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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  March 24, 2017 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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the westminster attacker — two more arrests as police try to establish whether of not he was working alone. detectives have released this photograph of 52—year—old khalid massoud, who it is now known was born adrian elms. he went to school in tunbridge wells — one former classmate expressed shock. he was genuinely a nice guy. i was upset today to think he's turned the way he has. and upset to think what he's done to these poor families. 15 people are still in hospital — prince charles thanks staff as he visits some of the injured, including a 19—year—old student. we'll have the latest on the police investigation. also tonight... horn blares making a noise over his controversial healthca re plans. but donald trump could lose a knife—edge vote tonight on one of his key election pledges. the eu won't try to punish britain over brexit, says the head of the european commission, but he warns there will be a bill to pay.
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can you go to your mummy and shake herfor me by doing can you go to your mummy and shake her for me by doing she's can you go to your mummy and shake herfor me by doing she's not can you go to your mummy and shake her for me by doing she's not waking up. and we meet the four—year—old twins who saved their mother's life when they worked out how to open her mobile and call the emergency services. coming up on bbc news — there's a big weekend of world cup qualifying ahead, and a huge match for chris coleman's wales against the republic of ireland in dublin this evening. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. police say they've made two more significant arrests as they try to establish whether the man who launched the attack on westminster was working alone or with others. 11 people have now been arrested. detectives have also released the first image of the attacker 7 52—year—old khalid massoud,
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who was born in kent and named adrian elms at birth. they are appealing for information from anyone who knew him. here's our special correspondent lucy manning. the face of khalid masood, the face that confronted police officers and parliament. the face that looked out of the car at pedestrians as he knocked them over. the 52—year—old was known by a number of names. good adrian elms in kent, by the time he was at this boys‘ secondary school in tunbridge wells, he was called adrian ajao after his mother got married. school friends remembered him asa married. school friends remembered him as a sporty pupil who liked to party, a very nice guy. adrian was a very nice lad, a fun guy, always laughing, alwaysjoking, very nice lad, a fun guy, always laughing, always joking, worked reasonably hard, good at sport, lady by reasonably hard, good at sport, lady rugby very well. just an own
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assuming guy. but khalid masood was soon developing a reputation for violence. in this sleepy sussex village where he lived in his 20s, at the local pub, he slashed a man in the face with a knife and was sent to jail. didn't have a very good reputation, definitely. i remember he was a bit of a troubled character, i think would be the way to describe it. a family friend said this was not the only time he turned violent. a chap was looking at him, andl violent. a chap was looking at him, and i were sitting at the pool table, and he took umbrage against him looking at him like he was, the landlord was looking at him, and he flew over the bar, he got a glass, he was going to do him. khalid masood spend time in three prisons. around ten years ago, he worked in saudi arabia. it is not clear when he converted to islam, but he started using his current surname at
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least 11 yea rs started using his current surname at least 11 years ago. his mother now lives in a remote farmhouse in camarthenshire, which detectives searched yesterday. they have not beenin searched yesterday. they have not been in any sort of contact with their sun for well over 20 years, i understand. when it comes to terrorism, unfortunately, nobody can be responsible for the action of their children. we now know he launched his terror attack after staying overnight at a hotel in brighton. he seemed happy, staff said, i'm troubled by what he was about to do. but he was about to leave his hotel room to drive to london to kill. he was joking and smiling and friendly. he was a very, very friendly person. he was a lovely guest, i might him, and he even put comments in the system as a
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nice guest. there was nothing in his conduct or demeanour which would have let me get a feeling, there was something weird about this guy. and he'sjust on his way something weird about this guy. and he's just on his way to commit something weird about this guy. and he'sjust on his way to commit mass murder. detectives have searched the hotel and there have been more raids and arrests. in manchester, a car was taken away by police in didsbury. two arrests described by senior officers as significant were made there and in the west midlands. police are still trying to build a picture of the man who came here to attack westminster. they say their main aim now is to try and work out if he was acting alone, inspired by terrorist propaganda, or if they are others still out there who encouraged him, supported or even directed this attack. but it's clear there are still gaps in the police chillies knowledge. we are appealing to the public today to say, if even
