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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 26, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 5pm: home secretary amber rudd calls on technology firms such as whatsapp to allow security services access to encrypted messages in terrorism cases. whatsapp says it is corp rating with the authorities. we do want them to recognise, they have a responsibility to engage with government and law enforcement agencies when it is a case of terrorism. detectives say it took just 82 seconds for khalid masood to carry out his murderous assault before he was shot dead. he's believed to have acted alone. they say his motive may never be known. the family of the police officer who was killed, pc keith palmer, has thanked the people who tried to save his life. they say they're grateful he did not die alone. more than 30 people have been injured, two seriously, after a suspected gas explosion on merseyside. in russia, police clamp down on anti—corru ption protests held across the country. 500 are arrested in moscow. main opposition leader alexei navalny is among those detained. at least 18 people have been injured after an escalator malfunctioned at a shopping mall in hong kong.
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also in the next hour: the beginning of the end for mercedes' dominance of formula one? ferrari's sebastian vettel pips lewis hamilton to the chequered flag in the opening race of the season in melbourne — his first win since 2015. good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. the home secretary, amber rudd, has called on technology firms to allow access to encrypted material in terrorism cases. it's understood that the westminster attacker, khalid masood, used the whatsapp messaging service seconds before he killed four people last wednesday, but it's not known what was communicated. nick beake reports. whatsapp has just issued a
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statement. it reads... we are horrified at the attacks carried out in london earlier this week and we are cooperating with law enforcement as they continue their investigations. nick bea ke as they continue their investigations. nick beake has more. an attacker heart of london, and it's chaotic aftermath. scotland ya rd it's chaotic aftermath. scotland yard believe all of this is the work of one man acting alone. but was khalid masood encouraged in some way? key was active on the messaging gap whatsapp on his fog just seconds before he struck. but the police are unable to see the content of these encrypting messages. and, in an interview this morning, the home secretary said social media companies must do more to help the authorities. it is completely unacceptable. there should be no place for terrorists to hide. we need to make sure that organisations like whatsapp, and there are plenty of others like that, don't provide a secret place for terrorists to communicate with each other. it used to be that people would steam open
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envelopes or just listen to be that people would steam open envelopes orjust listen in on phones when they wanted to find out what people were doing, legally, but in this situation we need to make sure that our intelligence services have the ability to get into situations like encrypted whatsapp messages. her message was supported by the man who runs the eu's crime—fighting agency. by the man who runs the eu's crime—fighting agencylj by the man who runs the eu's crime-fighting agency. i agree with her call for changes to be made. the legislative solution is for her and other lawmakers to decide. from my point of view, i agree something has to be done to make sure we can apply a more consistent form of intercepted communication in all parts of the way that terrorists invade our lives. all messages on whatsapp have end—to—end encryption. that means they are scrambled, and if they are intercepted, they cannot be read. whatsapp, which is owned by facebook, says it has a duty to protect the private communications of its i protect the private communications of itsi billion protect the private communications of its i billion users worldwide. here at westminster, the tributes to pc keith palmer and the other
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victims of wednesday's attack, continue to grow. and the metropolitan police have now released more details on what was a brief but deadly result. assault. he mounted the pavement on westminster bridge. 30 seconds later the crashes into the palace of westminster. the first 999 call is then received. half a minute later, masood is shot dead. a rampage lasting 82 seconds from start to finish. but for the police, it is an ongoing and complex investigation. although they have now warned they may never understand why, sued carried out the attack. an attack which has prompted criticism of the prevent strategy, the goverment‘s current policy for combating extremism.” goverment‘s current policy for combating extremism. i think prevent in its current form has huge problems, i think it is broken, the brand is toxic, there are question marks about the training, the trainers, about the level of quality
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of training within schools, about how it is being implemented on the front line. and therefore what i have asked for is a pause, an independent review. any changes will be too late for the victims of the westminster attack, including pc keith palmer. his family have now thanked those who tried to save him, and say they have been overwhelmed by the love and support they have received. nick bea ke, by the love and support they have received. nick beake, bbc news, westminster. merseyside fire and rescue service says it could be several days before people caught up in a suspected gas explosion can go home. dozen of people were hurt in the blast last night. several buildings collapsed. linsey smith reports. the scale of the devastation shows just how powerful the explosion was. 0ne building, housing three businesses, totally destroyed. this is what it looked like before last night. the blast was heard up to six miles away. the sound of the building blowing up was captured by a car's dashboard camera. explosion. what was that?!
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ijust i just heard this ijust heard this loud bang, and everything flew past me. i felt things hitting my leg. glass flew within inches, masonry flying past me. two people were taken to a trauma unit in liverpool with serious injuries. 32 others were treated at hospitals in wirral and chester. there is a multitude of injuries that have happened but the two patients that have gone through to the major trauma unit at aintree, they have significant injuries. the emergency services won't speculate on the cause of the blast, but a number of local people had said they smelt gas yesterday, and on friday, national grid engineers were on the scene. this incident is likely to be protracted, this is likely to last several days, very significant damage as you can tell. so it will be some time before people will be allowed back into their homes. some people whose homes had to be evacuated spent the night in a local church.
