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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 24, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown at westminster, where more details are emerging about the man who carried out the westminster terror attack. khalid masood was born adrian russell ajao in dartford in kent. questions are being asked about how the 52—year—old decided to convert to radical islam. police make two more significant arrests overnight and are trawling through massive amounts of computer data. they have urge the public to help them. there might well be people out there who did have concerns about khalid masood but weren't sure did not feel co mforta ble masood but weren't sure did not feel comfortable for whatever reason in passing that information to us. i know i urge anyone with such information call us. i know i urge anyone with such information call us. an american tourist posts a picture of murdered police officer keith palmer, taken less than an hour before he died, as the 75—year—old man who died from his injuries last night is named as leslie rhodes from south london. also, in other news: the president of the european
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commission, jean—claude juncker, has told the bbc that the eu will not seek to punish britain during brexit negotiations. hosni mubarak has been freed after yea rs hosni mubarak has been freed after years in detention following his overthrow in the arab spring revolution in his country. a warning that bad behaviour in english schools is not being dealt with properly and pupils performance is being negatively affected. good morning. we're live at westminster, where it seems life is returning back to normal as the roads have opened for the first time since wednesday's terror attack here.
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in the past few hours, we have had more information from the metropolitan police who are investigating the attack. they are appealing for anyone with information on khalid masood, previously known as adrian russell ajao. they say they've made two further significant arrests in the west midlands and north—west england. a total of nine people are in custody. one woman has been released on bail. the fourth victim has been named as 75—year—old leslie rhodes, from streatham in south london — one of three people killed by a car on westminster bridge. scotland yard are now appealing for information from anyone who knew the attacker, khalid masood, whose birth name was adrian russell ajao. first, for the latest on the investigation, here's jane frances kelly. this photo is thought to have been
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taken of pc keith palmerjust 45 minutes before he died. the american tour seen with them was at westminster prior to the attack and askedif westminster prior to the attack and asked if she could pose with the officer. other victims of the attack we re officer. other victims of the attack were ays ha officer. other victims of the attack were aysha frade, also an american tourist, kirk cochrane. please have also confirmed that another man has died. whilst we with formal identification, we believe he is leslie rhodes, aged 75 from stress in south london. my thoughts are with his family at this time. furthermore, two people remain in hospital in what is described as a critical condition, and one person is considered to have life—threatening injuries. is considered to have life-threatening injuries. the man responsible for the deaths was 52—year—old khalid massoud, previously known as adrian russell
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ajao. he was born in kent and was recently lived in the west midlands. he had a range of previous convictions including gbh, has edge of offensive weapons and public order offences. his last conviction was in 2003 for possession of the night. he was also known under a number of aliases and was known to the security services. he said overnight there were two significant arrests in the west midlands and the north—west. one woman has been released on bail. five searchers are continuing. 2700 items have been seized including computer information. the police are appealing to the public for information as they try to piece together whether khalid masood acted alone or part of a wider network. anyone who knew khalid masood well, anyone who understands his associates work or provide information about the places he has recently visited. there may well be people out there who did have concerns about khalid masood but
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weren't sure or did not feel co mforta ble weren't sure or did not feel comfortable for whatever reason to pass that information to us. i know iurge pass that information to us. i know i urge anyone with such information to call us. the manager of this hotel in brighton concerned confirmed that khalid masood spent his last nightmare. one guest is soften said there was nothing in his demeanour to suggest he was planning an atrocity. the sun has reported that as he jet died he told staff he was going to london, adding it isn't what it used to be. the attack has reverberated across the world but it was an attack at the heart of british democracy. schultz show the prime minister being led away to safety by her security team, a scene of uncertainty. it is still unclear -- it of uncertainty. it is still unclear —— it was still unclear what had gone on outside the gates of westminster. last night the police, politicians and faith leaders join thousands of people in trafalgar square with the message that
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terrorism and fear will not prevail. we know that the attacker hired his car in birmingham. we know that the attacker hired his car in birmingham. khalid masood stayed at a hotel in brighton the night before carrying out his atrocity. our reporterjuliette parkin has been speaking to the hotel's manager. we have been able to put together some of the last known movements of khalid masood. we know that he stayed here in this brighton hotel the night before he carried that those london attacks. ejecting here at about one o'clock in the afternoon on the tuesday. staff say he was very friendly, very polite and there was nothing about him to suggest anything suspicious. he used a credit card under the name of khalid masood. they even wrote in the book that he was a very friendly and nice guest. one member of staff here is from birmingham, he said he
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was from birmingham and they chatted about that. the manager said that he personally welcomed him and he seemed a nice, polite man. he even parked his car in this car park. it was the same car of the carried out those london attacks. this is what the manager told us earlier. the police came on wednesday night to start their investigation. i was called at home quite late at night at about midnight, one o'clock in the morning to be told the police we re the morning to be told the police were here. they asked for my advice andi were here. they asked for my advice and i said i would cooperate. they asked the staff questions and we are open to this. it is normal for us. it was a bit of inconvenience because we try to run a business at the same time. yesterday we had police in the hotel. they were
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interviewing all the staff in the middle of server so it was a bit of an inconvenience, but we had to cooperate with them and tried to give them all the information. we have all the back—up for this. we have all the back—up for this. we have all the contacts, the address, the telephone number, the person's correct names, addresses. we have all this for the police. most of the staff have been interviewed by the police, giving the correct information. he came home address birmingham as his address? yes, he gave the correct address and the registration card when he checked in. later on they heard in the news that there are dressed in birmingham was correct. everything he said to us was was correct. everything he said to us was correct, his correct name, address, telephone number. everything he gave us when he checked and was correct. as was
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mentioned in the newsletter on. the ca rd mentioned in the newsletter on. the card that ejecting to your car park, was that the same car that was used in the london atrocities. yes, we haven't seen the registration in the paper yet, the number is not very clear, but it is 90% the same car. we know it was a great car, are semi—4x4. we are not sure if it is a ford hyundai i1i0, semi—4x4. we are not sure if it is a ford hyundai mo, in the paper it said how young guy, but it is the same car because we do ask for the car's registration number when we checked in. we will see what is in the news to make sure it is a match. the card with the same as the one that we saw, my colleague saw the carand she that we saw, my colleague saw the car and she confirmed it was exactly the same car. we need to confirm the registration number. we were shown the room at the hotel where khalid masood stayed. police
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reno searched extensively on wednesday night. they took away things like the toilet roll holder, the trouser press, the capital, all of the sheets. the groom has not been returned to normal but there is evidence that he stayed there. staff he said they are shaken and can't believe that the man who appeared so polite and friendly could have left here early that morning, early wednesday morning, i'm gone on to such terrible atrocities. we have heard this morning that the police have been in touch with thousands of witnesses and retrieved thousands of witnesses and retrieved thousands of witnesses and retrieved thousands of items and made more arrests as well.
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i suppose one of the key questions, daniel, is was he alone —— a lone wolf or was he part of a team? the key thing for them to know is whether in relation to this attack is still someone out there who is a threat to the uk that could potentially try to launch another attack. that has been the focus of their enquiries since khalid masood was shot dead. that is the key thing for them to find out. the first set of arrests for what you might think of arrests for what you might think of as routine arrests, to pick up people known to be contacts of his quick picture to find out for them what if anything they know. of those original eight arrests, one person has released. we can assume that somebody not central to the enquiries any more. then to further
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arrests overnight, one in the west midlands and one in the north—west. the police have described them a significant arrests. that is the first clue that these people might have had some idea what police believe might have had some idea over what might happen. that is clearly a n over what might happen. that is clearly an important step forward for the police. that is an important moment in this investigation, one which the police concede is still fast—moving and expanding and developing all the time. daniel, thank you. here at westminster the roads are reopening and it looks like life is returning to normal, which is exactly what the prime minister said she wanted to happen asa minister said she wanted to happen as a gesture of defiance that westminster would not be cowed in anyway. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is at the houses of parliament, where floral tributes
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are being laid. iam right i am right in the shadow of big ben. just behind me is westminster bridge, where the attacker drove over, no one into people who were walking on the pavement. this is where the attacker came. he eventually crashed the car into the side of the railings. it is busy around here today and it is exactly what would've been like on the morning of the attack. lots of people going to work, but tourists, too. people have come here because it isa too. people have come here because it is a tourist attraction, but i think some people have also come here to reflect. the attacker would have come round here, swung around this corner. we are seeing just this side of carriage gates. that is where the attacker ran onto the
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parliamentary estate, where we know he stabbed one of the police officers who was on duty. the questions that are being asked about whether they should be increased security around this area of the parliamentary estate, an area where ca i’s parliamentary estate, an area where cars go in the night. sometimes the prime minister and other ministerial ca i’s prime minister and other ministerial cars go in the night. questions about whether this should be always somebody armed here or if there is somebody armed here or if there is somebody armed here all the time. the chair of the intelligence and security committee, dominic grieve, he suggested that it would be a pa na cea to he suggested that it would be a panacea to think that arming every single officer on the streets of london would be a solution and prevent this type of attack happening in the future. also, the sense we are getting from politicians is that they don't want to see armed police at every single point and every single officer he is trying to look after the security of
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mps and peers, but also the staff. remember there is catering staff and other staff inside the palace of westminster and they don't want to see every single officer who is guarding the palace being arms. so, yes, things are pretty much back to normal. camera crews are here, obviously, to, at lots of tourists. we know from mark rowley, we are going to more police officers walking around the police streets of london across the capital and in other parts of the uk. we know that whilst there is going to be, as there would be for any attack like this, there will be a review of what happened but we are not getting a sense that security is going to be hyped up in the aftermath of this attack. all the mps we have talked to her said the dome at the palace of westminster to be turned into a fortress. thank you very much.