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in hindsight now you realise something about khalid masood, something about khalid masood, something about khalid masood, something about his associates, his movements, now is the time to come forward to speak to us. a bright student, turned violent man, turned terrorist. no—one is sure how or why. the fourth victim of the attack has been named as 75—year—old leslie rhodes from streatham, in south london. it's thought he had been crossing westminster bridge on his way to or from a hospital visit when he was hit by masood's car. 50 people, from 12 different countries, were injured in the attack. three remain in a very serious condition in hospital. 0ur correspondent sarah campbell reports. as the number of tributes continues to grow, so, too, the number of people killed in the attack. friends and neighbours here in clapham are mourning the loss of 75—year—old leslie rhodes. he was a retired window cleaner. he would clean the
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windows, take your rubbish downstairs, he would do anything for you. to be there at that precise time and get hit by that maniac, i mean, it's unbelievable. he will be sorely missed, he really well. aysha frade, who was on her way to pick up her two daughters from school, lost her two daughters from school, lost her life on the, which, as did kurt cochran from the united states, in london, celebrating his wedding anniversary. and pc keith palmer, pictured here with an american tourist in the hour before he was stabbed to death. an online appeal by the metropolitan police federation for his family has reached more than half £1 million, double its target. among the seriously injured his police co nsta ble seriously injured his police constable chris davies, who was hit by the car along with two other police officers. in total, up to 50
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people were injured in the attack. most have been discharged from hospital. some are well enough to talk about what happened. hospital. some are well enough to talk about what happenedlj hospital. some are well enough to talk about what happened. i didn't wa nt to talk about what happened. i didn't want to die, so i wasjust like, i'm going to be ok, i'm going to try and convince myself that i'm going to be 0k. putting i was horrified, i was scared for my life. i said, i didn't wa nt to scared for my life. i said, i didn't want to die. andreea cristea, the romanian woman who was pushed over the barriers by the attacker‘s car, is still unconscious but is now stable. she was in london with her boyfriend, and the country's ambassador told me today that the fa ct ambassador told me today that the fact she survived at all is a miracle. they were coming to london to celebrate her birthday. he intended to ask her for marriage the same day. and this was unfortunately the destiny. prince charles, with 19—year—old student travis frain,
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pictured today during a visit to kings college hospital. this is one of several hospitals across london which are continuing to treat the injured. staff are coming to terms with the magnitude of what they had to deal with. with the magnitude of what they had to dealwith. it with the magnitude of what they had to deal with. it was inspiring the way people worked together and communicated to deal with the patient in front of them. it didn't matter how many more were coming, you knew you would just keep working. it was really quite something. today at westminster abbey, there was a show of solidarity. religious leadersjoined together for a minute's silence to rememberfour who were together for a minute's silence to remember four who were killed and the many more who were injured. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is outside scotland yard. so, many unanswered questions — how is the investigation progressing? yes, and talking to sources inside the investigation, i get the
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impression that the initial, intense act evictee, in which the known associates of khalid masood were rounded up, that very, very intense work of the first 48 hours is perhaps now starting to slow down. i think the detectives here at scotla nd think the detectives here at scotland yard have now started to getan scotland yard have now started to get an idea of what the story is, and now they are starting to do the ha rd and now they are starting to do the hard miles, working through the huge amount of evidence that they have gathered, going through the huge amount of computer data that they have gathered, including that contact that there was between his phone and the whatsapp app just a few minutes before he drove across was mr, which. was that significant? but i think still, the metropolitan police are making it clear that although they have got some idea about the story, they want the a nswer to about the story, they want the answer to the key question, was khalid masood acting totally alone 01’ was khalid masood acting totally alone or was he khalid masood acting totally alone orwas he in khalid masood acting totally alone or was he in some way given assistance by others? knowing that
