit. there is a standing case that was never overturned that that was never overtumedihat the challengers. they may favours the challengers. they may have favoured the decision that came down. they can say this is a different order and written differently and dropped some of the issues and we want you to look on
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issues and we want you—toleekfl on issues and we want you—toleekflee on an emergency basis. they this on an emergency basis. they would do that. whether they would win isa would do that. whether they would win is a good question. but this is a case clearly being groomed for the supreme court. they‘ re a case clearly being groomed for the supreme court. they're going to take it all the way. is that weeks or it could be weeks for the month? it could be weeks for the ninth circuit, but months for the supreme court. they may - want to supreme court. they may not want to move and wait until there is a ninth justice who is a strong executive power record. thank you very much. reinforce that the president needs a win somewhere and he has a problem with his travel ban and with the obama care replacement and wire tapping and there are problems every where? what the processor said -- professor said is interesting, the
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majority of legal opinions believe the president has the law on his side. the executive powers in protecting the borders seem to be at their zenith. that- not matter for this president, if politically for this president, if this plays out over months that is months of distraction from the kinds of things that the president needs to get done. there are no legislative achievements so far for this white house. we are talking about travel bans and that kind of thing, they and he is losing on that fronts, he needs to have a win and he needs to have some concrete actions that he can say, listen, i have passed laws and made differences. the other thing is that words have consequences. sometimes you think the president doesn't seem to understand that or doesn't care, but the implications of his words when he is in the oval office are greater and that is what the judges have ruled. what the
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greater and that is what the judges have [m what the judge in hawaii have ruled. what thejudge in hawaii said is statements on the campaign m i have an impact and it is trail have an impact and it is interesting the of interesting the psychology of president trump is fascinating, he could say what he wanted when he was ce of his company. now he is president of the united states. and people need to trust these words. in the last hour, the republican and democratic leaders of the senate intelligence committee announced they have found no evidence to support president trump's claim the obama administration tapped his phones during the 2016 devin nunes, the republican chair of the the house intelligece committee,
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made a similar statement yesterday. so two seperate inquiries and nothing to suggest there was any surveillance of mr trump's phones. so, is the president going to let it drop? no, he's not. take a look at some of the things written about about wiretapping and eavesdropping and don't forget when i say wiretap, those words were in quotes, because wiretapping is pretty old fashioned stuff, but it covers surveillance and many other things. and nobody ever talks about the fact that it was in quotes, but wiretap covers a lot of things, i think you're going to find some interesting items coming to the forefront over the next two weeks. i'm ata i'm at a loss now, he can pick up the phone, he can end this now and ring up and declassify the documents, there have been two inquiries and we get this sort of refrain, in two weeks, something else will happen, so he kicks it
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down the line and it "rue“ the down the line and it muckies the waters and the congress on both sides are getting tired of it. it is a distraction, all this in quotation stuff and whether it was ifnff afifi whether if wai l oi’ ifnff afifi whether if wai l or wire tapping muddies surveillance or wire tapping muddies the waters, but what the president said in his tweet four times in four separate tweets is indisputable. said in his tweet four times in four separate tweets is indisputablem you look at that, it doesn't say wire tapping. inverted commas. you look at that, it doesn't say wire tapping. inverted commasm doesn't matter whether it is in inverted commas, it is what the president wrote. you said words matter and we have had the president °p matter and we have had the president op the size of his inauguration crowd, the millions who he said voted illegally for which there is no evidence, on this wire tap, for which there is no evidence, a g which there is no evidence, a by partisan pairing l the senate said partisan pairing in the senate said there is no evidence. the- he
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there is no evidence. the more he does this and say things for which there is no evidence that can be proven to be false, that has consequences for him in his legislation, because republicans are losing patience with it. that is where he has his problems. and remember the timing, this was just the day afterjeff sessions recused himself from the russian affair. now sean spicer has been speaking. the president's executive order false within his lawful authority in seeking to protect our nation's security. and the department will continue . defend his executive continue to defend his executive order in the courts. the department is exploring all options to defend this order, we intend to appeal the
