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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 25, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at five. ukip's only mp douglas carswell is standing down from the party — but will stay on as an independent mp. he tells us he's achieved his main objective with the party. we can be certain that brexit is in good hands. ukip's leader paul nuttall says carswell‘s resignation isn't a surprise. his deputy says the mp's departure won't affect the future of the party. he has been a very semidetached person but a very long time in this party, and frankly, this is rather a nice breath of fresh air that this is now behind us. two men remain in custody in relation to the westminster terror attack, as it emerges that the man responsible sent messages moments before he acted. president trump sends out a defiant
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tweet on health care. also in the next hour, the european union turns 60. leaders from 27 eu countries gather to mark the anniversary, as theresa may prepares to formally declare the uk's intention to leave the club. and lewis hamilton will be on pole position for tomorrow's f1 curtain raiser, after out—qualifying sebastian vettel in melbourne. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the uk independence party's only mp — douglas carswell — has announced he's leaving the party. mr carswell said that he was quitting ukip in the knowledge that his goal of leaving the european union had been achieved. he will now be sitting as an independent mp. in a statement ukip‘s leader paul nuttall said that the party has not benefited financially or organisationally from having douglas as an mp, while former leader nigel farage tweeted that mr carswell had jumped before he was pushed. in mr carswell‘s first television interview, my colleague reeta chakrabarti began by asking him more about his decision to leave the party. on wednesday, theresa may announces that she's triggering article 50.
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ukip, my party, we were set up 23 years ago to get us out of the european union, job done, we have won. is that the only reason for ukip‘s existence, many would say ukip is a much bigger force than that? obviously, when you get into politics and people are elected to do things there are all sorts of things you can convince yourself you are there to do. but, you know, ithink the fundamental reason for ukip, certainly the reason i made that switch and the reasons why i think millions of people around the country made the switch to ukip, obviously, when you get into politics and people are elected to do things there are all sorts of things you can convince yourself you are there to do. but, you know, ithink the fundamental reason for ukip, certainly the reason i made that switch and the reasons why i think millions of people around
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the country made the switch to ukip, was over the europe question. we can be sure now, we can be absolutely certain that brexit is in good hands. we are going to leave. all of the things that vote leave campaigned for are going to come to pass, it's wonderful. this is a moment for celebration. you are doing this a few days before the prime minister triggers article 50. starting that period of negotiation that will lead to the withdrawal, why have you done it now? i thought of maybe doing it a couple of days after, then i thought it's momentous, wonderful news, i thought actually saying it now might allow some context. i want people to go on to my blog and read what i have said. i avoided putting something in a newspaper or briefing a journalist, i thought write it on my blog, first of all see if anyone reads my blog, it took them a while. i think they're reading! let people see what i have said in my words, iwant people to understand, for me getting out of the european union is so important, i care so passionately about it, i was prepared to change parties, trigger by—elections, it's happening in three days' time. it's wonderful. what is going to happen now, because you say that you are going to sit as an independent mp without triggering a by—election?
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you can do that, technically, but morally should you be doing that? if i was switching party i would without question call a by—election. i know that because i was the first mp in, i think, 26 years to do that. no one makes you, but i felt when i was a conservative no—one makes you, but i felt when i was a conservative and wanted tojoin ukip i felt a moral obligation. a democratic obligation to do that. but i am not switching parties now. i am not changing, i am not crossing the floor, i am going to still sit in opposition. i am going to be holding the government to account. if you entered a world in which you would automatically have a by—election if you left a party, farfrom empowering constituents that would strengthen party bosses so i think this is entirely right, entirely consistent with the principles of direct democracy. i have stood for election four times and won four times and i am now without having the party hierarchy able to focus entirely on meeting my constituents' needs. yet there are people within ukip who say you really should stand for re—election, you were elected with ukip support, ukip leaflets and support behind you. surely you should? there are always going to be one or two people who don't reciprocate the goodwill and amicable feelings i have for the party, i wish them well and have respect for those people i met in ukip, they're the heros ofjune 23rd.
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there are always going to be one or two who perhaps won't take yes for an answer. look, we are in this business for one reason, getting out of the eu, that's happening on wednesday, let's not snipe at each other. if you want to be angry with the modern world, find something else to be angry about. let's be clear, you will not stand down to trigger a by—election? i am not calling a by—election, i am not changing parties, so i have no need to. if i was to join the conservatives, not that i am a good conservative, but if i was to join the conservatives, then of course i would call a by—election but i am not. you have no intention of joining the conservatives? theresa may has done a fantasticjob the past eight months, her trajectory is spot on. 2020 is a long time away, let's wait and see but i am not going to join the conservatives as mp for clacton. you have said in your blog and said now that you are leaving ukip, it's amicable, friendly, but we all know that relations between you and the previous leadership of ukip, nigel farage, their backer aaron banks, have been anything but amicable.
