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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  March 24, 2017 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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today at 5, the widening investigation into the westminster attack as police make arrests in the west midlands and the north west. police say khalid masood, who was previously known as adrian russell ajao, had used multiple aliases. there might well be people out there who did have concerns about masood but were not sure or did not feel co mforta ble but were not sure or did not feel comfortable in passing that information to us. i urge anyone with information to come forward. detectives are trying to piece together masood's last movements — including the night before the attack, when he stayed in this hotel in brighton. prince charles has been visiting some of the injured at kings college hospital. the fourth victim is named as 75—year—old leslie rhodes from south london. i'm jane hill, with the other main stories on bbc news at 5. president trump gives congress an ultimatum — pass his new healthcare bill today or he'll leave obamacare in place. i'll be talking to the quick
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thinking four—year—old who used voice control on his mum's phone to call her an ambulance when she collapsed at home. what's going on? and have the crew of the international space centre found life on mars? we'll get mark kermode‘s take on the science—fiction horror film life, plus the rest of this week's top cinema releases in the film review. good evening, it's five o'clock. i'm ben brown in westminster, police say the investigation into wednesday's terror attacks is ‘very large and fast—paced' and they've made another arrest this afternoon — a 32—year—old woman in manchester, making a total of 11 people now in custody.
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they are continuing to appeal for information to trace any "associates" of the attacker khalid massood as they build a picture of his movements in the months, weeks and days before he killed four people in and around the vicinity of the palace of westminster. richard lister reports. what made khalid masood become a killer and who helped him plan his attack? they are the questions the police are trying to answer as they release this image from his driving licence today. the investigation reaches right across the country but birmingham isa reaches right across the country but birmingham is a key focus. today police took cars from the other has other man arrested by armed officers yesterday. a neighbour saw it happen. the police surrounding everywhere banged the door down and took him at first, he was handcuffed and he had a smirk on his face. smirk on his face? yeah. overnight
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police were in east london gathering evidence from a flat linked to masood. a woman was arrested in manchester this morning. police retrieved his car after a man was arrested at these flats in the city in the early hours of the morning. there have been 11 arrests so far but police say they still need more information about masood. what we are appealing to today, to the public, to say, it if, even in hindsight you realise something about khalid masood, something habit is associates, his movements, is planning, now is the time to come forward and speak to us, officers. the investigation in westminster the investigation in westminster and the search of more than 20 in westminster of more than 20 addresses around the country has led to 2,700 items being seized, the identification of 3,500 witnesses, and the processing of hundreds of video images uploaded to the police. this brighton hotel was where masood
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stayed the night before he set off for london. detectives arrived here within hours of the attack and focused on room 228, where he also stayed last friday. they took with them the trouser press from the room, the kettle, and even the toilet roll holder, all of which could provide dna or fingerprint evidence. it's really shocking at the moment... the staff can hardly believe the attacker was the same man they checked in. he was joking and smiling and friendly, he was a very, very friendly person when he walked in. it really is, actually... the receptionist said he was a lovely guest, i liked him. she put comments in the system, you know, he's a nice guest. the news has come as a shock to others at the hotel too. the guy was calm, there was no — there was nothing in his conduct or demeanour that would have let me get a feeling there was something weird about this guy. and he'sjust on his way to commit mass murder. the inquiry‘s also taken police to west wales where khalid masood's parents live. tethered powys police spent the