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flawed rulings. the department of justice is determining the strategy and timing and we expect action to be taken soon and seek clarification of the order prior to - the of the order prior to appeal. the danger is real and the law is clear. the president was - to change the president was elected to change out the president was elected to change our broken immigration system and will continue to exercise his authority and presidential responsibility to protect our nation. and just before i get to your questions and then before introduce director mull vainy, i was asked on the enforcement of the president's order to restrict lobbying activities of executive branch members and i said i would get back tojohn. the executive order itself has a section, 5, which focuses on enforcement and each agency works with government ethics
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to establish procedures for determining of the the determining violations of the the pledge. sean spicer speaking about the travel ban and showing they are going to fight this all the way. yes, saying what we were saying and what professor tu rley was yes, saying what we were saying and what professor turley was saying that they believe the law is on their side on this one. now to scotland. there's an escalating dispute today between the british prime minister and scotland's first minister on the question of a second referendum on scottish independence. theresa may said earlier today that now was "not the time" to be considering another vote. instead she wants to focus on the complicated brexit negotiations. when the snp, the scottish government, say it is time to start talking about a second scottish independence referendum, i say that, just at this point, all of our energies should be focused on our negotiations with the european union about our future relationship, and to be talking about an independence referendum would, i think, make it more difficult for us to be able to get the right deal for scotland and for the uk. and nicola sturgeon‘s response?
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it's not up to westminster to disregard—the—democ—reticll—ll . mandate in scotland. let's have a listen. we have a conservative government with one mp in scotland saying they will stand in the way of the choice of the scottish people. i mean, this is like winding the clock back to the bad old days of margaret thatcher. it is an argument for independence really in a nutshell that westminster thinks it's got the right to block the democratically elected mandate of scottish government and the majority in the scottish parliament. history may look back on today and see it as the day that the fate of the union was sealed. let's go now to westminster and speak to alex forsyth, our political correspondent. the language is the most interesting thing in that statement from nicola sturgeon, invoking the memory of margaret thatcher from 30 years ago and talking of the fate of the union
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margaret thatcher from 30 years ago and the ing of the fate of the union margaret thatcher from 30 years ago and the tories :he fate of the union margaret thatcher from 30 years ago and the tories who ate of the union margaret thatcher from 30 years ago and the tories who of of the union margaret thatcher from 30 years ago and the tories who of course union margaret thatcher from 30 years ago and the tories who of course are >n margaret thatcher from 30 years ago and the tories who of course are not particularly liked in scotland among particularly liked in scotland among particular sex of society. it a particular sex of society. it makes you think it is going to be difficult for these two women to get together and get the best out of the brexit negotiation. they're in a high stakes game and almost a stand off, because theresa may said what she did unexpectedly and didn't warn nicola sturgeon, the first minister of scotland, what she was going to say and what she said was nicola sturgeon, you want a second independence referendum, by the spring of 2019, that is before the uk leaves the eu and theresa may said that is not the right time for it. she was careful not to reject the possibility outright, because the possibility outright, because the argument of nicola sturgeon that is could fuel the case for independence if westminster was seen as blocking something which the scottish parliament wanted. theresa
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may picked her words carefully, but both are in a real political gamble, theresa may thinking she can play to the will of the scottish people and say we don't want more division. nicola sturgeon thinking she can do the same, but persuade them that their rights are being eroded by westminster. it is going to be a case of one having to back down and we don't know who. thank - very we don't know who. thank you very much. here in the united states it is congress that controls the money. but the budget proposal written by the white house is a marker of how the president intends to rule. and you will seefr—om this first —— — —— increase in military spending and stark cuts across much of the rest of the government. so let's take a look at the winners and losers. the biggest loserrof all is they will see a 31% cut in funding — that wipes out over 50 programmes and over 3000 jobs.