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how much has that influenced your decision? i rarely made any big decisions in politics with reference to either of those two individuals and their priorities. my decision to trigger a by—election was in order to make sure we got a referendum. my decision to back vote leave was in order to make sure that the right people ran the right sort of campaign. when i called the by—election and celebrated the victory in the clacton by—election i talked about the need for a eurosceptism that appealed to all britain and all britons and i feel very much that you win in politics from parish councils to referendums by being positive and optimistic. i listened to all sorts of criticism and advice from some people who were perhaps, you know, take a different view. i wish them well. well, a little earlier i spoke to peter whittle, deputy leader of the uk independence party. he gave me his thoughts on mr carswell‘s decision to leave the party.
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look, i mean, the fact is that the people who voted for ukip and voted all the way along for ukip didn't really vote for ukip because douglas carswell was there, he's been a semidetached person for a long time with the party. this is rather a nice breath of fresh air that... symbolically, though, very important to have a member of parliament in the house of commons behind you. well, it is if it's somebody who is utterly with you as a party. but i think that douglas was never really comfortable in ukip, that's now been made clear and of course we look forward very much to him obviously being a man of principle to have a by—election and we will look forward very much to fighting the seat. he says there is not going to be a by—election. oh, he did. right, the fact is he made quite a big fuss when he came over to ukip of actually standing as a man of honour in his seat and trying
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to get re—election, so i think the same should apply here. the point is that douglas can go on his merry way but the fact is it makes almost no difference to us at all. our political correspondent told me that this is a key moment. here's a device of figure, who never really left the conservative party. he fell out with nigel farage. people have the accused douglas carswell of using his parliamentary position to block nigel farage. that senior
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figures who are delighted that douglas carswell is leaving, but they will be pleased that after 4 million votes, the only seat they had was in clacton and now they will not have that. he has made it perfectly clear he doesn't intend to have a by—election in the me that he did when he crossed from the conservatives to ukip. ukip with clearly loved to have a go at winning the seat for ukip. douglas ca rswell was winning the seat for ukip. douglas carswell was seeing brexit is in good hands, theresa may has got her trajectory spot—on. so he's leaving ukip, basically saying, it's ok, and other party has got grexit covered. indeed. he was full of praise for the prime minister, leading some to wonder where his future lies. he was careful in his answers to say he does not intend to rejoin the conservative party has the clacton
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mp, but if you pick through that, it doesn't seem to rule out the possibility of calling a by—election ina possibility of calling a by—election in a future rapprochement with the conservatives. he says he doesn't intend tojoin the conservatives. he says he doesn't intend to join the conservatives now, but he doesn't appear to be ruling it out long term. what then of the future for ukip? that is the big question we have had sincejune 23 last year. douglas carswell says it isjob done. he was 23 last year. douglas carswell says it is job done. he was deflected questions are asked if he thinks ukip hasa questions are asked if he thinks ukip has a future. he seems to be saying ukip‘sjob ukip has a future. he seems to be saying ukip‘s job is ukip has a future. he seems to be saying ukip‘sjob is done. i think the new leader of ukip is very clear, he sees their mission to go after working class vote is in the north of england, former labour voters. perhaps douglas carswell
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didn't see himself as part of that project. a former head of the metropolitan police has called for changes to security at westminster, following wednesday's terror attack. former commissioner lord blair said there should be a review of the arming of officers. two men from birmingham continue to be questioned by police in connection with the attack. our correspondent nick beake reports. the scramble of armed police in the aftermath of the westminster attack. new video taken by a taxi driver shows how marksmen swooped on parliament from all directions. this footage shows medical equipment being thrown to those treating the unarmed pc keith palmer. but it was to no avail. now, one former police chief in charge during the london bombings 12 years ago, believes security at westminster needs to be tightened. i am absolutely certain that there will be a review now of the kind of outer soft rim. always behind it is the inner core of armed officers, but pc keith palmer has paid for his life for that soft outer rim and i think his family at least and everybody else needs
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the reassurance that that will be reviewed. the picture emerging of the killer, khalid masood, is confused. a man described by some as charming, also had a long history of violence. we knowjust three minutes before he launched his deadly attack, he checked messages on his phone. counter—terror police will be desperate to know who he was last in contact with. the key question why did khalid masood strike at westminster has still not been answered. its not clear if someone while he was in saudi arabia or maybe during his three spells in prison. but senior scotland yard officers tell me they are more concerned about the risk of people being brain washed behind bars here than from jihadis trying to return from abroad. 15 people from the attack are still in hospital. two of them are critical.