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nearby roads are likely to be closed for some time. earlier, i spoke to linsey smith, and i asked her how relieved people are that the dance centre was not full of people at the time of the explosion. we have heard how in that dance centre just an hour before it was filled with children. there is a lot of relief in this area. obviously people are still in hospital, two people are still in hospital, two people are still in hospital, two people are seriously injured. but there is a lot of feeling here that it could have been far, far worse. the police and fire services and people from the national grid are here today investigating exactly how this happened. the building that was destroyed, there were three businesses contained within that building. it is not known yet which of those buildings the explosion actually happened within. and until that investigation concludes, the clean—up here caunt really progress.
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and as you saw from the pictures, some people have told... been told it will be a police 2a hours before they are back in their homes. but looking at some of those properties, some of them the front has been com pletely some of them the front has been completely blown off. you can speculate quite safely that it would be just 2a hours, it will be many days and weeks before they can go back home. presumably a lot of interest in the area of reports that the gas board had actually been called out in the last few days to reports of some kind of leak. we don't know if it's connected, but people must be speculating about that quite widely? yes, we haven't had that verified yet but a lot of local people said that they smelt gas on friday and saturday. and that's why this investigation is taking place and why it's very important to establish exactly what happened. can you tell us finally what the latest is on the casualties? well, all we know at the moment is that there are two seriously injured casualties who are
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still in hospital, and many more people who were taken to hospital, some of them by ambulance, some of them made their own way there last night, some of them have already gone home. the two that were seriously injured are now still in hospital. lindsey smith talking to mea hospital. lindsey smith talking to me a little earlier. in the united states, police in ohio say one person was killed and 16 others injured when at least two men opened fire in a nightclub in cincinnati. they have named a victim as a 27—year—old. i6 they have named a victim as a 27—year—old. 16 others were injured. they said hundreds of people were in the club at the time and described it has a horrific situation. it is not clear what prompted the shooting. the police health and update a short while ago. last night, at about 1:30am, our emergency communications section began receiving calls that shots had been fired with injuries inside the cameo nightclub, which is located at
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4601 cannot ave in district two. as the night unfolded, and the initial investigation began, it was determined that the bar was very crowded. approximately a couple of hundred people. and what we know at this point in the investigation, several local men got into some type of dispute inside the bar. and it escalated into shots being fired. from several individuals. as a result, there were 16 people that sustained gunshot injuries. one of which is deceased. a total of 15 others that were injured. one in the extremely critical condition in addition to that. several others more serious injuries and some very
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minorand more serious injuries and some very minor and were released. the individual that was deceased at the scene has been identified and his family has been notified. mrobryan spikes, 27 mr obryan spikes, 27 years of age obryan america cincinnati gave his reaction. as has already been reported, there is no evidence —— the mayor of cincinnati. there is no evidence that this was a terrorist attack like in miami and many other places. however, to the victims, what difference does it make? they have been terrorised by gun violence, innocent victims. it's
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important for everyone to understand that... people were just going to have a good time and ended up getting shot. that is totally unacceptable. this is a country where you should be able to go out and have a good time and not be in fear of getting shot. and so this is a tragedy that has struck other communities and now it has struck cincinnati. i'm confident that while oui’ cincinnati. i'm confident that while our hearts are broken, our spirit is not. we will work together as a community for the victims and solve this crime. that is john cranleigh, the mayor of cincinnati, talking about the shooting overnight at the nightclub in which one person died and i6 nightclub in which one person died and 16 people were hospitalised. let's ta ke and 16 people were hospitalised. let's take a look at some breaking news that has just come into us at
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bbc news. that is a report from the united nations. it says six aid workers have been killed in an ambush in south sudan. the attack, which took place yesterday, it resulted in the deaths of aid workers, it is not clear whether they were working directly for the united nations or for one of the non—government organisations that we re non—government organisations that were working in south sudan. that obviously has been an extremely dangerous area for trying to operate in. many parts of the country, it has been impossible to get aid to them. we are told that famine is coming, in part as a result of the war between sudan and south sudan, which was granted its independence just a very short time ago. just to confirm the report from the united nations, six aid workers killed in an ambush in south sudan. we will bring you more on that story as we get it. in the meantime, let's take a look at a round—up of some of the other stories making the news this hour. cleveland police have released the names of two boys whose bodies were found at the foot of cliffs at saltburn—by—the—sea on friday night.