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the state department will see a cut of 29%. and both the agriculture and labour departments will see cuts of 21% each. in all, there are cuts to 15 departments — the savings will raise 11.3 billion dollars of new funding over the next two years for the wall on the mexican border. just a fraction of what will be needed to complete it. there will also be a 6% increase in funds for veterans, a 7% bump for homeland security and a $54 billion increase in defence spending — that's a 9% jump. so katty big numbers, put that increase in defence spending into some context for us. as christian mentioned that nine per cent equates to a rise of about sli—billion dollars. compare that with the total state department budget — a proposed $37.6 billion dollars. to the defence increase is more than
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the state department. the director of the white house budget office made it clear today this is exactly what president trump wants. make no mistake about it, this is a hard—power budget, not a soft—power budget. that is what the president wanted and that is what we gave him. today's planned budget cuts for the environmental protection agency puts into focus once again the trump administration's controversial approach to climate change. what he wants to do is red meat stuff — anything like veterans, the war, military, i'm running through them, homeland security. this what is conservative base wants the president to spend on and are not interesting in diplomacy. but you withdraw diplomacy and you end up withdraw diplomacy and you end up with problems around the world which means mu = to spend more on your
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means you have to spend more on your military. i have had a tweet, dave saying, why are you always knocking trump, he is doing what he said he would do. name me a president that has done that. people say it is not a surprise, this what is he on. when we say doing campaigned on. when we say doing this, the budget has to go through c0 ng ress this, the budget has to go through congress and a lot may not happen, as an indication of his priorities and what his voters' priorities are it is clear — more military, less diplomacy and less money for the environment and that is one of the biggest losers. nick bryant reports from florida. the southern coast of florida has long been america's playground. the destination for millions of tourists each year. the waterfront home of some of the most prized real estate in the country.
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but the sunshine state has become a gorgeous front line in the fight against global warming. rising sea waters and recurring flooding risks turning miami beach into a modern—day atlantis, a city submerged by water. even on sunny days it can get inundated because seasonal tides bring the ocean to people's doorsteps. so much of it now is a construction site, as the city builds pumping stations and raises roads. miami beach is going to disappear, people building all these new houses and apartments, they don't want to hear it. they are in total denial. local resident, dan kipness, gave us a tour of the newly built flood defenses which scientists fear will be obsolete in just a few decades time. the us army projects that water levels could rise five feet by the end of this century, but america's new commander—in—chief is a climate change denier.
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our so—called president thinks it is a hoax, it is a chinese hoax. i mean, i can't believe it, i live right in the middle of climate change every day. we are so affected here, how dare the leader of this great country say it doesn't exist. it is impossible, he cannot be thinking this way. and the people around him cannot be thinking this way. just up the coast is the president's luxury florida mansion. he calls it the winter white house but it is also a climate change ground zero. donald trump has repeatedly rejected the science of climate change. even though it is estimated that over the coming decades rising sea waters could inundate a quarter of his very own luxury estate. but florida went for donald trump at the election and just 25% of those who voted for him nationwide believe that climate change is caused by human activity. donald trump, are you happy with the way things
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are going at the moment? very happy. supporters like barbara grossman agree, 100% with the president. the sea rise level is so minute, it can't even be counted. eui saw is 1‘ e55 e55}? 55151 “155 being flooded regularly. maybe the sand is all on landfill, it is sinking with all those high—rises. —j you do not think it is climate change? no, i don't think it has anything to do with it. of all the world cities, miami ranks second in terms of properties and assets at risk from global warming and water levels here are rising at nearly ten times the average worldwide rates. but the politics of climate change as clear—cut as the science. and florida demonstrated, you can deny its very existence and still reach the white house. nick bryant, bbc news, miami.