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a website set up in memory of pc keith palmer has now raised almost £750,000. nick beake reporting there. a man from eastbourne has claimed he was attacked by khalid masood 14 years ago. danny smith described how he met masood — known then as adrian elms. i met imet him i met him in a pub in eastbourne, he seemed that a pretty decent fellow. i had seemed that a pretty decent fellow. ihada seemed that a pretty decent fellow. i had a few beers with them. a few days later, we fell out, and he tried his best to kill me. he pulled a knife, held it to my face. i thought surely, he's not going to hit me. but he hit me with the knife and he flinched to do it and i stood there, thinking, he's not going to do it. then all of a sudden, he hit me with a knife, straight through my
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face, through my nose, through my tongue, into my mouth. among the victims, were a young romanian couple andrea and andrei, on a city break in london. andrea was knocked off westminster bridge into the thames when the attacker drove along the pavement. she is still seriously injured in a london hospital. our correspondent nick thorpe sent this report, from the couple's home town of constanta, on the romanian black sea coast. many romanians have strong connections to britain as a place to live, work or go on holiday. today there's also a strong sense of solidarity as they follow the fate of two of their fellow citizens, so tragically caught up in the london attack. simone is a work colleague of andrei's. like the couple, she lives here in constanta — the city famous for its black sea port and fine architecture. like them, she is a frequent visitor to london and even has a picture on her phone of herself on westminster bridge with her family. translation: they were in
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london on a city break to celebrate his birthday. he was planning to ask her to marry him. it was going to be the most important moment in their lives. in this iconic place, in london. the start of their new life together. we romanians are very grateful for all the help andrei and andrea have received. we would especially like to thank the doctors and nurses and all the medical staff for everything they're doing to help them. come home safe and sound to get married here in constanta. we are waiting for you! the seafront here in constanta, with its old casino, is a favourite place for young couples to celebrate their wedding. millions of romanians are hoping that one day soon andrea and andrei will be walking the path here, too. the headlines on bbc news:
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ukip‘s only mp douglas carswell is standing down from the party — but will stay on as an independent mp. ukip says his resignation isn't a surprise and it won't affect the future of the party. two men remain in custody as investigations continue into the westminster terror attack. it's emerged khalid masood sent whatsapp messages moments before he carried out the attack. after failing to get his health care bill through congress, president trump sends out a defiant tweets on his plans to replace obamacare. thousands of people are in london for another protest against the uk leaving the european union. the prime minister theresa may is due to trigger article 50, which will start the process
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for leaving the eu, on wednesday. marchers held a minute's silence at the start of the demonstration, in memory of the victims of the terror attack at westminster. earlier i spoke to the labour mp david lammy who voted to remain and join the demonstrators today. this is a fantastic, democratic moment. i have been speaking to people from wales and scotland, a young boy who came with his mum from devon. they are cross—party, there are conservatives concerned about the direction of their party, labour members, lib dems, snp. they're coming to protest, because they are deeply concerned about the hard brexit wrote this country is on, and they're fighting the european cause. going back to that initial question,
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obviously deeply held feelings by the people on this march, but do they think they can fundamentally change the course now? of course they can. there is a lot to do between now and the next two years. we're putting our future between now and the next two years. we're putting ourfuture into between now and the next two years. we're putting our future into the hands of 27 countries, we are seeing we re hands of 27 countries, we are seeing were going to exit the single market. i think a lot of people don't have the confidence in people like david davis, so a lot can change. a week is a long time in politics. look what has happened this week here in parliament square and look at the democracy that is here today. of course you have to protest, you have to fight and stand up protest, you have to fight and stand upfor protest, you have to fight and stand up for what you believe in. we've done that before in this country and will do it again. what is the message from today's march in terms of the changes you want to see. if you can't stop brexit, what would
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you can't stop brexit, what would you like to see happening during the course of negotiations?” you like to see happening during the course of negotiations? i think a lot of people here are very concerned about conditions for eu nationals across the country. they are hugely concerned about leaving the single market. a lot of people here are small business owners, worried about that. many expect the economy to downtown significantly over the coming months and years. and they are here because we live in a democracy and they want to scrutinise those in government who are making a decision that ultimately parliament would get a cn. for all of those reasons, democracy returns to the street and thatis democracy returns to the street and that is why they are making their voices heard. i absolutely stand with them. they also want to see something about a tolerant, inclusive britain. very concerned about a rise in hate rhetoric in this country. douglas carswell has
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quit ukip, saying of theresa may, that brexit is in good hands. what do you think his departure means for the future of ukip? what does it mean for the labour party's efforts to capture voters that perhaps, on some issues at least, ukip might have made inroads? the first thing i think is this is about a lot of the major actors behind the mess we are now in leaving the stage. we saw nigel farage leave, michael gove and now we see douglas carswell beta stage. the truth is, what i'm concerned about is that the ukip tendency that has got weaker as a political party, now exists almost within mainstream parties. i'm actually concerned that some of that has infected my own party. douglas