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is very important. we know now that he was born adrian elms, we heard from one of his former classmates earlier on. you could tell the shock at the sort of man that he would become? yes. it is a very, very interesting journey, isn't it? become? yes. it is a very, very interestingjourney, isn't it? born toa interestingjourney, isn't it? born to a single mother on the outskirts of london, going through childhood in some quite nice parts of sussex but becoming at some point an angry young man who was involved in violence, in drugs, in getting drunk, ending up in prison. and then this time teaching in saudi arabia before then returning to the uk, changing his name to a clearly muslim name, living in luton and then in the west midlands. the question on thatjourney is, when was the moment that he became a violent extremist? was it something that was part of his early conversion to islam, was he immediately converted to a very violent version of that, or was it
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something that just happened violent version of that, or was it something thatjust happened in the last weeks and months? don't forget, he only acted on this violent extremism in those last few days. and he had actually been living a life as a very normal member of the muslim community for many years before that. in belgium, prosecutors have charged a 39—year—old man with attempted terrorist murder after a car was driven at high speed towards crowds in antwerp's shopping district yesterday. the suspect is a french national of north african origin, identified as mohammed r. he has also been charged with possession of weapons, after several knives and an unloaded shot gun were found in the car. getting rid of so—called 0bamacare — the scheme to provide healthcare for millions of americans — was one of the main planks of donald trump's election campaign. but it now looks like it could fall at the first hurdle. he has demanded a make—or—break vote tonight on his troubled healthcare bill to replace it. and he's issued an ultimatum to fellow republicans, saying if they don't back his reforms, they will be stuck with 0bamaca re.
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jon sopel is at capitol hill. and this vote is looking pretty close, isn't it, jon? the only thing ican close, isn't it, jon? the only thing i can say with certainty is that if anyone tells you they know how this vote is going to go, they're lying. choose your metaphor, this is on a knife edge. what it boils down to is the health insurance which millions of americans will get in future. the congressional office says up to 24 million americans could lose their health insurance as a result of this. for donald trump, this is a massive test of his authority. can the great deal—maker get a deal done with congress? he is finding it very different from being the ceo of a company, where you tell people what to do, instead, having to deal with politicians who have minds of their
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own. what happens if he loses this photo? well, if he loses, there is a huge loss of prestige, he has got a very red—faced at the end of it, because he has invested a huge amount in it. it could have a knock—on effect for other legislation which he wants to introduce. i'm just going to finish by saying that we have counted donald trump out on so many occasions, he wouldn't get past superjuice day, occasions, he wouldn't get past super juice day, he occasions, he wouldn't get past superjuice day, he wouldn't become the republican nominee, you couldn't possibly win the presidency. and people might say he couldn't possibly win this vote. let's see. our top story this evening. two more arrests by police, as police try to establish whether westminster attacker khalid massood was acting alone. and what happened next in the hit film love actually, all will be revealed
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on comic relief tonight. coming up in the sport on bbc news, the new formula 1 season gets under way in australia this weekend. lewis hamilton is showing so far that he will be the driver to beat. next week the prime minister will trigger article 50 — the official start of divorce talks with the european union. the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, says the eu won't try to punish britain during the brexit talks. but on the eve of celebrations marking the eu's 60th birthday, mrjuncker insisted the british government would have to pay what it owed before leaving, a sum of about £50 billion. from brussels here's our europe editor, katya adler. it is the eu's 60th birthday and it's rolling out promo material and the red carpet to celebrate. eu leaders are gathering in rome
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for the birthday bash. the timing's a little awkward, of course, just as one of the club's most influential members — the uk — prepares to leave. jean—claudejuncker is the president of the european commission, which will be the lead eu negotiator in brexit talks. in brussels, just before leaving for rome, mrjuncker told me theresa may would be sorely missed this weekend. on saturday, there will be a celebration. the leaders of 27 member states will be there. u nfortu nately, yes. not 28, only 27. that surely is going to be the elephant in the room though, the fact that theresa may is not there. she is not an elephant. her absence... no, no. i like her as a person. i am deeply respecting the british people, the british nation. we are not in a hostile mood when it comes to brexit. we'll negotiate in a
