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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 27, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. very good morning. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. face to face: theresa may and nicola sturgeon meet for talks as the scottish parliament prepares to back a second vote on independence. the prime minister will urge unity, ahead of brexit, describing a united uk as an "unstoppable force". good morning everyone. it's monday 27th march. also this morning, bt is hit with a record fine of £42 million, because of delays in installing high—speed business lines. buildings were destroyed. locals had described seeing brix reading down from the sky. we will have all the latest on saturday night's explosion. good morning. we are on the road this morning. we are on the
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a50, talking about article 50. we will be looking to find out what businesses and workers think. in sport, england, scotland and northern ireland all win in world cup qualifying. jermain defoe returns from nearly four years out with a goal as england beat lithuania 2—0. and there's a new quid on the block. this is it. the new pound coin and tomorrow it enters circulation. we'll be finding out why not everyone is happy at its introduction. it feels lighter. and the weather's been so lovely we've sent matt out and about. we have had some problems adjudications, but he will whether slater. —— problems with communications, but he will be with us communications, but he will be with us later. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will meet scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon later
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today for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. the visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. catriona renton reports. brexit was top of the agenda when these two leaders met for the first time, shortly after theresa may took office. later today, they are said to meet again. but first, the prime minister will meet at the office for national development. on wednesday, she will trigger article 50, triggering the uk's exit from the eu. but 52% of scots voted to remain. nicola sturgeon has therefore called for a second referendum on scottish independence. not only is there no uk wide agreement on the week ahead, but the uk government has not moved even an inch in pursuit of compromise and agreement. but theresa may has said
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not now. we should be working together to get that right deal for scotla nd together to get that right deal for scotland and the uk. so i say that is myjob as the prime minister. so for that reason, i seated the snp that now was not the time. lastly, the scottish parliament started debating whether to seek permission from the uk government for a second independence referendum. it was halted due to the terror attack on london. it is expected that with the backing of the scottish green party, the first minister will achieve a majority in favour. a representative for the scottish government says they understand the uk government wa nts to they understand the uk government wants to discuss article 50, and they hope there are areas that the minister can provide answers. —— prime minister can. bt has been fined a record £a2 million by the communications regulator ofcom.
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it found bt‘s openreach division had cut compensation payments to other telecoms providers for delays in installing high speed business lines. the company said it "apologised wholeheartedly" for the mistakes. whether at home or at work, cable switch connectors are still provided by bt. some carry large amounts of data at great speed. but there are cases where the company has been slow to deliver the lines. and the uk relies on the bigger cables which make up the network, as they support mobile and broadband operators, as well as big businesses, schools, and hospitals. where bt ousted meet deadlines for ever net services, they need to pay compensation to the likes of vodafone and talk talk. but they have been using a clause in the contract they have been using a clause in the co ntra ct to they have been using a clause in the contract to reduce payments. now, bt has been hit with a huge extra bill. any record fine, ofcom has ordered them to pay £a2 million on penalties. the scale of the fine is said to reflect the importance of bt
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to other companies, who offers services such as broadband. bt has apologised saying that it should never have happened and measures have been put in place to stop it happening again. at an addition to define, it will need to find the additional £300 million owed to companies in compensation. it has emerged that people living close to the site of a major explosion on merseyside reported smelling gas at least 2a hours before it happened. the national grid has confirmed that reports of lea ks were probed, before the suspected gas blast in wirral on saturday. clare fallon is live in bebington, close to where the explosion happened. clare, are the emergency services still on the scene? we can see behind your emergency services are still on the scene. -- behind you that. yes, this is as close as we can get to the site of the explosion this morning. emergency workers are still here this morning. people who are here on saturday night had described how
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they thought that they had been an earthquake or a bomb blast, such was the forced to make force of the explosion. emergency workers have said that it was astonishing that norm was killed, especially bearing in mind that the building was com pletely in mind that the building was completely destroyed in this explosion and that it was a game studio. only hours earlier, it was used for children's dance lesson. a police investigation is now under way. what we do know is that in the hours before the explosion, people had called out engineers from the national grid, saying they could smell gas. we've been told by the national grid that engineers came out and could not find anything amiss. but of course, now, in the light of the explosion, a major investigation under way to try and establish what caused saturday night's blast and so much devastation. thank you very much for the moment. we will have more on
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that later. attempts to end the political stalemate in northern ireland have reached a dead end. unionist parties and sinn fein have until later today to broker a deal but talks have broken down. our ireland correspondent chris page is in belfast for us this morning. chris where does this leave the northern ireland assembley? louise, in northern ireland, negotiations this part and parcel of politics. and usually, the talking is right to the deadline and sometimes beyond. today it is slightly different because sinn fein have decided they will not be putting ministers into the devolved goverment. and that means that there is no prospect a devolved government because normal work. the sticking points, there seemed to be too. firstly, legal recognition of the irish language. and then there is also a long running issue which has proved impossible to resolve, and thatis proved impossible to resolve, and that is the operation of new agencies to investigate killings
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from the troubles. essentially, there are three options. under the law, another election is to be called within a reasonable time period. but i think most of the parties in the public would not. secondly, new legislation could be passed in the house of commons to impose direct rule northern ireland, so impose direct rule northern ireland, so northern ireland would be run by westminster. or, thirdly, the deadline could be extended for more time. the matter what happens, northern ireland is expecting an uncertain political future. the government must do more to reduce the number of cut—price offers on unhealthy food to help curb childhood obesity, according to mps. the health select committee, also calls for rules on junk food advertisements to be made tougher. it argues the government's official obesity plan contains "vague statements" that are "inadequate". but ministers say the strategy is the world's "most ambitious plan on childhood obesity". the number of first—time buyers relying on gifts or loans
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from their parents in order to get on the housing ladder is at an all—time high, according to new research. one in three young people are relying on the so—called "bank of mum and dad" in order to buy their first home. the social mobility commission warns that families on lower incomes are increasingly missing out. a broken braking device may have been to blame for an hong kong escalator suddenly reversing direction and increasing its speed at a shopping centre. wow. at least 18 people were injured. video footage shot by witnesses captured the incident as dozens of passengers lost their balance and tumbled down the escalator. several ambulances rushed to the scene and took the injured to nearby hospitals. that is terrifying. it has one job, doesn't it?
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an american airline has been criticised after two young girls were stopped from boarding a flight because they were wearing leggings. the incident at the airport was seen by another passenger, who took to social media to tweet united airlines. the airline responded by saying they had the right to refuse passengers for not following their dress code. they later clarified that the girls were not on a general ticket and had to meet certain standards. but there's been criticism with some celebrities wading in, some people have called the decision sexist. sarah silverman said she would not be flying with the airline. and this was one model's responds, there. i think this is leggings—gate.” was one model's responds, there. i think this is leggings-gate. i am so confused. because they won a special ticket? with a first—class? confused. because they won a special ticket? with a first-class? no, i think they were related to summary from the airline. it was for friends and family. and there were special restrictions on just because of that. that is what they said. who
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knew? anyway. good morning. it was a successful night for the home nations in world cup qualifying with wins for england, scotland and northern ireland jermaine defoe scored on his first appearance for england in nearly four years. some people said he would never play for england again. he ended up getting called back, and there he is with a goal. so who knows? he might be there at the world cup next year. jamie vardy added a second for gareth southgate's side as england maintained their unbeaten run in qualifying. scotland, though, left it late to beat slovenia i—o. substitute chris martin scored in the 88th minute in their must—win game at hampden park. the victory moves gordon strachan‘s side up to fourth in group f. northern ireland stay second in group c after a 2—0 win over
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norway at windsor park. first—half goals from jamie ward and conor washington were enough — it means they remain five points behind group leaders germany. and british number onejohanna konta eased through to the last 16 of the miami open tennis. it took herjust over an hour to beat france's pauline parmentier in straight sets. cs. you had a konta doing great again. what more can we say about her? —— so, yes. johanna konta doing great again. we would go to the headlines. theresa may will meet scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon later today for the first time
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since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. bt has been fined a record £a2 million by the communications regulator ofcom. and we will be talking about that later. all of that highlighted in green. i need to get a running order like that. you always get one. i have this really nothing that tells a what is coming up in the programme. anyway, let's pegula to be front pages. talk aboutjermaine defoe, there he is. —— let's take a look. the main story is that internet giants hired the terrorist‘s finds note. this is about the whatsapp message is being kept secret. can you pass the
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guardian in regards to that? she was saying that she wants to know what is on whatsapp. and they have a response here. the guardian is talk about it. please access, amber rudd calling for police and intelligence agencies to be given access to whatsapp. but liberties group said it was unrealistic and disproportionate as a request. we go to the daily mirror. top cop claim someone to the daily mirror. top cop claim someone is protecting madeline mccann‘s kidnapper. someone is protecting madeline mccann's kidnapper. the daily express a re mccann's kidnapper. the daily express are talking about a possible big council tax rise. a lovely picture of the weather, there. it was such an hour stay where i was in a survey. was such an hour stay where i was in a survey. i think we'll get on pitches. —— where i was yesterday. there are a lot of things that you know that i do not. —— pictures. we want to know how you enjoyed the weather. if you've got any pictures summing up your sunny weekend, we'd like to see them.
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iam i am getting really confuses morning. did you look at the mail? you haven't done the mail, have you? the front page of the mail, their stories about david cameron at downing street, a cover—up over uber. they also tell you about prince harry and his girlfriend. are they setting up a home together? over here we have the boat race on sunday, that means that spring is officially here. oxford versus cambridge, it is very them and them. what do we have to do with this, most of us think but, apparently, this is ill feeling ahead of the boat race this year because one of the crew has swapped. he used to row for cambridge and now he swapped and roads for oxford which means that there is a lot of ill feeling and nobody is speaking to him. a weigh in at some time last week, two
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strokes were eyeballing each other like boxes. people do swap football teams... yes, but is itan like boxes. people do swap football teams... yes, but is it an oxford versus cambridge type rivalry? have a list on the back era of footballers who crossed the big divide. one player who represented both old firm football clubs. someone who played squash for scotla nd someone who played squash for scotland and for england. a bit of buildup to the boat race, really but i thought it was an interesting read. i have one more here. this is big. have you ever stolen lunge from someone big. have you ever stolen lunge from someone at work? i am outraged by that. i have been on this receiving end. a carton of soup stall on.