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harry watson and alex yeoman, from east cleveland, were both aged 17. police are still trying to establish what happened, but are not treating their deaths as suspicious. divers from the irish navy have recovered a body from the wreckage of the coastguard helicopter which crashed earlier this month. a postmortem examination will be carried out later today. the aircraft was providing cover for another coastguard helicopter on a mission when contact was lost. three people are being treated in hospital after a car mounted four teenagers have been arrested. the police say the incident in islington is not terror—related. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says he will oppose plans to give ministers the power to change some aspects of the law after brexit without pa rliament‘s prior approval. he was speaking ahead of the publication on thursday of government plans for what will happen after britain leaves the eu in two years' time. we need total accountability at every stage of this whole brexit negotiation.
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i understand there is going to be about 12 ancillary related bills. we're not going to sit there and hand over power to this government to override parliament, override democracy and just set down a series of diktats for what is going to happen in the future. we'd be failing in our duty as democratically—elected parliamentarians if we did that. jeremy corbyn. the government will announce proposals to repeal the 1972 act that brought the uk into what was then the european economic community. earlier, our political correspondent, mark lobel told me what the government hoped to achieve. they want to transition the law into british law without any black holes being left. the government wants to give ministers assure power so they can tidy up a lot of the stuff they say would be necessary —— special powers. if you were advertising a public service contract, at the moment you have to put it into an eu
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publication. butjeremy moment you have to put it into an eu publication. but jeremy corbyn moment you have to put it into an eu publication. butjeremy corbyn has come out and said he is opposed to any special powers, anything that would take power away from parliament, as we just heard would take power away from parliament, as wejust heard him that, properly scrutinising this bill. we had a response from the leader of the house of commons, david lidington, this morning stop for it would be a limited and defined power, not to act like a dictator but by secondary legislation, and the scope, the scope, the definition of those powers and when they can be used, in what circumstances, is something that parliament will have to approve in voting for the bill itself. the special powers will have to be voted for empowerment, the timing and definition and all of the rest of it. by coming into force, they will becoming through parliament. the sovereignty essentially lies with them there. the actual bill itself will not be voted on until the spring. there will be plenty of time for the two parties to thrash out their positions on this. this will bea their positions on this. this will be a complicated process. in a0
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yea rs be a complicated process. in a0 years presumably so much of the legislation that has been introduced since 1972 as kind of had to incorporate elements of european, eu wide law. and somehow we have got to ta ke wide law. and somehow we have got to take out the bits we don't want to hold onto the bits we do. it sounds like in some cases searching for a needle in a haystack. therein lies the tension. you have got so much to do injust two the tension. you have got so much to do in just two years if the government sticks to its timetable to avoid those black holes. the government wants to kick the can down the road and bring everything in and it wants to do it in what it saysis in and it wants to do it in what it says is a very efficient way by giving ministers powers. but labour is nervous behind—the—scenes about what the government bike do with these powers and if changes that would change the meaning is of laws, not just the tidying would change the meaning is of laws, notjust the tidying up exercise we re notjust the tidying up exercise were to take place. the former ukip leader nigel farage says douglas carswell — who quit the party yesterday — should trigger a by—election to test whether voters in his clacton consituency approve of his move. the two men have long been at odds over the future of ukip. mr farage told reeta chakrabarti that his rival had caused "endless division" in the party.
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cla cton, cla cto n, of clacton, of all cla cton, of all 650 clacton, of all 650 seats in parliament, is demographically the numberi euro parliament, is demographically the number i euro sceptics parliament, is demographically the numberi euro sceptics eat in this country. and i would say this — a lot of people who voted carswell into parliament didn't vote just because of him, they voted ukip. he has now given up the label on which he was elected. this is the man who led the charge in parliament for real recall, to give people a mechanism whereby if 20% of the constituency voted to have a bye election, they should legally be able to have one. so what we will do is we will take him at his word and we will now write to every house in cla cton we will now write to every house in clacton and ask them, do you want a by—election or not? is more than 20% say that they do, we will then find out just how honourable say that they do, we will then find outjust how honourable mr carswell is. that was nigel farage beating to reeta chakra barti. the headlines on bbc news: home secretary, amber rudd, calls on technology firms such as whatsapp to allow
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security services access to encrypted messages in terrorism cases. whatsapp says it is cooperating with the authorities. more than 30 people have been injured — two seriously — after a suspected gas explosion on merseyside in russia, police clamp down on anti—corruption protests held across the country — 500 are arrested in moscow, main opposition leader alexei navalny is among those detained. let's yet more on that story of russians on the streets of moscow and other cities this afternoon. that is as a result of the protests which have been organised against corruption. protesters want prime minister dmitry medvedev to resign over the negotiations. police in moscow said 500 people have been detained. opposition activist alexei navalny is among those detained. a short while ago i spoke to steve rosberg when he was at the heart of
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the protests in moscow and he gave us the protests in moscow and he gave us this update. here on pushkin square in the centre of moscow, the crowd is taunting, we are russian. there are several thousand people who have gathered here. —— the crowd is charging. the authorities say this anti—corruption is charging. the authorities say this anti—corru ption protests is charging. the authorities say this anti—corruption protests is illegal, but people have come onto the streets anyway, and there is a heavy police presence. one man tried to unfurlan heavy police presence. one man tried to unfurl an poster on the statue. police pulled him down and people we re police pulled him down and people were shouting, disgrace, let him go. the level of corruption is too high in russia right now. every citizen understands it. it is hard to live ina understands it. it is hard to live in a corruption atmosphere. i have children, grandchildren. and they... i can't breathe in this. so now the riot police have moved on to pushkin square. the police have been telling the crowd all afternoon that this is
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an illegal meeting. it looks as if the riot police intend to clear the whole square now of protesters. meanwhile, we hear that the opposition activist and anti—corruption campaigner alexei navalny has been detained by police just up the road from here. he is man who called people onto the streets, not only in moscow today, but across russia. variety police have now cleared protesters from pushkin square. —— the riot police. they are lying down the riot police. they are lying down the main street in the russian capital. people came out in moscow today to protest against corruption in the russian government. but this sends a message to the crowd that fighting corruption is not a priority for the russian authorities. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. the iraqi military has denied that hundreds of civilians were killed in air strikes by us—led coalition forces on mosul earlier this month.
