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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 17, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at ham. the snp insists there will be a second independence referendum and accuses the prime minister of being afraid of the people's choice. scotla nd scotland will have its referendum and the people of this country will éfifi the 9213912 elf this, ifigfitfij fiiii'i their ehe the eeeele et thie eeehtte fiiiti their choice. they will not be have their choice. they will not be denied their say. theresa may meanwhile is expected to set out plans for a stronger union when she addresses conservatives at their spring conference later in cardiff. britain's surveillance agency — gchq - has britain's surveillance agency — gchq — has described claims it was asked to spy on donald trump by president obama as "utterly a warning that secondary schools in england face losing an average of six teachers because of funding changes. also coming up — hungary's
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controversial plan to deal with seekers. it presses ahead with the construction of two container camps on its border with serbia to hold migrants despite international criticism. and waiting with baited breath. leicester city fans null find out leicester city fans will find out who their team will meet in the last eight in the champions league draw. good morning. it's friday 17th march. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the deputy scottish national party leader, angus robertson has insisted there will be a second referendum on scottish independence. opening the party's spring conference in aberdeen, to draw a line under
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the snp‘s proposed timetable for a second independence referendum. later, theresa may is expected to set out plans for a stronger union when she addresses conservatives at their spring conference in cardiff. iain watson is at the snp ffififfitfififfi ifi ifififfieee’ffi’fie’f ' ’ spring conference is an occasion to slug it out, it seems, because we are hearing to very strident opinions on whether there should be a second referendum or a second independence referendum or not. absolutely. we are going to see, if you like, a tale of two spring conferences. theresa may will probably underline - decision not probably underline her decision not to allow a scottish referendum for the time being, in other words, until after brexit. as you can imagine, that's gone down like the proverbial lead balloon here in
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aberdeen as the snp gather for what they have said is their biggest ever spring conference. they have got local elections getting underway in scotla nd local elections getting underway in scotland as well, so a lot of the activists are here and they were hearing from angus robertson, the deputy leader of if??? snp . ,, ~ ~ hearing from angus robertson, the deputy leader of % snp but - hearing from angus robertson, the deputy leader of % snp but also i deputy leader of the snp but also the leader at westminster, when he said in no uncertain terms that theresa may must not be allowed to stop a second referendum taking place. let there be no doubt. scotland will have its referendum and the people of this country will have their choice. they will not be denied their say. just in case some people in
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whitehall aren't listening, scotland's referendum is going to happen and no uk prime minister, no uk prime minister should dare to stand in the way of scotland's democracy. so, a lot of rhetoric at the moment, but in terms of the detail, the process, what happens next? i think, as detail, the process, what happens next? ithink, as you detail, the process, what happens next? i think, as you said, detail, the process, what happens next? ithink, as you said, a lot detail, the process, what happens next? i think, as you said, a lot of the rhetoric, although there isn't a second referendum yet, it feels like the phoney war is already underway, not only with her speaking in about 40 not only with her speaking in about a0 minutes time but with the activists gathering here, they are arguing on two fronts. firstly that scotland's voice should be heard and eye.» 2" . . .. .. .. .. wi wwww, z" . w w w w w "'i that they want to leak this secondly that they want to leak this to —— link this to brexit. angus
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robertson were saying theresa may is that they might snub her worried that they might snub her idea of the hard brexit she wants. in terms of what happened next, there will be a vote in the scottish parliament next week which the snp are guaranteed to win, because they have the support of the greens, so they will have enough support of msps to approach formally theresa msps to aggroach formally theresa! the prime minister, to call on may, the prime minister, to call on the scotland act, which set up the devolved parliament in the first devolved parliament in the'fiest—l place, to call under the scotland act for westminster to - with act for westminster to agree with the scottish government a timescale fl; the scottish government a timescale that the scottish government a timescale i that referendum. it's for that referendum. it's pretty clear from everything theresa may has said so far that she will - no has said so far that she will say no to that at least on the snp‘s timescale. i think they will then say that this is proof positive that westminster is listening to us. i think secondly it is a win win situation as they see it, because partly they will get people to say my goodness, why is westminster standing in the way of the scottish people? but secondly, there are
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important local elections coming up in scotland as well and snp are targeting glasgow, wanting to wrest control from labour, so if they can get people fired up with the get peepte fired ep with the” "f’ f’ ' ' fl " ,, saying that westminster are in the way of their standing in the way of their democracy, they will say, look at oui’ democracy, they will say, look at our support in the polls and they will argue that it is unsustainable for theresa may to stick to her guns and make sure that she doesn't open negotiations about the referendum until after brexit. and theresa may is due to speakati the conservative spring conference at around ii.a0 this morning. mark, theresa may presumably will be trying to spark —— strike the right with this speech. she mustn't time with this speech. she mustn't seem dismissive of many in scotland, must she? indeed, and she's got a
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careful path to tread but as very careful path to tread but as ian was saying, what a bruising end toa ian was saying, what a bruising end to a bruising week in this battle with these two conferences side—by—side, really ramping up the political pressure and - battle political pressure and the battle lines continually being redrawn. we are waiting to hear from the prime minister. the deputy snp leader that, angus robertson, was going through her lines this morning in the times when she said it would be fundamentally unfair but the scottish people to have to make a decision before the brexit deal has been negotiated and signed off. he made the opposite point saying it only be fairfor a only be fair for a choice to would only be fair for a choice to come to the scottish people before they are forced out of the eu against their will, as the scottish national party would put it. he also complained about the role that the representation in scottish representation in westminster, that he leads, is getting in theresa may's meetings