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police have been saying that the fourth the talent he was 75—year—old leslie rhodes from streatham in south london. they have said that 50 people in all were injured in the attack, and number of them are still in hospital, two in particular are critically ill. iam i am three miles from where the attacks took place. this morning outside kings hospital there is still a large police presence. the news that came through last night that leslie rhodes, a 75—year—old, died here. he lived in streatham, not far from died here. he lived in streatham, not farfrom here. died here. he lived in streatham, not far from here. he died here. he lived in streatham, not farfrom here. he is the died here. he lived in streatham, not far from here. he is the fourth person to die, along with pc keith palmer, aisha afraid, who was
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underway to pick up her children from school, and kurt cochrane, an american tourist. eight temp two we re american tourist. eight temp two were brought here on wednesday afternoon, one of them are still critical. they say yesterday to war allied home, which means this morning there are still five victims being treated here. thank you very much indeed. let's ta ke thank you very much indeed. let's take stock of where we are with this investigation and the whole security picture in the wake of these attacks. we can speak now to kim howells, former chairman of the intelligence and security committee. hejoins me from cardiff. with me is chris phillips, former head of the national counter—terrorism security office. chris, was this man, khalid masood, a lone wolf or did he have accompanied accomplices, that is the key question. it is. there will be
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lots of investigations going into him at the moment. the phone is a great avenue for them. they will know exactly where he has been that he has been using a telephone. we need to get away from this lone wolf thing, there is nearly always somebody else involved, if only on an advisory capacity. kim howells in cardiff. there is a question about the security services. this man was on their radar. he was only a peripheral figure, on their radar. he was only a peripheralfigure, which on their radar. he was only a peripheral figure, which makes on their radar. he was only a peripheralfigure, which makes it very difficult for the security forces to keep track of everybody. it is an almost impossible task to keep track of everyone. at some stage this guy might have worried the police, but then disappeared and become completely irrelevant all of their enquiries. suddenly he reappears. we have had this in the
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past. maybe 700 people have gone out to fight for so—called islamic state ican to fight for so—called islamic state i can syria and iraq, maybe 400 of them have returned already. the task of trying to monitor all of those people is a huge one. it is enormously consuming in terms of staff and assets, technology. it will not be easy from here on out. this is one occasion were somebody got through but there are networks out there that the police and intelligence services will be investigating at a furious pace at the moment. chris phillips, khalid masood, 52 years of age, we know he had been imprisoned several times, and convicted of several terrorist offences. he could have been radicalised in prison or become mentally unstable, anything could have happened. he seems to have shown violence over his history, and
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violence which then they be has led him to becoming radicalised. it is a difficult thing to monitor from the perspective of the police. it takes about 50 officers to conduct surveillance operation for one day on one individual. this guy was interested to the police years ago so interested to the police years ago so the chances of being followed we re so the chances of being followed were low. in terms of security lessons, are the lessons that need to be learned both in terms of security around the palace of westminster or more generally? there will be lessons learned from this. as mps have been saying, we don't want to turn the palace of westminster any more than we have done into a fortress. one of the great virtues of the way that we govern in this country is that it is accessible, that we don't live in a police state, that we have
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accountability, we have ways of questioning those who make these decisions for us. it is going to continue to be a big debate, because as chris has said, chances are this notion of a lone wolf is mostly i think as spurious one. there are networks and contacts are there for nearly all of these people and we need to know who they are and how they operate if we are going to remain safe. that is the biggest human rights we have to think of, how we can remain safe on the streets of our country. chris phillips, some people are saying perhaps that the attack at carriage gates that the attacker had discovered that was perhaps a vulnerable point around the palace of westminster because the gates there are often there are lots of deliveries coming and going. do you
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think that was a week link in the security around the palace of westminster? the gate of any building will always be a weak link. this is a working building. people are coming and going. mps need to come in and out. we need to be practical. we can't turn our buildings into fortresses. at the end of the day the security worked. the sky. within ten metres of the front gate and he was killed. we gather he was killed by a close protection officer by the defence secretary rather than one of the armed police. he was killed by a police bullet, and that is what we wa nt to police bullet, and that is what we want to happen. the police and the security of this building worked. we need to bear that in mind. kim howells, do you think carriage gates
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isa howells, do you think carriage gates is a vulnerable point in the palace of westminster security?” is a vulnerable point in the palace of westminster security? i agree entirely with chris. he has had absolutely right. it is a working building. vehicles and people have to move in a night. i have no doubt there will look carefully at how each person is assessed. this guy ran in through those gates. as a former rugby player i can tell you it is not easy to bring someone dying back quickly and such a short space of time. the real task is to gather intelligence on these people long before they ever get into a car and start mowing innocent people dying. very good to talk to you, kim howells, and chris phillips, former head of the national counterterrorism security office. many thanks to both of you. that is the latest from here in westminster
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as the police investigation into khalid masood continues. just a little bit more detail coming in. trying to flesh out the background of khalid masood. this is coming from carmarthenshire were local man has been speaking about shockin local man has been speaking about shock in the community after police searched an isolated farmhouse there in connection with the investigation into whether the's attack. this man confirmed that a couple, understood to be the mother and stepfather of khalid masood, had lived at the isolated property for many years. he believed that they are at the mother and stepfather of the man named by police. he said that he believed the couple had been estranged from khalid masood for many years and that he had never actually been to the property in wales, as far as he
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knew. he said he also thought that khalid masood has to have brothers. more information is starting to emerge on the background of khalid masood as the police tried to understand and piece together his trajectory from criminal activity to the attack that he carried out on wednesday. let's look at some of the day's other news. it's the eve of the 60th anniversary of the eu and our bbc europe editor, katya adler, has travelled to brussels to sit down with president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker. she began by asking him to reflect on the significance of the moment for both europe and great britain. it isa
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for both europe and great britain. it is a failure and a tragedy. with all this excitement about the breadth of process finally starting on wednesday at pretty much the same time that the european union turned 60 years old, what does the european commission president have to say about that? how would you feel on wednesday when the letter of notification arrives here in brussels? i will be sad, notification arrives here in brussels? iwill be sad, asi notification arrives here in brussels? iwill be sad, as i was sad when the referendum took place in britain. for me it is a tragedy. iam in britain. for me it is a tragedy. i am everything but in a hostile mood when it comes to britain. we will negotiate in a frank way, fairway and we're not naive. will there be a fee to pay? it will be a bill reflecting former commitments
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by the british government, the british parliament. there will be no sanctions, no punishment, nothing of that kind. i am strongly committed to preserve the rights of europeans living in britain and british people living in britain and british people living on the european continent. this is not about bargaining, it is about respecting human dignity. all next week we'll be answering all your questions on the triggering of article 50 with our editors at the bbc. please get in touch. you can text us or send an email, or contact us via twitter using the hashtag #bbcaskthis. poor behaviour is not taken seriously enough in schools and the official data underestimates the extent of the problem. that's the view of the government's school behaviour expert, tom bennett.
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in a review published today, he says more funding and better training are needed to tackle the issue. marc ashdown reports. pupils demonstrating the sort of low—level, disruptive behaviour many teachers will be all too familiar with. using a mobile phone in class, messing about on their chair, or making silly noises. it's the kind of thing the government's behaviour tsar, tom bennett, wants to stamp out. an ex—nightclub bouncer, two years ago he was drafted in to assess how schools cope with disruptive pupils. since then, tom bennett has visited schools across england. his report recommends offering better training to headteachers to help them identify bad behaviour, more funding from government for special units within schools with particularly challenging behaviour to help them tackle it, and he calls an ofsted to reassess how it grades behaviour. it's too often glossed over, he says, if a school is doing well in other areas, like exam results. ofsted says it isn't planning any changes to inspections, but says his recommendations will be considered as part of future plans.