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instead it blamed booby—traps set by so—called islamic state. it comes as iraqi forces are continuing their offensive to drive is fighters out of western mosul. iraqi forces are reporting they have captured the badoush dam. this is also in the west. jeremy bowen is near the front line. is helicopter attacks have been going on steadily throughout the day —— the use helicopter attacks. earlier there were some suggestions that the iraqis had paused their offensive because of the air strike that killed so many civilians. but the evidence here is that is not happening. in fact, evidence here is that is not happening. infact, the evidence here is that is not happening. in fact, the tempo of the operation has increased. as well as these helicopters, i have seen them using some quite primitive,
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inaccurate weapons. now, that may help when it comes to killing the fighters from the jihadist group islamic state, but if they are inaccurate, they may well also kill more civilians, if civilians or in the area which is being attacked. and, long—term, politically, that is difficult, because if this country is going to have any real hope of unifying eventually, then everybody‘s lives... everybody needs to feel that their lives are worth saving, that their survival matters. it could be that sunni muslims who are there trapped with islamic state feel that the authorities don't really care feel that the authorities don't really ca re if feel that the authorities don't really care if they get killed. and if that happens, that's pretty disastrous for the future. that is oui’ disastrous for the future. that is our middle east editorjeremy bowen. in mosul, reporting from the front line in the west of the city. the taxi firm uber has suspended its pilot programme for driverless cars after an early model crashed on a
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roadway in arizona. the accident is the latest in a series of crashes involving autonomous vehicles. it's not yet known whether the car was in self—driving mode at the time of the crash. uber said it caused no serious injuries. in hong kong, at least 18 people have been injured, one seriously, after an apparent escalator malfunction in a shopping centre. take a look at these pictures. the escalator was packed with shoppers when it apparently went in to reverse at high speed and dozens of people were thrown to the bottom. one man received a serious head injury. a spokesperson for the langham place centre said the escalator had passed a recent safety inspection. in germany, polls have closed in the state of saarland's recent election. an early indicator is that mrs merkel‘s party has strengthened its position. the first dinosaurs
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may have originated in the northern hemisphere, and could even have lived in the area that's now britain. that's just one of the findings in a new study published in thejournal nature, which suggests that theories about dinosaurs that have been around for over 100 years could actually be wrong. our science correspondent pallab ghosh has more. fossilised bones that capture a time that dinosaurs ruled the earth, more than 65 million years ago. by measuring how they changed over the years, researchers worked out how they are related, and how they evolved. but a new assessment published in thejournal nature, which suggests that that theory which has lasted i30 years, maybe wrong. the current theory is that there are two main groups of dinosaurs. one, which includes the stegosaurus, and another, which has two branches. the vegetarians such as the brontosaurus,
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and the meat eaters, such as the savage tyrannosaurus rex. it turns out that the meat eaters are in the wrong group, and should be with the stegosaurus. it also shows that the very first dinosaurs did not originate in what is now east africa, but much further north, possibly in an area which is now britain. we've taken dinosaur origins, which originally were thought to be southern hemisphere, and brought them into the northern hemisphere, and it could well be that dinosaurs originated even within britain itself. what we have here is a key specimen in this analysis. and here is the fossil that led to this shock finding, a primitive dinosaur the size of a cat was found in lossiemouth in scotland. it was an animal like this that led to the creatures that dominated this planet for 165 million years. the new family tree will mean that we will have to rethink our ideas of how they evolved and spread across the globe. this is a fairly major change to our knowledge of dinosaurs.