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that. i have been on this receiving end. a carton of soup stall onm isa end. a carton of soup stall onm is a growing concern. i put this on social media this morning and somebody admitted to taking a bite ofa somebody admitted to taking a bite of a quiche and then putting the rest of the quiche back in the fridge. apparently, 29% of us admit to having lunch stolen stealing or having had stolen? set to i% stuff favourite mug has been stolen, 29% say their lunch is stolen. 5% of people admit to booby trapping their belongings. using things like motion triggered cameras. and 5% of people leave a strongly worded note will if you have a strongly worded note could you please let us know? let us know about your fridge theft. quite
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a pandemic. 30%. know about your fridge theft. quite a pandemic. 3096. i have never... i don't put my food in the fridge nor don't put my food in the fridge nor dol don't put my food in the fridge nor do i take that of anybody else. don't put my food in the fridge nor do i take that of anybody elsem was in the fridge for many weeks that i ended up beating, because i thought it needed a home. —— eating. it has been a wonderful spring weekend. this morning we look at how would you can make your garden friendlierfor bees. would you can make your garden friendlier for bees. pollinators are under pressure due to loss of habitat. let's find out what we can do to help. good morning i am in the centre of london at the london wildlife trust's centre for wildlife gardening. a stunning oasis, a haven, a specially designed about the little things we can do to help
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protect our native ease. notjust the honeybees but the solitude bees. all the things we can do to help them. this centre has been here since 1989. it is behind a set of residential housing and the smell from some of the pollinating plants smells fantastic at the moment. we will look at it more detail later but let's get on to the forecast because it was a stunning weekend where temperatures reached 19.9 degrees celsius in northern scotland and why we have had warm days, there have also been cold nights. misty in places as well and a lot more cloud to begin with than we saw yesterday morning. a little fog around, murky over the hills to begin with and it will take a little while for some of that green is to disappear. best of the morning she sunshine for western parts of the uk in scotland. a touch
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of frost this morning to get you off on your morning commute. plenty of sunshine to go with it and it starts across central and southern parts of england. by the afternoon the cloudiness will be towards the coast. a warm day across the south of the country. like winston yesterday but it will feel a little cooler times. the temperature for some is still in single figures. the sunshine will be out and across the western parts of england and into scotla nd western parts of england and into scotland we could see temperatures peak not only in the mid—teens but the upper teens, reaching around 18 or19 the upper teens, reaching around 18 or 19 celsius. wales looks good as well and we will see sunshine out here. sunny spells, possibly a little more cloud than we saw through yesterday and northern ireland should have a fine day some sunny spells. through tonight low cloud will be more abundant again across the central and eastern parts
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of the uk and that will creep to the west. breaks in the cloud will cause of frost once again but most of us will be frost beat as we begin tuesday. it will take a while for some of the slow cloud to break up but better tomorrow compared to today. clouds will drift away northwards particularly across the western half of the uk and some of those could be a little on the heavy and thundery side. but with the wind going south—westerly, for all of us it will be a warm day. warm across eastern part in a single warm day for southern parts of england we could see temperatures reach 20 degrees. continuing with a warm scene, particularly with the sunshine western areas are prone to of rain on wednesday. the eastern areas stay dry and later in the week will see rain across east anglia and the south—east. the rain we do see
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tomorrow and wednesday will be sporadic. only a small portion of the day for many of you with a lot of dry weather as well on a bit of sunshine and a bit of warmth as well which will assist those these across the uk. more details throughout the morning. later this week, the prime minister will trigger article 50 — beginning the formal process of britain leaving the european union. so what does it all mean, and what happens next? we've sent sean for a roadtrip down the a50. this morning he's in stoke—on—trent. good morning. we have a sign, just to remind us where we had over the next few days. this is an insulated manufacturer in stoke, on the 8050. we will be going all the way out and all the way back talking about article 50. we discussed that, because, it triggers on wednesday.
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the negotiations will formally start their and we have sent back along their and we have sent back along the road already to talk to businesses to see what they want from the negotiations. in the referendum as june divided from the negotiations. in the referendum asjune divided the country. 52% voted to leave and 48% voted to remain. since then not a lot has changed but this week the process of an picking our relationship with the eu begins. and it is certainly fuelling debate about the road that lies ahead. now eu members have rules that they must stick to. part of the lisbon treaty. article 50 is the bit of it which tells you how countries can actually leave. so, essentially, it is the divorce ruling. but the whole process is quite vague because no country has left before. it is a little bit like travelling down a road without any clear signs of
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where you are going. now we already know that the uk will be leaving the single market, which is the agreement between eu countries allows goods, services and people to move freely between them. ending that arrangement is potentially a big problem for exporters. for this industry, the potteries, 50% of their stuff goes to the eu. they think there is a lot at stake. but one of the big businesses here is jcb which makes industrial vehicles and sells them to work 150 countries. the boss, a long standing conservative party donor does not believe that trade will be affected. immigration is another issue. theresa may said one of the main m essa 9 es theresa may said one of the main messages she had taken from the
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leave vote was that british people wa nt to leave vote was that british people want to see a reduction in immigration. now it is not clear yet how the government will achieve it and many businesses who rely on migrant workers are worried that tighter controls will mean they will not be able to get the workers they need. but it is notjust a dish people and british businesses will have a say in what happens next. the uk car industry is worth £70 billion and employs thousands of people. most of the likely to hear it in derby is foreign owned so when it comes to lobbying for the best deal, what the bosses of these companies think really matters. once article 50 has been treated there is a ten year time frame 50 has been treated there is a ten yeartime frame in 50 has been treated there is a ten year time frame in order to get all of that brexit negotiation done. —— to yeah. bites, this is a road we have never been down before so that time frame could easily slip. —— two
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year time frame. and we have 27 countries we need to negotiate with. that will not be easy. it will not be straightforward, particularly for businesses like this one. this businesses like this one. this business here manufactures installation. this is the stuff behind your walls and under the floorboards. pretty much all of the chemicals in these products are all imported yet they hardly export anything here. and on top of that they are owned by a belgian company. what companies like think about how negotiations go on wednesday? that's what we will be doing over the morning, we will be talking to the bossy and local businesses about what stokes thinks, about what businesses think about what theresa may well say on wednesday. more on the 850 from sean... i like that. article 5080 50.
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you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning... the new 12 sided one pound coin enters circulation tomorrow and they'll be harder to forge. we'll find out why some businesses believe the change could cost them a fortune. 12 signs and made of two metals. it even has an hologram on the front. 12 signs and made of two metals. it even has an hologram on the frontlj cannot see it. my eyesight, my age? 0h, cannot see it. my eyesight, my age? oh, a cannot see it. my eyesight, my age? oh,a£ cannot see it. my eyesight, my age? oh, a £ now! i can see the pound. while we sort that out, here is news travel and weather from wherever you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the public are being told to seek help if they feel they may be suffering from post traumatic stress disorder following the terrorist attack on westminster bridge and parliament last week. specialists at the university of london say after that the 7/7
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bombings, a third of witnesses suffered from ptsd so psychiatrists are reminding people to get help if they feel they need it. in the short term it is quite likely that a number of people will feel distressed or that their life may have changed to some degree. speak to friends and colleagues, keep to your routine, do not drink too much alcohol, do some exercise. all good normal healthy coping strategies. but month later you're still not sleeping and you have nightmares and are irritable, you should see your gp. around 100 women, many of them wearing blue for peace, linked hands across westminster bridge yesterday as part of a vigil to remember the four people who died in last weeks terror attack. most of the women wore the muslim headscarf and stood quietly for five minutes, as a bagpipe played nearby. the national army museum in chelsea has said it will reopen its doors to the public on thursday, after a three year, multimillion—pound refit. it was formally opened by the queen a few days ago — and among the items on display — will be the queen's very own uniform from when she was in
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the women's royal army corps from 19119 to 1953. the timing could not be dead for the opening of the top ten most visited attractions in britain last year where all in london. the museum is at number one, a position it has held for the past decade. there were well over 65 million visits, more than the total population of the uk between all the tourist sites. let's have a look now at trouble. on the roads, trafalgar square is closed southbound from st martins place to the strand for emergency repairs to a gas leak. traffic is coping well. and in south—east london, in bexleyheath, crook log is closed eastbound near the leisure centre for repairs to a pot hole. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. after a truly gorgeous
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weekend were waking up to a misty mundy morning. the good news is that will not last for long and we will get sunshine a little bit later. dismissed, this low cloud towards the north of london is quick to lift this morning and in the sunshine arrives. they north—easterly — easterly breeze will keep things chillier longer coast of central london should reach 17. a pleasantly warm afternoon. overnight tonight to exert an extent a repeat performance of last night. cloud, mist and murk developing. a minimum temperature six and nine celsius. a similar start to tuesday morning. that will lift and we will get sunny spells and on the potentialfor some showers through tuesday afternoon especially the further west you are. it turns progressively more u nsettled it turns progressively more unsettled from midweek onwards. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello this is breakfast
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with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 6:31. good morning. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... the road out of the eu — as the prime minister prepares to trigger article 50, we'll find out what it means for businesses along the a50 trunk road. laura james is a successful writer and journalist. she's also autistic. she'll be here to tell us how a routine hospital visit lead to her diagnosis at the age of 46. and unlocking the secrets of gravity. physics professor jim al—khalili will be here to tell us where in britain gravity is weak and where we weigh the least. very interesting. probably someone the south, i would think. because of the south, i would think. because of the equator type thing. you know? it
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is along the right lines. but now a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may will meet scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon later today for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. the pm's visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. bt has been fined a record £112 million by the communications regulator ofcom. it found bt‘s openreach division had cut compensation payments to other telecoms providers for delays in installing high speed business lines. the company said it "apologised wholeheartedly" for the mistakes. it has emerged that people living close to the site of a major explosion on merseyside, reported smelling gas at least 26 hours beforehand. the national grid has confirmed that reports of lea ks were investigated, before the suspected gas blast in bebbington in wirral on saturday. two people were seriously hurt and dozens others injured when several buildings collapsed. attempts to end the political
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stalemate in northern ireland have reached a dead end. three weeks of talks to form a power—sharing coalition between unionist parties and sinn fein, have broken down, with the republican party saying it won't be nominating anyone for the post of deputy first minister. the government must do more to reduce the number of cut—price offers on unhealthy food to help curb childhood obesity, according to mps. the health select committee also calls for rules on junk food advertisements to be made tougher. it argues the government's official obesity plan contains "vague statements" that are "inadequate". but ministers say the strategy is the world's "most ambitious plan on childhood obesity". and these are extraordinary pitches.