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the department for education described this report as "relevant and insightful", and says it will use the findings to help support schools. mark ashdown, bbc news. let's have a look at the weather. good morning to you. it is fairly fresh in the breeze outside my front door. elsewhere, i have made police fear behind me, blue screens behind me, but he is building up to say but, isn't he? guess, but, it is like this in some parts of south—western england. this ribbon of cloud at its thickest has been producing some rain and there is that threat to the rest of the morning of that removing into affect the southern channel counties. the
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cloud will gradually break away. much of the country will have dry and sunny weather. underneath the clear skies tonight there will be a widespread frost. that is down to a high—pressure system sitting over russ keeping things settled over the weekend. there will be as stiff breeze on the south coast. on sunday, still be onshore breeze, offering a little bit more cloud over eastern areas, but essentially there is a lot of dry weather this weekend. i hope you get the chance to enjoy it. enjoy your weekend. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11:30: more details have emerged of the man who carried out the westminster terror attack.
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khalid masood was born adrian russell ajao, in dartford, in kent. police say they have made two more significant arrests overnight. they've spoken to thousands of witnesses and have begun trawling through massive amounts of computer data. the attacker stayed the night at a hotel in brighton before travelling to london. the manager says he made no attempt to conceal his identity and address. everything he said to us is absolutely correct his correct. is absolutely correct. his correct name, address, telephone number. everything he gave us when he checked in was correct. it was the same as what was mentioned in the news later on. an american tourist posts what is thought to be the last photo taken of murdered police officer keith palmer, as the 75—year—old man who died from his injuries last night is named as leslie rhodes, from south london. the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, has told the bbc that the eu
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will not seek to punish britain for leaving during brexit negotiations. egypt's former president, hosni mubarak, has been freed after years in detention, following his overthrow in the country's arab spring revolution of 2011. a warning that bad behaviour in english schools is not being dealt with properly and pupils‘ performance is being negatively affected. that is according to a review being published to date which says more funding and better training and needed. it is time for sports now. hello. good morning. if lewis hamilton tried to play down mercedes's a nswe rs tried to play down mercedes's answers ahead of the new formula one season, the first day of the track proved it was mind games. he was fastest in both practice sessions ahead of the australian grand prix
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on sunday, half a second quicker than anyone in the second session, a huge margin. the new cars knocking up huge margin. the new cars knocking up to five seconds potentially of the lap times. second quickest was sebastian vettel in his ferrari with va ltteri bottas sebastian vettel in his ferrari with valtteri bottas third in the other mercedes. lewis hamilton called his opening day 99 cents perfect. my rule on the racing side would be to be proactive, to work with the teams, to work with the fia, to find the right solutions to make our sport as great as possible in the future and by great, i mean close racing, healthy teams, a true meritocracy of drivers and all the things we know we have in a perfect world. dele alli has been banned for three european club games after the europa league tie against gent. he was sent off for league tie against gent. he was sent offfor in league tie against gent. he was sent off for in st challenge in the first half of the second leg at wembley and the suspension will be served if spurs get in next season which looks
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likely with the team second in the premier league. wales manager kris commons says that crucial world cup qualifier against republic of ireland tonight is not a must win game but says there is a desperation to reach another major tournament. ireland are top of group d after four matches unbeaten, with wales only winning one of their qualifiers so far, four points behind in third. ina campaign, in a campaign, you get halfway and see where you are and you fight at the wrong end of the wrong end, so all this pressure on us is what we have always wanted. i have wished for it, jumped about it. being halfway in the campaign and still having a say in who finishes top, who comes second. we are right in that. england women have reached fourth in the fever rankings. they got a famous one and two over the usa and they have gone above canada in the list. scotland remain 21st,
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wales go up 33rd as northern ireland of 55. rory mcilroy is out of the wgc match play golf, having only played one round. the second of his three opponents in the round—robin group stage of the tournament in texas, gary woodland, pulled out, leaving denmark's soren kjeldsen, who beat mcilroy on wednesday, needing only a half a point in his match against argentine emiliano grillo to eliminate the northern irishman. kjeldsen was due to play his final group match against woodland. so since he's guaranteed a win, mcilroy can't qualify. england's tyrrell hatton and paul casey won, to maintain their 100% records. but masters champion danny willett is out. british swimming is conducting an investigation after multiple bullying claims were made by paralympians about a coach. bbc sport has learned the sport's governing body began an internal review after several para—swimmers made complaints. some are understood to include rio 2016 medallists. and david haye has been called before boxing authorities to explain his comments in the build—up to his heavyweight defeat to tony bellew last month.
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haye had graphically described the injuries that he hoped to inflict on his opponent, and claimed bellew was ‘risking his life' by entering the ring. haye will appear before the british boxing board of control next month. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much. much return to our coverage of the westminster attack and ben brown. it has raised questions once again about the effectiveness of security around the houses of parliament. the attacker, khalid masood, 52, was able to get several metres past the carriage gates before he was shot by police. this is what scotland yard's mark rowley had to say earlier this morning about reviewing security. i understand why tragic events such as this generates questions about the security of parliament. our current arrangements have been
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developed with parliament over many years and are designed to provide access to the seat of our government, balanced carefully with security that is proportionate but not overly intrusive. of course, after an incident like this, as would be expected, my team will work with parliamentary authorities to assess whether a different tone or a different balance is necessary. more widely, across the country, the police service will sustain an enhanced armed and unarmed presence over the next few days. london and the uk are open for business and we're out there in greater numbers to make sure the public see a high presence to help reassure them as they go about their daily lives. in london, the number of armed officers remains at nearly double strength, whilst in other parts of the uk, there are up to a third more officers on duty. acting assistant! rowley speaking
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earlier. on the victoria deryshire programme, my colleague, joanna gosling, spoke to dani singer. she witnessed the aftermath of the attack on westminster bridge i saw the car going on to the pavement and knocking several people over. somebody on the bus then shouted if anyone had first aid training, they should get off the bus and go and help. so i got off straightaway and just went to the first person i saw who looked like they weren't being attended to which, as you say, was a man who had quite a significant head injury and potentially other injuries that we couldn't see. so, at that point we didn't really know what was going to happen after that, probably hadn't even happened yet. and so what help did you give? well, i mean, iwas fortunate in that the other chap who was with me helping the gentleman we were with was a medic. there wasn't a whole lot we could practically do, it was just monitoring pulse and breathing and checking his airways were as clear as possible. i was just talking to him really. he was unconscious, but i was just, you know, you are never aware
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of what people are aware of themselves. so i was talking to him, telling him what was going on, describing when the ambulances were coming and just hoping that some part of him was registering our presence and that we were there to help him. do you know how he is now? i don't, no. i have got no idea. and as you said, you did not know that it was actually a terror attack happening. you went off when the ambulances arrived. when did you discover what had actually happened? i went offjust to wash my hands basically and then i came back to the people i was with on the bus a few minutes later, we had to be diverted all the way around. so it was about ten minutes later when i finally realised that from what they said, there had been gun shots fired, a police officer had been stabbed, and then we put two and two together and realised this was probably part of the same incident and that it probably was a terrorist attack of some sort. a quick recap of the new information we have received this morning from
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the police, who say that the fourth victim of the westminster attack is a 75—year—old man who has died from his injuries, leslie rhodes, and streatham in south london. 50 people injured, still in hospital about 30, two critically ill, and two more significant arrests overnight in the west midlands and the north west of england. so knowing people currently in custody, that is the latest from westminster, back to you. thank you. the former president of egypt, hosni mubarak, who was overthrown — after the arab spring uprisings of 2011 — has been freed from a military hospital. mubarak served almost six years in detention, on charges of killing protesters in the uprising that ended his 30—year rule. but earlier this month, an appeals court cleared him of these charges. sally nabil is in cairo for us. this release is hugely controversial. absolutely. different
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reactions from different people. supporters of mubarak really happy because they see him as a patriotic hero who should not have stood trial in the first place. they see him as a great ruler. on the other hand, we have those who took the terrorists we re have those who took the terrorists were more than six years ago to topple egypt's longest serving president and they see mubarak as a symbol of corruption and repression and the fact he was freed and went home today brings a lot of frustration and frustration for these people. especially that this is ata these people. especially that this is at a time when we have tens of thousands of political prisoners behind bars, according to locals. so this is painful, a painful contradiction. but as of the revolution. mubarak is out while tens of thousands of young people are behind bars because they dared to say opinion is that the current