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i think we should do the show from there one day. from florida. while it is still there. 31% proposed cut to the environmental protection agency. that is a hefty cut. an incredible escape to share with you now — 10 people, including members of a bbc news crew, have been injured after a massive explosion on italy's mount etna. europe's biggest volcano spewed lava and burning rocks into the sky, forcing people to run for cover. 0ur science reporter, becky morelle was among them, and tells her story from sicily. i was with a bbc crew filming a lava flow from a recent spate of volcanic activity. but the lava mixed with some snow causing first, a small explosion. then a larger one. they pelted us with rocks
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and boulders and steam. get the bag. to get to safety. but some were left with cuts and burns and bruises. have you seen the others? and a guide suffered a dislocated shoulder. a volcanologist who was with us said it was the worst incident he had experienced in his 30 year career and that we were lucky no one was left with serious injuries. extraordinary escape. i was hearing from the news room that the produce hear the was with rebecca, the lava
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hit her back and burnt through her coat. they have all gone to hospital. i think they're all only lightly injured. but a lucky escape. beautiful to watch from afar. why didn't they have warning. apparently the lava reacted with - snow. you're watching one hundred days from bbc news. still to come for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — us secretary of state rex tillerson has met the japanese prime minister, but will he have a tougher time when he heads to beijing this weekend? and when these us congressmen couldn't fly because of snow, they drove to washington all the way from texas. and of course, they streamed it live. that's still to come on 100 days, from bbc news. a day of contrasts in the uk today,
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the best of the sunshine in the south—east. this was taken by a weather watcher in kent, looking across a field of daffodils. cloud and showers in - north—west and showers in the north—west highlands. you can see in between the two there was a fair bit of cloud. a bigi@ difference- cloud. a big temperature difference either side of this front. that fresher air in the north—west will win out. it is coming behind a weak fm that win out. it is coming behind a weak ff-mt that will win out. it is coming behind a weak “mt that will drift win out. it is coming behind a weak ff-mt that will drift south bringing front that will drift south bringing some rain. behind it, the cold air follows as do a good few showers into mired and scotland —— northern ireland and scotland. someg fall l ireland and scotland. some will fall as snow over higher ground. some frost in sheltered places. in the morning, still some wintry showers over higher ground, but the north—east of scotland starts on a decent north. but wet for most of scotla nd decent north. but wet for most of scotland and northern ireland. down to wales and the south—west of
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england, a bright start. many southern counties getting a decent start with sunshine. bright and breezy. and colder than it has been on recent mornings. make the most of the sunshine, because it will cloud ‘from the north—west as rain over from the north—west as rain continues to pile in, still further snow over higher ground in scotland. come the afternoon, many southern counties staying dry and mild at 10 to 13 degrees. but colder in the north at 7 to 9 in scotland. but we have the cheltenham gold cup on friday and it will be cloudy in the itii'ri “iii 55i.v'i.i if lit igigxi but it should sta d , afternoon, but it should stay dry, pleasy. through the evening some rain spreading towards the south—east and you can see it is mild and a grey start to breezy and mild and a grey start to the day on saturday. with some rain. continuing across the north and west of the uk. the further east you are, it is drier. but some rain in the
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higher ground at times. as you go through saturday into sunday, many of us will see this warm sector, but it will be windy. but mild to start the day on sunday with some cloud and rain in the west. and the further east l and rain in the west. and the further east you ~ — and rain in the west. and the ;% east you are l and rain in the west. and the ;% east you are the better further east you are the better chance of staying dry for much of the day. welcome back to 100 days. it story. —— a reminder of our main story. president trump's second travel ban is blocked by the us courts, but he vows that he will make it happen. the two us congressmen who forged an unlikely partnership as they drove across the states to get to washington for a vote. centre ground european leaders are celebrating mark rutte's victory in the dutch elections. german chancellor angela merkel called it a good day for democracy,