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ca rswell is has infected my own party. douglas carswell is but one actor. it is clear that he doesn't quite know where he stands, but the tradition that he believes in, i think is affecting mainstream politics, and it's something i think it's important we resist and resist very hard. president trump has come out fighting after the bill to overturn barack obama's health reforms was withdrawn on friday, because of a lack of support within his own republican party. he's tweeted that "obamaca re will explode". after the defeat, he said he will now switch his focus to tax reform. earlier i spoke to our washington correspondent laura bicker, and i asked her why the president could not get his health care bill passed. if you look at where the republicans are now, they control all of the major beepers within washington and they still couldn't get this done. this tweet is to reassure his supporters. one of the things that
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was key about yesterday's, is that both the republicans and the president's spokesman greg into say that the president had done all he could. he had tried notjust a twist arms but break them, when it came to persuading republicans. the problem is, when it comes to politicians who represent different districts across america, you have bedded differing views in one party. on the left of the party, they thought reform went too far and believe too many people without insurance. on the right, they felt the reforms did not go far enough. we couldn't come to any consensus. when he says, we will come together and piece together a new health care plan, right now, thatis new health care plan, right now, that is not looking very likely. the us military says it carried out an air strike at an iraqi request at a site where hundreds of civilians are reported dead. the united nations has raised grave
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concerns about the casualties in the iraqi city of mosul. iraqi forces, backed by a us led coalition, are fighting to retake the city from the terror group islamic state. at least 200 people are reported to have been killed, with many buried under the rubble. the us has opened a formal investigation. our correspondent has the latest. it's a mass of humanity teen challenge and it's not as big as the one that may be coming down that road in the next couple of weeks. whether black smokers, which is
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where the islamic state is carrying out its actions. this is very much a theatre of war. the people who have been coming in and have been talking about what they have been through. they have topped about air strikes. they have topped about air strikes. they have topped about air strikes. they have common in the last few days and have killed hundreds of civilians. they have complained that the jihadists have used them as human shields. but they have also, in tears and anger, spoken very bitterly about the attacks and air strikes on civilians. i spoke to multiple witnesses, who said that there are perhaps hundreds of bodies still lying in the rubble that people cannot get to. if you take it
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all together, the effects of the war, the wounded, the dead, military accidents and the massive humanity in need of the people who have been displaced, it comes together as a great big humanity dean emergency. it is worsened by the fact that it is happening in a country that was already broken into pieces by war. it isa already broken into pieces by war. it is a huge challenge, and it's ha rd to it is a huge challenge, and it's hard to think of a bigger one anywhere in the world at the moment. two teenage boys have been found dead at cliffs at saltburn in north east england. cleveland police were called to huntcliff last night and found the bodies of the two 17—year—old boys at the bottom of the cliffs. enquiries are ongoing to establish the circumstances of exactly what happened. the families of the boys are being supported by specialist officers. a 17—year—old has died after collapsing in the ring at an amateur boxing match.
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eddie bilbey, from derbyshire, was competing in south normanton on friday evening. he later died in hospital. european union leaders have marked the 60th anniversary of the eu's founding treaty with a formal declaration promising to deepen unity. the meeting comes four days before theresa may, who is absent from the ceremony in rome, is due to formally declare the uk's intention to leave the eu. damian grammaticas reports from rome. signing their new declaration of unity, each in turn, the leaders from every eu country were in rome today except one, the uk on the point of triggering its exit. just as the union marks its 60th birthday. it was founded in this very same room. 1957, six nations created an economic partnership. today, it has vastly expanded, but emerging from an economic crisis, facing terrorism and refugees flows and brexit. so 27 leaders struggled to fit into the same room. crisis, facing terrorism and refugee flows and brexit.
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so 27 leaders struggled to fit into the same room. the union now has its own currency, a single market and even an anthem. the eu's leaders said it should not be forgotten that co—operation had brought peace and prosperity to a continent they remembered from their childhoods being destroyed by war. it is a union that rose from the ashes of two world wars, shaped by the hands and by the iron will of those who had returned from battlefields and concentration camps only a few years earlier. i was eight years old when the community established a single council and a single commission through the merger treaty. the road i then took to school every day still led through the ruins of the burned city.
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for me, the second world war is not an abstraction. outside, supporters of the eu rallied on rome's streets. this was one of the several events in the city, butjust a few hundred turned out to it. the leaders' summit here today is in part about charting a new future for the eu, responding to the challenges they face. but the crowds who've turned out aren't that big so the question they have to answer is how to rekindle enthusiasm for the project? let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather forecast now. if you mist out on the sunshine today, that will be plenty more of that model. stunning weather in parts of the country, but temperatures will soon tumble away,
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quite chilly night. don't forget to put your clocks forward one hour, giving you one hour less sleep. it will be cold, temperatures while down into single figures. in rural sports, some frost, particularly across the glens of northern ireland and scotland. a lot of sunshine to come yet again. sunshine from dawn to dusk for most of us. if you're out in the breeze is out of the sunshine, it will feel distinctly fresh. exposed coast temperatures will be held back. very warm indeed for the time of year. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: ukip‘s leader paul nuttall has described