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—— pictures. a broken braking device may have been to blame for an hong kong escalator suddenly reversing direction and increasing its speed at a shopping centre. at least 18 people were injured. video footage shot by witnesses ca ptu red video footage shot by witnesses captured the incident as dozens of passengers lost their balance and tumbled down to the ground. several ambulances rushed to the scene and took the injured to nearby hospitals. you just see it from a different angle ina you just see it from a different angle in a moment. that must have been terrifying. exactly. and that happened in hong kong. it is 6:34. here's katherine again with all the sport. yes we have all the world cup qualifying football action. that is a bit ofa qualifying football action. that is a bit of a phrase, is that? scotland are the only ones with anything to worry about. but that one at the weekend kids there when is a live a little bit. so all very positive after a weekend of international
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action. yes, all three of the home nations in action won last night. england beat lithuania 2—0 in a world cup qualifier at wembley. five—year—old bradley lowery, who has cancer, led out the england team alongside the man he describes as his best friend — jermaine defoe. we will be hearing more about that a little later. it was his first goal for england in four years. defoe was replaced by jamie vardy in the second half, and the leicester striker took his chance when it came. england's manager says defoe can't be ruled out of competing in next summer's world cup, if england qualify. it is really important that we are able to call on people likejermaine defoe. clean to have the impact that he had any game like he did today. if he has been playing as well as he has this season, there is no reason why he could not. —— just for him to have the impact. also in group f are scotland. they beat slovenia 1—0 at hampden park in a game manager
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gordon strachan had described as a ‘must—win'. they left it late, chris martin came off the bench to score in the 88th minute. the victory moves them up to fourth and keeps their slim hopes of reaching the world cup alive. up next, they host england injune. northern ireland remain in second place in group c after a 2—0 win over norway in belfast. goals from jamie ward and conor washington were the difference at windsor park. the victory leaves northern ireland five points off group leaders germany and two clear of third place czech republic. results build confidence and momentum and believe. and we have carried out on. we had that experience of qualification for france, and the express of the credit —— that is a credit to the players. they did not let their standards drop. and a dream they can go to russia, as well. and with every game, you are closer to reality. world number one dustinjohnson beat jon rahm in the world match play final. american johnson won on the final hole against the 22—year—old spaniard in texas.
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it meansjohnson becomes the first player to win all four world golf championships. british number one johanna konta is through to last 16 of the miami open tennis. it took herjust over an hour to beat pauline parmentier of france in straight sets. konta will now play spain's lara arrua—barrena for a place in the last eight. rugby, and wasps are five points clear at the top of the rugby union's premiership after a 40—33 win at home over worcester the visitors had winger bryce heem sent off at the start of the second half — and from there wasps made the extra man count, running in six tries in total for the bonus point win. saracens scored eight tries to condemn bath to their biggest defeat in 15 years. 53—10 the final score. that means saracens stay in third place. now, you might remember her from last year's strictly come dancing, but now claudia fragapane is back to her dayjob. she's been quoted this week saying her time on the show has improved her routines, but she had to settle for second
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place at the british championships. that was the slip that saw her go out of bounds cost her the title in the floor event, which went instead to maisie methuen. and back to that heartwarming story of the five 25—year—old who led england out onto the pitch at wembley. this is been some of the reaction. —— to the five—year—old. jermaine defoe himself said i hope you had amazing day. it was perfect to walk out at wembley with you. best mates, he said. sunderland also tweeted this. and bbc sport said this. as a pitches on the front and back pages of the papers of bradley out they were jermaine defoe. they really built quite a relationship. thank you very much. 6:39.
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endometriosis and fibroids are conditions that affect millions of women, but according to a new report they need to be taken more seriously. over 2,500 people across the uk were asked about their treatment. fibroids — the most common non—cancerous growths that develop in or around the womb affect up to 70% of women. some will feel extreme pain. the survey found 12% of women had to wait up to two years for treatment. endometriosis can cause painful periods and lower back pain. it is estimated to affect! in 10 women in the uk. 40% of women said they needed 10 or more gp appointments before being referred to a specialist for the condition. paula sheriff is the chair of the all—party parliamentary group on women's health. shejoins us now. good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. so many people affected by these kind of issues. are you concerned? what is your biggest concern about them? i think so much of the report has caused concern. i think the fact
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that as you alluded to, 40% of women took 10 gigabytes upon us to be referred to specialist. 46% said they were not treated with dignity and respect. and i think 67% of that cohort also said that they left their appointment not feeling like they had adequate information about their condition and also about the treatment plan thereafter. what is behind those issues, then? is that a lack of knowledge or care in the way these people are being dealt with? it is easily affecting 70 women in the country. that is. one in ten women will be subject to and addresses. —— endometriosis. ithink the fact is there is some stigma about this in society. one of the things that came out of the report was to have these issues discussed in schools. i think many doctors, u nfortu nately, in schools. i think many doctors,
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unfortunately, the feedback we got is that women were told to get on with it. you have period, get on with it. you have period, get on with it, it is a fact of life. go away and do not bother us. and we know there is an excellent practice out there, that we identified, that some doctors are providing, with excellent empathetic care. but sadly, this appears to be desperate. it is interesting about women having to go back to ten different appointments. and that sort of judgement, agp making a judgement when something is normal and when it needs to be tested. how do you sort that out? again, we identified some good practice, where people were being referred almost immediately, but sadly, a big percentage reported having to have as many as ten appointments. —— a gp. that is almost unimaginable. imagine the pain and the mental torture. again, one of our recommendations is that an approved pathway be followed when an approved pathway be followed when a woman goes to a gp with these problems. what is the likelihood of
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that being ta ken problems. what is the likelihood of that being taken on and use? is very cost indication? is this a simple way of saying this works, this is a serious issue for millions of women across the country, please, can you put this into place? absolutely. it should be more cost—effective to follow the pathway. because you can imagine that ten gp appointments has not come cheaply. and it is important that a woman is diagnosed earlier to avoid things that fertility province, which can be very expensive in the long run. we'll be working with experts and most importantly with patients to make sure that these issues are taken on. —— a avoid things like fertility problems. we'll be speaking to a woman who suffers from fibroids later on. but nhs spokesman
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said that they take women's health very seriously and will carefully consider the report and recommendations. do let us know if there is anything else that you would like to tell us about that. matt is out there somewhere in london. not sure exactly where. can you tell us how it is out there? it is not bad at all. we are in central london. we are in packenham. we are at the london wildlife trust's centre for wildlife gardening. it is a stunning location, all set up around gardens that promote the habitats of native wildlife. this week, the royal horticultural society and the london wildlife trust have joined forces for the big creative initiative. it is all about protecting the habitat of our native bees, both of which have been in drastic decline over recent years.
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take london alone. the size of lawns and gardens around 2—and—a—half times the size of hyde park had disappeared —— disappear every year in the capital. we are trained to amend that and give you some tips and advice on what you can do to help encourage and protect our bees. and there are more details on that. there is a free fax the mac fact sheet —— there is a free fact sheet out there. will have more information about protecting the bees. on slightly important well. we go to the forecast. it is a little cloudy after a stunning weekend in which we saw warmers conditions of the year so far. warm by day, but corbynite. chilly today in the morning across the uk. mist low cloud across parts of the midland and is in england in particular. so some of you are still waking up to eccles r. —— cold by night. lots of
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sunshine to start the day. peter rossi across parts of scotland into the afternoon. shetland will continue to see clouded skies. and mist low cloud around the borders later on, particularly for the goes. but most, warned they had. temperatures 17 degrees or 80 degrees. north—west of england blue skies for south—eastern coasts could hold onto mist low cloud. single figure highs if you do. but away from that, those that start off the mist low cloud will see the sunshine come out. i warm day across parts of england, given the winds are a little bit lighter. and a fine day two for wales. temperatures there could reach 18 or 19 degrees through the afternoon. of northern ireland, there will be high cloud at times, but some good sunny spells throughout. so another warm and sunny day for the mist majority. the night, though, will be a little cold
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again across northern and western areas, especially where the skies areas, especially where the skies are clear. that low cloud from last night returns a night at a bit more extensively, particularly across central and eastern england and eastern parts of scotland. it will keep temperatures up, and turning milder towards the south—west later on as winds come up from a southerly direction. that will bring changes for tuesday. the mist low cloud will break up. but a day of seychelles and clear skies for many of you. just to begin with in wales and the south—west. these will develop across parts of central and south—west england, northern ireland, and england. some of those will be heavy at times. —— heavy. but wherever you are, it will be dry and warm. temperatures in england on tuesday could get up to around 20 degrees. and we would be far off that on wednesday, with sunshine, the best of which will be across parts of east anglia and eastern england. but in the west, cloud at times, with outbreaks of rain coming and going, and a strengthening breeze. between the showers, it
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should feel warm. it will hopefully encourage some of the bees out. and more details on what you can do to help protect our native bees to the programme. but now, back to you guys. look at the start! how cute they landed on cue to at the start of your cross. “— landed on cue to at the start of your cross. —— look at the ducks. but that was the first sunny day we have had for a while. is this your dog? yes. she was out sniffing the flowers yesterday. we want to know how you enjoyed the weather — if you've got any pictures summing up your sunny weekend, we'd like to see them. you can get in touch in all the usual ways. e—mail us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk
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tweet us @bbcbreakfast or share your images on our facebook page. later this week, the prime minister will trigger article 50 — beginning the formal process of britain leaving the european union. so what does it all mean, and what happens next? we've sent sean for a roadtrip down the a50. this morning he's in stoke—on—trent. good morning, sean. good morning. we have thought about this and that is why here at this insulation manufacturer in stoke. they have levelled off a little bit but it is baking hot in here. it is literally an oven. this began as liquid at one or end of the factory, goes to a baking area and comes out like this. are talking to businesses like this this week along the a50 about article 50 because of the triggering
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of that on wednesday. it will be an important time to see what theresa may does with the negotiations, what will business be like in a couple of yea rs. let's will business be like in a couple of years. let's speak now to kevin who ru ns years. let's speak now to kevin who runs this place. you put new investment into this plan, you are owned by belgians. you're watching what theresa may says on wednesday? i think it shows confidence that we have the european owned business here willing to invest another £20 million in the uk construction industry as it sees it is still a strong country to invest in. you do not export much but you import quite a lot. have you noticed a big change since the vote to leave in the cost of everything? unfortunately with the change of the foreign exchange rate we have seen duty increases in our raw materials. so in the short term, has been bad? it has been a challenge because we have had to incura hike in challenge because we have had to incur a hike in costs that we were not expecting and it has been far
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beyond what we were expecting at that point. a challenge for the whole industry. just squeeze past you here. that is why it is important. in the short term it may not have that much affected in the long—term there will be quite a lot of negotiation. let's stick to poor mouth. you are an expert on all things brexit. what sort of things will change on wednesday that businesses need to look at over the next few years? i don't think much will change on wednesday. we know the eu call for a summit on april 29 and nothing will really happen until after the german election. and then everything needs to be concluded by about october 2018 so we will be quite rapid. slow to start with but after october it will become quite rapid. what will business be looking for? what changes to the manufacturer like this see? the first thing is for whitehall and
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westminster to understand we have is that it will manufacturing sector and the service industries related to that. when we begin negotiations we need to understand that those processes and i think the big problem is not negotiating free trade agreement it is just stimulating trade and in the region here, what we really need to do is to look at infrastructure so we can provide a competitive infrastructure across all transport options and skills to make us more competitive. is there one thing in these negotiations in the next 18 months where we finally get a deal at it that businesses think we will need? infrastructure. the problem is in the region here we are close to capacity in terms of transport infrastructure. the government needs to put some real money into investment in the region here. thank you very much. we will be talking about this all morning.