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while spain's prime minister mariano rajoy praised dutch voters for their show of responsibility and maturity. despite his party losing almost 20% of their seats, mark rutte held off the challenge from geert wilders' freedom party. the far right freedom party did make gains in the election, however, and their leader geert wilders insisted he is here to stay. 0ur message to the people of the netherlands is to stay on the course that we have plotted for this country, did take —— keep this country, did take —— keep this cou ntry safe country, did take —— keep this country safe and stable and prosperous. that message has see". a prosperous. that message has been a difficult one but the people of rewarded us forward. the netherlands has said no to the wrong kind of populism. the far right freedom party did make gains in the election, however, and their leader geert wilders insisted he is here to stay. mark rutte hasn't got rid of me, the patriotically bring continues and i will be here if they need me for the negotiations and if that is not the case that he won't get rid of me just yet. just before we came on air i spoke to our correspondent ros atkins, we were talking about a big success
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for mark rutte, but when you look at the final result, he lost eight seats under labour party slumped from 38 to nine and geert wilders still came in in a pretty strong second position, so what should we read into this election? i think the thing is that everything in politics is relative and if you go back a few weeks geert wilders had a clear lead in the polls, and i'm talking about are several point lead and there was an expectation that he could perhaps get more votes for his party than any of the others in this election and the fact that this has not happened, not even close, with mark rutte on 33 and geert wilders on 20 is quite a turnaround from where we were recently and that is the reason that even though mark rutte has lost seats and geert
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wilders has gained seats, the narrative that is being told the dutch press, and i think it is the correct one, is that this is a good night for mark rutte, not a disastrous one for geert wilders, but not the breakthrough he was looking for. it sounds a bit like the financial markets, you need to be the expectations of your shareholders! the other thing that has come out to me is that populism, as mark rutte can be defeated, but only when said, can be defeated, but only when there is a plausible and acceptable alternative. hillary clinton was not that alternative, mark rutte was. i wonder if people in the esffisrlafiflé= wonder if people in the netherlands are asking if france have unacceptable alternative? this is a really key point. i have just been speaking to a man who has just been speaking to a man who has just retired from parliament but he was a just retired from parliament but he wasa mp just retired from parliament but he was a mp for the mark rutte party was a mp for the mark rutteoarty. ..l .l he was a mp for the mark rutteoarty. ll .l he has just be there was a gap a and he has just be there was a gap a couple of months ago between what mark rutte was saying and what geert wilders was saying about immigration and mark rutte set into that gap and he acknowledged that the liberal party moved towards the populist
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message, partly because it is arguing that it is correct to say so but also because it sense, and that seems to have made big impression on dutch voters. i am absolutely certain that the politicians in france would have been looking at that and thinking about how they take on marine le pen and her message from ben front national and seeing that that message worked for mark rutte and maybe they need to consider it. as the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, prepares to arrive in beijing this weekend for the first high level visit since president trump took office the prospect of a trade war between the worlds two biggest economies is lingering. but any move by washington to increase the tax on some imports into america, to try to protect us jobs, would almost certainly mean retaliation from beijing, and the threat of harm to plenty of us firms exporting everything 7777' from shanghai, our correspondent robin brant reports. the strawberry, fresh and sweet and
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maybe the next weapon in a transposition —— tra nspacific maybe the next weapon in a transposition —— transpacific trade war. china's expanding middle—class love fresh fruit and us firms have set up here to grow and sell in china. it reckons there is also a place for its california strawberries, so next month they will be flown in and they will be pricey. part of the reason for that is the import duty. china adds 14% on fresh strawberries from the us. the prospect of a hike any time soon could squash sales. we would be concerned, from the standpoint of oui’ concerned, from the standpoint of our our product could be affected by any type of trade. issues between oui’ any type of trade. issues between our two countries. but certainly for us our two countries. but certainly for us what we can do is continue to focus on premium, that- best focus on premium, that is the best thing that we can do to ensure that the consumers are going to q thing that we can do to ensure that the consumers are going my