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the decision by the party's only mp — douglas carswell — to leave the party as no surprise. mr carswell says he'll carry on sitting as an independent mp and is leaving ukip "amicably and cheerfully". lord blair, a former head of the met police, has called for changes to security at westminster, following wednesday's terror attack. two men from birmingham continue to be questioned by police. donald trump's tweeted that obamacare "will explode" and that a "great healthcare plan" will replace it. the president had to abandon his healthcare bill because of lack of republican support. european leaders have marked the sixtieth anniversary of the european union signing a new declaration in rome. theresa may wasn't there, as the anniversary comes days before she'll trigger article 50. it is time for a round—up of all the
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day's sporting action now. hello. thank you. good evening. the formula one season has started and it's started well for lewis hamilton who dominated qualifying in melbourne. new rules mean formula one has even faster cars, probably the fastest the sport has ever seen and the new era got off to a promising start, as hamilton claimed pole position at the australian grand prix. but we could see a real battle between mercedes and ferrari this season, as nick parrott reports. new cars, new regulations, but it was deja vu in australia as lewis hamilton came out on top in qualifying for the fourth year running. the briton predicted ferrari would be a threat and vettel joins him on the front row. his new mercedes team—mate valterri bottas got closer to hamilton than rosberg managed a year ago and the finn went second. others seem unlikely to challenge with red bull's hopes appearing thin for now. verstappen was more than a second
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off the pace and had to settle for fifth. daniel ricciardo pushed so hard it cost him dear in front of his home fans. if hamilton was on the limit, it didn't show. when it mattered it beat the mark set down by bottas and despite reviving ferrari's fortunes, vettel was more than a quarter of a second adrift. working how he can gain advantage over the mercedes will be crucial. this rule change has been huge and such a massive challenge for everyone and the guys have just worked, you know, so hard to make this car what it is today and to be out there, to up here representing them, valtteri did a greatjob. it is great for us for mercedes. i'm looking forward to the race and it is close between us all. dundee united have won the scottish challenge cup,
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with victory over st mirren at fir park. it's the first time they've won the competition — — and dundee did it in some style with a stunning opening goal. tim hague reports. this, the scottish challenge cup final and the prize for dundee united and st mirren and therefore all to see. but before that, respect. a minute's silence for the victims of this week's london terror attack. once it got underway, it was saint mirren who started the stronger. while united were struggling for a fitting in the match, tony andrew changed all that. what a volley and what a goal from the on loan norwich city midfielder. yet the lead lasted around ten seconds. straight down the other end, st mirren levelled. and despite a pretty ordinary second—half, i7 minutes from extra time we had a
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winning goal. thomas mickelson the man. while it might have been three late on, it would not matter. in this competition for teams outside the scottish premiership, it is a day in the sun for dundee united. in rugby's premiership leicester tigers are up to fourth after beating northampton saints 36—31 in a thrilling derby at franklin's gardens. it was a fitting send off for leicester interim coach aaron mauger in his last game before matt o'connor takes charge. the tone was set for a thrilling game with northants taking the lead inside just ninety seconds. the home side had a six point lead at the break, but ben youngs' try helped tigers edge ahead for the first time in a topsy—turvy game. leicester were behind with one minute to go but owen williams‘ massive penalty sealed the win. the defeat for saints though damages their chances of reaching the play offs. and in the other premiership matches,
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exeter chiefs had a bonus point viucotry over sale. 30—25 which boosts exeter‘s chances of a home semi—final. wihle harlequins, who are chasing a top fourfinish, have helped their cause with a 53—17 win over newcastle. and in proi2, top of the table leinster had a narrow one point victory over cardiff blues. munster beat zebre 50 points to 14 to continue to head towards the play offs. glasgow against connacht kicked off around 20 minutes ago. the score there is 10—5 to glasgow. and treviso and ospreys kicks off later. england's ross fisher has booked his place in the quarterfinals of the world golf championship matchplay tournament in texas. he got there by beating the two time masters champion bubba watson 4&3 — including this sensational chip on the 15th. he'll go on to face japan's hideto tanihara in the last eight, who knocked out paul casey. phil mickelson is also through to
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the quarterfinals. he beat australia's mark leishman. he will now face american bill haas. there was a dramatic finish to the dubai world cup, which is one of the richest horse races in the world. the world number one—rated racehorse, arrogate, came from last place to win the £8 million race. the four—year—old colt, the 3—1 on favourite, is trained in america by bob baffert and ridden byjockey mike smith and he made it seven wins on the trot as he beat gun runner and neolithic at the meydan race course. britain's johanna konta is through to the third round of the miami open, but she was given a fright by qualifier aleksandra sassnovitch. in a match interrupted twice by rain, konta sailed through the first set, lost the second on a tie—break, then regained her composure to wrap it up 6—4 in the third. she faces the world number 57 next, pauline parmentier, of france. sir bradley wiggins says he will "shock a few people", once the uk anti—doping investigation, into alleged
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wrong—doing at team sky is over. they're looking into the delivery of a package to wiggins before the 2011 tour de france — and speaking on sky television, wiggins said the claims were — in his words — "the worst thing to be accused of for a man of my integrity" and promised he would have a lot to say. chris froome's hopes of victory at the volta a catalunya were destroyed this afternoon as the team sky rider lost 26 minutes on his rivals in the penultimate stage. the briton, riding his first european race of 2017, had moved into second yesterday, but alejandro valverde left him well beaten today and extended his overall lead. the stage victory though was snatched from him by daryl impey in a sprint to the line. britain's adam yates is in fourth, froome now 31st. boxer anthony crolla is looking for revenge tonight. he lost his wba lightweight world title last september to jorge linares —