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we have had a system in place for 130 years, we thought we understood the relationships of these big groups of animals, but it may be that we have a major rearrangement of the dinosaur tree. this re—evaluation of fossils challenges a theory that has been accepted since the victorian era, and so will be controversial. but if it is proved to be correct, textbooks on the subject will have to be rewritten. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather prospects with john hammond. let's take a look at the weather prospects withjohn hammond. hello, i hope you have managed to enjoy some sunshine at some stage during this weekend. there has been plenty of it on offer courtesy of the area of it on offer courtesy of the area of high pressure keeping the rain bearing weather front at bay. you can see how that translates on the scuttle a picture — clear skies, many of us have had sunshine from dawn until dusk —— the satellite
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picture. temperatures have responded, especially in the highlands of scotland, where we got into the high teens, one or two places nudging 20 degrees, the warmest day of the year so far. this evening soon calls down. it chilly night and we will see some changes. areas of low cloud and missed in central and eastern parts. in them 01’ central and eastern parts. in them or oral parts, especially the north—western areas, it will get down to below freezing —— in the mole or oral areas. a lot more sunshine across scotland, cloud from northern ireland and certainly some more cloud across east of the pennines. areas of fog through parts of the midlands, east wales even. further south, patches of cloud. it will soon start to warm up again. most parts of the uk are also settling into another fine and sunny day. however, this low cloud across central and eastern areas will be quite persistent in some parts of
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north—east england, may be creeping up north—east england, may be creeping up under the south—eastern coast of scotland, it could stay grey. in the sunshine, it is much warmer, 17 or 18 degrees in the london area for example. a dry start of the week but it doesn't stay that way. rain spreading from the west, although even then, between the wetter periods, we will say some warm sunshine. low—pressure winding itself up out in the atlantic, sending france in our direction, the first will arrive in south—western areas through tuesday. —— sending weather fronts. hit and areas through tuesday. —— sending weatherfronts. hit and miss rain at no greater amounts, but a change in the weather nonetheless, particularly across southern and western areas. further north it is staying dry and chilly across the coast. the front will be followed by another one, this one looks active and lively. that means potentially heavier and more persistent rain, particularly across western parts of the uk. some of that. to spread eastwards later on in the week. hello.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 5.30pm: the home secretary has called on social media providers to end the encryption of messaging services. her comments come after it was revealed khalid masood used whatsapp messaging just before launching his attack in westminster last week. scotland yard has confirmed the attack carried out by masood took just 82 seconds. detectives say his motive may never be known. they believe he acted alone, despite one of the 11 people arrested in connection with the attack remaining in custody. more than 30 people have been injured, two seriously, after a suspected gas explosion in merseyside. several buildings collapsed and others were damaged in the incident last night. it could be several days before people can return to their homes. more than 700 people are arrested in moscow as police clamp down on anti—corru ption protests held across the country. among those detained is the main opposition leader alexei navalny. two teenagers whose bodies were found at cliffs at saltburn in north yorkshire on friday have been named as alex yeoman and harry watson, who were both aged 17. detectives are investigating the circumstances surrounding their deaths.
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on this weeks meet the author i will talking to kate hamer. england, ireland and wales are all in action tonight. this much got underway under an hour ago and jermaine defoe scored the opening goal, side fitting it in after 21 minutes. a brilliant goal. 15
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minutes. a brilliant goal. 15 minutes left until half—time and it remains1—0. minutes left until half—time and it remains 1—0. you minutes left until half—time and it remains1—0. you can minutes left until half—time and it remains 1—0. you can listen on radio five live right now. arguably more at stake for scotland tonight. in the same group as england but are fair. if they do not beat slovenia their hopes of qualifying week ‘s very slim indeed. the game kicks up at 7:a5pm. sometimes it is easy for a manager to say this is what we have to do. if we draw, when or always, it depends. we have to win. what you don't have to do is win in the first ten minutes. you never know in big games when your opportunity comes along. northern ireland are well—placed heading into the match with norway. the second in their group, five points behind germany and on course to clear the play—off last. we have an opportunity to put seven points between us and norway and if we get to ten points, at that stage in the campaign, you believe it is possible to put yourself in a position to qualify and we have
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qualified for france, we've been through that, we know what is required to get there now. sebastian prodl has won the first formula 1 grand prix of the season. it is his first win since the singapore gp in september 20 15. more evidence of mercedes porto domination being over after the introduction of faster ca rs. after the introduction of faster cars. lewis hamilton started on pole but sebastian prodl had the advantage in peace and tyre wear. lewis hamilton balls new team—mate came third. tennis and the british number one eased past our opponent in straight sets in the third round at the miami open. she did all three sets to win in the previous round, but the world number 11 were sharper in this much. she got the first break and went on to ta ke
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she got the first break and went on to take the first set 6—a, against her opponent, a6 world ranking players —— places be all her. she was in no mood to hang around, claiming the set 6— love. the car just over an hour to dispatch our opponent. —— it took her. two games in the rugby union premiership today and wasps have moved five points clear at the top after a0 points to 33 at worcester. they had been behind after a frantic end to end first half. kristian wade scored just before the interval to level the match at half—time. but the game finally poised, worcester we re the game finally poised, worcester were reduced to 1a. the winner was shown a red card for taking out another player ended the era. elsewhere, saracens are still in
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with a chance of a top two finish in the league thanks to a win over bath. scotland winger scored one of the first three first—half tries. five more followed in the second half. saracens stay third in the table now, just a single point behind second placed exeter. world number one dustin johnson is behind second placed exeter. world number one dustinjohnson is leading against his japanese opponent. the american isjust against his japanese opponent. the american is just one against his japanese opponent. the american isjust one up against his japanese opponent. the american is just one up after 11 holes and consistently sinking long putts. britain putts adam yates is meant placed. he claimed his second title in this event crossing the line first. he won byjust over a minute
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and the seven stage competition. chris crum had to settle for 30th place. can you have dominated at the world cross country champion chips in the ugandan capital. in the men's race, adding to his world half marathon title, won gold. for a long comet would like it be denied by the home favourite. you can see there, he had an11 favourite. you can see there, he had an 11 second with going into the final lap of the course before breaking down with exhaustion. in the end, he needed all the encouragement you could getjust finished the finish line. the women's race was won in a kenyan 1-2- women's race was won in a kenyan 1—2— three finish. more in the next hour. let's get more now on calls from the home secretary amber rudd for changes to be made to the way communications are intercepted on social media. whatsapp says it is cooperating.