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about brexit inside westminster. something he put to her prime minister's questions. he said she was wagging herfinger at him like he was a naughty child and that's really how tories think, harking back to margaret thatcher's days when they ran roughshod over when they ran rogghehmj'over so staking —— stoking scotland. so staking —— stoking things up immensely. we know theresa may is going . call for a stronger, may is going to call for a stronger, more united nations. she will put relations with scotland at the heart what she is calling her plan for soon. but you feel that britain soon. but you feel that angus robertson just then, britain soon. but you feel that angus robertsonjust then, nicola sturgeon due to speak tomorrow and theresa may right in the middle of jl theresa may right in the middle of jt, this thing will ramp up before it, this thing will ramp up before it, this thing will ramp up before it comes down. indeed, and do you expect theresa may to set out in any greater detail the reasons why she thinks scotland should wait longer for another referendum? well, she's fundamentally saying that she thinks a referendum should happen when it
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can be done in an - manner can be done in an informed manner and, so far, we've had absolutely no indication as to what that timing should be other than that she doesn't want it to take place before the end of brexit negotiations. that leads us to speculate with a general election in 2020, just i year after election in 2020, just a year after the brexit negotiations are due to finish and a year before e‘fltt‘h _, ' ' w finish and a year before scottish parliamentary elections, is she really thinking about kicking this down the road for another six years? the snp has shown how determined they are to keep this on the agenda but the fact is, whatever angus robertson says, it is in the prime minister's if dusty when she allows scottish parliament to bring the scottish parliament to bring forward legislation to bring forth a referendum. thank you. theresa may is due to speak at the spring conference at around ii:a0am this stay with us on the bbc
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morning. stay with us on the bbc news channel and we will bring you that speech live. britain's surveillance agency, gchq, has described claims that it was asked by president obama to spy on donald trump as "utterly ridiculous". the unusual move to issue a statement came after white house press secretary sean spicer quoted claims first made on us tv channel fox news earlier this week. he didn't use the nsa, he didn't use the cia, he didn't use the fbi, and he didn't use the department ofjustice. he used gchq. what is that? it's the initials for the british intelligence spying agency. so simply, by having two people saying to them, the president needs transcripts of conversations involving candidate trump, conversations involving president—elect trump, he's able to get it, and there's no american fingerprints on it. with me now, our security correspondent, frank gardner. we are hearing in the last few minutes unconfirmed reports that sean spicer has apologised for these comments? if so, it would be very early in the day. over there it would be about
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6am. i've been trying to stand this up 6am. i've been trying to stand this up or down. nobody at gchq press office is picking up the phone today, so they are they being shy and retiring pilots or they are incredibly busy but as soon as we can confirm deny that, we will be able to state on that. it's unprecedented that i can think of for gchq to go public with a statement like this. as you know, they normally say, as you know, we neither confirm nor deny reports. they busily thought this was so damaging to their reputation though that they had to deny this before it damaged their reputation. there is a belief among some that if it went unchallenged, therefore they did it. if we look at where this statement
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from sean spicer came from, the administration was simply picking up administration was simply picking up a comment from a commentator on fox news. it's incredibly, unbelievably unprofessional of the white house to be doing this. the tweak in the first place, the allegation by donald trump that his predecessor ordered the wiretap without any evidence is very, very unprofessional and this is worrying, because the intelligent —— intelligence agencies report to the elected head of government. in the united states, the guy at the top is the president, the very person who trust them. in the - of doesn't trust them. in the case of gchq, they report to borisjohnson, the foreign secretary. i don't know if he signed off personally on that statement but i would imagine they had to get political from had to get political clearance from number ten to directly contradict something that is coming out of the white house. this is not good for anglo us and it's not
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white house. this is not good for anglo us - and it's not good anglo us relations and it's not good for relations between intelligence agencies and the elected governments. finally, briefly, presumably this unprecedented statement from gchq is coming because of the importance between —— of the importance of the relationship between us and uk intelligence sharing? it is and it is still the closest relationship in the world. britain, the us, canada the world. britain, the us;"canaéa= australia the world. britain, the us;"canaea= australia and new zealand share a great deal of information that doesn't automatically get shared with other countries in the world. britain will be very keen to nip that in the bud, so i suspect britain will be asking the nsa to look into this and to try to deny it from there and if there was no evidence i it. i would say on the evidence of it. i would say on the other side though, there has been us other eide—theegh, there has beerhels
quote
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of other eide—theegh, there has heerhels of angela merkel‘s phone. has helped develop software that mi5 has helped develop software that tracks into phones. they are not interested in what you or i are doing. they are interested in stopping terrorist attacks and organised criminals, russian cyber attacks and so on. so, in this rather murky world of covert cyber operations, it's quite easy for people to believe things like this and not people to believe things like this and - not forget that and let's not forget that christopher steel, former mi6 officer, rate the dossier, as yet unsubstantiated, that alleges that donald trump was involved in all sorts of things in moscow that so far there is no proof of. ck, frank, thank you very much for that. frank gardner on the gchq story. the german chancellor, angela merkel, is travelling to washington today where she'll be president trump at the white house. during his election campaign, mr trump frequently criticised mrs merkel, accusing her of "ruining
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germany" by taking in large numbecsofaflefugees! mrs merkel, who holds significant sway in europe, was critical of president trump's refugee and immigration travel ban, which was blocked by the courts. some breaking news just some breaking newsjust coming to us, the former chancellor george osborne has been appointed editor of the london evening standard. he will start in mid—may, we are told, and will continue as mp for tatton. he succeeds the new editor of radio a's today george osborne, the today programme. george osborne, the former chancellor of the exchequer, has been appointed editor of the london evening standard. not abandoning a career in politics, that will continue, but he's turning to journalistic pursuits as well, as editor of the london evening standard. that news just coming into us. standard. that news just coming into us. we will bring you some more on
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that very shortly. we should just say also that we are hearing this is waiting on the approval of civil service advisory committees. more on that very, very soon. in the past few minutes another developing news, thejury at snaresbrook crown court has acquitted a tennis coach of cruelty to his two daughters he allegedly spent years trying to make into tennis stars. our correspondence is at the court. the jury didn't take long at all to come to their unanimous verdict in this case. in fa ct, unanimous verdict in this case. in fact, they deliberated for around 90 minutes. this case involvesjohn de'viana, a former tennis coach, who was accused by his two daughters, who are 21 and 19, of cruelty over