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the consumers are going to paym is not just the consumers are going to paym is notjust the china ambitions of fresh fruit that could be at fresh fruit that could vbe'al-trs'takeazllll. . .l. lll.l could face a bump in the road ford could face a bump in the road for one of its iconic brands. made in america but on sale for a few yea rs now in america but on sale for a few years now in china, this is “she in america but on sale for a few years now in china, this is make or in america but on sale for a few years for! in china, this is make or in america but on sale for a few years for lincoln. i, this is make or in america but on sale for a few years for lincoln. it this is make or in america but on sale for a few years for lincoln. it has is make or in america but on sale for a few years for lincoln. it has been ea or in america but on sale for a few years for lincoln. it has been a z or in america but on sale for a few years for lincoln. it has been a bit e1533! 111 15-111:- !1p§1 e53:- e e1 i11ee5 111 11-1111- !1pe1 eeee e e1 a i11ee5 1111 11-1111- !1pe1 eeee e e1 afading e1ee51e1 11-1111- !1ee1 eeee e e1 a fading brand in the ford of a fading brand in the ford portfolio but recently sales have ticked up in the states. if these drivers here in china don't embrace lincoln that it could be the end of the road for the car that has carried presidents. this giant is made in kentucky and shipped to china. it costs twice as much here. of the reason for that is the part of the reason for that is the import tax, 25%. on the prospect of an increase the parent company, ford, told the bbc it would evaluate the situation should the need arise, but it would not comment on speculation. - american companies speculation. most american companies feel that both in beijing and washington the two leaders of the two governments appreciate that the sta kes two governments appreciate that the stakes are too high and this would be harmful and unproductive for
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either country, so the expectation ofa either country, so the expectation of a trade war is quite low, if not what about chinese nonexistence. what about chinese consumers? are they swayed by price, provenance, politics; american. provenance, politics? american. american, why? the taste is delicious. you think american ones are better? i don't think so. i don't think so. what if your leaders told you not to buy american fruit? does that matter? no. no, we can choose for ourselves. trade war or trade war, china often plays by its own rules. hershey's, the chocolate maker, had a factory here over a complex co m plex row complex row over missiles with south ll.llfll ll... lllllllll fl. 1 .. ll.llfll ll..... lllllllll fl. 1 .. it ll.llfll ll..... lllllllll 1l.. 1 .. it isa ll.llfll ll..... lllllllll 1l.. 1 .. it is a reminder that china korea. it is a reminder that china doesn't have to take a chunk in tax to make its point.
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so the other stories we are following today. police in france have arrested a student suspected of a shooting. he shocked the head teacher. in paris a letter bomb explodes at the headquarters of the international monetary fund, international monetarpfup pi . .= one person. royal assent injuring one person. royal assent has been given to the black sea legislation today, trading —— leading the way for britain to leave the european union. the prime 1ee eureeeee he'ee 1ee 5511 1ee eureeeee he'ee 1ee 1511 can now notify minister can now notify rascal flatts the uk is to leave the eu, starting a process of negotiations. it is unlikely to happen until next week to avoid a clash with an informal summit of eu countries. mike flynn, he used to be the national security advisor here, this isa national security advisor here, this is a warning for you to never take money from moscow because i know you have secret political ambitions! he
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took something like $30,000 from russian television, about $50,000 in took something like $30,000 from russ from levision, about $50,000 in took something like $30,000 from russ from the ;ion, about $50,000 in took something like $30,000 from russ from the russian, jt $50,000 in took something like $30,000 from russ from the russian, he 50,000 in took something like $30,000 from russ from the russian, he had 300 in took something like $30,000 from russ from the russian, he had not in totalfrom the russian, he had not disclosed it before and it is ripples here. was that very good judgment on his part to be taking from one of america's money from one of america's adversaries? perhaps not so much. another link with russia. my rubles stay firmly under the bed! [f geu eeee e’eenw-isftning’tnie’tsst - of two texas congressmen — beto o'rourke, a democrat, and republican will hurd, whose flights to washington were cancelled this week because of the snow. so in a last minute scramble to make a vote here in dc, the two of them hired a car and set off on a marathon journey from san antonio, which they streamed live on facebook. last night we told you it was touch and go. they were due to arrive in dcjust 10 minutes before that vote. did they make it? laura bicker‘s been to find out. just two days ago these men were mere acquaintances, political rivals. this road trip has resulted