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friendly way, a fair way. fair and friendly, 0k. so, what about the £50 billion the commission demands britain pays before it leaves eu, covering long—term budget commitments, for example. there will be no sanctions, no punishment, nothing of that kind but britain has to know, and i suppose that the government does know it, they have to honour the commitments, and the former commitments. to the tune of £50 billion? i don't have... i was not mentioning like that. 50 billion, 60 billion is around that. that is not the main story. we have to calculate scientifically. but before calculations come celebrations. the eu's birthday party in rome will be resolutely upbeat, despite the many challenges ahead, of
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which brexit is only one. the former egyptian president, hosni mubarak, has been released after years in detention, following his fall from power in 2011. the 88—year—old was being held in a military hospital. earlier this month, judges cleared him of any involvement in the deaths of protestors during the arab spring. now, if you've ever had problems with your broadband internet service — or even your telephone line — you could soon be entitled to compensation, automatically without claiming. the telecoms regulator 0fcom has put forward plans to help more than two and a half million customers who experience issues. with me is our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz. explain how all this will work? this is the regulator recognising it is
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not only inconvenient but can be costly. you might depend on the internet at home for your work, we might be missing work in order to stay in for might be missing work in order to stay inforan might be missing work in order to stay in for an engineer to visit. what will you get? this is what is likely. if you have a loss of service on your land line oil internet, not your mobile phone, and it lasts for more than two days, you will get £10 a day after that taken off your bill automatically. you will not have to claim cost if you sign upfora will not have to claim cost if you sign up for a new service and connection and there is a delay in the promised start date, you get £6 a day automatically. if you have arranged a visit from an engineer and they do not turn up you get £30 for the missed appointment. this will make a difference, as you say, to millions of people. there you can claim compensation at the moment,
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not do that successfully. some might bea not do that successfully. some might be a little bit disappointed. there area be a little bit disappointed. there are a lot of gripes about very slow internet and an intermittent service got up that will not count for the ill have to be a total break to get the loss of service and a sustained break. if it goes ahead next year, it will bring the phone companies in line with water and the energy providers and with the rail companies, some of whom are already providing automatic compensation if your train is late. he's just four years old but roman sharma managed to help save his mother's life when she collapsed at their home. he found her iphone, and used his mother's thumbprint to open it, so that he could ring the emergency services. duncan kennedy has been speaking to the twins and their mother. when it comes to ingenuity, this boisterous pair do not do things by halves. four—year—old twins roman
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and samuel sharma saw them other faint on the floor. what did they do? panic, cry? 0h, faint on the floor. what did they do? panic, cry? oh, no. first, samuel picked up his mum's and to place her bum on her iphone to unlock it and then they did this. siri, called daddy. they used siri, the phone's boys recognition system to call, not dad but 999. what is sure emergency? i am roman. the boys knew about siri by watching them mum and dad. i said, siri, 999. the police and the doctor came. eventually mum was taken to hospital. as a parent you tell
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things and you hope things sink in but you do not expect ever to happen 01’ but you do not expect ever to happen or to them to remember what you said. this is clearly a life changing piece of four—year—old philosophy. an employment tribunal has ruled that a cycle courier was actually a worker. andrew boxer said he was entitled to one week's at a pay and it was ruled the firm unlawfully failed to pay him this and more legal weight to the claim that sam firms are engaged in bogus self—employment. the duke and duchess of cambridge have announced that their son prince george will start at a private school in september in south west london. he'll become a pupil at thomas's battersea. in a statement the royal couple said they were confident it would provide george with a "happy and successful