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night searching this isolated property. —— night searching this isolated property. — — dyfed— powys night searching this isolated property. —— dyfed—powys police. they said later the occupants aren't being treated as suspects, and are receiving what they described as appropriate support. local people were stunned to learn masood had family here. i think it's not so much shock as sympathy for the mother who's been estranged from her son, as i understand it, for many years. 0bviously she's come out to a tranquil location and, what she thought was, and everything's sort of broken loose around her. 0n westminster bridge there are few signs of the carnage which changed so many lives on wednesday, but there are now double the usual number of armed officers on duty in london and this investigation is getting ever wider. richard lister, bbc news. so what more do we know about khalid masood? he was born and raised in kent, he had a string of convictions,
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and recently had been living in birmingham. he spent the night before the attack at a hotel in brighton. daniel boettcher reports. a school photograph of the boy who later called himself khalid masood. 0ne later called himself khalid masood. one small detail at the centre of the piece, fast—moving investigation. what is emerging is the life of a man who used many names. who moved around the country and had a long criminal past. he was born adrian russell elms. he was born adrian russell elms, the surname was his mother's maiden name. he also used the name of his stepfather, ajao. his date of birth 1964, christmas day. he was entered onto the birth register in dartford, kent. when he hired the car he used for the attack, he gave his profession as a teacher. the bbc has confirmed he never worked as a qualified teacher in
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english state schools. his criminal record dates back to 1983. his first conviction for criminal damage. in 2000 he was jailed for two years after admitting attacking a man with a knife, and in 2003 he was convicted of possession of a knife. but he was never convicted of any terrorism offences and was not subject to any current investigations, as the prime minister set out in parliament yesterday. what i can confirm is that the man was british—born, and that some years ago he was once investigated by mi5 in relation to concerns about violent extremism. he was a peripheral figure. as well as in kent he lived in east sussex, in 2016 he was living in east london under the name masood. it's not clear when he changed it. and his most recent address was in birmingham. and as more information comes to light, police hope this will help to establish connections he may have had and his motivation for the attack. and that it may prompt more members of the public to give them information that could prove key to their inquiry. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is at the met police headquarters, new scotland yard.
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the central question, daniel, was he acting alone or did he have accomplices? you do get the sense that the police have not got to the bottom of that yet, which is a suggestion that that question probably has not yet developed into a question that suggests that others are involved at this stage. the appeal this afternoon still asking this key question, saying, we want to know if he acted alone, inspired by terrorist propaganda or give others have encouraged, supported or directed him. we are keen to hear from anyone who knew masood well, who understands who his associates we re who understands who his associates were and can provide us about information about places he visited. police described two of the overnight arrests as significant which suggests that they are making progress, they said a man of 27 was arrested in birmingham and a man of 35 arrested in manchester. west
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didsbury, we believe. and news this afternoon of another arrest, woman of 32 arrested in manchester, bringing to 11 and the total number of people arrested. 0ne bringing to 11 and the total number of people arrested. one of them having been released on bail. we believe she is the partner of khalid masood who was arrested in east london. the other question is how he was radicalised. we know that he spent time in prison. was it there? we also know that he spent time in saudi arabia. was it there? we are starting to get a nice picture of that time, around the time he served his last sentence. people who knew him around the time of 2003 remember a man called aidy going to his local pub and being a heavy cocaine user, so pub and being a heavy cocaine user, so around the time of his last prison sentence it does not seem that he was a midi who might become massively religious although we know that not long afterwards he makes
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his first visit to saudi arabia. we think he then comes back for a short while around 2006 and maybe spends some time in crawley but after that he is then back in saudi arabia and it seems that by the time he returns to britain from that second, longer term in saudi arabia, 2010, at that point his adopted the religion of islam, has ta ken point his adopted the religion of islam, has taken the name khalid masood. there is no indication at that point that he got involved in any kind of violent extremism, just any kind of violent extremism, just a suggestion from the prime minister and the intelligence services that he had appeared on the periphery of an investigation into others involved in violent extremism but until that point he had only been involved violent crime. people describe him as quite an angry man when he was younger in sussex. by the time he was living his last few months in the west midlands people describe a shadowy figure who did not go out much and always went out in black clothes. people who saw him