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regime does not like. so it is a huge drop the trip. if there any sense that any of these activists from the uprising in 2011 who are behind bars, they might be freed? some of them have been freed, but they are under probation, meaning they are under probation, meaning they have the report to a local police station every single day. at the same time, we still have thousands imprisoned, islamists, secular and even journalists, they are being jailed nowadays. cameramen. egypt is being run by an iron fist under the military leader. so many people who supported the revolution one day, they believed that all their dreams have been laid to rest because none of the girls announced by the revolution more than six years ago, which is social justice and freedom of expression,
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none of these goals have been met. so the fact that mubarak is out brings a lot of disappointment for many people here. thank you very much, from cairo. breaking news now. an employment tribunal has ruled that a self—employed courier for the firm xl was a worker and therefore entitled to holiday pay. so the cycle korea claimed he was entitled to one week of holiday paid based on his work for excel, the tribunal agreed, finding that the claimant, his claim was well founded and he was a worker and that the firm unlawfully failed to pay him. this is interesting because the ruling adds more legal weight to claims of some firms operating in the so—called gig economy, that they are engaged and practices that they should not be. mr boxer took the claim against excel with the support
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of the independent workers union of great britain. that was injanuary. an employment tribunal found the corriere with city brind should be cast as a worker rather than self—employed and that is the case involving a taxi firm gruber, appealing against a similar ruling against it last year. so that is from our industry correspondent. president donald trump has demanded a make—or—break vote later on a new healthcare bill. a vote on thursday was delayed because of opposition from some republicans. that's despite mr trump's repeated attempts to persuade them to back the bill. with more, here's our washington correspondent, laura bicker. donald trump is done doing deals. after a frantic few days, his message to republicans — vote for change, or there'll be no changes at all. this has forced the hand of the house speaker. for 7.5 years, we have been promising the american people that we will repeal and replace this broken law because it's collapsing
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and it's failing families, and tomorrow, we're proceeding. but the votes are far from assured, as different factions of the party can't agree. for some, the health reforms go too far. for others, not far enough. i am still a no at this time. i'm desperately trying to get to yes and i think the president knows that. outside the capitol, they gathered in fear and frustration. all: hey hey, ho ho, donald trump has got to go! 24 million americans could lose their health insurance if the reforms go ahead. jessica sanchez has spina bifida. her family are already struggling to afford her medication. we try our hardest to save money because we know the medications are going to finish in 30 days. they only last me 30 days so, every month, we have to start saving more and more money so it can last us longer, and sometimes,
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it's not possible. protesters circled the white house, hoping the president would hear their cries. they worry about losing maternity and mental health care. but inside the gates, he was surrounded by those who support his key campaign pledge. for many, the price of health insurance has shot up, and that's one of the reasons they chose change and trump. by the way, it's close, not because obamacare's good, it's close because of politics. they know it's no good, everybody knows it's no good. it's only politics, because we have a great bill and i think we have a very good chance, but it's only politics. but the president still has some arm—twisting to do. we're going to have a long talk. i'm not gonna make it too long because i have to get votes, i don't wanna spend too much time with you and then lose by one vote, then i'm going to blame the truckers! donald trump has issued his ultimatum. after a delay, there will be a vote in the morning, but this is a political roll
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of the dice with a very real prospect of defeat. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: police reveal that the khalid masood was formerly known as adrian russell ajao, as questions are being asked about how the 52—year—old became radicalised. police make two more significant arrests overnight in their investigation and they are trawling through massive amounts of computer data. they have urged the public to help them. an american tourist post a picture of murdered police officer pc keith palmer taken less than an hour before he died. a 75—year—old man who died from his injuries last night is named as leslie rhodes, from south london.
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this is the business news today. automatic compensation — that's what ofcom wants for landline and broadband customers facing slow repairs, missed deadlines and engineers' visits that fail to happen. the telecoms regulator says it could benefit up to 2.6 million customers — more on that in a moment. statutory maternity pay for uk mothers is among the worst in europe, according to analysis by the tuc. the trade union body says only ireland and slovakia have worse "decently paid" entitlements. it defines decently paid as two—thirds of a woman's salary, or more than £840 a month. robotics and artificial intelligence could affect almost a third of uk jobs by the 2030s. a report from accountancy firm pwc says manual routine jobs are most at risk — those with a human touch, like health and education, are safer. however, they don't believe that 30% ofjobs will dissappear — rather, automation could create more
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wealth and additionaljobs elsewhere in the economy. thank you forjoining me this morning. thank you forjoining me this morning. ever waited in to get your broadband fixed, then the engineer has been a no—show? well, the telecoms regulator ofcom wants instant and automatic compensation for landline and broadband customers who suffer poor service. it's just at the proposal stage, but ofcom want these payments to apply whenever services go wrong and are not fixed quickly enough. slow repairs, missed deadlines and engineers' visits that fail to happen as promised would all be covered. matthew howett is a telecoms and technology analyst at the consultancy ovum. thank you forjoining us this morning. at this stage, it is just proposals, have we had reaction from the industry? the industry have been working through this would ofcom for some time to reach a voluntary agreement to bring this in, but ofcom said they have not got the commitment they wanted from the industry. they are working together,
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we will see this. it remains to be seen whether it will be imposed by ofcom like they have announced today or whether it can be agreed between the providers and the regulator. ofcom have bandied about figures, 2.5 million customers and it could cost the industry up to £185 million. is that it risked the industry will increase prices to cover these compensation payments?” don't think so. in the uk, we have one of the most competitive markets for things like fixed line broadband and mobile than anywhere else in europe. in many cases, the rest of the world. competition between providers keeps prices down and the speeds will always go up. one thing missing here has been the issue of quality and the problems there have been with getting engineers to fix things when they are broken or to get a new line installed in the first place and the regulator has put a push to improve this, but they
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have not gone as far as the date by getting that automatic compensation for consumers. this could be difficult to police. theoretically, the responsibility would be on the provider. we have seen in some areas train companies will give compensation if your train is delayed by a certain amount of time, but that still voluntary. automatic and nonvolu ntary, but that still voluntary. automatic and nonvoluntary, do you think the industry will go for it?” and nonvoluntary, do you think the industry will go for it? i think they will and if we look at the way ofcom has behaved in the last couple of years, it has moved to a very pro—consumer organisation, keen to show what they do for the consumer, so they will make sure they implemented in the best possible way. of course, this is not the only pa rt way. of course, this is not the only part of the jigsaw, there is also the work the regulator is doing the penalised companies if they are late at fixing things and they do not meet certain quality of service guarantees they have in place. so there are two elements. the automatic compensation for consumers and potentially companies will be
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fined if they do not meet the targets they have agreed with the regulator. thank you very much for your time this morning. in other business news... uk households added an extra £13.4 billion to their debt last month — almost 5% more than at the same time last year. figures from the british bankers association say consumer credit is growing at an annual rate of 6.6%, much faster than wage growth. would you pay to tweet? twitter is considering adding a paid membership option for businesses and what they call "power users", but there's no indication they would charge regular users. a premium membership scheme could offer twitter a new way to make money, at a time when users are increasingly turning to other networks like snapchat. and just days before the uk triggers article 50 to begin the process of leaving the eu, deutsche bank has committed to moving to a new office in london. germany's biggest lender is in exclusive talks for a 25—year lease on a new building. garth ritchie, uk chief executive of deutsche, told staff the move "underlines the bank's commitment to the city of london".
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this is how the markets have been faring... ftse is down shortly, a volatile day, the first fall in losses for eight years. the share price is down 2.5%. the pound is up against the dollar. the pound is up against the dollar. that's all the business news. thank you. a major breakthrough in the diagnosis and treatment ofjuba glistens has been discovered by a tea m glistens has been discovered by a team of scientists using gene sequencing to isolate the strain of tb. so patients who might have waited months to get the right drugs can now be diagnosed in little more
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than a week. public health england says it is the first time in the world the technique has been applied on such a large scale. a young boy has helped save his mother's life, thanks to his quick thinking, and an iphone. police have released the audio of a 999 call, in which the four year old told an emergency services worker he couldn't wake his mother up, because he feared she was dead. her son managed to unlock the phone by pressing his thumb on the fingerprint lock. he then used the phone's ‘siri' function, saying ‘help', which then connected him to emergency services. let's listen to some of that call. hello, please, what is your emergency? hello. where is your money? she is at home... that is quite incredible. what quick thinking from a four—year—old, roman, to save his mother. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel.