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an11 year who are 21 and 19, of cruelty over an 11 year period. the prosecution's case was that he wanted them to be wimbledon stars and he put them into ' he hut tn . 1 ifitfi training camps. ' he nut tn . 1 into training camps. however, the ' he nut tn 1 1 into training camps. however, the girls accused their father and they gave evidence by video link. they said that their father physically and emotionally abused his daughters. in one incident, his eldest daughter said that her father wrote the letter, said that her father wrote the letter l l said that her father wrote the letter l for lisa said that her father wrote the m l for lisa on said that her father wrote the letter l for lisa on her head said that her father wrote the letter lfor lisa on her head in permanent marker when she didn't perform as well as he had hoped. —— lfor perform as well as he had hoped. —— l for loser. perform as well as he had hoped. —— lfor loser. in perform as well as he had hoped. —— l for loser. in the defence's case, he gave evidence himself in this trial, and he said he would never have hurt his daughters, he loved his daughters, he wanted them to do at tennis but he would never well at tennis but he would never have harmed defence also have harmed them. the defence also said that the girls made up the allegations out of spite because john de'viana left the family home and separated from their mother in 2001. so do not guilty returns of
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verdict. not guilty on both of those cou nts verdict. not guilty on both of those counts of child cruelty and mr de'viana, when he heard those is read out, put his head in verdict is read out, put his head in his hands and break down in tears. he was then asked by the judge to leave the courtroom and he was sobbing as he left. bear in mind, this is a father who was accused by ts this is a father who was accused by his own two | this is a father who was accused by his own two daughters of child cruelty when they were younger. but he has been found not guilty on those two counts of child cruelty. 0k, those two counts of child cruelty. ok, helena, thank you for bringing us ok, helena, thank you for bringing us up to date with that news from the courts. now, more on that developing story from the last develoging story—from—the—laste of moments that the former couple of moments that the former chancellor george osborne has been appointed editor of the london evening standard. he will start in may and continue as mp for tatton. may andrcontinue as—mprfcit—tatteawh with me is the bbc‘s media reporter. tell us more. george osborne was the
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chancellor who was merrily dismissed by theresa may last summer. all wondered what he would do next and 110w wondered what he would do next and now we know. he's moving into journalism. it is one of the biggest journalistic jobs journalism. it is one of the biggest journalisticjobs in the uk. he's got a bit of a background in. , he's been interested in journalism, he's been interested in it for awhile, but this - shock a it for awhile, but this will shock a number of people. the key thing is that he will continue as an mp. he's beenin that he will continue as an mp. he's been in the headlines controversy over the last few weeks because he's taken a job at blackrock, one of the world's largest asset management companies, but his constituents in tater will wonder whether he has time to serve them in parliament was to stand as editor. it's an issue for osborne to consider how he keeps his constituents happy but in terms of. standard, this isi huge of the standard, this is a huge queue for them and they will be very pleased to have a high—calibre new leader. and teze going to address leader. and he's going to address the media after he spoke into the
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evening standard staff? yes, it is very destabilising when an editor leaves and there is shock going through westminster and in media. he is going to speak to staff in the evening standard newsroom between 121215 and he will explain how he will reconcile it with the rest of his responsibilities, what his editorial britain will be and how he would transform the london evening standard commercially. like all newspapers, it is struggling in a market losing a lot of money. i think the hours of the london evening standard, because it's an afternoon paper, it goes to the papers —— the printers at 11am, the hours will mean that he will work in hours will mean that he wittfiaerk—efi the morning from five until 11 and then he - go off and be the morning from five until 11 and then he. go off and be an mp in then he will go off and be an mp in then he will go off and be an mp in the afternoon. he will be a busy old b, george. you are already working at his schedule for him. are there
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any teas to be crossed, i is to be dusted over this appointment?m any teas to be crossed, i is to be dusted over this appointment? it is worth saying that there is an advisory committee in the civil service which needs to be completely happy with this. it's possible they might say hang on a second, we are not completely happy, but they don't ultimately have the power to stop . g appointment. it's an advisory this appointment. it's an advisory committee. so it's a formality osborne has to go through. that's a procedural problem. i think he's going to have an issue persuading his constituency will be around for them and that the bigger challenge. i need to be doubt this treat for oui’ i need to be doubt this treat for our viewers which serves, i suspect the prime minister might be about to find out revenge is a dish best served in a huge newspaper. there's no doubt that it is a hugely influential in london and influential newspaper in london and george osborne is nothing if not mischievous. the way that he was
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sent to the backbenches last year with the death to me that what better —::——s; e; ,,. with the death to me that what better fret—t ee— to , with the death to me that what better 2 to take with the death to me that what better to take revenge better opportunity to take revenge against some of his political foes and by editing a newspaper with that reach. it is also important to him reach. it is also imgrtant—tohg= show that he's not a tory lackey. to show that he's not a tory lackey. he will have deep chews his fights and show that he's prepared to do what all editors and journalists do, which is sometimes say bad things about people who their friends. thank you very much for that. that news that george osborne has been appointed editor of the london evening standard. every secondary school in england could lose the equivalent of six teachers by 2020, according . an according to an education think tank. the education policy institute, says schools will see cuts averaging nearly £300,000 over the next three years. but the government says funding is atan but the government says funding is at an all time high and will continue to rise. sarah campbell has more. save our schools! parents and pupils in nantwich, cheshire, protesting last month about a lack of funding
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for their schools the government has plans to redistribute funds, it says, more fairly, and it says at £a0 billion this year, school funding in england is the highest it has ever been. despite this, today's report confirms no school will avoid a real—terms cut in budget over the next few years. schools are facing significant cost pressures. the cost of running the school increases, rising number of students and from local authorities having less money to spend. so whilst the distribution of money might be fairer, there ie “ht-i net ennfi'fl mar-e . .. — . ,, the education policy institute estimates that by 2020 the average real—terms loss of funding per primary school will be £7a,000, and per secondary school, the average cut will be £291,000. that equates to every primary school losing two teachers, and every secondary school losing six.