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ata in black clothes. people who saw him at a hotel in brighton the mice before described a cheery, nice man, a man who then drove across westminster bridge, kid hitting as many tourists as he could, killing three and then stabbing a policeman in the neck at the gates of the houses of parliament. daniel, thank you. that's the latest from new scotla nd you. that's the latest from new scotland yard. with me now is tom wilson from the think—tank the henry jackson society who recently carried out research analysing every terror conviction on british shores since 1998. you have carried out a lot of research into terrorism in the last few years, research into terrorism in the last few yea rs, how research into terrorism in the last few years, how likely was it that this man, masood, was acting com pletely this man, masood, was acting completely alone? we would find that very unlikely, even in most cases where an individual carries out an attack single—handedly or has carried out a plot, and is convicted single—handedly, usually he would have been part of a wider network or would have communicated with another extremist online. in all, only 10%
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of cases that we looked at were com plete of cases that we looked at were complete lone wolves acting alone. we know that theresa may described him as having been on the radar of mi5 him as having been on the radar of m15 yet seen as a peripheral figure. in some ways he doesn't fit the stereotype of a terror suspect. an older man, in his 50s. that's right. generally we think of the average person as someone in their early 20s, particularly we have seen people getting younger in recent yea rs, people getting younger in recent years, and maybe to do with isis, people trying to travel to syria to join islamic state, that's associated with younger people. one of the reasons he may have been on the radar is because he's older and if someone has a history of being involved in extremism it is easy to those people. and the method of attack. crude, innocence, ploughing attack. crude, innocence, ploughing a car into pedestrians and using a knife to attack a policeman. is that the new pattern of terrorism, we sought similar things in reds mice
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and berlin. exactly, whether al-qaeda they put the emphasis on aviation and bomb plots, with a islamic state, the head ideologue has said to his followers, if you can't get guns or explosives, use whatever you have, knives, vehicles. that would suggest potentially a link to an islamic state inspired attack. tom wilson, from the henry jackson society, thank you very much. now the casualties of the attack. prince charles has been visiting some of the casualties caught up in the attack. he's met paramedics and support staff who have been looking after the injured. last night a fourth victim died, 75—year—old leslie rhodes from south london. sophie hutchinson reports. spring flowers growing in number close to westminster bridge where the horror happened. tributes for those who were injured and died in the attack. for pc keith palmer, who lost his life, a football scarf from charlton athletic,
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where he was a loyal supporter. this is believed to be the final photograph taken of the police officer. the american tourist with him had said she liked his hat and now wanted his family to have this image. one of the first people to help pc palmer after he was stabbed was mike crofts, seen here. he had been having a meeting in parliament. today, in an emotional interview, he refused to accept he had acted as a hero. i wouldn't really accept the tag of hero. again, i think pc palmer is a hero. the 10, 15 police officers who were treating him, such unity in that moment. all really working hard to try and save him. then later, the helicopter team arrived — just fantastic. others who lost their lives were aysha frade, a wife and mother of two young daughters killed
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on the bridge, along with american kurt cochran, who came to london with his wife to celebrate 25 years of marriage. and the death toll rose again today as police announced a fourth victim had died. whilst we await formal identification, we believe that he is leslie rhodes, a 75—year—old from streatham in south london. police said their thoughts were with the family of leslie rhodes and his neighbour in south gap and paid tribute to him. he will be sorely missed. very, very sorely missed. details of the 50 or so people injured in the attack are still sketchy. one of those still unconcious but stable is romanian andrea cristea, who fell into the river thames during the attack. she had been in london with her boyfriend. the romanian ambassador said it was a miracle she had survived. tourists, they were coming to london to celebrate their birthday.