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but gets the chance to win that title back, along with the wbc title and ring magazine crown in a huge unification fight in manchester. a warning there is some flash photography in this report from alex gulrajani. anthony crolla wants his world title back. in september champion met champion. crolla againstjorge linares. i honestly believe he took over. he had a fantastic shot which buzzed me. is that the hardest to have been hit in your career? buzzed me. is that the hardest to have been hit in your career7m buzzed me. is that the hardest to have been hit in your career? it was up have been hit in your career? it was up there, certainly up there! my legs did not quite feel the same. linares showed his true class in that meeting but crolla did enough to earn a rematch. getting these two face—to—face a second time is one
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thing. grabbing the public‘s attention is another. tony bailey when david heyman edge to do just that, making huge sums of money on pay—per—view television for a nontitle fight. does it cross to —— does it frustrate you that you're not getting the coverage for a big bite? would not sit comfortably with me. i bite? would not sit comfortably with me. lam happy. the bite? would not sit comfortably with me. i am happy. the boxes know how good a fight and the boxing fans. it is something you learn to accept. crolla is just thankful to is something you learn to accept. crolla isjust thankful to be boxing at all. two years ago he was hit over the head with a concrete paving slab after catching burglars at his neighbour's home leaving him with a fractured skull and broken that. miraculously, just six months later he was back in the ring. miraculously, just six months later he was back in the ringlj miraculously, just six months later he was back in the ring. i saw it as a second chance. it has made me appreciate things so much more. i know how lucky i am to still be
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boxing. getting his hands on that first world title was not easy. it took a rematch with colombian da rleys perez. it took a rematch with colombian darleys perez. he held that title until losing it last year. coming back from a career threatening life—threatening injury, you have come back into the ring, you have won world title and lost a world title. how do you put it into context? i am under no illusions, this is the toughest fight of my career. fighting summerlike jorge lorenzo, i have got to fight using my head and notjust my heart —— for 93v my head and notjust my heart —— for gay linares. but as anthony crolla has shown, he never gives up —— george linares. can he do it? well you can hear live commentary on bbc radio 5live from quarter past ten. boxing correspondent mike costello will be ringside, challenger hughie fury. if you are not a boxing fan, mike
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costello will make you interested in that fight. that's all sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website. and we'll have much more in sportsday at 6.30. karthi, thank you. the uk independence party's only mp — douglas carswell — has announced he's leaving the party. mr carswell said that he was quitting ukip in the knowledge that his goal of leaving the european union had been achieved. he will now be sitting as an independent mp. in a statement ukip‘s leader paul nuttall said that the party has not benefited financially or organisationally from having douglas as an mp, while former leader nigel farage tweeted that mr ca rswell had jumped before he was pushed. in mr carswell‘s first television interview, my colleague reeta chakrabarti began by asking him more about his decision to leave the party. on wednesday, theresa may announces that she's triggering article 50. ukip, my party, we were set up 23 years ago to get us out of the european union, job done, we have won. is that the only reason for ukip‘s existence,
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many would say ukip is a much bigger force than that? obviously, when you get into politics and people are elected to do things there are all sorts of things you can convince yourself you are there to do. but, you know, ithink the fundamental reason for ukip, certainly the reason i made that switch and the reasons why i think millions of people around the country made the switch to ukip, was over the europe question. we can be sure now, we can be absolutely certain that brexit is in good hands. we are going to leave. all of the things that vote leave campaigned for are going to come to pass, it's wonderful. this is a moment for celebration. you are doing this a few days before the prime minister triggers article 50. starting that period of negotiation that will lead to the withdrawal, why have you done it now? i thought of maybe doing it a couple of days after, then i thought it's momentous, wonderful news, i thought actually saying it now might allow some context. i want people to go on to my blog and read what i have said. i avoided putting something in a newspaper or briefing
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a journalist, i thought write it on my blog, first of all see if anyone reads my blog, it took them a while. i think they're reading! let people see what i have said in my words, iwant people to understand, for me getting out of the european union is so important, i care so passionately about it, i was prepared to change parties, trigger by—elections, it's happening in three days' time. it's wonderful. what is going to happen now, because you say that you are going to sit as an independent mp without triggering a by—election? you can do that, technically, but morally should you be doing that? if i was switching party i would without question call a by—election. i know that because i was the first mp in, i think, 26 years to do that. no one makes you, but i felt when i was a conservative and wanted tojoin ukip i felt a moral obligation. a democratic obligation to do that. but i am not switching parties now. i am not changing, i am not crossing the floor, i am going to still sit in opposition. i am going to be holding the government to account.
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if you entered a world in which you would automatically have a by—election if you left a party, farfrom empowering constituents that would strengthen party bosses so i think this is entirely right, entirely consistent with the principles of direct democracy. i have stood for election four times and won four times and i am now without having the party hierarchy able to focus entirely on meeting my constituents' needs. yet there are people within ukip who say you really should stand for re—election, you were elected with ukip support, ukip leaflets and support behind you. surely you should? there are always going to be one or two people who don't reciprocate the goodwill and amicable feelings i have for the party, i wish them well and have respect for those people i met in ukip, they're the heroes ofjune 23rd.