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the government says it does recognise the pressures schools in england are facing, and is helping them to make savings. natalie perera is executive iieffig- at the education policy institute and one of the report authors — shejoins me from central london. good morning, natalie. just give us an idea first double of how you arrived at these figures, that secondary schools, for example, could face losses of almost £300,000 over the next three years, primary schools tens of thousands of pounds, may be leading to schools losing up to ten teachers. that's right. so, there are a number of things at play here which we take into account in oui’ here which we take into account in our report. the first thing, as you heard in your piece just now, is that the government is introducing a
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new national formula that the government is introducing a new nationalformula for that the government is introducing a new national formula for funding schools in england. that typically means that money will move across different schools and across different schools and across different local areas. that's a rational thing for the government to do, because the current school funding system is very out of date, very unclear and i doesn't allocate very unclear and it doesn't allocate money consistently across the country. that's the first thing. the second thing is that schools are facing wider cost pressures as a result of inflation and cuts to other elements of education funding. what we've done is taken all of that into account, including the impact of their proposed formula, and we find that over the next three years, going to twenty20, we see cuts to the extent of about £291,000 for the
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average secondary the extent of about £291,000 for the average secondary school and about £aa,000 for the average primary school. so when the government says more money is going into schools, the bandits allocating are going up, in one sense that might be true but if more people are coming into the system and schools are coping with other costs, is it also true to say that the amount of money the school have coming in is actually flat or declining? that's right because people numbers are going up, the cost of going —— running a school is going up and because of wider cuts to other education budgets that typically help with support services in schools... so realistically can the government sustain this argument it makes that it's actually putting it makes that it's actuatly'pfittmgi more money in? well, it's true on one hand if you look at the cash amount that is going in, but in terms of the real terms impact on schools, we find that e_ there
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schools, we find that by 2020, there will be no schools to avoid a real—time cut. will be no schools to avoid a real-time cut. we have heard today from mps saying that they have told real-time cut. we have heard today froi education ng that they have told real-time cut. we have heard today froi education secretary ey have told real-time cut. we have heard today froi education secretary thative told real-time cut. we have heard today froi education secretary that their ld the education secretary that their proposals on the funding formula for schools will not get through the commons in their present form. when you hear that and when we take into consideration what you are saying in your report, what sort of change do your report, what sort of change do you hope this will bring about in terms of the government's thinking on education funding? we are quite clear in our reports that the principle of the national funding formula is the right approach and we principle of the national funding formula want right approach and we principle of the national funding formula want to ht approach and we principle of the national funding formula want to see pproach and we principle of the national funding formula want to see the iach and we principle of the national funding formula want to see the government wouldn't want to see the government backtrack from that. but when you ta ke backtrack from that. but when you take it into account with the wider context that we've been talking about, that creates real cost pressures for schools. but the a nswer pressures for schools. but the answer isn't necessarily to backtrack from the new proposed funding formula. ok, natalie, thank
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you very much. she was one of the authors of that report. let's look at some of today's other developing stories. on the gchq story, you will have heard that sean spicer had claimed that gchq had been spying on donald trump at the behest of president obama. we are hearing from a spokesperson for theresa may that it has been made clear by us that the allegations about gchq are ridiculous and that the british government has received assurances they will not be repeated. so, assurances that those allegations made by the trump administration about gchq will not be repeated. we have been hearing reports that sean spicer, the spokesman for the administration, has apologised for making those allegations. we haven't
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been able to stand those up but this does suggest the trump administration is rapidly rolling back from that position. we are also a little bit more about the seeing a little bit more about the appointment of george osborne who has been appointed editor of the london evening standard. the owner of the evening standard, evgeny lebed as has said he is thrilled to announce the editor is george osborne, i am announce the editor is george osborne, iam proud announce the editor is george osborne, i am proud to have an editor of such substance who reinforces the edge —— evening standard's standing and influence in london. let's go back now to gchq, going to westminster to speak to our political correspondent, ben wright. then, those assurances the government has received, do we know if those assurances have come with apology? no, we havejust been an apology? no, we havejust been asking about minister's official spokesman about this and he said he would not go into the conversations
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had been had between the uk and that had been had between the uk and us representatives. all the spokesman said was that assurances had been given that these allegations would not be repeated and that the uk had made it clear, quite firmly, that the suggestion quite firmly, thetthesuggesticrrr gchq was involved in this was ridiculous. but he wasn't completely ridiculous. but he wasn't specific on whether there had been an apology. we were also lead to assume that it was the white as official spokesman who had had this conversation with the uk in washington. it seems they are retreating rapidly from this allegation, pretty embarrassing but essential it gets sorted out because of the relationship between the uk and the usa and the intelligence agencies. quite right, and there is an eagerness and washington to end the best and - er suggests this is one best and the uk suggests this is one benefit of the special relationship as you can resolve these issues
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quickly on such sensitive matters as intelligence sharing. briefly, is i intelligence sharing. briefly, is elfett on our intelligence sharing. briefly, is azett on our other intelligence sharing. briefly, is f‘jueff on our other developing thought on our other developing story, the appointment of george osborne as editor of the evening standard. any reaction you have picked up? we broke the news to the prime minister's official spokesman during the briefing this morning and the wood is surprised and shocked as many of us that when the news came through. —— and he looked. it is there, they will be as surprised as there, they will be as surprised as the rest of us but if g know the rest of us but if you know george osborne you know he always to bea to be a journalist from the wanted to be a journalist from the beginning of his career. he lost the world of journalism, the beginning of his career. he lost the world ofjournalism, the gossip, the intricate —— he loves the world of t“ this is what he set journalism. this is what he set out to do and he is someone who did not wa nt to to do and he is someone who did not want to just leave the cabinet and set on the backbenches, this sort of high—profilejob set on the backbenches, this sort of high—profile job editing set on the backbenches, this sort of high—profilejob editing in national newspaper will be wonderful for him and people clearly enjoy it and it