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infrastructure clearly important. what about labour and staffing? all of this kind of stuff? that will start on wednesday when article 50 gets under way and that is why are on the a50. thank you very much. fantastic goggles as well. the new 12—sided one pound coin comes into circulation tomorrow. the treasury says the currency will be much harder to forge, but how ready are the nation's parking meters, vending machines and lockers? i still could not see the hologram. one has a £ and the other one is the digit number one. you can see the scratch a bit there underneath the head of the queen. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been finding out if the small change is going to cost businesses a fortune. since 1983 the pound coin has flowed
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through our economy. down high street into shops, vending machines, shopping trolleys, parking meters. but the days of the round pound are numbered. from october 15 these will no longer be legal tender and from tomorrow these, the new 12 sided coins, will enter circulation. it looks pretty. can i keep it? i like it. it reminds leave the old threepenny bid. —— it reminds me. it. it reminds leave the old threepenny bid. —— it reminds mem is thought that 3% of the old pound coins were fake but the total cost of switching over will exceed £100 million. all that expense of changing every vending machine, shopping trolley, everywhere you put pound coin in will need to be
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changed and it costs someone. the industry did not know until we saw red on the news. this man runs a supplier of vending machines. he says that upgrades to 4000 of them have cost his company £200,000. we have cost his company £200,000. we have been blatantly told thank you, new coin and it is yourjob to put in the relevant mechanisms. we have not been given a relevant time frame to do this, it will not be completed until the end of the year. the treasury decided to switch. in a statement it said he worked with business every step of the way to help them prepare for the new pound coin which it says it will be the most secure of its kind in the world. at the royal mint in south wales, 3 million of them are being produced every day. we had some issues with the old pound coin. the technology was 30 years old. it is
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made from two different coloured metal, a white coloured metal and a brass coloured outer. in addition there is a hologram. when you look in one direction you will see the number one and in the other direction you will see the £. i think it is important that the public can feel confident, that they know that when they hand this from me to you it is worth a pound and it is genuine. a leisure centre in birmingham where the lockers need upgrading. he has been a busy man full done nearly 4000 now across the country. things could soon get even busier. there is still a lot of work and a lot of bloggers out there that still need to be changed over. as of tomorrow there will probably be a wave of leisure centres are waking up wave of leisure centres are waking up to the fact that the coin—operated lockers will no longer operate. most businesses are ready for the change and the long—term
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benefits of the new pound coin are worth the short term cost. we have a first here. i have my pound coin. dan has lost his. the first pound coin down the back of the sofa already. i went to do a heads and tails and it sort of disappeared down here somewhere. i haven't found it yet. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. two people continue to be treated in hospital this morning after a car mounted the pavement in arlington in the weekend. knives were found at the weekend. knives were found at the scene and five arrests have been made however police say the incident outside a pub on essex road on
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saturday night was not terror related. the public are being told to seek help if they feel they may be suffering from post traumatic stress disorder following the terrorist attack on westminster bridge and parliament last week. specialists at the university of london say after that the 7/7 bombings, a third of witnesses suffered from ptsd so psychiatrists are reminding people to get help if they feel they need it. in the short term it is quite likely that a number of people will feel distressed or that their life may have changed to some degree. speak to friends and colleagues, keep to your routine, do not drink too much alcohol, do some exercise. all good normal healthy coping strategies. but months later you're still not sleeping and you have nightmares and are irritable, you should see your gp. the national army museum in chelsea has said it will reopen its doors to the public on thursday, after a three year, multimillion—pound refit. it was formally opened by the queen a few days ago — and among the items on display — will be the queen's very own uniform from when she was in the women's royal army corps from 1949 to 1953.
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well, the timing couldn't be betterfor the opening, as the top ten most visited attractions in britain last year were all in london. the british museum is at number one, a position it's held every year for the past decade. between all of london's visitor attractions, there were well over 65 million visits. that's more than the total population of the uk. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the roads, trafalgar square is closed southbound from st martins place to the strand for emergency repairs to a gas leak. traffic is coping well. and in south—east london, in bexleyheath, crook log is closed eastbound near the leisure centre for repairs to a pot hole. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. after a truly gorgeous weekend we're waking up to a misty monday morning. the good news is that will not last for long and we will get sunshine a little bit later.
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dismissed, this low cloud towards the north of london is quick to lift this morning and in the sunshine arrives. they north—easterly — easterly breeze will keep things chillier along the coast but central london should reach 17. a pleasantly warm afternoon. overnight tonight to an extent a repeat performance of last night. cloud, mist and murk developing. a minimum temperature six and nine celsius. a similar start to tuesday morning. that will lift and we will get sunny spells and the potential for some showers through tuesday afternoon especially the further west you are. it turns progressively more unsettled from midweek onwards. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. as the scottish parliament prepares
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to back a second vote on independence. the prime minister will urge unity ahead of brexit, describing a united uk as an unstoppable force. good morning it's monday 27th march. also this morning bt is hit with a record fine of £42 million because of delays in installing high—speed business lines. good morning. we're on the road the morning on a50. we are looking at
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what manufacturers like this one is that whatever the brexit deal. and in sport, england, scotland, and ireland, all we are world cup qualifying. jermain defoe returns after four years out as england beat little when you to nil. —— england beat little when you 2—0. and there's a new quid on the block. this is it. the new pound coin, and tomorrow it enters circulation — we'll be finding out why not everyone is happy at its introduction. and the weather's been so lovely we've sent matt out and about. good morning, yes. i'm at the wildlife trust wildlife garden in south—east london. we are looking at what we can do to protect our native bee species this morning and look at the forecast as well. after a stunning weekend, where we have more of the sunshine today? the answer for some is yes. but the rest of the details are in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will meet scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon later today for the first time since she rejected calls
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for a second referendum on scottish independence. the visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. let's speak to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon, who joins us live in glasgow. lorna, what do we expect to happen today? it would be so fascinating to hear exactly what is said in this meeting, would that? it really work. there is this constitutional stand—off ongoing, and i think the key question today is world has been a day that compromise can be found. the two leaders will meet later today. before that, theresa may is meeting staff at the department of international develop and, where she will set out her aim of setting a global britain with a strong union. she was a host —— she will say how post—brexit plan will involve strengthening the devolution settlement. she is also meeting with
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police scotland to discuss counterterrorism, after the attack last week at westminster. the issue of security will also be on the agenda, with her meeting with nicola sturgeon. inevitably, though, a lot of their discussion will be about article 50. a spokesperson for the scottish government said that two days before article 50 is triggered, there hasn't yet been no discussion with the scottish government over what would be in the latter starting a process, and no discussion of how scotland's edges will be represented, and no discussion of what role the scottish government will play in the negotiations. there will play in the negotiations. there will be a lot to discuss. there will indeed. thank you. talking a bit more about that with a few mps soon. but bt has been fined a record £42 million by the comedic issues regulator ofcom. —— the communications regulator ofcom.