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start to his education". the headmaster said he was greatly looking forward to welcoming the prince in september. ed sheeran, kylie minogue, eddie redmayne, simon cowell, just some of the celebrities taking part in this year's comic relief. and there's a mini—sequel to the film, love actually, which will premiere on bbc one tonight. lizo mzimba's live at the 02. yes, this is the stage where some of the biggest names in comedy will be stepping out very soon. since it began, comic relief has raised more than £1 billion for people in need here in the uk and overseas. when tonight's money raising efforts kick off injust over tonight's money raising efforts kick off in just over half an hour, tonight's money raising efforts kick off injust over half an hour, one off injust over half an hour, one of the highlights will almost certainly be the on—screen reunion of some very familiar characters from a very special movie. # some things that happen for the first time...# 14 years on from hit romantic comedy love actually, its stars are back
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for a special short film sequel. like the original, it's been written and directed by richard curtis, who co—founded comic relief with lenny henry. it'll be shown during an evening that will be mostly comedy but that will address other, more serious, issues. of course, it's been a difficult week with the events in westminster. will that be reflected in tonight's show? i think we all feel that tonight is about saving lives, and about people coming together, and about partnerships. in itself, red nose day is a statement about how people do reach out to each other, help each other, and try to save and change each other‘s lives. so, lenny will be talking about it at some point. poor little baldy you. as always, some of comedy‘s biggest names will be appearing. shut up! david walliams has hosted a jeremy kyle special. shut up. infinity and no returns. several famous faces will be auditioning to be the new
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voice of physicist stephen hawking's voice synthesiser, including actress and comedienne rebel wilson. i'm reading for the role of stephen hawking — the greatest enemy to knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge. inevitably, much of the focus is on the celebrities and the red nose day studio. but comic relief‘s continuing success is really down to viewers at home and members of the public fundraising around the country. like in snaith, in east yorkshire, where a main road was closed down, so that local children, and a few others, could perform a money—raising song and dance number. # we'll be loving you till we're 70. all those taking part know that tonight is really about raising money. celebrities like
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ed sheeran will be shown visiting some of the areas where comic relief‘s work makes a real difference and places where the charity's help is most needed. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz shafernacker. iam i am filled with optimism for the weekend. it really is looking beautiful. clear, blue skies on the way. just a few fair weather clouds. it will stay settled all the way through the weekend and into sunday. the mornings will be frosty. just a touch of frost in one or two areas across northern areas of the uk in particular. it was cloudy early on. the sun really did struggle in the south. it was gloomy for a big chunk of the day for the northern areas showed the lion share of the good
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weather. we will have light winds. temperatures will fall away under clearing skies. probably mist and fog forming. in the city above freezing. 0ut fog forming. in the city above freezing. out of town temperatures will be down 2—2, minus four degrees, particularly across northern parts of england and scotland. mist and fog in a few areas. then, basically, a stunning, stunning, sunny saturday. in some spots temperatures might even get up to 17 celsius. you can must get the deck chairs out. saturday night and into sunday, high pressure is still there. certainly, most of our digital devices do this automatically back one amb comes 2am. so the clocks spring forward this weekend. this is a selection of some of the sunrises and sunsets
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this sunday. sunday, another beautiful one. cool around the coasts. both saturday and sunday, particularly in east anglia. in that it is looking beautiful. next week things could go downhill a little bit. we will enjoy the weekend. a reminder of our main story. police say they have made two more significant arrests they try to establish whether the westminster attacker khalid massoud was acting alone. that's all from the bbc news at six. so it's goodbye from me. and on bbc one, we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: a huge investigation is underway into westminster attacker khalid masood, who had used multiple aliases. police have made arrests in the west midlands and the north west. he went to school in tunbridge wells — one former classmate has expressed his shock. he was genuinely a nice guy.
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and i was upset today to think that he would have turned the way he has and upset to think what he's done to these poor families. prince charles has visited staff and some of the injured at kings college hospital in central london. the fourth victim has been named as 75—year—old leslie rhodes, a retired window cleaner. in the us, president trump is battling to get his new healthcare bill through congress. rebel republicans are threatening to block the replacement for 0bamacare.
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