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earlier, my colleague reeta chakra barti spoke to the director of europol, rob wainright, who echoed ms rudd's warnings about online extremism. well, we are actively supporting that investigation, reeta, the details of which i cannot share today, but to give you some context, it is one of about 80 counterterrorism cases across europe that europol has supported this year, sharing thousands of intelligence messages across the counterterrorist community in europe, using our means to monitor, report on the close of terrorist financing, terrorist use of firearms, and also to monitor the way in which the internet, of course, is being used to spread this ugly propaganda. 80 cases across europe? i mean, that is a lot of cases, isn't it? what are the difficulties facing police forces as they struggle to deal with this threat?
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well, i think the scale is a real challenge for us, we have thousands of radicalised individuals working across a very dispersed network, some of which, like we saw in the attack on the berlin christmas market last year, the attack in nice last summer in france, and what appear to be the case in westminster, these people are on the fringes of that radicalised immunity. —— of that radicalised community. not much intelligence to indicate that they are about to carry out an attack like this, and that makes the job of the security services and the police exceptionally difficult to get right. having said that, you know, i think we are seeing almost all of the attacks now being stopped, this was the 1ath attempt in the last three or four years, and the only one, until now, to get through, but it is indeed a highly challenging scene that is faced by the police. you referred a little bit earlier to social media, and you will be aware
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that the british home secretary, amber rudd, has called on technology firms such as whatsapp to help security services, to allow them access to encrypted information in cases like these. what is your reaction to that? well, i think it is a reasonable call by the home secretary, what we are seeing across the hundreds of cases that europol has been supporting is that encryption is becoming more and more of a feature of those cases, more and more of a means by which terrorists are attempting to communicate in a secure way. and a really significant challenge for the police to get beyond that. at the heart of it, reeta, is this stark inconsistency that the police have the means by which to carry out lawful interception of telephone calls, but not a similar means that those communications if they appear through a social—media platform, and that doesn't seem right. there is an inconsistency that has not yet been fixed by the right legislation or the right kind of interaction between government
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and technology partners. more now on the suspected gas explosion near birkhenhead on the wirral. adam dingwall was driving in the area at the time and told me what he saw. we headed over that way because i thought, well, i first we headed over that way because i thought, well, ifirst you do so i may be able to do something to help. as we pulled up, wejust saw may be able to do something to help. as we pulled up, we just saw bricks and class and rubble everywhere. so
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i went running over to see if i could do anything. and a police officer stopped me. i presume he was officer stopped me. i presume he was off duty, she certainly wasn't in uniform. and he asked me to run into some of the house is that we are nearby and had been hacked, to see if there was anybody inside. and what did you think? thankfully, i didn't find what did you think? thankfully, i didn'tfind any what did you think? thankfully, i didn't find any people. there was nobody in them. all of the house is, the front doors were completely on an and so i could just easily walk straight in and inside each of them it was just an absolute mess. lots of rubble, alas, everywhere. i couldn't really see a lot because it was dark and i didn't want to return any lights on, what with there being this really strong smell of gas.