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it found bt‘s openreach division had cut compensation payments to other telecoms providers for delays in installing high speed business lines.the company said it "apologised wholeheartedly" for the mistakes. simon clemison reports. whether at home or at work, cable switch connectors are still provided by bt. some carry large amounts of data at great speed. but there are cases where the company has been slow to deliver the lines. and the uk relies on the bigger cables, which make up the network, as they support mobile and broadband operators, as well as big businesses, schools, and hospitals. where bt fails to meet deadlines for ethernet services, as they are known, they need to pay compensation to the likes of vodafone and talk talk. but they have been using a clause in the contract to reduce payments. now, bt has been hit with a huge extra bill. in a record fine, ofcom has ordered them to pay £42 million on penalties. the scale of the fine is said to reflect the importance of bt to other companies, who offer services such as broadband. bt has apologised,
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adding that it should never have happened, and that measures have been put in place to stop it happening again. but in addition to the fine, it will need to find the additional £300 million owed to companies in compensation. it has emerged that people living close to the site of a major explosion on merseyside reported smelling gas at least 24 hours before it happened. two people were seriously hurt and more than 30 others were injured when several buildings collapsed. the national grid has confirmed that reports of lea ks were investigated, before the suspected gas blast in wirral on saturday. clare fallon is live in bebington, close to where the explosion happened. clare, are the emergency services still on the scene? you have moved little bit) now. what is the latest? yes, this is where the cord and is this morning. this is as close as we can get to
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the scene of the explosion on saturday night. and now that the sun is up, we can get a better idea of the scale of the devastation coming here, really. it is a scene of devastation here this morning. and people who are here on saturday evening have described how they thought that this was an earthquake, ora bomb thought that this was an earthquake, or a bomb blast, so loud was the explosion, that they heard. they describe seeing bricks raining down from the sky. let me bring in this man, aaron. your church was opened up man, aaron. your church was opened up and became a refuge centre on saturday? you were a couple of miles away, but you heard it committed new? yes, i was 3.5 miles away. but we heard it from where we were. of course, you came back here, your church was opened up. just tell me what was going on. we came down five orten what was going on. we came down five or ten minutes after the blast happened. and with inside half an out, there were people beginning to come into the church, people with so
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many different injuries. families coming in and, getting the church, really. and we were able to give them shelter and give them tea and coffee, and it ended up being a trio centre, where paramedics were able to help those who are injured at the time. —— triage. to help those who are injured at the time. -- triage. we can see from the damage to the houses are that there will be a lot of people not waking up will be a lot of people not waking up in theirown will be a lot of people not waking up in their own beds. yes, i think for the foreseeable future, it will be so —— sometime before people can get back in there. we need to do we can as a community to give people food and shelter and any resources we can at the time. thank you for your time this morning. a police investigation is under way as you mentioned before. we have been told by the national grid that people did report the smell of gas in the hours this explosion. engineers came out and found nothing was amiss. but the
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priority will now be to establish exactly what happened. thank you for that. those aerial pictures are incredible. it is amazing that more people weren't injured. or that it did not happen at a different time of day. we will have more on that little later. attempts to end the political stalemate in northern ireland have reached a dead end. unionist parties and sinn fein have until later today to broker a deal but talks have broken down. our ireland correspondent chris page is in belfast for us this morning. chris where does this leave the northern ireland assembley? in northern ireland, political negotiations have a habit of going right up to the deadline and often beyond. this time, though, things have turned out differently. talks have turned out differently. talks have finished ahead of the deadline, but that has happened because there has been a breakdown, but a breakthrough. sinn fein say they are not going to put any ministers fought to go into the power—sharing devolved government, and the garment cannot function without sinn fein, because they are the largest irish
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nationalist party. so when the deadline officially passes at 4pm this afternoon, there is a decision which is broken shah. he must call another stormont assembly election within a reasonable period, but the last assembly election happened just earlier this month, and the one before that happened just last year. so there is a another election, they will be third in less than a year. he could pass legislation and have stormont run from westminster, all you could try to resurrect the negotiations. either way, you could try to resurrect the negotiations. eitherway, northern ireland is facing more instability. the government must do more to reduce the number of cut—price offers on unhealthy food to help curb childhood obesity, according to mps. the health select committee, also calls for rules on junk food advertisements to be made tougher. it argues the government's official obesity plan contains "vague statements" that are "inadequate". but ministers say the strategy is the world's "most ambitious plan on childhood obesity". at least eight people thought to
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have died after an avalanche has struck in centraljapan. seven teachers and one teacher feared dead and 38 others injured. it took place during a climbing session near a popular ski resort for students. for other teachers and students are missing. the area has received heavy snow over the last few days. a broken braking device may have been to blame for an hong kong escalator suddenly reversing direction and increasing its speed at a shopping centre. we will show you some pictures from mobile phones. at least 18 people were injured. it is pretty horrific to see. video footage shot by witnesses captured the incident as dozens of passengers lost their balance and tumbled down to the ground. several ambulances rushed to the scene and took the injured to nearby hospitals. people have tumbled to the ground on top of each other. several ambulances have easily made their way there. it is just coming up to
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7:11. now, we speak a lot about article 50. later today, the prime minister will meet scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon. this a day before holyrood is expected to vote in favour of seeking a new referendum on independence. the meeting will coincide with theresa may setting out her plans for a more united nation ahead of triggering article 50, when she formally begins the process of leaving the eu. to discuss this, we are joined from westminster by the snp mp, stephen gethins and annie wells from the scottish conservatives who is in glasgow. thank you very much real—time on brea kfast. thank you very much real—time on breakfast. stephen, first of all, wouldn't be sensible to see what the deal is before talking about a second referendum ? deal is before talking about a second referendum? yes, you are right. that is why the first minister has set out a timetable that would mean that we would have to see what the deal is for leaving the european union. michelle bunny, the european union. michelle bunny, the commission will be dealing with this, has said that we would need to
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see something by autumn 2018. but critically, before that, as well, we need answers from the uk government. we arejust need answers from the uk government. we are just hours away from triggering article 50, and there are still significant questions over what role the scottish government will play, and what is deal with europe will look like that will have such an impact on jobs in the economy. so difficult questions today and the next 48 hours, as well. annie, such an important time for scotland. why, with that in mind, is this meeting taking such a long time to put together?” mind, is this meeting taking such a long time to put together? i don't think the meeting is taking too long to put together. when the primer is the first began the prime minister, she spoke to the union on the steps of downing street. so we knew that article 50 was good to be triggered before the end of march. the prime minister is coming to speak to the scottish government. she was to work with them. what is wrong with a
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second referendum ? scotland with them. what is wrong with a second referendum? scotland did vote to remain committed and a? scotland did vote to remain, yes, but it was auk did vote to remain, yes, but it was a uk wide vote. we have to that when we go through the process of triggering article 50 and negotiating with 27 other eu states, that we don't actually want any more upset and divisive campaigning in scotland. we need to be democratic and support the vote of the uk people. stephen, on that point, is this a distraction? shouldn't be focused be allowed to be on getting the best deal, and this then to be easily after that? adding wet -- artic we all need to recognise a significant change is coming. that will have a significant effect on jobs, the economy, the moment, and opportunities for young people. what we need to recognise is that people should be given the choice about what kind of change they want to see. and that is why i said earlier
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on that the first minister's timetable follows the prime minister's timetable about what happens next. this is about giving people the choice. remember that taking scotland out of the eu could cost u p taking scotland out of the eu could cost up to 80,000 jobs, according to economic think tank. that is really significant. the scottish government has the responsibility to try and protect those jobs and the economy as far as they possibly can, which is why the scottish governance or become promoters of the membership of the civil market. and the single mother was also some it was important to scottish conservatives. annie, what is your response? do they have the support of this is people? poll after poll had shown no appetite for a second independence referendum. and that is notjust the people who vote in 2014. but also some people who voted yes, they want easy the snp get on the job. they have significant powers devolved, and even now, they asking westminster to hold onto them for
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another years. a giver and much real—time. stephen, too want to come back on that, quickly? no, just on that, the scottish government is outperforming the english government. the first minister is as not had trouble to seek. this is about protecting jobs and protecting the economy. stephen, annie, thank you for your time this morning. as we heard earlier, it could be a constitutional stand—off. so it could be a frosty meeting, today.|j wouldn't mind being a fly on the wall for that one. it is quarter past seven. and it has been a lovely spring. things you can do, such as planting nectar filled wildflowers. but the children involved, get them to build insect hotels. we have more details about advice on the garden. there will be details on the bbc breakfast site later on. warmest day of the
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year so far yesterday. the forecast, starting on a chilly now this morning. for some of you, a nifty and great start. parts of central and great start. parts of central and eastern england in particular. some of our great club will linger close to the coast but notice in mind how the cloud fins and breaks in the sunshine comes through. for most there will be a blue sky day yet again and another fairly warm one. after a frost filled style in scotla nd one. after a frost filled style in scotland and project could hit 17 or 18 degrees easily for a couple of spots. shetland holds on to more cloud. elsewhere across england and certainly into wales you will see a
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long to the afternoon, clear blue skies for many and across the south coast competitor yesterday, winds will be lighter so may feel warmer there. even we can see temperature around 17 or 18 degrees. 19 is possible across wales. maybe you will more cloud than we saw through the weekend but still a fine day with sunny spells. through tonight, missed and low cloud will return across many central and eastern parts so once again it will be murky across some of the hills. into south—east scotland as well. clear skies in the west will lead to temperature dropping a touch. a little frost around into the morning but maybe not as much as you have seen but maybe not as much as you have seen for the last few mornings. tuesday, for some of you, it begins like it did today with the sunshine around. low cloud and green across eastern parts of england. generally speaking tomorrow, cloud across the uk with sunny spells. showers first