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gives him a real pulpit to make his views on brexit melon. he was pretty sceptical about how the government is going ahead with this and believe they have the wrong priorities and thinks the economy should be more at the centre of this. this gives him a platform to make those views heard. it is unprecedented, i think. i do not think a sitting member of parliament has ever been editor of the major newspaper. the telegraph editor in the 1970s had been in cabinet in the 1960s but had left cabinet in the iefifienfiifihfi parliament cabinet in the iefifieufiifihfi parliament by the time he took over at the telegraph. people ask if he can reconcile these two jobs but it yet another addition to the is yet another addition to the ballooning portfolio of george osborne. i'm sure that all will be
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lots of people with lots of things to say later on. slightly later than usual here is thomas with the weather. we are very patient is here. there is not an awful lot of good news this weekend. let me show you the headlines. cloudy, breezy and some this weekend. let me show you the head not. cloudy, breezy and some this weekend. let me show you the head not too >udy, breezy and some this weekend. let me show you the head not too great. ireezy and some this weekend. let me show you the head not too great. there and some this weekend. let me show you the head not too great. there will some this weekend. let me show you the head not too great. there will be he rain. not too great. there will be some sunshine. fine weather in southern areas of the uk and here temperatures might nudge into the further north of the mid—teens. further north of the weather story is in the clouds are rolling in from the atlantic j..[ . bringing rain on two wheels, north—west england, quite soggy and northzwest england. guite soggy and = northern ireland and scotland. the winds will strengthen tonight and certain whimsy across the southern areas as - and more clouds rolled areas as well and more clouds rolled in through tonight and into tomorrow. mild overnight because of
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these atlantic winds and the cloud and the rain. the weekend, here it is, belfast "~‘“jg-| and the rain. the weekend, here it is, belfast "tut“; pretty soggy. is, belfast looking pretty soggy. the further south you are the drier it will be. not clear skies by any means but at least it looks dry in the south. that's it. this is bbc newsroom live with annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11.3a: the headlines at 11.3a: the deputy leader of the snp claims theresa may is eases; " of the snp claims theresa may is ease; of holding a of the snp claims theresa may is fnghmaé of holding a second % frightened of holding a second scottish independence referendum. meanwhile, the prime minister will tell the tory spring conference she's working for the whole country when she launches a "plan for in "plan for britain" in cardiff later. the white house says allegations gc heap to spy on donald trump will be
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not repeated. it comes after they said the claims were utterly ridiculous. —— gchq. george osborne has been appointed editor of the london evening standard. a former tennis coach has been found not guilty of cruelty to the doctors he wanted to become stars. —— of the daughters. let's get the sport now. leicester city will face atletico madrid in the quarterfinals of the champions league. the english champions league. the english champions i the only british side champions are the only british side left in the competition and were one of the first names drawn in nyon. ian rush did the honours. they have faced atletico twice before, losing home and away in the uefa cup in ‘97 and also going out in the cup winners cup to the spainiards in cup winners cup in 1961. atletico madrid have been runners up
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in the champions league atletico—madrid havebeen—runners ug—ll twice in the in the champions league twice in the past three years. this is the draw in full. bayern munich against the holders of real madrid. and juventus against barcelona, a repeat of the 2015 final. the first legs played on april the 11th and 12. leicester city will be away in madrid for the first leg. the 18th and 19th of aprilfor the first leg. the 18th and 19th of april for the second legs. manchester united will find out who they've got in the guarter finals of; the europa league shortly. they're favourites for the trophy after beating rostov at old trafford last night to seal a 2—1 aggregate win. it's the final day at the cheltenham festival. st patrick's day, gold cup day. it's been a briulliant week for the irish they had six winners yesterday, willie mullins and jockey ruby walsh accounted for four of them, and will djakadam, last year's runner—up is the current favourite for the big race. but trainer colin
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tizzard has a couiple of fancied but trainer colin tizzard has a couple of fancied runners including cue card who has arrived at the course this morning. and has also won at ascot last month. he worked so hard with his head in his chest and rips up over, he jogs back. he is a happy horse. he is not ready for anything else yet, he is a racehorse and he loves it. i really believe he has got a good a chance as he has ever had. the going will be all in the betting markets. here's the clerk of the course with his thoughts on the race. ruby and willie mullins on fire yesterday and they sort them a couple of weeks ago in ireland and cougle of weeks agmin ireland—and = looked in tremendous form. i was he looked in tremendous form. i was talking to somebody about native
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river and if the ground might be too quick for him it was he won at newbury on soft ground and the a nswer newbury on soft ground and the answer is to not be surprised because he has a real turn off i do because he has a real turn off = .- i do not think the because he has a real turn off g i do not think the current route. i do not think the current conditions will be detrimental to any of them. they would be described by the professionals is pretty well terfe‘l you can - the final perfect. you can follow the final day of the festival on bbc radio five live from 1pm. warrington wolves‘ poor start to the superleague season continues as they we re superleague season continues as they were beaten 22—8 at leigh. two trys from gareth hock helped condemn warrington to their 5th straight defeat. it's it‘s the final weekend of the six nations with england looking to win back to back grand slams when they play ireland tomorrow. number eight billy vunipola and wing anthony watson return to the starting 15. a win would be a record—breaking19th consecutive victory for eddie jones‘ side. former england captain will carling says the current england side will eclipse the 1992 team if
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they match their achievement of back—to—back grand slams. i have had will carling texting me remindigl i have had will carling texting me remindig me how great his team reminding me how great his team was called his team. i am very aware and we are not seeing it is a daunting thing, going to ireland, we are very much excited by the opportunity that presents itself and why not? we should be excited. it is not a scary thing to that‘s all sport for now. theresa may is expected to set up plans for a stronger union when she addresses conservatives in cardiff in the next few minutes. our wheels correspond and is betterfor us. the tone of the speech will be crucial, being watched ever so carefully by many beagle. that is right. many eagle. that is right. it
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many geogley. that is right. it is so many people. that is right. it is ironic in some senses at this conference is in cardiff, obviously the welsh football team, and that is exactly the type of rhetoric to reza mate will outline, wanting a more united britain and accentuated what she said in response to nicola sturgeon and what she said on monday. she said that scottish referendum cannot happen as these are brexit negotiations continue and the scottish people cannot make any sort of decision and should not have another referendum until they know what deal is on the table. she will continue to say she will try and do the best deal for?“5 uk as a whole. the best deal for the uk as a whole. she will push that throughout this speech today and i think getting that tone will be key to making sure people listen and carry on with what she has been saying for the past few weeks. it has been a iiiiej weeki