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there are always going to be one or two who perhaps won't take yes for an answer. look, we are in this business for one reason, getting out of the eu, that's happening on wednesday, let's not snipe at each other. if you want to be angry with the modern world, find something else to be angry about. let's be clear, you will not stand down to trigger a by—election? i am not calling a by—election, i am not changing parties, so i have no need to. if i was to join the conservatives, not that i am a good conservative, but if i was to join the conservatives, then of course i would call a by—election but i am not. you have no intention of joining the conservatives? theresa may has done a fantasticjob the past eight months, her trajectory is spot on. 2020 is a long time away, let's wait and see but i am not going to join the conservatives as mp for clacton. you have said in your blog and said now that you are leaving ukip, it's amicable, friendly, but we all know that relations between you and the previous leadership of ukip, nigel farage, their backer arron banks,
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have been anything but amicable. how much has that influenced your decision? i rarely made any big decisions in politics with reference to either of those two individuals and their priorities. my decision to trigger a by—election was in order to make sure we got a referendum. my decision to back vote leave was in order to make sure that the right people ran the right sort of campaign. when i called the by—election and celebrated the victory in the clacton by—election i talked about the need for a eurosceptism that appealed to all britain and all britons and i feel very much that you win in politics from parish councils to referendums by being positive and optimistic. i listened to all sorts of criticism and advice from some people who were perhaps, you know, take a different view. i wish them well. but nobody listening to you would use the term is positive and optimistic to describe the atmosphere at the top of ukip? it
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has been very suspicious and openly hostile towards you. yesterday, if we we re hostile towards you. yesterday, if we were having this interview you could expect me to answer on their behalf. one of the things about today, it is a beautiful spring day but i do not have to answer that question any more. talk to them. but you're saying that acrimony has no bearing on you deciding to go?m acrimony had got to me, there have been one or two bumpy events in the run—up to the referendum. i am focused on politics. i made the switch to ukip because i want us to leave the european union. on wednesday, theresa may is making that happen. brexit is in safe hands. i have absolutely no doubt as ukip‘s only successful mp at the last election, that the prime minister we have at the moment is 100% delivering on what people like me want her to deliver on and also people who voted remain. a liberal brexit works for more than 52% of
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the country. here we are, now you have left ukip, a discussion at observer, if you like, where does this leave the party?|j observer, if you like, where does this leave the party? i think there isa this leave the party? i think there is a political cartel in this country. it is so frustrating that there is a politicalfrustration where young people do not feel parties represent them. i used to think it was a question of the right ministers with the right plans, now we need far—reaching fundamental change. now i will be pushing for this agenda. i have suggestions about how we can shake up politics. i think politics is becoming an oligarchy and solve the insurgents are propping up the oligarchy. i wa nt to are propping up the oligarchy. i want to see far—reaching change. i'm not sure ukip is the vehicle for that trend. do you think they are finished as a political force? use a job done, is theirjob done? there are other solutions impolitic slack steve hilton's. that would allow
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people to do politics without a political party. the problem with political party. the problem with political parties like the ukip is they tend to replicate all the things about establishment parties. they are small cliques at the top, they are funded by rich donors. i think we should do politics in a different way, said the party is controlled by different groups of people are not the only options. hello, good evening. the uk independence party's only mp, douglas carswell, has announced he's leaving the party. he said he decided to go because the party had achieved its goal of pulling britain out of the european union, adding that he was going on "amicable terms". he will now represent clacton as an independent mp, but there are calls for him to face a by—election. our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. shall we shake hands?”