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thing, they will push northwards northern ireland and eventually southern scotland. some could be heavy even with the odd bit of thunder that will only be a small pa rt thunder that will only be a small part of your day in the balk will mostly be dry particular across the north of scotland. in england we could see temperature reached 20 degrees tomorrow. warmly we see the sunshine again on wednesday, the best that will be across the eastern areas. in the west there will be more breeze, cloud of time and outbreaks of rain. shari was dry weather and sunshine around but when that sunshine is out it will feel very pleasant. if you have got a sunshine, get out and take a photo. if you were out this weekend, taking photographs and enjoying nature across the uk, send them into a zero bbc breakfast via twitter or e—mail. we will try to your pictures later on air. it was quite a lovely day
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for many parts of the country. elsewhere for you... the communications regulator, ofcom has fined bt openreach a record £42 million after it reduced compensation payments for delays in connecting high—speed business lines. it was found the telecoms giant had committed a "serious breach". gaucho ramussen is ofcom's investigations director and he joins us now from our westminster studio. good morning and thank you for joining us. could you explain to us what had been going on and why this level of fine? these are high—speed lines are the digital backbone of the country and bp rolls them out and they have 30 days to do so when companies ordered lines to be rolled out. sometimes they can get that deadline, possibly for valid reasons, but they need to provide notice and they need the right reason for doing so. it is a
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matter of the tea, that dt can control, then they need to pay compensation for a delay. and what was the problem? we found that they had used a mechanism for delaying the rollout and not paying compensation in an inappropriate manner. now we have learned they have done to tune of 330 million pounds in compensation to providers who are out of pocket. you find them £42 million. why did you set that level? it is a record fine. the highest fine we have imposed. we feel that it very much reflects the seriousness of the breach in question and the importance of this sector of the uk economy. of course, the fai needs to be seen in context. in line with a significant compensation package. we spoke to
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the chief executive from bet. and he said the investigation revealed that they felled short of the high standards they expect. they take it very seriously. he goes onto say they put place matters to control and people to prevent it from happening again. are you happy that this is the end of it now? we see this is the end of it now? we see this as an investigation into historic contact. we have seen tangible change at the tea and of course beattie has met our requirements in full in terms of improving the independence of overreach and we welcome that. we know that they will now separate. you mentioned earlier that they will now need to pay other money to people who they have provided a service to? that is correct. beattie, as part of settling these allegations, have also agreed to a compensation package and we
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understand that that amounts, it is estimated to amount to 330 pounds. and the £42 million, we are to go to? that money goes to treasury. now a story that shock to this morning was a survey but said the 29% of us have had our lunch stolen. people are all wondering out there and they just take someone else's lunch?|j just take someone else's lunch?” get the feeling, 5% of people occurred in to the survey to send a strongly worded. the thing is i don't even put my food in the fridge. ijust don't don't even put my food in the fridge. i just don't leave don't even put my food in the fridge. ijust don't leave it there. gordon says that he is to write the name of his manager on the food to deter thieves. delia says they can keep the pork pie but if my special
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sandwich was pinched i would be fuming. it is so cute to see languages with their name written on them. and malisse said a vegetable bake was once stolen 50 years ago. the shock and horror is still with her today. you've taken it in, you have purchased it, so ijust takes it! leonardo says that and occasional lift of milk is ok. if you still some work says susan, where do you eat it? under the desk? i accidentally, says kate, once stole a banana. how do you do it
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accidentally? it either is or is not yours? somebody else says that they once drank half a bottle of lucozade to put the rest back in the fridge. tracy says that she was starving and she was skint. she was innocent but she was skint. she was innocent but she did want to take a bite out of someone's quiche and put it back in the fridge. i don't know... i don't know what you can do. tony five minutes past seven. what is the world coming to? —— 25 minutes. as the prime minister prepares to trigger article 50 what does it what does minutes. it mean for businessess along the ‘a50' trunk road? sean is in stoke—on—trent for us this morning. this sign is not stolen. i should make that clear. it is our own a 50 signed because we are discussing article 50 all this week. it is the
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start of the formal brexit negotiation. we are at a stoped manufacturing plant today. they manufacture instillation. chris is watching this. chris, where would you find this stuff in your house? under yourfloor, in you find this stuff in your house? under your floor, in the cavities of your walls and in the loft. and everything is the right shape this morning? thank you. things like this. the chemicals in this will be imported. some countries will export these kind of things. if you are a business that does that, you will be watching what theresa may says to the european union on wednesday in her letter and what her priorities... do you have staff from the european union? all those things will be looked out over the next few days just to see how much businesses is keeping an eye on it. for all of that, here is the news travel time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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the public are being told to seek help if they feel they may be suffering from post traumatic stress disorder following the terrorist attack on westminster bridge and parliament last week. specialists at the university of london say after that the 7/7 bombings, a third of witnesses suffered from ptsd so psychiatrists are reminding people to get help if they feel they need it. in the short term it is quite likely that a number of people will feel distressed or that their life may have changed to some degree. speak to friends and colleagues, keep to your routine, do not drink too much alcohol, do some exercise. all good normal healthy coping strategies. but months later you're still not sleeping and you have nightmares and are irritable, you should see your gp. around 100 women, many of them wearing blue for peace, linked hands across westminster bridge yesterday as part of a vigil to remember the four people who died in last weeks terror attack. most of the women wore the muslim headscarf and stood quietly for five minutes, as a bagpipe played nearby.
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the national army museum in chelsea has said it will reopen its doors to the public on thursday, after a three year, multimillion—pound refit. it was formally opened by the queen a few days ago — and among the items on display — will be the queen's very own uniform from when she was in the women's royal army corps from 1949 to 1953. well, the timing couldn't be betterfor the opening, as the top ten most visited attractions in britain last year were all in london. the british museum is at number one, a position it's held every year for the past decade. between all of london's visitor attractions, there were well over 65 million visits. that's more than the total population of the uk. let's have a look at the travel situation now. bea13
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be a 13 commercial in stepney is blocked into town. that is because ofa blocked into town. that is because of a crash so expect major delays along that road. and in south—east london, in bexleyheath, crook log is closed eastbound near the leisure centre for repairs to a pot hole. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. after a truly gorgeous weekend we're waking up to a misty monday morning. the good news is that will not last for long and we will get sunshine a little bit later. this mist, this low cloud towards the north of london is quick to lift this morning and then the sunshine arrives. a north—easterly — easterly breeze will keep things chillier along the coast but central london should reach 17. a pleasantly warm afternoon. overnight tonight to an extent a repeat performance of last night. cloud, mist and murk developing. a minimum temperature six and nine celsius. a similar start to tuesday morning. that will lift and we will get sunny spells and the potential for some showers through tuesday afternoon
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especially the further west you are. it turns progressively more unsettled from midweek onwards. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it is exactly 7:30. let's bring you up—to—date with the latest news stories. theresa may will meet scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon later today for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. the prime minister's visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. bt has been fined a record £42 million by the communications regulator ofcom. it found bt‘s openreach division had cut compensation payments to other telecoms providers
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for delays in installing high speed business lines. the company said it "apologised wholeheartedly" for the mistakes. we have investigated the source of bridges before, but this is the largest find we have imposed. we feel it reflects the seriousness of the breach in question and the importance of this particular sector of the uk at konta me. of course, the find needs to be seen in context, with the significant connotation package. —— compensation package. two people were seriously hurt and dozens more were injured when several buildings collapsed following a major explosion on merseyside at the weekend. it has emerged that residents reported smelling gas at least 24 hours before the suspected gas blast in bebbington in wirral on saturday. you can see what happened here in these pictures. the national grid confirmed that reports of leaks were investigated, prior to the explosion. they are amazing pictures. they are amazing picturesm
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they are amazing pictures. it is incredibly lucky that more people would hope. i know people were hurt, but... yes, it could have been horrific. attempts to end the political stalemate in northern ireland have reached a dead end. three weeks of talks to form a power—sharing coalition between unionist parties and sinn fein, have broken down, with the republican party saying it won't be nominating anyone for the post of deputy first minister. the rail company first mtr has been awarded the franchise to run south west trains for seven years from august 2017, the department of transport have announced. transport secretary chris grayling said the firm will deliver the improvements that people say they want right across the southern western franchise area. matt is out and about their talking about these. we will be talking about these. we will be talking about that in about ten minutes. ——
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talking about bees. and ducks. that was a spectacular landing from those ducks. it is almost like we queued them. kat is here with the sport. we will be talking about getting a ducks in a row. yes, it is to be going that way for england. top of the group. playing little any, as they did in their world cup qualifier, no disrespect to live away near, but they are obviously not as good as the world champions, germany, it seems a little bit unfairto germany, it seems a little bit unfair to say that you got out a few yea rs unfair to say that you got out a few years ago and now you to go play the world champions, germany. —— lithuania. positive for lithuania. it seemed a bit mean to say gareth southgate, at your first game in charge, time to face the world champions. a win is a win. will it wasn't. well it wasn't.
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all three of the home nations in action won last night. england beat lithuania 2—0 in a world cup qualifier at wembley. five—year—old bradley lowery, who has cancer, led out the england team alongside the man he describes as his best friend — jermaine defoe. we'll be hearing a little bit more from defoe later on. —— jermain defoe. and it was the sunderland man who opened the scoring — his 20th for his country but his first for england for four years. he was replaced byjamie vardy in the second half, and the leicester striker took his chance when it came. england's manager says defoe can't be ruled out of competing in next summer's world cup, if england qualify. it is really important that we are able to call on people likejermain defoe, so he can have the impact that he help in a game, like he did today. if he has been playing as well as he has this season, there is no reason why he couldn't. back to the really heartwarming story now of the five—year old sunderland fan bradley lowery. —— five—year—old.