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weeks. it has been a turbulent week, her, weeks. it has been a turbulent week her, considering when the snp for her, considering when the snp came out with that announcement on monday, responding to it over the past few days and also with the expenses issue the conservative party have had. it is an important conference for them with respect to it over the past few days and also with the expenses issue the conservative party have had. it is an important conference for them was respected as claims and the saul respected as claims and the snp conference carries on in the tone from each other will be and the tone from each other will be mirroring each question from the demands thrown by the snp. theresa may will again be accentuating the fa ct may will again be accentuating the fact she want the union to stay together as these negotiations go ahead and make sure the snp are aware of that. she will be making a statement in her speech eminently now and that is the message she wa nts to now and that is the message she wants to give. is she expected to set out much more in the way of the tale of why she thinks scotland should wait for a referendum until the - position with its position
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the uk‘s position with its position with the eu becomes clearer? —— wait for the detail. what the tory party and government are relying on it in the wake of the two referendums we have had caught two for scotland, on the leaving the union and is leaving the leaving the union and is leaving the eu, they are hoping that is, in a sense, they are worn out and do not want another referendum but they also hope the last scottish referendum, they voted to stay in, it was marginal but very unhinging on the fact that will be the case again and that‘s saying, look, they voted to stay the last time, patience is wearing thin on having another one and they do not want a divisive. having another one inch at a short space of time is not further thatis that is not fair to put another and that is not fair to put another vote to the scottish people when
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they will be clear on what the — is going to they will be clear on what the is going to be had negotiation is going to be had between the uk and the eu as brexit article 50 is triggered. the other thing to remember is as the snp conference carries on in aberdeen nicola sturgeon and - members nicola sturgeon and her members will be pushing and pushing theresa may as the day goes on what further aggressive pushing towards getting as referendum. we heard yesterday alex salmond in the house of commons saying that the government would rue the day they made this decision to say to the scottish people when they can have a referendum. they are adamant they should be having one on their terms but it is not down to them, of course. the decision will come from westminster on when they can have that referendum and theresa may has outlined the reasons for
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saying so. she did not say they cannot have one, she said they cannot have one, she said they cannot have one in the time frame they want. cannot have one in the time frame they- want. and it would be a they would want. and it would be a difficult ask to have another independence referendum in that short two—year window as the brexit negotiations take place, of course. it illustrate the political debate is set for quite some time now to be absolutely dominated by the questions of eu membership and a second independence referendum for scotland. one wonders if any other subjects will get even at this conference. that is exactly right andi conference. that is exactly right and i think there was always expectation the snp, one would assume the government thought that was going to come eminently and when the cat was the bag on monday there was a reaction on and = was a reaction on wednesday and thursday from the government. as you say, that will be the discussion q 3 now on, kee-cin the union from now on, keeping the union
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together is a theresa may‘s main aim as she goes ahead and tries to negotiate the best deal, and heard opinion, but the whole of the uk. it is difficult to see how other topics will a is difficult to see how other topics will - a mention today but she will get a mention today but she will get a mention today but she will be mentioning the plans for how each different part of the union will benefit from these brexit negotiations, hopefully aiming to settle a ny negotiations, hopefully aiming to settle any fears the scottish people have in terms of staying in the uk as referendum have in terms of staying in the uk as - referendum persists. what as the eu referendum persists. what will be difficult and what makes this speech a bit more tricky is the of this week has been so nature of this week has been so turbulence in terms of the political atmosphere. the announcement came on monday from nicola sturgeon and it has been this ongoing expenses issue then theresa may‘s reaction. it and then theresa may‘s reaction. it has given a bat.- bite to this has given a bit more bite to this conference, in some respects. she will continue to e conference, in some respects. she will continue to push that line but
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as you mentioned it will be difficult to see how other topics will get a mention outside of brexit negotiations and scottish independence. as i say, what will be the main message from theresa may is how can the scottish people - on how can the scottish people vote on another referendum without knowing the terms of the brexit deal, and will be truly want one? knowing they did not have one very long ago and the referendum is such a divisive method for people anyway, for forfriends. for friends. that will be families, forfriends. that will be the message and the outline theresa the message and the outline'ti-teresa = will the message and the outline'theresa = will be giving again here in may will be giving again here in just eight few moments time. thank you... . . just eight few moments time. thank you for . . just eight few moments time. thank e for that, thomas. we are waiting you for that, thomas. we are waiting for theresa may to take to the podium in cardiff. to make this very important speech at the conservative spring conference. we will be back there as soon as she does. in the
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meantime let‘s look at some of the other news developing today. southern railway guard and the rmt union are to stage a fresh 2a—hour strike on the ath of april in the dispute over staffing and the role of conductors. it comes after the drivers‘ union aslef reached a revised deal with the parent company. they are set to - on the company. they are set to vote on the new agreement on the 3rd of april. the government has placed temporary restriction on advertising on youtube and asked it over google to explain my adverts were appearing youtube and asked it over google to explain m extremist vere appearing youtube and asked it over google to explain m extremist material. aring youtube and asked it over google to explain m extremist material. the alongside extremist material. the move follows an investigation by the times which said rick apologists, anti—semite and band hit pictures we re anti—semite and band hit pictures were receiving plays ahead of their videos. they said a number of global breed videos. they said a number of global brand l also
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videos. they said a number of global brand i also pooled their brand of also pooled their advertising for the same reason. aship advertising for the same reason. a ship operated by the british company ran aground on a coral reef causing extensive damage. on the ath of march the caledonian sky hit reefs at low tide. the region is famous for its biodiversity and the ship was taking tourists on a !-.=w—.ew...eeee'w—.e = ship was taking tourists on a ti:;t:t:; expedition. the bird—watching expedition. the incident has caused outrage in indonesia and it has been suggested indonesia and it has'been suggested captain could face criminal the captain could face criminal charges. have a cop in the north sea has been taking off a list of sustainable fish. —— haddock. stocks declined last year and action is needed to boost the number of breeding age fish. the decision has been criticised by scottish fishermen. for a full summary of the news go to our website. lots more on beerfor
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you. the authorities in the rue remain on high alert after heavy rains caused mudslides to burst their banks in capital, lima. —— in peru. tens the capital, lima. —— in peru. tens of thousands of people have been left homeless. asa left homeless. as a mudslide churns up the baby of what was someone‘s home a woman suddenly emerges, clinging for her life. slowly she is able to find her feet and step away. before onlookers rushed to help her. later in hospital peru‘s health minister tells her she had a lucky escape and she is not the only one. just watch as a mudslide takes out to trucks. —— to trucks. one i the