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but, looking round, it wasjust an absolute mess in each of them. adam, as we are talking to you we are looking at pictures of the scene last night. it is the scene of utter devastation. the explosion was obviously extremely powerful. yes, definitely. rubble and bricks had travelled the fear old distance and i would say the houses op. cit. that i went i would say the houses op. cit. that iwent in, i would say the houses op. cit. that i went in, all the windows were one end and the doors had come off the hinges. you sound slightly shaken. i am, to be honest. it was quite amiably expedience, but at the time, vaginal and got pumping and ijust went in to see what i could do. —— adrenaline got pumping. and you address has been made today
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in birmingham by the met counter terrorism command. the address —— and arrest to police at an address in birmingham and a 30—year—old man was arrested today are under suspicion of preparing for terrorist attacks. also still in custody as if 58—year—old man arrested back on the 23rd of march under suspicion of preparation of terrorist acts. until now, only one had been in custody by police confirmed they had made another arrest, this time in birmingham, of the 30—year—old man. more on that if we get it in the course of this evening. carrie lam has been elected as hong kong's new leader, the first woman to hold the top job. she's thought to be china's preferred candidate, so it is no surprise that she won. hong kong selects its leader by a specially chosen committee, rather than giving everybody a vote. juliana liu reports. the winning a moment. she is the
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first woman chief executive elect in hong kong. she did not get to soak up hong kong. she did not get to soak up the applause for long. minutes later, a group of activists protested against her when. they carried you want it was, a symbol of the 20 1ath carried you want it was, a symbol of the 201ath democracy carried you want it was, a symbol of the 20 1ath democracy protests and chanted, i want universal suffrage, as she stood on stage. the former civil servant was undaunted. my priority will be to seal the divide and to ease the frustration is and so unite our society. there was little sign of unity outside the voting venue. she was elected, not by the people, but by an election committee, large and loyal to beijing. these activists are protesting against the entire election process, calling it a sham. she has promised to shield divisions in society, but, given the lack of
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widespread public support for her, that could be very different to achieve. we are here to protest against hong kong's chief executive election. as we all know, hong kong people do not have the right to choose their own chief executive. i do not have any hope that she will solve hong kong's social issues. the chief executive elect has become an increasingly divisive figure. despite her promise to unite the city, some are a wording of the government faces when she takes office. fifa's former medical director has spoken out about the abuse of legal painkillers by elite footballers, something he says could have "life—threatening implications". jiri dvorak, claims around half of players involved in the past three world cups regularly took non—steroidal, anti—inflammatory drugs. he spoke to david ornstein as part of the bbc‘s state of sport week it's known as the beautiful
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game, but the pursuit of glory can be ugly. when injury occurs, there is pressure to play through the pain, and now a leading doctor says the use of legal medication is one of football's biggest problems. if you cover up symptoms over years or decades, this is general in medicine, if you have an underlying pathology and you constantly cover up with medication, the underlying pathology or disease is not cured. dr dvorak warned about this in 2012, when he found almost a0% of players at the 2010 world cup took painkillers before every game. football's governing body, fifa, say they are providing education on the well—being of athletes, while the professional footballers' association insist it is not a major issue in the english game. but dr dvorak argues that lessons have not been learned. when i put on the weight,
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on the scale, the doping and the abuse of medication, the abuse of medication is much more alarming. wake up and be careful. it's not as harmless as you think, that you can take it like cookies. it has side—effects. well, this isn't about banned or hard—to—come—by substances or supplements, it's about everyday over—the—counter anti—inflammatories like ibuprofen, and the question is whether and to what extent these are being misused by footballers. it's widespread in football. always has been, always will be. as a player, you first ask, is it is legal? if it is, it's fine. is it going to help you get through a game? yes. generally without too many questions, without too much concern, you'll take what you've been offered. the overuse of medication feeds into the wider topic of athlete welfare, an issue the government is taking
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seriously with a duty of care review due to be published shortly. david ornstein, bbc news. the headlines: more than 700 people are arrested in moscow as police clamp down on anti—corruption protests held across the country. among those detained is the main opposition leader alexei navalny. now it's time for meet the author. who doesn't enjoy a story that delves into the supernatural,
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that touches our deepest feelings and fears? kate hamer‘s new novel, the doll funeral, unfolds in a dark mysterious place when a young girl, ruby, find some escape from a nightmare childhood at home and a strange kind of solace in the presence of ghosts. a story where the two strands in an adopted child's life are bound together in another world, where we can't be sure what's real and what's imagined. welcome. i read somewhere, kate, that you were moved, as a child, by grimm's fairy tales, and, having read the doll funeral, i'm not surprised, because so much of that spirit here. definitely, yes.
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i had a very old edition of grimm's fairy tales, as well. i think it was from around the turn of the 19th, 20th century, so they definitely weren't sugar—coated in that version, it was, in some ways, i feel the original fairy tales are crime stories, to a great extent and so i was steeped in that from quite an early age. they are horror stories, in a way. about lost children and children being eaten and fierce wolves coming out of the forest and witches and so on, but our imaginations are stirred by these things, aren't they? yes, i think definitely, because they speak to fundamental truths and fundamental fears within ourselves, so, yes, that's definitely something i've never shaken off and particularly in this book.