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we will be backin back in westminster for the latest developments on the attack, as police and other investigators try to piece together more details on the background of khalid masood and how he became radicalised. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with a look at the weather. hello, phil. good morning. just looking through the window and it is still dry here, tha nkfully the window and it is still dry here, thankfully that fits in with the forecast. however, there is an exception to the rule and i take you for what of our weather watcher pictures which came in earlier from devon. further north, it strive with a lot of cloud. it was a cloudy start. further north again, in east
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lothian, north berwick, you are into this great swathes. not all doom and gloom although if you go too far north, you run into another weak weather front which could be producing rain and drizzle. how to reshape up in a couple of hours? will much of the rain moves away from the south—west, still a lot of cloud. behind that, much, much brighter skies. a glorious day for many. northern ireland, northern england, the majority of scotland. and a veil of cloud associated with the weak weather front, which will have enough about it to produce rain, into the northern isles. after those clear skies, the temperatures drop from the highs of 12, 13, 14, drop from the highs of12,13,14, well down into single figures, especially in the countryside. if your blooms are at their peak, i am
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afraid they could be frosty tonight because of that high pressure which will keep the skies cleared through the weekend. saturday is dry and bright and fine, chilly, frosty for some, with a significant breeze across the south east. still a bit of breeze across the north. the onshore breeze dents the temperatures. towards the west, 17, possibly 18 degrees. but with the onshore winds, it could be the north norfolk coast is eight, nine, 10 degrees. that is not the only excitement of the weekend. saturday night and early sunday morning, the clocks will leap forward. do not get caught out by that. the weekend may well be settled weather, warm sunshine, and still quite early in the year so there could be a touch of frost. sunday, not a great deal of frost. sunday, not a great deal of difference. maybe more cloud from the north sea. and temperatures
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topped out at around 13, 14, possibly 15. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown at westminster, where more details are emerging about the man who carried out the westminster terror attack. the first photograph of khalid masood, who was previously known as adrian russell ajao, urges, pictured ina adrian russell ajao, urges, pictured in a football team as a teenager. more details are emerging about the life of the 52—year—old attacker. police make two more significant arrests overnight and are trawling through massive amounts of computer data. they have urged the public to help them. there might well be people out there who had concerns about masood, but werent sure or didn't feel comfortable about passing information to us. i now urge anyone with such information to call us. more details emerge of the attacker‘s moments before the attack.
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he stayed the night at a hotel in brighton before travelling to london. everything he said to us was absolutely correct, the correct name, address, telephone number. everything he gave us when he jack payne was correct, was the same as was mentioned in the news later on. i'm annita mcveigh. the other main headlines: the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, tells the bbc that the eu will not seek to punish britain during brexit negotiations. egypt's former president hosni mubarak has been freed after years in detention following his overthrow in the country's arab spring revolution of 2011. a warning that bad behaviour in english schools is not being dealt with properly and pupils performance is being negatively affected. good afternoon.
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things are returning to normal here at westminster. the roads have reopened and westminster underground station has reopened. they are appealing for anyone with information about masood, previously known as adrian russell ajao, to come forward with information. this picture has just
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this picture hasjust emerged. it is him asa this picture hasjust emerged. it is him as a teenager in a football team, so the younger khalid masood circled with that red circles, that a semi—aged 14 in the school football team. khalid masood has, we gather, had various aliases, various different names. he was born as adrian helms in kent, became known as adrian russell ajao. at one stage he was known as the league chaudhry as well. the police also know that he lived at various addresses around the country in sussex, in kent, in luton and the midlands. he had a number of convictions for assault, grievous bodily harm, but never for any terrorism offences. the first conviction was for assault when he
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was 19 years old. the last conviction was back in 2003 for possession of a knife. those are some of the details emerging about khalid masood, the man who killed four people on westminster bridge and that the houses of parliament. in other developments so far this morning, police say they've made two further significant arrests in the west midlands and north—west england. a total of nine people are in custody. one woman has been released on bail. the fourth victim has been named as 75—year—old leslie rhodes, from streatham in south london. he was one of three people killed by a car on westminster bridge. scotland yard are now appealing for information from anyone who knew the attacker, khalid masood, who was previously known as adrian russell ajao.
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first, for the latest on the investigation, here's jane frances kelly. this photo is thought to have been taken of pc keith palmerjust 45 minutes before he died. the american tourist seen with him was at westminster prior to the attack and asked if she could pose with the opposite. other victims of the attack were aysha frade, a mother of two. also an american tourist, kurt cochran. police have also confirmed another man has died. whilst we await formal identification, we believe that he is leslie rhodes, aged 75, from streatham in south london. my thoughts are with his family at this time. furthermore, two people remain in hospital in what is described as critical condition, and one person is considered to have life—threatening injuries. the man responsible for the deaths was 52—year—old khalid masood, his birth name adrian russell ajao. this photograph has emerged of him
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during his school days. he was born in kent and most recently lived in the west midlands. he had a range of previous convictions including gbh, possession of offensive weapons, and public order offences. his last conviction was in 2003 for possession of a knife. he was also known under a number of aliases and was known to the security services. police said overnight there were two significant arrests in the west midlands and north—west. nine people are in custody, one woman has been released on bail. five searches are continuing. 2700 items have been seized, including computer data. the police are appealing to the public for information as they try to piece together whether khalid masood acted alone or part of a wider network. anyone who knew khalid masood well, anyone who understands who his associates were, anyone who can provide information about the places he has recently visited.
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there might well be people out there who did have concerns about masood but weren't sure or didn't feel comfortable for whatever reasons in passing that information to us. i now urge anyone with such information to call us. the manager of this hotel in brighton confirmed that khalid masood spent his last night here. the police searched about whether the image of the distaff. one guest to som said there was nothing in his demeanour to suggest he was planning an atrocity. he was polite, i noticed that. he came across to me as well spoken, in the little i heard. pleasant smile. nice man. nice man. the attack has reverberated across the world, but it was an attack at the heart of british democracy. shots show the prime minister being led away to safety by her security team, a scene of uncertainty. it was still unclear what had gone on outside the gates of westminster. last night the police,
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politicians and faith leaders joined thousands of people in trafalgar square, with the message that terrorism and fear will not prevail. an online appeal by the metropolitan police federation for the family of pc keith palmer, who was stabbed to death in the grounds of parliament, has reached more than half a million pounds — double its target. extraordinary generosity there as people give money to the family of that 48—year—old police officer, pc keith palmer, who was stabbed to death protecting parliament. four
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people were killed by khalid masood, including pc keith palmer. 50 were wounded in all. many of them are still being treated in various hospitals. our correspondent fiona lamdin is at kings college hospital in central london. i'm about three miles from where the attacks took less and behind the bank of ireland has behind me the police are still very much guarding the entrance the kings hospital this lunchtime. the very sad news that came out last night that leslie rhodes, 75 years old, from streatham in south london, not far from rhodes, 75 years old, from streatham in south london, not farfrom here. he sadly died last night. his death no means for victims have died. pc keith palmer, ie aysha frade, the
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mother on the way to pick up two daughters from school, and kurt cochrane, an american tourist celebrating his 25th wedding anniversary. the hospital have told me today that eight victims were brought here on wednesday afternoon. one of them is still in a critical condition, two were allowed home yesterday much to the relief of theirfamily. yesterday much to the relief of their family. that means this lunchtime there are still five victims still being treated in the hospital behind me, one still in a critical condition. thank you. more details are beginning to emerge about the movements of khalid masood mood —— khalid masood. khalid masood stayed at a hotel in brighton the night before carrying out his atrocity. our reporterjuliette parkin has been speaking to the hotel's manager. we have been able to put together
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some of the last movements of khalid masood. we know that he stayed here in this brighton hotel the night before he carried out those london attacks. ejecting here at one o'clock on the tuesday afternoon. staff say he appeared very friendly, very polite and there was nothing about him to suggest there was anything suspicious. he checked in as khalid masood and used a credit ca rd as khalid masood and used a credit card under that name. they say they even wrote on the boat that he was a very friendly and nice guest. one member of staff said he was from birmingham, he said he was from birmingham, he said he was from birmingham and they chatted about that. the manager of the hotel personally welcomed him and his teddy was a nice, polite man. he parked his car in this car park. it was the same card carried out those london attacks. the police came on wednesday night to start their investigation. i was called at home quite late
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at night, about midnight, one o'clock in the morning, to inform me the police were here. they asked for my advice and i said you just have to cooperate, until i come in tomorrow morning. that's what happened. they asked the staff all the questions and we are quite open to this. it is normalfor us. it was a bit of an inconvenience because we try to run our business at the same time. yesterday we had police in the hotel, inverstigating, seeing the room. they were interviewing all the staff in the middle of our service, so it was a little bit of an inconvenience, but we had to cooperate with them and try to help them, give them all the information. as i said, luckily, we have all the back—up for this. we have all the contacts, the address, the telephone number, the person's correct name, the addresses. so we have all this for the police. most of the staff have been interviewed by the police, giving the correct information