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ina rivals. this road trip has resulted in a bipartisan romance. rivals. this road trip has resulted in a bilartisan romance. part of the in a bipartisan romance. part of the drama was this, are we going to get to the vote in time? we only have 36 hours. are we going to be able to get along with each other? they drove through the night, catching the attention of a - nation. drove through the night, catching the attention of a - nationlj sleep. that is so funny. need to sleep. that is so funny. they live streamed a debate on health care, border control, the threat of terrorism, a town hall on wheels. do we defund the department for education? no. that were singalongs. and a whole singalongs. and doughnuts. a whole lot of doughnuts. cheers, buddy. they took the detail, including to land. when you see that there is a
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cool chondrites —— congressman like beto o'rourke, who knows a lot of interesting stuff about music, or a fit guy like three, who likes to eat doughnuts... i'm not a big doughnut eater, ijust like them. you no this is the high—tech map that i worked on last night. i am supposed to be the cyber security guy but we couldn't weather camera properly or the speaker and i think that kind of humanised the entire institution. as they raced to dc, thousands tuned ear phones in the travel advice to help them make it in time for the in congress. you no i am still vote in congress. you no i am still disappointed that he thought we would get there on time. we made it! we had plenty of time, obviously. 36
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hours and 30 minutes is not plenty of time, that is cutting it as close as you can. can this burgeoning work—out in washington? is not a dirty word bipartisanship is not a dirty word so don't be afraid to reach and go beyond what you have always talked beyond whatpouhaveatwa'pstalked and beyond whatyouhaveatwaystalked and what we think about as a ora or a republican and i think democrat or a republican and i think america will reward you for that. that is bipartisanship right there. god bless you, america. andy. a lot of doughnuts were eaten. i love those guys! there was another mad scramble i should tell you about from new york to washington, it involves katty kay who almost missed the train. i eeee1111111e111ee 1ee 11eei e; sure 11111e11e1111111e111ee 1ee 11eei e; sure if this was - trailer. not sure if this was the trailer. look at this trade. i think katty kay was in the second carriage of that, sipping a skinny latte. look at the poor passengers on the platform. 151“; at this! platform. look at this!
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imagine starting your commute like that! what a bad way to get to work! that is 100 days for this week. join us again, at the same time on monday. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines now: the uk government has rejected calls for a scottish now is not the time. in response the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, said that westminster must respect scotland's democratic mandate. the conservative party has been fined a record £70,000 for breaking campaign spending rules during the last general election. an update on the market numbers for you. here's how london and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states
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this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. more reaction to the main story. theresa may says there should be no referendum on scottish independence until after a brexit deal is done. nicola sturgeon said that response was like winding the clock back to the bad old days of margaret thatcher, with westminster blocking the democratic mandate in scotland. let's get some reaction to this from david torrance, political commentator and author of a biography of nicola sturgeon, who's in our edinburgh studio. thank you very much indeed for joining us. nicola sturgeon is locked in quite a battle now. it is locked in quitela.battl.e.nowl [.l'ls ‘from clear that the scottish far from clear that the scottish people want another referendum or that she could even win it, why do you think she has done this now?|j think you think she has done this now?” think that nicola sturgeon and her
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party, the snp, are confident that events party, the snp, are confident that eve nts o nce party, the snp, are confident that events once they reach a conclusion, and that could be some way off, will work in their favour. i think they recognise that public polling shows there are still is not a that there are still is not a majority for independence, although recent polls have suggested a slight increase, but they think, come the crunch, given the prime minister ‘s reaction today, that there will be a significant shift in their favour, maybe a year or two down the line. how is nicola sturgeon going to get the referendum she once if, as see-1: 1 11 the referendum she once if, as seems likely, the formal request that we expect next week is actually rejected, 1 11 11111 expect next week is actually rejected; at ’ ’”” expect next week is actually re'ected, at least i expect next week is actually re'ected, at least for the time rejected, at least for the time being, by the government in westminster. it is in westminster ‘s westminster. it is in westminst; ‘p—e to block it, isn't it? westminster. it is in westminst; ‘p—e ‘to block it, isn't it? yes, power to block it, isn't it? yes, but what the prime minister said today was not an equivocal no, it was basically no but... no to the
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smt requested timescale but the prime minister significantly did concede that another referendum would follow at some point. i
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