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he intended to ask her for marriage on the same day and this was, unfortunately... another victim from portugal said he was determined not to die. another victim from portugal said he was determined not to dielj another victim from portugal said he was determined not to die. i was like, yeah, i'm going to convince myself that i'm going to be ok and myself that i'm going to be ok and my legs will be ok but i was horrified because i was scared for my life. this afternoon, prince charles arrived at kings college hospital in south—east london, a major trauma centre, to meet some of the injured. a total of 20 people are being treated at a number of different locations, of whom six are still believed to be critically ill. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. all—day people have been laying
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floral tributes to those wounded and killed in the attack on wednesday, 48 hours ago. just behind me on parliament square, people have been laying flowers, just opposite carriage gates where pc keith palmer was stabbed to death. there is a fund for his family which has already raised more than half £1 million. we arejust already raised more than half £1 million. we are just hearing, already raised more than half £1 million. we arejust hearing, in terms of the number of people still in hospital, we know that 50 were originally injured, 17, we hear, are still in hospital, and two of them are critically ill, one with life—threatening injuries. that's all for now from us at westminster. thank you, ben. it's 18 minutes past five. just a reminder of the headlines. the main story. police investigating westminster
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attacker khalid masood make arrests in the west midlands and the north west. prince charles has been visiting some of the injured at kings college hospital. the fourth victim has been named as 75—year—old leslie rhodes from south london. and in the us, president trump is battling to get his new healthcare bill through congress. a vote is due this evening. in sports lewis hamilton is already favoured it to win the new formula 1 season after finishing half a second quicker in second practice for sunday's opening grand prix in australia. ben gibson gets his first call—up to the senior england squad, the middlesbrough defender replaces chris smalling for the world cup qualifier against lithuania. dele alli will miss the first few games for spurs next season if they qualify because he has been banned for three europe cup games following his red card against kent. more sports headlines just after half
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past. thank you. now, more about the attack in westminster, specifically the wider impact of this attack. you may know this, earlier this afternoon, muslim leaders joined christian and jewish leaders to condemn the attack in westminster, and hold a vigil for those who died and were injured. cardinal vincent nichols, the archbishop of westminster, and hejoins me now, alongside qari asim, an imam at leeds mosque. gentlemen, good overview to speak to us, thank you for coming in. imam asim, special prayers have been set at mosques around the country today in light of what has happened. absolutely, muslims are united in
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grief, sadness and shock with the rest of the community in britain. because it is our shared home, our country and for this reason muslims across the country today held a special prayer during the friday services where they remembered the victims, in particular pc keith and the other victims. and those who have been affected by this traumatic and horrific attack on our soil. there were hundreds of thousands of muslims across the country that came together to pray for solidarity, for peace and unity in this country. the prime minister is among those who have said that this attack was a perversion of islam. that's a direct quote from theresa may. she said, muslims must not be blamed for it. helpful comments? yes, the message, the tone from the government, the prime minister herself, has been one of reassurance. making a distinction between the faith of islam and the twisted ideology of these terrorists. terrorism has no religion. no faith will ever condone
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violence. as a result, people of faith, and people of no faith are united against terrorism. 0ur strength as a nation is based on our values of tolerance and respect. rule of law and democracy. it is only these values that will help us defeat terrorism. cardinal, you were nodding. absolutely. it was a privilege for me to stand alongside the major faiths of this country this afternoon and to be able to say, there is no space for hate in our response to the terrible deeds that have happened. if we stop making enemies out of people who wa nt making enemies out of people who want to be our friends we are doing the work of the terrorists for them. it's very important that any instinct to turn and take reprisals against the muslim community is absolutely resisted that that's a very destructive path to take. we heard this afternoon, this
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commitment to peace and to the building of our society. as catholics and as jewish people, building of our society. as catholics and asjewish people, we need to walk this path although it's a long way to go until we all shoulder to shoulder. we are some way from understanding why this man did what he did, one assumes that as well as wanting to create fear there isa well as wanting to create fear there is a desire to drive a wedge somehow. is that something that your role can help with? what is your message in that regard?” role can help with? what is your message in that regard? i think there is a complementarity between what we did this afternoon and what happened in travolta square last night. trafalgar square last night was a strong affirmation —— trafalgar square. from those who had