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to trucks. —— to trucks. one of the driver is somehow claim from jag car = driver is somehow claim from his car just before the rushing water drags his vehicle away. —— - out of his vehicle away. —— climbs out of his vehicle away. —— climbs out of his cab. it is not clear what to the people in the other in some parts of peru capital lorry. in some parts of peru capital lima the only route to safety is up police airlift children out of as police airlift children out of floodwaters. warm temperatures... we're going to leave bad report and crossed the cardiff were the prime minister is about to dress the conservative party —— we will leave that report. you will have léff'i party —— we will leave that report. you will have léff'? speech from you will have heard the speech from angus robertson this morning saying she was panicking when she attempted to draw a line under proposals for a second independence referendum. bringing two second independence referendum. bringing - two events together bringing these two events together under one banner reminds us we are and will always be the consemative
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and will always be the conservative and will always be the conservative and unionist party. applause. the only party today that represents and delivers for every part of this precious united kingdom. i would like to thank alun cairns for that introduction. alan is a determined and campaignerfor and passionate campaigner for wales‘s interests and always speaking up for this great nation of the uk at the cabinet table. i would also like to pay tribute to the work the conservative group in the of the conservative group in the national assembly and in particular its leader, andrew rt davies. abe—zlélééé applause. the clearest and result. the loudest voice, doing the important work of holding the labour government to account. and thank you to you, also,
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for all the work you do for our party here in wales. thanks to you some of our best results at the last general election were achieved right here. in the north james davies taking the seat from labour. in mid wales chris davies taking a seat back from the liberal democrats. in the city, craig williams holding cardiff north would be majority ten times greater than 2010. in the south—west, byron davies becoming the first conservative mp in that area for it —— in its 130 year history. applause. not so long ago people were quick to write us off here in wales and remember those days when people said we could not win here again, but you proved them wrong. today we are winning in wales once - people
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the same elsewhere, too. they said the same elsewhere, too. they said the same elsewhere, too. they said we could not win in the north of england. but tell that to the voters of copeland and their new brilliant member of parliament. brilliant memberofparliamenl! is the modern conservative this is the modern conservative party, reaching out to all parts of the country and are winning in all parts of the country. party that works for everyone, not just the privileged few. right across great britain, on the ath of may, people will go to the polls to decide who they want to run their local services, care for the local environment and set the council tax they pay. in scotland and europe in it will be all up elections wales it will be all up elections in every local authority. —— in scotla nd every local authority. —— in scotland and stewart in wales. in england some of our great cities and england someof ourieatcitiesand ‘ areas will choose a powerful
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their areas will choose a powerful new mayors. as a party we go into these important elections confident about thejob these important elections confident about the job we can do to serve local people and local communities. from cardiff to the cairngorms, to durham, people are looking dover to durham, people are looking for a party with a plan to secure a better future, a better future betterfuture, a betterfuture for their town or the city, the county under the country. and our task is clear, we must work to be that party. in local elections across the country that means being the party that sets out the credible and compelling case to keep council tax low for more effective and and low for more effective and efficient local services and more responsive representation. in the elections for a new metro mayors, our candidate that is, in the west midlands, james palmer in cambridgeshire, or candidate in
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cambridgeshire, q'fgqfiidgtgig— ., . ,. ,, ,, ‘ manchester, in liverpool, cambridgeshire, q'fgqfiidgtgig— ., . ,. ,, ,, ‘manchester, in liverpool, in greater manchester, in liverpool, in the west of england, they must be the west of england, they must be the candidate is pointing the way to better quality of life, greater social, cultural and economic opportunities and a more prosperous future for local people § a plan future for local people with a plan to deliver. as her majesty's government of united kingdom, responding to and delivering on the decision of the british people to leave the eu and embark on a new global role, our task is clearer still. it is to use this moment of opportunity to shape a brighter future for britain. it is to use this period of change to step back and ask ourselves what kind of country we want to be. and it is to use the years ahead to deliver an ambitious programme of economic and social reform, that prepares britain
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for that brighter {i’% and ensures for that brighter future and ensures we emerge stronger, fairer, more united and more outward looking than ever before. and that is why, today, i want to talk to you about this government's plan for britain. a plan for britain that will guide or policies and actions, a plan for a britain that will deliver a stronger, fairer country, for we stand on the threshold of one of the most significant moment britain has known for many years. during the next two weeks we will trigger article 50 and begin the negotiations to secure the united kingdom's departure from the european union. applause. and at such moments of great
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national moment that define the character of the nation, we have a choice. we can look forward with choice. we can look forwarg gtg= and hope or give in to the optimism and hope or give in to the politics of fear and despair. i choose to believe in britain and ifififiié iii! eéliéfié lfi. gflfélfi. éfifi oui’ ifififiié iii! eéliéfié lfi. gflfélfi. éfifi our best days lie ahead. that our best days lie ahead. because while the road before us may be uncertain at times, i believe with the british people, it leads towards a brighter future for our children and grandchildren. a brighter future will notjust happen. the stronger country we want, just emerge, it. take want, just emerge, it will take effort and focus. discipline and ha rd effort and focus. discipline and hard work. and, above all, it requires we set out and deliver on a plan. so plan for britain is a plan for a brighterfuture, plan. so plan for britain is a plan for a brighter future, a plan. so plan for britain is a plan for a brighterfuture, a plan to make the most of the opportunities ahead and to build a stronger and if??? 5:3 if £713 3 ei’f;,%’ iii. 7. ., . ,,..,,, fairer britain, 577553 5:3 if 57-173 5 55’5555’ 55.37 7. .7 7 7777777 fairer britain, morefififteé and -
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577553 5:3 if 57-173 5 55’5555’ 55.37 7. .7 7 7777777 fairer britain, morefififteé and more fairer britain, more united and more outward looking. they plan to get the right deal for britain abroad, yes, but also a better deal for ordinary working people here at home. and that is crucial. for the referendum result was notjust a vote to leave the eu, it was an instruction to change the way our country works and the people for whom it works, forever. it was country works and the people for wht to it works, forever. it was country works and the people for wht to change , forever. it was country works and the people for wht to change the rever. it was country works and the people for wht to change the balance was country works and the people for wht to change the balance of is call to change the balance of britain, to make this great united kingdom a country that works for everyone, not just the kingdom a country that works for everyone, notjust the privileged we, the conservative understand few. we, the conservative understand that, and we, the conservative party will respond. we will get the right dealfor britain will respond. we will get the right deal for britain abroad forging a new partnership with our friends and in europe but looking beyond allies in europe but looking beyond europe to build relationships with new friends and new allies and old new friends and wellifififlfifildl friends around new friends and newalliessafldfildi friends around the world, too. at the same time, google pursue the ambitious economic and social reforms we need —— we will pursue