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to assist them with their enquiries. he gave an address in birmingham as his home address? yes, he gave the correct address and the registration card when he checked in. later on i heard in the news that there are dressed in birmingham was correct. everything he said to us was correct, his correct name, address, telephone number. everything he gave us when he checked in was correct. as was mentioned in the newsletter on. the car that he checked in to your car park, was that the same car that was used in the london atrocities. yes, we haven't seen the registration in the paper yet, the number is not very clear, but it is 90% the same car. we know it was a grey car, a semi—4x4. we are not sure if it is
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a ford ora hyundai, in the paper it said how young guy, but it is the same car because we do ask for the car's registration number when we checked in. we will see what is in the news to make sure it is a match. but the car with the same as the one that we saw, my colleague saw the car and she confirmed it was exactly the same car. we need to confirm the registration number. we were that room here in the hotel work khalid masood stayed. police searched it extensively on wednesday night, taking away things like the toilet roll holder, the trouser press, the capital. they took away all the sheets. that room has now been returned to normal but there is evidence he stayed there. staff say they are shaken and they can't believe the man he appeared so polite and friendly could have left here early that morning, early
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wednesday morning, i gone on to commit such terrible atrocities. the police have been interviewing about 3500 witnesses to what happened here on wednesday. they have recovered 2700 items from the various raids they had been carrying out. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is at the met police headquarters, new scotland yard, close to where the attack took place in westminster. we were hearing fascinating details about the night before when khalid masood stayed overnight in brighton and people whose son said he was polite, pleasant with no signs whatsoever he would carry out this atrocity. they gotten him quite well and that hotel because he hadn't stayed there on the tuesday night he had also previously stayed there on the friday night, so he had checked
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in and out of that hotel twice. it had been noted both times that he was friendly, nice was the word that was friendly, nice was the word that was used. certainly no indication in those days before that he was about to commita those days before that he was about to commit a horrendous act of violence. we are starting to get quite a good idea about khalid masood night. we can take you right back to the time he was born. we have seen birth records saying he was first named as adrian russell ajao m is. he was sometimes known as adrian russell ajao. by the time he was committing crimes in his early 20s he seemed to be still using the name elms. he was convicted in 2003 of stabbing a man in the nose with a
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knife. he was convicted under the name adrian elms. at that point after leaving prison he went to saudi arabia to distinguish as a foreign—language. he seemed to spend quite a bit of time there. he seemed to have converted and changed his name to khalid masood. he returns to britain in about late 2009, lives in luton for a while and ends up in the west midlands. the centre of this please investigation having identified him is to try to work out if there is anybody out there who had any idea of what he was planning and on that subject we do hear that they have made what they call significant arrests overnight, one in the west midlands and one in the north—west. we understand that is a 35—year—old man who was arrested in
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manchester. the investigation is still moving quite fast and at this point the police don't know where it is going to lead them. thank you, daniel. the key question for the police is was khalid masood acting alone, or was khalid masood acting alone, or was he part of a wider conspiracy and did he have accomplices? let me show you that picture we have just received of him as a teenager, aged about 14, ina received of him as a teenager, aged about 14, in a school football team. khalid masood went on to become a man who was convicted of a number of offences when he was 19 years old. he was convicted of grievous bodily harm, then various other offences through the years. his last
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conviction in 2003 for possession of a knife, but neverfor any conviction in 2003 for possession of a knife, but never for any terrorist offences. the prime minister was saying yesterday that he was known to the security services but not for any... never convicted of any terrorist offences. she said he was a lwa ys terrorist offences. she said he was always considered by the security services to be a peripheral figure. that's the latest from westminster. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the first photo of khalid masood who was previously known as adrian russell ajao emerges, pictured in a football tea m russell ajao emerges, pictured in a football team as a teenager, as further details emerge of the life of the 52—year—old attacker. please make two more significant arrests overnight and trawling through massive amounts of data. an american tourist post a picture
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of murdered police officer keith palmer, taken less than an hour before he died. a 75—year—old man who died of his injuries last idea has been named as leslie rhodes from south london. time to take a look at the sport. the formula one season is underway and with new regulations allowing for faster cars. lewis hamilton undeniably was the stand out performer of day one. he was fastest in both practice sessions today ahead of the australian grand prix. in the second session he was more than half a second quicker than anyone. a huge margin by formula one standards. second quickest was sebastian vettel in his ferrari. with valteri bottas third in the other mercedes. hamilton called his opening day ‘99% perfect‘. tottenham‘s dele alli is banned for three european club games after his red card during the europa league tie against gent.
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the midfielder was sent off for a nasty challenge in the first half of the second leg at wembley. the suspension will be served if spurs get into europe next season, which looks likely with the team second in the premier league. wales manager chris coleman insists their crucial world cup qualifier against the republic of ireland tonight is not a must—win game, but admits there‘s a ‘desperation‘ in the squad to reach another major tournament. ireland are top of group d after four matches unbeaten. with wales having only won one of their qualifiers so far... four points behind them in third. i have dreamt about this, wished about it. we are right in it. england women have returned to fourth in the fifa world rankings equalling their highest position.
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the side came third in the shebelieves cup earlier this month after a 1—0 win over the usa and have gone back above canada. scotland remain 21st, wales move up to 33rd and northern ireland are up to 55th. british swimming is conducting an investigation after multiple bullying claims were made by paralympians about a coach. bbc sport has learned the sport‘s governing body began an internal review after several para—swimmers made complaints. some are understood to include rio 2016 medallists. david haye has been called before boxing authorities to explain his comments in the build—up to his heavyweight defeat to tony bellew last month. haye had graphically described the injuries that he hoped to inflict on his opponent and claimed bellew was ‘risking his life‘ by entering the ring. haye will appear before the british boxing board of control next month. that‘s all sport for now. i‘ll have more in the next hour. as theresa may prepares to trigger article 50, starting the process of britain‘s exit from the european union, top politicians gather in rome to mark the eu‘s 60th anniversary.
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prime minsiter theresa may won‘t be attending the celebrations. the president of the european commission, jean claude juncker, has said the eu will not seek to punish britain during the forthcoming brexit negotiations. mrjuncker has been speaking to our europe editor, katya adler, who isjoining me now from brussels. what was his mood for the significant week of next week? well, it is all about timing, isn‘t it? they are going to be toasting with champagne glasses and be celebrating 60 years of the european union just days before one of the biggest and most influential members of the european union box out the door. theresa may will send the letter of
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the four—month process of leaving the four—month process of leaving the eu then. it is notjust bragg said thatjohn club brugge is faced with. within the eu we have splits in the eurozone, high unemployment, terrorism, confusion and indecision about migration. and rising populist nationalism in many eu member countries. there is lots of nail—biting going on about what will happen in the french elections and whether marine le pen could be the next french president. she does not like the eu and one side of the euro. of course there is bragg said that empty seat that could have been taken by theresa may. on saturday there will be a celebration, 27
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leaders will be there. the elephant in the room will be that theresa may will not be there. she is not an elephant! her absence. i like her as a person. i expect the british people and the british nation, we are not in a hostile mood when it comes to brexit because i do wish to have with britain in the next decades a friendly relationship. have with britain in the next decades a friendly relationshipm course, we will miss her. when theresa may is not there on saturday what will be in your mind as the way to stop others following suit, other member states walking out the door? would you try to use the negotiations around brexiter but others off? i am in everything but
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not a hostile mood when it comes to britain, but they don‘t want others to ta ke britain, but they don‘t want others to take the same avenue. let‘s suppose for one second that others would leave, two, three, 45, that would leave, two, three, 45, that would be the end. did those negotiations not turn nasty? the european commission has been tasked with this negotiations, we will negotiate in a frank way, in the fairway and we are not naive. will there be a fee to pay? it will be at there be a fee to pay? it will be at the reflecting former commitments by the reflecting former commitments by the british parliament. there will be no sanctions, no punishment nothing of the kind. they have to honour the commitments, the former
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commitments. to the tune of £50 billion? it is around that, but that is not the main story. we have to calculate scientifically what the british commitments where and then the bill has to be paid. there are 4.5 million europeans who are very nervous at the moment, 3 million living in the uk, european citizens in the dk, 1.5 living in the uk, european citizens in the dk,1.5 british people living in the uk, european citizens in the dk, 1.5 british people living elsewhere in the european union. does that remain for the commission a priority to make sure that they know what is to come? it is for me a priority. it is about people. i am strongly committed to preserve the rights of europeans living in britain and europeans... british people living on the european continent. this isn‘t about
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bargaining, it is about respecting human dignity. eg talk about feelings. i will you feel on wednesday when that letter of notification arrives here in brussels? i will be sad, notification arrives here in brussels? iwill be sad, as! notification arrives here in brussels? iwill be sad, as i was sad when the referendum took place in britain. for me it is a tragedy. does it feel like a failure? it is a failure, and the tragedy. so, he was in pensive mood. you will see the 27 eu member states reaffirming their marriage vows the european union while they are in bloom this weekend. brexit will be looming over their minds. everybody knows that process is starting on wednesday, so just a few days from now. thank you very much. let‘s have a