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suffered come in unity. extraordinary turnout. and what we did today was to show that that unity has deep roots in the religious soul of our country, judeo christian, making space for the islamic subsoil. from that subsoil, thatis islamic subsoil. from that subsoil, that is where we get our values from, we should not ignore that, we should nurture it and create space in this society for religious expression because it is creative. religion is not a problem to be solved, it is a resource. imam asim, as much as one can generalise, are their concerns among muslim people and he speak to, anxieties, despite the message that theresa may has sent out? it's natural for the muslim community to feel that anxiety because last time an incident like this happens, we saw a spike in acts of hatred. but i think
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this time, the establishment and eve ryo ne this time, the establishment and everyone else the message has been one of resilience, of communities coming together because more than anything these terrorists want to drive a wedge between communities, reinforced this us and them narrative. i think what we did this afternoon was standing shoulder to shoulder saying, we are not great, we stand together and we will defeat terrorism. i wish that we could talk even longer. it is very good of you to come and speak to us, thank you very much, qari asim and cardinal vincent nichols. we will speak more about the attack after 5:30pm. now it's 24 minutes past five. let's turn our attention is to events in the united states. president trump has issued an ultimatum about the healthcare changes he wants to introduce. in the last few minutes we have heard that the bill, due to be voted on later tonight is still short of support. this is something he's been
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trying to drive through, it should have been voted on yesterday and it was not because of lack of support. let's find out the latest from gary 0'donoghue, who is following the debate in washington. i think they have set a time, gary? the vote this evening? what is your sense of what will happen? yeah, the vote should ta ke will happen? yeah, the vote should take place in about three hours' time. as we speak, the speaker of the house, paul ryan, the most powerful republican in the country after the president, he is the man charged with getting that bill through. he's at the white house updating president tramp on the numbers as we speak. the white house spokesman has just been lost in the last two seconds whether they have the votes. he did not say yes, he .net that she did not say no. he said the president thought this was their chance to replace 0bamacare and that would be at after this moment in time. the stakes are enormously high. they are not
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confident of getting the vote. we think they are still short of those. but still three hours to and things could change between now and then, you never know. whatever happens, it's exposed a huge split in the republican party. they have campaigned against 0bamacare for seven yea rs. campaigned against 0bamacare for seven years. they have fired to repeal and replace it, the difficulty all along is that they haven't been able to agree on a formula to do that, and that internal disagreement inside the republican party is on show today, big—time. republican party is on show today, big-time. that is what is so interesting. it is fascinating because it is about health care, as donald trump was so derisory about that policy during the campaign. it's also about how he can or cannot manage his relations with congress. the republican party has both houses under their control, and the senate
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just about under their control, 52-48, just about under their control, 52—48, they have the white house. these are the optimum circumstances when you are meant to be able to get your own way, not just when you are meant to be able to get your own way, notjust in things the president can do but legislated things you can do. and this was the first big test of that. and they don't seem able to deliver at this stage. we will see what happens later on. the difficulty, if you delayed even further, is that both sides in trench, both sides feel emboldened, i'm talking about both sides of the republican party, they hold out for more, you lose the political party and you lose some political party and you lose some political capital. the next thing you want to do in congress, tax reform, whatever, that becomes harder. winning breeds winning and losing breeds losing and that is the dangerfor losing breeds losing and that is the danger for republicans in the losing breeds losing and that is the dangerfor republicans in the house. fascinating, thank you, gary. much more from you as the evening goes on. keeping an eye on that vote, due
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in the next few hours, full coverage of that from washington. the duke and duchess of cambridge have announced that their son, prince george, will start school this september, they say they are confident that the school will provide him with a good start to his education and the headmaster of the school says he is looking forward to welcoming the prince in september, at thomases battersea, private school. now the weather. now the weather. it will stay sunny all the widespread frost is on the way this evening, the reason is that clear skies are brought by high pressure and in the centre of the high the winds are very light, this is why we will have those still calm frosty conditions first thing in the
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morning. in towns and cities, around 2 degrees, outside of town much colder. the nippy start first thing tomorrow. but in the afternoon it's looking beautiful. so the high pressure is with us alter the course of the day. i want to point out that the strength of the breeze across the strength of the breeze across the south—east of the uk will make it feel chilly on the actual coastline itself but inland we are talking about temperatures of 15 or 16 degrees. copycat conditions for most of us on sunday, more central and eastern areas, overall, beautiful. this is bbc news at five. the headlines: a huge investigation is underway into westminster attacker khalid masood, who had used multiple aliases. police have made arrests in the west midlands and the north west. masood — who was previously known as adrian russell ajao — spent the night before the attack in this hotel room in brighton. detectives are trying to piece together his final movements. prince charles has visited some of the injured at kings college hospital in central london. the fourth victim has been named as 75—year—old leslie rhodes, a retired window cleaner.