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bradley, who has cancer, led the england team out along with his hero jermain defoe last night. this has been some of the reaction on social media... "i hope you had an amazing day." "it was perfect to walk out at wembley stadium with you." sunderland said "two sunderland heroes lead the way" and bbc sport said "this little hero was an england mascot today". jermain defoe has a vision not played for england to the last yea rs. played for england to the last years. so to walk out with bradley was a special occasion for both of them. also in group f are scotland. they beat slovenia 1—0 at hampden park in a game manager gordon strachan had described as a "must—win". they left it late, chris martin came off the bench to score in the 88th minute. the victory moves them up to fourth and keeps their slim hopes of reaching the world cup alive. up next, though, they host england in june. or you oryou can ask or you can ask as a manager is to go certain things. they did everything
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we re certain things. they did everything were asked. and they push themselves to another level, there. whatever will be will be. i was enjoying their performance as a manager. northern ireland remain in second place in group c after a 2—0 win over norway in belfast. goals from jamie ward and conor washington were the difference at windsor park. the victory leaves northern ireland five points off group leaders germany and two clear of third—place czech republic. results build confidence, and momentum, and belief. and we have carried that on. you know, we had that experience of qualification for france, and the experience for the finals, and that is a credit to the players. they didn't let their standards drop. and they hold onto the dream they can go to russia, as well. and with every game, you are closer to reality. there's only one brit left in at the miami open, and johanna konta is still going strong. it took herjust over an hour to beat pauline parmentier of france in straight sets. and she's through to the last 16. finally, now, you might
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remember her from last year's strictly come dancing, but now claudia fragapane is back to her dayjob. she's been quoted this week saying her time on the show has improved her routines, but she had to settle for second place at the british championships. it was a slip that saw her go out of bounds cost her the title in the floor event, which went instead to maisie methuen. soa so a big upset there. four gold medals at the com world games, you are expected to win the british championships. but a bit of a mistake from her, there. talking of mistakes, that from the fridge. the work fridge, which i think is outrageous. very quickly, key said that somebody has padlocked his milk to the shell. justin said he is damages and says in a note that he has done so. somebody stole a cream and here, and said an e—mail to staff. she got more back. and rachel
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writes breastmilk on her green top to stop someone... that would definitely do. all the ideas. i do that you need to go as far as to lick a sandwich. you could you say you did it. &:37, and later this week, the prime minister will trigger article 50, beginning the formal process for britain to leave the european union. loads of questions we have been asking. what does it mean? what happens next? the man with all the a nswe rs , we happens next? the man with all the answers, we hope, is sean, coming from the a50. yes, we are in stoke today. we are going to be going along the a50. here, they are manufacturing installation. there are manufacturing installation. there a re lots of manufacturing installation. there are lots of businesses right across the country they will be winding what theresa may once out of the
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negotiations when they finally get under way on wednesday. —— wondering. so we said steph out on the a50 to find out what is to happen these negotiations. the referendum last june divided the country. 52% voted to leave and 48% voted to remain. since then not a lot has changed but this week the process of unpicking our relationship with the eu begins. and it is certainly fuelling debate about the road that lies ahead. now eu members have rules that they must stick to. part of the lisbon treaty. the rulebook. and article 50 is the bit of it which tells you how countries can actually leave. so, essentially, it is the divorce rules. but the whole process is quite vague, because no country has left the eu before. so it is a little bit like travelling down a road without any clear signs of where you are going. now we already know that the uk
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will be leaving the single market, which is the agreement between eu countries that allows goods, services and people to move freely between them. ending that arrangement is potentially a big problem for exporters. for this industry, the potteries, 50% of their stuff goes to the eu. so they think there is a lot at stake. but one of the big businesses here is jcb, which makes industrial vehicles and sells them to work 150 countries. —— to over. the boss, a long—standing conservative party donor, does not believe that trade will be affected. immigration is another issue. theresa may said one of the main messages she had taken from the leave vote was that british people
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want to see a reduction in immigration. now, it's not clear yet how the government will achieve it and many businesses who rely on migrant workers are worried that tighter controls will mean they will not be able to get the workers they need. but it is notjust british people and british businesses who will have a say in what happens next. the uk car industry is worth £70 billion and employs thousands of people. most of them, like toyota here in derby, are foreign—owned so when it comes to lobbying for the best deal, what the bosses of these companies think really matters. once article 50 has been triggered, there is a 2—year time frame in order to get all of that brexit negotiation done. but this is a road we have never been down before so that time frame could easily slip. and we have 27 countries we need to negotiate with. that will not be easy. it is not to be easy. there are lots
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of businesses like this one here. kevin rudd is this place. we were on the breakfast plus, we're calling at the breakfast plus, we're calling at the a50 bus. you are the first passenger, kevin. we are going to have a quick tour around here. —— keven runs. —— kevin. have a quick tour around here. —— keven runs. -- kevin. the construction industry as a sole place to invest in the uk. we have hundreds of thousands of houses that need to be built in the uk. so we are investing tens of millions of pounds to build a new plant to ensure there is enough material available for the construction needs of the uk. all right. so does it actually help you guys, the fact that you do not export? all your tradies prayad much in the uk. we do
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do exports. —— all of your trade is pretty much done in the uk. the domestic market is strong. we want to support that to the best of our ability. so these negotiations get under way on wednesday between theresa may and the european union. we are going to sort out what that relationship will look like in a few yea rs relationship will look like in a few years time. what would be a priority at about? party-goer be asking the government to negotiate as hard as they possibly can to ensure that we do not get hit with high tariffs that damage business further than some of the import prices are ready have. in terms of import prices, if you are an importer in your painful all of this, what is this chemical ain? all of this, what is this chemical again? it is mdi. well, prices go up, though again? it is mdi. well, prices go ? again? it is mdi. well, prices go they again? it is mdi. well, prices go up, though they? they do. and it has had an impact in the uk on the rosa good. i need to kick you off now, echo free, and welcome david. we now talk to david frost, who represents
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tons of businesses right across stoke. welcome aboard. you represent loads of businesses in stoke. stoke, generally, voted pretty considerably to leave the european union. our business is here pretty happy with how it is going? businesses had just gone on with the job of creating wealth and jobs. they have been doing that usually successfully over 40,000 jobs having been credited in the last two years. unemployment has plummeted and continues to fall. businesses are getting on with it. we have heard a lot about the car industry and what might happen to it in the future just because the lack of nissan, they have at some kind of deal. but we have not heard much about the potteries. is a concern amongst businesses that they are not being pinery ties as much as other sectors? this will be a big issue for us. —— prioritise. geely, it governments are going to focus on big businesses. —— clearly. potteries are vital to our economy.
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what the govern has you do is to try and understand that certain key sectors that are based geographically are understood. so certain sectors of idling creaking and exporting around the world. we need to be to do that around it world into the future. we are going to be on the road on the a50 investigating article 50 before the article 50 is triggered on wednesday. whoever is driving it doing wonderfully. well done, andy. can we look at the driver? thank you very much. see you a little bit later. a reluctant driving style there. many of us in this week we're looking at how to make your garden more be friendly. we have a cheeky
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fluffy be in the background here with matt. yes, the only brave enough to come out this morning but we are at the london wildlife centre for wildlife gardening in hackham. a joint initiative launched this week between the rhs and the london wildlife trust to find out more about what we can do to protect the bee population of the nation. joining me is mike waller, an ecologist. can you tell us more about the initiative? it is very simple, it is all about improving your garden or your balcony or any green space, for bees. making it better for wild bees such as bumblebees and solitary bees of which there are many different kinds. because their habitat has been disappearing? absolutely. many people are taking over their gardens but we need to create little nooks
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and crannies where they can breed and crannies where they can breed and thrive and have plenty of wild flowers to feed from. so a few little simple steps. it is all about creating the right space and also a lot of nice wild flowers for pollen and nectar. even leaving a few wild areas in corners of the garden is vitally important as well. what else can be done? simple things. solitary is like looks crannies and holes in which they can live and breathe. cut a bottle in half, stuff it with bamboo cane like this and it creates tiny little holes for them to enter and breed in. or, if you feel more ambitious, you can get a bit of sheu ambitious, you can get a bit of shelf like this and fill it up with bits of cardboard, bar, bamboo, to create spaces. children can easily
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get involved with this as well. thank you very much. we will discuss more about what we can do to help preserve the bees of the nation will talk more about the weather. it has been a wonderful weekend across the uk. the temperature yesterday peaked at 20 celsius in the north of scotland. the forecast today is for more sunshine for some of you but we will have a more cloud here and there. a chilly start, misty but great conditions across central and eastern parts of england this morning. that grey cloud will take awhile to shift and burn away but it will last through much of day across eastern coastal counties of england, unlike what we saw on the weekend. but after what has been a frosty staff are a couple of view, another cracking spring day ahead. much sunshine around. certainly across scotla nd sunshine around. certainly across scotland where we saw temperatures reach close to 20 degrees yesterday, could hit 1819 again today through parts of the highlands. cut across
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the shell and is potentially a little but a cloud goes to the coast but it is across the eastern counties where the cloud will linger and the temperature will not only be around 19 celsius. elsewhere in the sunshine temperatures will happily reach the teams, could reach around 19 celsius across western part of england and wales. even across southern counties of england with the light breeze. it will feel a little warmer. another fine day as world come across in northern ireland. here, however, a lot more cloud than we saw yesterday so there will be case of sunny spells rather than clear blue skies. but really, for the vast majority of the shaping up for the vast majority of the shaping up to be another beautiful day. that sets us into a lovely evening. but what will happen through tonight, is much like what happened last night. low cloud across the eastern coastal counties will become more expensive once again, particularly across england into parts of south—east scotla nd england into parts of south—east scotland as well. keep it averages up scotland as well. keep it averages up here but in clear skies towards the west you could see a touch of frost to take us into the morning.
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into tuesday there will be some changes once again. we start quite grey and misty, particular cross and eastern areas. but into the afternoon will probably be funnier. into the west will cease and showers into the morning commute. fairly sporadic and they would develop further across other central western pa rt further across other central western part of england into northern ireland by the end of the afternoon across southern. for most of you the bulk of the day will be dry. in the sunshine between the showers, temperatures could hit 20 degrees in parts of south—east england. into wednesday, more showers developing across the west, were more frequent and we have seen on tuesday. eastern areas they dry and bright for the longest. how nice for the bees. they will be happy. more later on and as he said, it has been a beautiful weekend for many parts of the country. we asked for photographs and you have not disappointed us.
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first of all this photo has been sentin first of all this photo has been sent in of slater ‘s bridge in little langdale. david has a e-mail this picture of his family in the sunshine. oh, look at those three! janet says her dog enjoyed the sand dunes. that is in devon yesterday. and, finally... a 80 gram which is clearly smiling. it made her smile all this weekend as well. —— a baby bmb all this weekend as well. —— a baby lamb which is clearly smiling. i had wa nted lamb which is clearly smiling. i had wanted to see this brave few weeks. logs, i have the new pound point! since dan lost a coin in... it is allowed to touch them. these are some of the first that have ever been seen. this is what they look like, 12 sites, two different
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metals. a hologram along the bottom. there is a hologram below the head of the queen. it has a £ and the number one on it as well. if utility you can seek the number one turn into a pound. it is there. they're coming to circulation tomorrow but there are some issues about parking meters, vending machines, lockers and some people say it will cost an awful lot of money to change this over to the new pound coin. you can to spend the old coins until october but the change would cost businesses of fortune. since 1983 the pound coin has flowed through our economy. down high street into shops, vending machines, shopping trolleys, parking meters. but the days of the round pound are numbered. from october 15 these will no longer be legal tender and from tomorrow these, the new 12—sided coins, will enter circulation. it looks pretty.
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can i keep it? i like it. it reminds me of the old threepenny bit. the shape and structure of the new corn make it harder to forge. —— new coin. it is thought that 3% of the old pound coins were fake but the total cost of switching over will exceed £100 million. all that expense of changing every vending machine, shopping trolley, everywhere you put a pound coin in will need to be changed and it costs someone. the industry did not know until we saw it on the news. this man runs a business, supplying vending machines. he says that upgrades to 4000 of them have cost his company £200,000. we have been blatantly told thank you, new coin and it is yourjob to put in the relevant mechanisms. we have not been given a relevant time frame
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to do this, it will not be completed until the end of the year. the treasury decided to switch. in a statement it said they worked with business every step of the way to help them prepare for the new pound coin which it says it will be the most secure of its kind in the world. at the royal mint in south wales, 3 million of them are being produced every day. we had some issues with the old pound coin. the technology was 30 years old. it is made from two different coloured metal, a white coloured metal and a brass coloured outer. in addition there is a hologram. when you look in one direction you will see the number one and in the other direction you will see the £. i think it is important that the public can feel confident, that they know that when they hand this from me to you it is worth a pound and it is genuine.