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look at the weather. high pressure is bringing a lot of dry weather in time for the weekend. already we have quite a bit of sunshine around. it is cloudier in some areas, this is a picture recently in from somerset. that is because there is all this cloud settling on the southern counties. we also have cloud and patchy rain in the far north of scotland. it will be cold in the wind further south. it leads us into a cold night as the breeze for most of us is light, when the skies cleared there will be a frost. there will be some freezing fog around. quite cold in the south, as well. the wind will strengthen again tomorrow. although we will see some sunshine, it will feel quite chilly. as it will with
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the cloud in the far north of scotland. for most of us, the maximum will be in the teens. sunday will be very similar, still the nagging breeze in the south. maybe more cloud across the country, but still drive. —— dry. good afternoon. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12:30. the first photo of the man who carried out the westminster terror attack has emerged. khalid masood, who was previously known as adrian russell ajao, is pictured in a football team as a teenager. police say they have made
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what they call two more significant arrests overnight. they‘ve spoken to thousands of witnesses and have begun trawling through massive amounts of computer data. the attacker stayed the night at a hotel in brighton before travelling to london. the hotel‘s manager says he made no attempt to conceal his identity and address. everything he said to us is absolutely correct. his correct name, address, telephone number. everything he gave us when he checked in was correct. it was the same as what was mentioned in the news later on. the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, has told the bbc that the eu will not seek to punish britain for leaving during brexit negotiations. egypt‘s former—president, hosni mubarak, has been freed after years in detention, following his overthrow in the country‘s arab spring revolution of 2011. and bad behaviour in english schools is negatively
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impacting pupil performance, according to a review published today. it says the issue isn‘t being dealt with properly and more funding and better training are needed. let‘s go back ben brown now, who‘s at westminster. for the latest on wednesday‘s terror attack and the investigation. the police cordons have been lifted around westminster and the roads are open again and things are getting back to normal. we have taken a closer look at carriage gates, which is where the attacker killed police co nsta ble is where the attacker killed police constable keith palmer on wednesday afternoon. let‘s take a look. you can see and police officers inside carriage gates, the gates were close, but police officers in there
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now. on wednesday afternoon, this is where the attacker khalid masood ran in after driving across westminster bridge, and he stabbed police co nsta ble bridge, and he stabbed police constable keith palmer come up on duty here. and he later died of his injuries although he was given a solicitation by amongst those foreign office minister tobias ellwood. the attacker was shot dead bya ellwood. the attacker was shot dead by a host protection officer of the defence secretary who was armed and close by. there are questions about security at carriage gates. some security at carriage gates. some security experts said that for too long, this has been a weak link in the security around the palace of westminster. the gates, they are open to long, deliveries are made into the palace of westminster. and as part of a security review, weather carriage gates should be looked at as having been too vulnerable. but the gates closed for
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now and you can see tributes have been left for the fallen police officer, keith palmer. with me is hasan hoque. he was in the palace of westminster when the attack of westminster when the attack took place on wednesday, and has started a fundraising campaign for the victims. he is from a group called muslims unite for london. thank you very much. you are involved in the lockdown on wednesday when everybody in this vicinity was told to stay where they were the several hours. yes, i arrived at portcullis house around 2:15 p.m., 2:20 p.m., we had started a meeting. the room we were in was directly opposite the gate and whether 4x4 had crashed and so we had a perfect view of what was going on. and it was surreal. there
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is always a hive of police activity there and at first, you think it is maybe an accident. but we saw bodies on the bridge. it is very difficult process when you are there watching it. some became clear to you it was some sort of terrorist attack? we then got a call from the mp will visiting, the bell had gone for a vote, saying this is happening. i‘m not going to be coming back, they are locking down the chambers. so we we re are locking down the chambers. so we were in the lockdown until 7:30 p.m.. asl were in the lockdown until 7:30 p.m.. as i said, you are from a group muslims unite for london. what has been the reaction of the muslim community to this atrocity? we were there in the office watching out of there in the office watching out of the window and stalking to ourselves. as a muslim, my thought
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was, what constructive thing can we do? so we set up this fund to ask fellow muslims and others in london to help meet the needs of the victims and their families. immediately, before the names and details of the victims were released, we presumed some of them would be tourists, visitors, their families may be abroad, they may not be familiar with the resources available in the uk and they will need support. i just available in the uk and they will need support. ijust got in contact with the chaplain at st thomas hospital and i will be going there for friday prayers soon. they went out from the hospital when the incident took place. but hopefully working with the hospital and the mayor‘s office to make sure the funds meet the needs of the victims and their families. the funds meet the needs of the victims and theirfamilies. the reaction
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overwhelmingly has been very positive. everyone is very positive about how london has reacted. all londoners have reacted. —— how muslims have reacted, how the police have reacted. how we have not let ramifications come out of it, and we are pleased with ourselves as a city for that happening. we do not know the precise motivations of this man, khalid masood. but we gather he was so—called islamic state, they claimed this, they claim him as one of their soldiers. they said this was an act in furtherance of islam. asa was an act in furtherance of islam. as a muslim, what is your reaction and response to that? yes, well, as and response to that? yes, well, as a muslim and somebody who was born in london and has lived in london all my life, it is still shocking. i know a lot of viewers might think
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islam comes up as a finger around islamic state or other incidents. but as a muslim, i still find it shocking that this happens and the person doing it may end up saying he was doing it in the name of my religion. so as shocking as that may be, we still get shocked. does that and eu this is claimed is something in the name of your religion? yes, it always does. for some the outside of our faith it always does. for some the outside of ourfaith might it always does. for some the outside of our faith might think this is normal, it is not. one thing that has changed, especially in the uk, we are having within our community more frank discussions. there will be some people who say, can the muslim community perhaps in london or elsewhere in the country do more to prevent the radicalisation of people? there is always space to do more. i am always pleased that there
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isa more. i am always pleased that there is a lot happening already, but there is definitely always space to do more. thank you very much for your time. you are trying to raise money. yes, so far, iwould encourage everyone to search for us. muslims unite for london. contribute is little or as much as you can. we have so far reached around £20,000. and we will be talking to various partners to make sure it gets distributed. the money that is being collected is being distributed. that is very good to know. thank you very much indeed. there is another appeal to tell you about, and online appeal by the metropolitan police federation for the family of the 48—year—old officer pc keith palmer who was stabbed to death in the grounds of parliament. you can see
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the extraordinary amount that has already been donated, £521,000. half £1 million for the family of keith palmer. that is the latest from westminster. back to you in the studio. thank you very much. from westminster. khalid masood was known to police, but only considered previously to be a peripheralfigure in security terms. that has now changed and as the head of counterterrorism at scotla nd the head of counterterrorism at scotland yard said earlier, the challenge now is to find out whether masood was supported or encouraged by others. with me is dr karin von hippel, from defence and security think tank the royal united services institute. thank you very much forjoining me. considering the profile of masood,
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perhaps older than many of the people we have seen carry out this type of attack, but there are similarities. a criminal background, not necessarily a terrorist background, but somebody who has become radicalised along the way. and carried out an attack. how do you think the building of this profile will be done? he is also a convert as well, and british—born. many people expect it is the immigrants coming in across europe. the police are very good at pulling together the information. the issue is, as you said, because he is older than average, now police and others needs to be thinking wider in communities and not just focusing needs to be thinking wider in communities and notjust focusing on the youth, but also the larger community. to see who is vulnerable for this kind of involvement in attacks. you said to me you think
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that internationally, countries which have suffered from this sort of attack probably could pool resources and intelligence and information to how one another. right, there is some of that going on, but if you look at the last few yea rs, on, but if you look at the last few years, the attacks inspired and directed by isil outside the call in iraq and syria, there have been 300, 400 casualties in europe and north america alone, that is a significant number of people killed. there is a global coalition but they are much more focused on what is happening in iraq and syria, and i think they need to direct greater efforts to pooling resources and sharing information, to get the public involvement in this country more than they have done. does the public know how to get involved, or do people feel that they have the language to start these kinds of conversations? great question. that met ways to get involved. if you spot a bad guy, and think in that
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way. the information is out of date, people were more involved ten years ago. on the prevent side, the public do not understand what to do enough. britain has this prevent programme that works with communities and others, but the greater public does not know how to engage in prevent and there is no business talking about religion and islam. so i think about religion and islam. so i think a greater public conversation about this would be important. you said nobody wants to live in a police state and the response has to be proportionate. and no one can prevent everything from happening in all places. what we are left with in terms of enhancing the response is that preventative side. yes, the community is really do need to be engaged in more profound ways. on the other hand, you can also say the good news is this country is very good news is this country is very good at gun control and that could have been a lot worse yesterday had the attacker had a gun like they did