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in the us, president trump is battling to get his new healthcare bill through congress. rebel republicans are threatening to block the replacement for 0bamacare. a vote is due in about three hours. and now we have all the sport. good afternoon. lewis hamilton is already favourite to win this year's formula one world chmapionships and the first race hasn't even happened. the mercedes driver finished fastest in both practice sessions today ahead of sunday's australian grand prix. and in the second session he was more than half a second quicker than anyone.
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a huge margin. with hamilton saying he was surprised about how fast his car was. ferrari's sebastien vettel was second fastest with hamilton's mercedes team mate valteri bottas third on the timesheets. this season features new cars that are bigger. and quicker. with up to five seconds shaved off lap times as the sport's new owners try to attract new fans. my role on the racing side would be to be proactive, to work with the teams, to work with the fia, to find the right solutions to make our sport as great as possible in the future. and by great, i mean close racing, healthy teams, a true meritocracy of drivers, and all the things we know we have in a perfect world. 0nto football and wales' manager chris coleman insists their crucial world cup qualifier against the republic of ireland tonight is not a must—win game. but does admit there is a ‘desperation' in the squad to reach another major tournament. ireland are top of group d after going four matches unbeaten. wales are also unbeaten but only have one victory
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from their qualifiers so far. and are four points behind ireland in third. in a campaign, you get halfway and see where you are. are you fighting at the wrong end or the right end. so all this pressure on us is what we've always wanted. i've wished for it, dreamt about it. being halfway in the campaign and still having a say in who finishes top, who comes second, we're right in that. england face lithuania on sunday. they're top of group f with 3 wins a draw but they'll have to do without defender chris smalling who's injured. instead ben gibson gets his first senior call—up. and the middlesbrough player is already well respected by his soon to be england team mates. i've played with in on a few occasions with the under—21s —— with him. i've known him since then and we have got on quite well and i've seen him a few times. he's a very
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good player and he's been getting a lot of praise the season or how he's been playing for middlesbrough. —— for how. it's fully deserved and hopefully he will enjoy his time here and you never know maybe he will make his england debut. meanwhile, england's women have returned to fourth in the fifa world rankings. equalling their highest position. the side came third in the shebelieves cup earlier this month after a 1—0 win over the usa, and have gone back above canada. scotland remain 21st, wales move up to 33rd and northern ireland are up to 55th. england wicketkeeper sarah taylor still hopes to play in this summer's cricket world cup. despite not being selected fora training camp in the uae next month. taylor's taken a break from the sport because of anxiety problems. but is back in training and according to coach mark robinson she's planning a gradual return to the team. that's all sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website.
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we'll have more in sportsday at 630. thanks very much. when roman sharma's mum collapsed, the quick thinking four year old knew he had to get help. what he did next has been praised by police. he used voice recognition on his mum's iphone to connect to the emergency services. let's listen to some of that call. hello, police, what is your emergency? hello, i'm roman. 0k, where's your mummy? she's at home. and where are you? at home, as well. we can speak now to claudia. and hersons, roman and his twin brother samuel.