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shall we shake hands? i don't think we need to! there's been no love lost between douglas carswell and some in ukip for some time. when he joined the party two years ago, it was a big deal. i am today leaving the conservative party enjoining ukip. but the relationship with the then leader soon soured. differences in policies and personalities. and today he quit ukip, saying itsjob was done when the country backed brexit. we have achieved what ukip was for. if other people want to carry it on, i wish them all the best. but you were the country's only mp —— the party's only mp, why quit if you have not put the final mail in the coughing? theresa may means brexit is in safe hands. no tea rs means brexit is in safe hands. no tears from nigel farage, the former party leader saying that douglas ca rswell had jumped before party leader saying that douglas carswell had jumped before he was pushed and was never truly ukip. currently does agree. it really
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won't make very much difference to us, other than drooling a line under something that has really cause nothing but heartache for about a year, more than a year. —— drawing a line. douglas was never that comfortable in the party, so i think really he will go on his merry way. douglas carswell is duly elected as a memberof parliament douglas carswell is duly elected as a member of parliament for the said constituency. thank you. last time he changed allegiances, the clacton mp madea he changed allegiances, the clacton mp made a big play of asking voters for approval, but not this time.“ i were switching parties, if i were going from ukip to the conservatives, then absolutely i would feel honour bound to call a by—election. would feel honour bound to call a by-election. but the voters voted for a by-election. but the voters voted fora ukip mp by-election. but the voters voted for a ukip mp and now they getting an independent. when i was a conservative and switched to ukip, i was the first member of parliament for 26 years to insist on a by—election. but i'm not changing parties, i'm not switching sides. so what do beagle think of his decision
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in his constituency? bit of a disgrace, he was doing well for ukip. it's down to him at the end of the day, if he wants to do that we can't do a lot about it, can we? he hasn't ruled out returning to the tories but for now he is and it did -- is tories but for now he is and it did —— is an independent who has once again raised the question of ukip's releva nce. again raised the question of ukip's relevance. let's pick up on that point with alex, who is in westminster. where does this leave ukip's future? after their role in securing brexit, you would think the party should be riding high but it is now seeking direction and it has been plagued by bitter infighting for more than a year and much of that has stemmed from different views about the way the party approached that referendum, with nigel farage, the former leader, and his supporters, advocating a hard—line his supporters, advocating a ha rd—line stance his supporters, advocating a hard—line stance on issues like immigration and others wanting a more moderate approach, including douglas carswell. for many, they will see his departure as a chance to move on from some of the division that has bothered ukip so long now,
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frustrating the party and stopping its chances of moving forward. but he left one party gift —— parting gift coming he said the uk'sjob he left one party gift —— parting gift coming he said the uk's job was —— ukip'sjob gift coming he said the uk's job was —— ukip's job was gift coming he said the uk's job was —— ukip'sjob was done now gift coming he said the uk's job was —— ukip's job was done now the public at backed brexit, again raising the question of what the party stands for following leaving the eu. a former head of the metropolitan police has called for changes to security at westminster, following wednesday's attack there. former commissioner lord blair said there should be a review of the arming of officers. two men from birmingham continue to be questioned by police in connection with the attack. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. minutes after the terrorist attack in the precincts of the palace of westminster. on the ground is co nsta ble westminster. on the ground is constable keith palmer, who was stabbed to death. his killer, khaled massoud, has been shot to death by police. meanwhile, armed officers here have left the scene to investigate the gates, where masood's car has mounted the pavement and crashed. meanwhile, the gates were left wide open, anyone
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could have got through. an understandable error according to a former head of scotland yard, who nevertheless leaves that in the future security will have to be more stringent. i'm absolutely certain that they will have to be a review now of the outer soft ring. always behind it is the inner core of armed officers, but pc keith palmer has paid for his life for that soft outer ring and i think his family at least, and everyone else, need reassurance. the bbc has obtained new footage of the police response. a fleet of cars carrying teams of marksmen racing down the embankment. this was shortly after khalid masood's trail of carnage which began on westminster bridge. questions remain unanswered about his route to radicalisation. he was a violent criminal before converting to islam more than a decade ago. one
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of his victims who have arrived is this romanian tourist, who was hurled into the thames. she was in london with her partner, who was also hurt. in remainiac, a friend paid tribute to the emergency services in london. translation: we would especially like to thank the doctors and nurses, all the medical staff, for everything they are doing to help them. today at scotland yard, police officers who were part of the emergency response laid flowers in memory of their colleague, keith palmer, who they tried to help. june kelly, bbc news. the bodies of two teenagers have been found at the bottom of cliffs at saltburn, near middlesborough. cleveland police were called to huntcliff last night. and our correspondent lindsey smith is there now. lindsey, they're still trying to establish what exactly has happened? they are. it was at 7pm last night that cleveland police were called to reports of a casualty here at the
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cliffs behind me. what they discovered on arrival with the coastguard was far worse, the bodies of two devon senior boys on a ledge. they were airlifted to the james cook hospital and we are told by clevela nd cook hospital and we are told by cleveland police that the two families of these teenagers are being supported by specially trained officers today. this part is buried popular with walkers and the police are appealing for anyone who may have been in the area before 7pm last night to get in touch with them and help piece together exactly what happened to these teenagers. thank you. european union leaders have marked the 60th anniversary of the eu's founding treaty with a formal declaration promising to deepen unity. theresa may is not at the ceremony, in rome. the meeting comes as tens of thousands of people protest in london against brexit, just four days before the formal process of leaving the eu is triggered. damian grammaticas reports from rome. this gathering was the eu's answer to brexit. 27 leaders from across europe
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returned to rome, to where the first steps to the creation of the eu were taken, to reaffirm their vows of unity, just as the uk prepares to quit. i do think that the brexit, the exit of britain, is a tragedy. the leaders were marking exactly 60 years to the day from the signing of the treaties of rome, in the very same room where they stood now. then, just six nations met to create an economic partnership. countries who had fought each other putting aside differences to rebuild europe. today, in a vast league expanded union, 27 prime ministers and presidents signed a new rome declaration, pledging to continue to cooperate, even as they faced challenges all around. their countries are emerging from the economic crisis but there are fears about jobs, terrorism, migration and divisions
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amongst the leaders too. europe as a political entity will either be united or will not be at all. only a united europe can be a sovereign europe.
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