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it begins with the revelation to a young girl, she's 13, that she was adopted and that she is not the natural child of the parents she is living with. and to that extent, she is confronted by the unknown right at the beginning. definitely. ruby finds out on her 13th birthday that she was adopted and her reaction to this is that she runs out into the back garden. she is delighted. she is delighted and sings forjoy. she just looks to the sky and starts singing forjoy. but there is a reason for this, because her life hasbeen such a brutish one up until that point. so that was a very strong central image, a starting image, for the book, i think. of a girljust bursting out the back door, almost like a camera was following behind here and it was kind of the jumping off point for the whole book. and what she then does is to immerse yourself, in a way,
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in an alternative world. she is in the darkness of the forest of dean, dark in every sense, physically dark place, you can get lost in, but also because there is evidence of the supernatural, there are strange people living different lives. it's in that sense a journey into the unknown. very much so and i think fairy tales, again, come in here because a lot of them, i mean, the forest is so important in the details. it's about maybe straying off the path and goodness and what is going to happen if you do. it could be dangerous but it is often people looking for alternatives as well, to the well trodden path, i think. and that is definitely what ruby does in the forest. above all, it's a dark place. and there is a very, very strong supernatural element
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in this story which i won't go into in detail because it would spoil it for the reader. but she finds for herself the division between the real—world and a past world, the world of our imagination, is a division that she can easily get rid of. yes, she slips between them quite comfortably. i think it's a lot to do with, the book is about how the past, kind of enacts its presence on the present and it's kind of, can you break away from that? the past resonates on the present and ruby is trying to escape that. she goes through trials. trials of fire and ice and all sorts of things and it's the question, can we escape our past? can we make a new future with different people and a different outcome. can we find that alternative path in the forest? because as this story unfolds, she is at a very important part
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of her life, physically, 13, going into adolescence, all sorts of things are happening to her, physical and mental, and it's a story that in our own ways we all know. i think it's just an interesting age, when you are on the threshold and the cusp of so many things. it's an age when i think things happen for you and also can go badly wrong quite easily. the girl in the red coat was a book that built a huge reputation for you and, like that book, this book is written in a way that grabs you from the first page. are you one of those writers who thinks that really, in the end, everything is in the first four or five paragraphs? that is really interesting. i'll tell you how i write. i tend to write the beginning, maybe the first two chapters, something like that, and then very quickly move on and write the last paragraph, definitely the last line, which doesn't seem to change, so it is both of those.
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that suggests they are related. yes. that's very interesting because there are people that head off into the wild, blue yonder and say, will this idea take me? you're not one of those. no. i think, point a to b, there can be various ways that things happen there. and things develop. i mean, did the supernatural element grow in your hands once you got your teeth into the story? yes, i think it did. there's a little character called shadow in it and i think, quite a tricksy, dark little character. an imp, really. he's an imp, yes. his presence was lighter in the first draft but i found, and this is what i find on many things, it's the characters that tug on your sleeve. he was definitely one of those.
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do you find yourself susceptible to the idea that there are occurrences that are unexplainable? i've never experienced it. there are people who i trust, rational, sane people, who believe that they have, so i just think it's fascinating. i believe the really supernatural thing is the mind, fundamentally. and actually the mind can do anything. and it plays tricks that we can't understand. yes, exactly. but, in the end, to get back to where we began, this takes us into the world of the fairy tale because that kind of story, the gothic gloom and excitement of some of those old fairy tales passed down the generations which turn up in all sorts of cultures and different formats, neverfades, does it? no, i think there's something about these folktales and these old stories thatjust goes very, very deep. and i bet you if you picked up that battered old copy of your grimm's fairy tales,
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you would know before you turned each page what the picture was going to be on the next one. that is so true. i still have it and those illustrations are so familiar and absolutely. i know exactly what you mean. kate hamer, thank you very much. thank you very much. yesterday was the warmest day of the year until today. you can see that most of us hapless guys from dawn until dusk and the death on the stage i and the we head into the evening as well. low cloud moving into central and eastern areas. it will be cold and in some real sports, particularly across the more westerly gears, they will get down
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to freezing. the overcast conditions prevail across parts of north—east england missing —— nudging into south—eastern and parts of scotland. we will settle into a fine day with plenty of sunshine and warmth again. we will lose that please across southern counties as well. i try the week ahead, enjoy it. in. in spreading in but still some sunshine. —— remit spreading in. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 6pm: home secretary amber rudd calls on technology firms such as whatsapp to allow security services access to encrypted messages in terrorism cases. whatsapp says it is cooperating with the authorities. we do want them to recognise,
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they have a responsibility to engage with government and law enforcement agencies when it is a case of terrorism. detectives say it took just 82 seconds for khalid masood to carry out his murderous assault before he was shot dead. he's believed to have acted alone. they say his motive may never be known. the family of the police officer who was killed, pc keith palmer, has thanked the people who tried to save his life. they say they're grateful he did not die alone. more than 30 people have been injured, two seriously, after a suspected gas explosion on merseyside. in russia, police clamp down on anti—corru ption protests
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