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which one made the call? it was a tea m which one made the call? it was a team effort, but this was roman who made the phone call and samuel assisted with the address. even listening to it, it is so hard to listening to it, it is so hard to listen to, explain where you were and what happened ?|j listen to, explain where you were and what happened? i had just picked up and what happened? i had just picked up the boys from score and taken them home, to give them their snack, and that was the last i remember —— from school. by all accounts i fainted and i hit my head on the doorframe fainted and i hit my head on the door frame and knocked fainted and i hit my head on the doorframe and knocked myself fainted and i hit my head on the door frame and knocked myself out completely. samuel found myself on the floor and alerted roman to the fa ct i the floor and alerted roman to the fact i wasn't moving. roman came over and check i wasn't moving and then decided he would call the emergency services. what is so astonishing, to use your phone at all, he had to use your thumb print
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to use the phone, when you were well again and you realised what he had done, where you astonished that he had behaved so calmly? —— work. absolutely, i did not believe it when i was told he was the one who called the emergency services. he said he had been filed on my thumb, which you don't need to do, but he had seen me do it and my husband is doing it when calling other people and he had said he saw people using the phone in that way and he decided that was the way to do it. he used it to call 999 come and you teach them these things hoping they will never have to use it, but if you do, it will sink never have to use it, but if you do, it willsink in, never have to use it, but if you do, it will sink in, and it obviously did and we are beyond proud of both of them for doing such a superjob and remaining calm. they look quite keen to get away. you are the only one who can hear my voice. can you
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ask roman, was he scared, worried? roman, when money fell down on the floor, did it frighten you? —— mummy. were you scared?|j floor, did it frighten you? —— mummy. were you scared? i was scared. he says he was scared. you we re scared. he says he was scared. you were brave enough to call the police. yes. shrugging it off. the tape is the proof and that is fantastic. absolutely. yes. you said you didn't believe it at first and once you were well again and you we re once you were well again and you were how many realised what had gone on, what was the conversation that you had with your boys? they were nonchalantly you had with your boys? they were nonchala ntly about it, you had with your boys? they were nonchalantly about it, they work very coherent about telling me exactly what happened and samuel
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saying that roman said healy of at the school but i'd told them where we lived, he got it wrong —— said he lived at the school. we were safe money, and the police came, and we did not open it cover because they we re did not open it cover because they were strangers, but they knocked down the door. —— we did not open it. my husband and i were dumbfounded. incredible, and the fa ct dumbfounded. incredible, and the fact they did not open the door even was an extra kudos to them for paying attention, really. what fa ntastically well paying attention, really. what fantastically well brought up little boys, this is amazing. everybody watching is so pleased that you are well and everything is fine. everyone sends congratulations to the both of them for staying so calm. thank you, we are very proud. they are now saying, ma'am, it is tea—time, can we get away?” they are now saying, ma'am, it is tea-time, can we get away? i have promised pizza, so, yes, iwould do
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that for them tonight. thanks for joining us. that is the story of the day. very calm and collected little boys. with the added bonus that they did not open the door because they had been told not to open that to strangers. that is a great story. you might know that comic relief is coming back this evening and one of the anticipated things is the sequel to love actually. the director richard curtis is a key part of it and he has been telling our entertainment correspondent why he decided to revisit the characters.
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the reason is because we could and it is quite easy to do little bits of every single character, but if you are doing a sequel to a movie you are doing a sequel to a movie you would have to work out a plot, but this is just a little glimpse and that will mean a loss of extra people will watch the show and we can make some extra money “— people will watch the show and we can make some extra money —— a lot. the editing of the original was a nightmare and things were changing all over the place, but you then got it into a place you are happy with. this time, the first love actually took me seven months, but this one we had two days. it didn't make much difference. it has made a huge impact, such a massive amount of interest, universal studios must have thought they could get another movie out of this. they did ask me to do it before but this is my way of getting out of a sequel. this is comic —— comic relief getting me out
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of doing a sequel. why is comedy and humoura of doing a sequel. why is comedy and humour a good way of getting the public to give money? when ever you go to places like africa, whenever you see projects, they are actually full ofjoy, so we are saying, do fun things, bring joy and laughter into people's lives, it seems a suitable thing. richard curtis, talking about red nose day and i was told off earlier, because i was listening to the special x cert —— special clip earlier of w1a and i was laughing so hard it but everyone off. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: police investigating westminster attacker khalid masood make arrests in the west midlands
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and the north west. prince charles has been visiting some of the injured at kings college hospital. the fourth victim is named as 75—year—old leslie rhodes from south london. and in the us, president trump is battling to get his new healthcare bill through congress. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. now on bbc news a look ahead to sportsday at 630 tonight. we ta ke we take a look to a big weekend in terms of world cup qualification, wales are four points behind the leaders of the republic of ireland, but the manager kris commons asking his side to keep their cool —— chris
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coleman. and we tell you why the ca rs are coleman. and we tell you why the cars are that much faster in formula 1and we cars are that much faster in formula 1 and we have a look at the state of sport in our special report, but now we have the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? we have life, science fiction with jake gyllenhaal. power rangers, they are still morphing, but are they mighty? and the lost city of z, real—life tale of exploration. mighty? and the lost city of z, real-life tale of exploration. life,
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could be anything, but this is set
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