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the ambitious economic and social reforms. that means building a stronger economy and investing in things that will deliver in a long time. tackling the problem of low productivity and securing a high paid, high skilljobs of the future. it means creating a fairer society as we break down the barriers of privilege and spread opportunity and prosperity around the country, it means forging a more united nation as we put the values of fairness, responsibility and citizenship at the heart of everything we do. it "es“ building a means building a stronger, fairer britain for our children and grandchildren, so they will be proud to call at home. from the start of the britain we build as we leave the eu must be truly global, a britain thatis eu must be truly global, a britain that is outward looking and embraces the world. because the vote to leave the world. because the vote to leave the eu was not a vote to turn our
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back on the international role or abandon our international outlook, britain at its best has always been a great global trading nation. we have always been shaped by and have helped to shape global events. one of the world's largest economies, with strong and fruitful relationship with countries around the world. those cooperative and open—hearted relationships are vital to our future success. as we leave the eu we will embrace - world the eu we will embrace the world and build a global, outward looking britain but is a confident and responsible player on the world stage. of course that means getting on with thejob of of course that means getting on with the job of delivering brexit, striking the right deals that builds a new partnership with europe, and we have been clear about our negotiating objectives. certainty wherever possible, control of our
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own laws, strengthening the united kingdom, maintaining the common travel area with ireland, control of immigration, rights . eu nationals immigration, rights of eu nationals in efs : and immigration, rights of eu nationals in and british nationals in in britain and british nationals in the eu, enhancing rights for free trade with european workers, free trade with european markets, new trade agreements with other countries, a leading role in science and innovation, corporation on crime, terrorism and foreign affairs and a phased approach, delivering a smooth and orderly brexit. 12 objectives that amount to one big goal. a new, positive and constructive partnership between britain and - european union. but britain and the european union. but a global britain also means making sf il;l§;l 381512 51252 fgi;;2 fg;f§'xl;! 7 7 7 7 7 7 77 sf il;l§;l 381512 51252 fgi;;2 fg;f§'xl;! 77 7 7 7 7 7 77 britain that emerges from the eu the britain that emerges from the eu a leading advocate of global free trade and promoting. defending trade and promoting and defending the forces of economic liberalism which have such an overwhelming positive impact on our world. it means building and strengthening our relationships with old friends and
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new getting out relationships with old friends and new - getting out and relationships with old friends and new- getting out and doing new allies. getting out and doing business right across the globe. and thatis business right across the globe. and that is what the department for international trade has been doing since it was set up last summer, building up our capability in readiness for that new global role, promoting british goods and services around the globe. that means continuing to attract the brightest and the best to work or study in britain but ensuring that process is managed properly so that our immigration policies as the national interest. continuing to meet to the world's poor and to support developing countries. protecting british interests and making the world a safer place for everyone. supporting our armed forces as they keep our country safe and secure. applause britain is one of the few nations
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anywhere in the world to meet both its un aid target and its nato defence target. that is a global britain of which we can all be proud. applause but our success as a global britain will be underpinned by the second will begunderglnneg 1:54 gig; gggggg will begunderglnneg £4 £14; 25441 in our plan for britain, a objective in our plan for britain, a stronger economy where everyone plays by the same rules. we've achieved a lot over the last six yea rs achieved a lot over the last six years to fix the economic mess left 7.7777 77 s... 7177 777777'7 7777 57s7 _ by labour and 7.7777 77 s... 7177 777777'7 7777 577 _ by labour and restore our public finances. the deficit has been reduced and our economy has grown. in 2009, 2010, the uk borrowed £1 in every £5 that was spent. this year, it is set to be £1 in every 15. working with business leaders across the country, we have delivered a record number of jobs, giving the country, we have delivered a record number ofjobs, giving more people in our country economic security and peace of mind for their families. we have taken the lowest
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paid out of tax altogether and bought in the national minimum wage so that people can enjoy a better standard of living. but there is so much more to - so for britain - continue to plan for britain will continfie tcz- 17:7, plan for britain will continfia tcz- 17:7, the down i that the bring the—deficitdown so—that—thg = lives within its means. in country lives within. “7131154115711 so, country lives within. itsmeans7h1 so, we will take a balanced approach, allowing us to invest approach, allowing us toinvest! where it4's cgfjf‘jj approach, allowing us toinvest! where ita's begged like the £2 of money for 2177 ’ t" 27 7. we announced t7727 we announced last adult social care we announced last é'if— adult social care we announced last 77 and where' ' w adult social care we announced last 77 and where it ' w adult social care we announced last 77 and where it will w adult social care we announced last 77 and where it will make w adult social care we announced last 77 and where it will make the w week. and where it will make the difference for britain in the assesses is; eéiisifi if. the like the £500 billion a long—term, like the £500 billion a year we committed in the - to year we committed in the budget to bring genuinely world—class technical education to britain for the first time. this funding will help to increase the amount of technical training for 16 to 19—year—olds by 50%. and it includes a high—quality three—month workplace for every student. it means that when they qualify, they will be genuinely work ready. it means we
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will be taking 15255531 genuinely work ready. it means we will be taking @ education will be taking technical education seriously and it will be taking technical education seriously and - it the parity seriously and giving it the parity of esteem it deserves, as we roll out our new modern industrial strategy to all parts of the country. applause that strategy will encourage and support the key sectors of our economy, providing opportunities for young people to find high—quality, high skilled work and spread prosperity around the whole i the this approach has already country. this approach has already been welcomed by sectors across our i look forward to economy and i look7forward'tof fl publishing. white paper later publishing our white paper later this year. and - a stronger that works for everyone, economy that works for everyone, government must also— economy that works for everyone, government must also support open markets and an open that markets and an open economy. that means recognising where . . . . . . markets and an open economy. that means recognising where markets . . . . markets and an open economy. that means % where markets are - means recognising where markets are not working for customers and being willing to step in on their behalf that consumers get a good so that consumers get a good deal. one market that is manifestly not
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working for all consumers is the energy market. energy is not a luxury, it's a necessity of life, but it's clear to me and anyone who looks at it that the market is not working 2 it should.
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