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in paris and brussels, many more people would have been killed. you cannot prevent every attack and nobody wants to live in a state like that. do you suspect that khalid masood was someone who was acting alone, but had been inspired by international terrorism? it is too early to tell, often when these attacks happen, the assumption is they are a lone wolf attack and later people find they were connected somehow to isil or different attack plots in different parts of the world. thank you very much toilet —— for your thoughts today. let‘s move onto other news today. president trump has given an ultimatum to his fellow republicans, as they struggle to reach agreement on changing the law on health care. a vote was due to be held in congress yesterday, but was delayed to allow more negotiations on the legislation. it was unclear whether or not mr trump had enough support among
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republicans for it to be passed. he has now demanded that a vote takes place later today, or he will leave barack obama‘s system intact, and move on. live to washington, and our correspondent, gary o‘donoghue. of course, donald trump came into office saying that he was a deal—maker and clearly, this is perhaps his way of trying to get a deal on this by issuing the ultimatum. what are the sticking points for some republicans? that depends who you ask. on the right of the republican party, the sticking point is they do not think this goes far enough to undo the provisions of so—called obamacare. the reforms brought in by the previous president. they have got some concessions this week, more power going back to the states to determine which parts of health—insurance will be offered or required by health—insurance
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companies. some changes to what is called medicaid, which is the programme that provides health care for the poorer in society. for some of these people on the right, that is not enough. alternatively, the more concessions you make to those, the more difficulty you have with the more difficulty you have with the more difficulty you have with the more liberal wing of the republican party, the more centrist wing of the republican party, who are concerned, projections suggest 20 million people could lose coverage and they do not like that kind of headline either. it is a huge deal, notjust between him and another property developer, but him and 200 republicans. and parliamentarians, getting them to go in the same direction is like herding cats! so a big difficulty and he has issued an ultimatum, now or never, no plan b. and i think he will be waiting for congress and the republicans here to blink. the raw
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politics, he does not have to face the electorate for another four yea rs, the electorate for another four years, congressmen face the electorate every two years in this country and they have to go on to their districts and say, we had been promising to repeal and replace obamacare, well, we just failed promising to repeal and replace obamacare, well, wejust failed to do that. if this bill is not passed, how much of a blow is this to the reputation of president trump as a deal—maker in this new arena and how much does it set a tone for future negotiations with congress? well, it will be a blow for him and i am sure he will blame congress because in a sense, it is congress that passes legislation and he can twist arms and cajole and have meetings and he has been doing all that. he has also said he is prepared to move on. his people were here last night walking these halls and talking to the different factions, suggesting the president was ready to move on to other parts of his agenda. and this
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might be the only chance they get. clearly, politicians always do that and say, this is the moment. but you get the feeling the president is prepared to walk away from this, even though he said publicly that not doing anything will mean that the current health system will colla pse the current health system will collapse and fail. and cause a lot of difficulty to ordinary americans. so he seems prepared to go down that road. thank you very much for that. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the first photo of a khalid masood, who was previously known as adrian russell ajao, images, pictured in a football tea m russell ajao, images, pictured in a football team as a teenager, as further details are revealed about the life of the 52—year—old attacker. police make two more significant arrests overnight in their investigation and they are trawling through massive amounts of computer data. they have urged the public to help them. an american tourist posts a picture of murdered police officer pc
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keith palmer taken less than an hour before he died. a 75—year—old man who died from his injuries last night is named as leslie rhodes, from south london. and an update on the market numbers, this is how london is trading, trade now under way in the united states as well. news coming in in relation to one of the victims of the attack on westminster on wednesday. and we are hearing about the romanian national, andreea cristea, she was on westminster bridge and she was, we
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understand, hit by the car driven by khalid masood and knocked into the water, and picked up by a boat. so looking at this, we have an exclusive interview with the romanian ambassador, who has been in regular contact with the hospital, saint bartholomew‘s, and the family of andreea cristea. she has not yet regained consciousness, we are told, but she is now stable. we are learning she has had an operation for a blood clot on her brain and that her lungs are also starting to clear. more detail on precisely what has happened. she obviously has not spoken, but the ambassador understands that the car driven by khalid masood mounted the payment, it hit the boyfriend of mrs cristea first and then her and that caused her to fall into the river thames,
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she was on holiday with her boyfriend and was planning to propose to her that day. her family have asked not to be pursued, the embassy stay this is the only statement they will make on behalf of herfamily, statement they will make on behalf of her family, so statement they will make on behalf of herfamily, so an update on one of herfamily, so an update on one of the victim is of wednesday‘s attack, who is clearly in a difficult condition. although she has not regained consciousness, she is now stable. some of the day‘s other news. customers should be paid automatic compensation by their phone company for problems with landlines and broadband. the telecoms regulator ofcom says providers should pay customers for slow repairs, delayed connections and missed appointments. the plans could affect more than two and a half million customers, who would receive up to £185 million in new compensation payments every year. at the moment, compensation is only paid to a small number of customers. nearly a third of ourjobs could be
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at risk due to the rise of robots, according to a new study. the accountancy firm pwc forecasts around 30% of current roles could potentially be automated by the early 2030s. workers in transport, manufacturing and retail roles are the most at risk, but analysts say automation could also create newjobs elsewhere and improve workplace quality. the former president of egypt, hosni mubarak, who was overthrown — after the arab spring uprisings of 2011 — has been freed from a military hospital. mubarak served almost six years in detention, on charges of killing protesters in the uprising that ended his 30—year rule. but earlier this month, an appeals court cleared him of these charges. a team of british scientists has made a major breakthrough in the treatment and diagnosis of tuberculosis.
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using genome sequencing, they have been able to isolate different strains of tb, which means patients who might have waited months to get the right drugs can now be diagnosed in little more than a week. phil mackie reports. the x—ray on the left shows a healthy chest. on the right, the latter stages of tuberculosis. 100 years ago, recuperation meant rest and fresh air. then, as technology advanced, came more breakthroughs. newsreel: the latest scientific step towards the detection of tuberculosis is x—ray photography. by the 1970s, tb rates in the uk were at an all—time low. but as drug—resistance grew, the killer disease came back. now scientists in oxford, and here in birmingham, have made a major new breakthrough. in a world—first, they‘ve used genome sequencing to give a more precise diagnosis, far more quickly. the uk has some of the highest tb rates in western europe, birmingham is one of the cities worst affected. there‘s been a clinic
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here for more than 80 years, and over that time, there‘s been a lot of changes to the way tb is treated. but for these patients, this breakthrough means they could recover much more quickly. instead of spending months in hospital, patients with complex, drug—resistant cases of tb have been sent home afterjust a week, with a much better chance of long—term survival. phil mackie, bbc news, birmingham. a young boy has helped save his mother‘s life, thanks to his quick thinking, and an iphone. police have released the audio of a 999 call, in which the four year old told an emergency services worker he couldn‘t wake his mother up and feared she was dead. her son managed to unlock the phone by pressing his thumb on the fingerprint lock. he then used the phone‘s ‘siri‘ function, saying ‘help‘, which then connected him to emergency services. let‘s listen to some of that call. what a fantastic little boy, and
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thanks to his efforts, his mother is fine. in a moment, the news at one. first, the weather. good afternoon, it is settling down and over the weekend, dry weather prevails. we had that earlier in the day in pembrokeshire, with very little cloud around. but in somerset, we have got more cloud and a weather front close by, quite a bit of cloud as you can see. this is a recent satellite picture, a wind making it feel chilly, and cloud across the far north of scotland and the northern isles. yes, still the chance of some rain across southern counties, particularly somerset, devon and on. for the majority of england and wales, dry weather and sunshine for northern ireland, northern england and southern scotland. the northern scotland regions have more cloud and quite a chilly breeze and patchy rain, but not a great deal, just making it
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rather grey and jam. through the night, that cloud remains in the north, but the south, the clouds disappears. we do have a breeze, just above freezing in towns and cities, it will be chilly with a frost and freezing fog as we had this morning in the midlands and the north and east of england. the weekend brings high pressure so dry weather prevails as a result. still, a keen and snacking wind, easterly wind, north—easterly in the south, making it feel chilly, and a lot of cloud across the northern ireland has and drizzle. that is the exception. in western areas sheltered from that, temperatures into double figures, 16, 17. near the east coast, more like 9 degrees, 12 if we‘re lucky. it will feel chilly because of the wind. if you have not heard yet, the clocks go forward an hour on saturday night so when we wake up sunday morning, a different sunrise, rising an hour later and setting an hour later.
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these figures across the country from the north, inverness, to the south, in dover. we cannot stray and settled with bright weather and sunshine. it feels warm in the sunshine. it feels warm in the sunshine outside the wind, but by night, some frost. sunday brings a keen wind and the south and on saturday and sunday, it could touch gale force in the south with more cloud on sunday but for the majority, dry and fine. the warmest in the west. the first picture emerges of the man who carried out the westminster attack. this is khalid masood as a teenager. police say he used a number of aliases and they‘ve appealed to the public for more information about him. there might well be people out there who did have concerns about masood but weren‘t sure or didn‘t feel comfortable for whatever reasons in passing that information to us. i now urge anyone with such information to call us. tributes are paid to those who died as a fourth victim is named
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as leslie rhodes from south london, he was 75. police say they‘ve made two further significant arrests with a total of nine people now in custody. we‘ll have the latest. also this lunchtime. the controversial health bill that could replace obamacare —
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