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a leisure centre in birmingham where the lockers need upgrading. he has been a busy man. done nearly 4000 now across the country. things could soon get even busier. there is still a lot of work and a lot of lockers out there that still need to be changed over. as of tomorrow there will probably be a wave of leisure centres waking up to the fact that the coin—operated lockers will no longer operate. the treasury is confident that most businesses are ready for the change for the change and the long—term for the change for the change and the long—term benefits of the new pound coin are worth the short term cost. now, you can bank your old coins now or spend an till october. it has
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smooth edges and milled edges. or spend an till october. it has smooth edges and milled edgesm you look, i know this is getting quite boring now. it is 12 sides and alternate sides have grooves and then flat sides. it feels a bit strange if you rub your finger around it. do you like it? what is not to like about a shiny coin? the old girl was... i do prefer the new ones. it does spin quite well. look, you are going to lose another one. did you see that perfect spin! time now for the news from the regions. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. do people continue to be treated in hospital this morning after a car
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mounted the pavement in islington over the weekend. five arrests have been made, the incident on saturday night was not related. -- terror related. the public are being told to seek help if they feel they may be suffering from post traumatic stress disorder following the terrorist attack on westminster bridge and parliament last week. specialists at the university of london say after that the 7/7 bombings, a third of witnesses suffered from ptsd so psychiatrists are reminding people to get help if they feel they need it. in the short term it is quite likely that a number of people will feel distressed or that their life may have changed to some degree. speak to friends and colleagues, keep to your routine, do not drink too much alcohol, do some exercise. all good normal healthy coping strategies. but months later you're still not sleeping and you have nightmares and are irritable, you should see your gp. the national army museum in chelsea has said it will reopen its doors to the public on thursday, after a three year, multimillion—pound refit.
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it was formally opened by the queen a few days ago — and among the items on display — will be the queen's very own uniform from when she was in the women's royal army corps from 1949 to 1953. well, the timing couldn't be betterfor the opening, as the top ten most visited attractions in britain last year were all in london. the british museum is at number one, a position it's held every year for the past decade. between all of london's visitor attractions, there were well over 65 million visits. that's more than the total population of the uk. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the a13 commercial in stepney is blocked into town. that is because of a crash so expect major delays along that road. and in south—east london, in bexleyheath, crook log is closed eastbound near the leisure centre for repairs to a pot hole. let's have a check
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on the weather now with kate. good morning. after a truly gorgeous weekend we're waking up to a misty monday morning. the good news is that will not last for long and we will get sunshine a little bit later. this mist, this low cloud towards the north of london is quick to lift this morning and then the sunshine arrives. a north—easterly — easterly breeze will keep things chillier along the coast but central london should reach 17. a pleasantly warm afternoon. overnight tonight to an extent a repeat performance of last night. cloud, mist and murk developing. a minimum temperature six and nine celsius. a similar start to tuesday morning. that will lift and we will get sunny spells and the potential for some showers through tuesday afternoon especially the further west you are. it turns progressively more unsettled from midweek onwards. va nessa vanessa has a breakfast show on bbc
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brea kfast vanessa has a breakfast show on bbc breakfast radio london and i will be backin breakfast radio london and i will be back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. face—to—face — theresa may and nicola sturgeon meet for talks as the scottish parliament prepares to back a second vote on independence. the prime minister will urge unity ahead of brexit describing a united uk as an unstoppable force. good morning, it's monday 27th march. bt is hit with a record fine of £42 million because of delays in installing high—speed business lines. the investigation continues into a suspected gas explosion here in wirral which destroyed buildings and injured dozens of people. we will be
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live with some of those affected. good morning. we are on the road this week, the a50, talking about article 50 and that vote to leave the european union. negotiations kick off and we look at what businesses like this one in stoke wa nt to businesses like this one in stoke want to get out of it. in sport, england, scotland and northern ireland all win in world cup qualifying. . vp jermaine defoe returns from nearly four years out with a gel as england beat lithuania 2—0. and, there's a new quid on the block. this is it. the new pound coin and tomorrow it enters circulation. we will be finding out why not everyone is happy at its introduction. and the weather's been so lovely we have sent matt out and about. thank you, good morning. we are looking to what we can do to protect the nation's bees this morning.
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more tips on what you can do to preserve the nation's bees and a forecast that contains sunshine for many but with a few expectations, all the details coming up. good morning. first our main story. theresa may will meet scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, later today for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. the visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. let's speak to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon who is in glasgow for us. so potentially this could be a frosty meeting today, couldn't it?” think that's entirely possible, yes. good morning. what's interesting is downing street this morning said of the meeting between the two leaders, the meeting between the two leaders, the prime minister and the first minister, that they hoped the talks would prove constructive but on the
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relationships between mrsmay and mrsnicola sturgeon they would only say every political relationship has its own dimension. these two leaders will have a lot to discuss. we get a sense of some of the issues in theresa may's comments ahead of that meeting. she's going to meet staff at the department for international development where she will set out heraim of building development where she will set out her aim of building a global britain with a strong union. she will vow never to allow the uk to become looser and weaker. she's also meeting officers from police scotla nd meeting officers from police scotland to discuss counterterrorism, that after that attack in westminster last week. security will be on the agenda with her talks with nicola sturgeon and also article 50, the scottish government says two days before that process starts there's been no discussion yet over the scottish government's role in that process, how scotland's interests will be represented. critically, theresa may is also saying she will forcefully reiterate her view that now is not the time for a second independence
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referendum. that an area which nicola sturgeon will want to push her on later today. thank you. we will have more details on that meeting throughout the day on the news channel. bt has been fined a record £42 million by the communications regulator ofcom. it found bt‘s openreach division had cut compensation payments to other telecoms providers for delays in installing high speed business lines. the company said it apologised wholeheartedly for the mistakes. simon clemison reports. whether at home or at work, cable switch connectors are still provided by bt. some carry large amounts of data at great speed. but there are cases where the company has been slow to deliver the lines. and the uk relies on the bigger cables, which make up the network, as they support mobile and broadband operators, as well as big businesses, schools, and hospitals. where bt fails to meet deadlines for ethernet services, as they are known, they need to pay compensation to the likes of vodafone and talktalk.
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but they have been using a clause in the contract to reduce payments. now, bt has been hit with a huge extra bill. in a record fine, ofcom has ordered them to pay £42 million on penalties. this is the highest fine we have imposed. we feel it reflects the seriousness of the breach in question and the importance of this sector of the uk economy. of course, the fine needs to be seen in context in the round with the significant compensation package. the scale of the fine is said to reflect the importance of bt to other companies, who offer services such as broadband. bt has apologised, adding that it should never have happened, and that measures have been put in place to stop it happening again. but in addition to the fine, it will need to find the additional £300 million owed to companies in compensation. two people were seriously hurt
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and dozen more were injured when several buildings collapsed following a major explosion on merseyside at the weekend. it has emerged that residents reported smelling gas at least 24 hours before the suspected gas blast in bebbington in wirral on saturday. the national grid confirmed that reports of leaks were investigated prior to the explosion. attempts to end the political stalemate in northern ireland have reached a dead end. unionist parties and sinn fein have until later today to broker a deal but talks have broken down. our ireland correspondent chris page is in belfast this morning. in some ways this was expected but what happens now to the assembly? this stalemate is difficult to solve, the parties had until 4pm this afternoon to form a new power—sharing executive here. as you
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say, the process has ended in breakdown, not breakthrough. sinn fein say they won't be putting forward ministers to go into the government here and because they're the largest irish nationalist party then stormont cannot function without them. when the deadline passes the northern ireland secretary has a tricky decision to make. as the law stands at the moment he has to call another stormont assembly election within what's described as a reasonable period but the last election was just over three weeks ago. alternatively, he could pass emergency legislation in the house of commons and take over running northern ireland from westminster. as neither of those options seem particularly appealing, he may play for time, try to get the parties back around the table for a deal. no matter what, northern ireland is facing more political uncertainty and it's been without a functioning government for three months now. thank you very much. mps must introduce tougher measures to tackle childhood obesity in england, including controlling supermarket price promotions on junk food and food high in sugar.
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a report out today by the health select committee argue that plans published by government ministers last year missed several important opportunities and don't go far enough. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. a levy on sugary drinks was the main element of the government's childhood obesity strategy when it was announced last year. while many health experts and campaigners said it was a start, they also thought the government could and should have gone further. now a group of mps has agreed that much more needs to be done to tackle childhood obesity. in particular, they want action to curb discounts and price promotions on unhealthy food. the committee also calls for clear goals on reducing overall levels of childhood obesity and for the levy on sugary drinks to be extended to milk—based products that have added sugar. we know that one in three 11—year—olds are overweight or obese, and that's notjust about individual choices, it's about the environment that children are growing up in and really the key thing that's
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missing from the current strategy is regulation around marketing and the promotions to children. representatives from the food industry itself told the committee that responsible retailers are being disadvantaged by those who continue to offer big discounts on food high in sugar and fat. in a statement, the department of health in england defended its use of a largely voluntary approach from the food industry to the reduction of sugar and fat, and said ministers had not ruled out further measures if results are not seen. but the mps argue the situation with childhood obesity is so serious and urgent, ministers need to take much more robust action. dominic hughes, bbc news. the rail company first mtr has been awarded the franchise to run south west trains for seven years
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from august 2017 with £1.2 billion of investment the department of transport have announced. transport secretary chris grayling said the firm will deliver the improvements that people say they want right across the southern western franchise area. at least eight people are thought to have died after an avalanche struck in centraljapan. seven teenagers and one teacher are feared dead and 38 others are injured. it took place during a climbing session near a popular ski resort. four other students and teachers are missing. the area has received heavy snow over the last two days. a broken braking device may have been to blame for an hong kong escalator suddenly reversing direction and increasing its speed at a shopping centre. at least 18 people were injured. video footage shot by witnesses captured the incident as dozens of passengers lost their balance and tumbled down to the ground. several ambulances rushed to the scene and took the injured to nearby hospitals endometriosis and fibroids
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are conditions which affect millions of women but according to a new report they are not taken seriously enough. over 2,500 people across the uk were asked about their treatment. fibroids, the most common non—cancerous growths that develop in or around the womb, affect up to 70% of women. some will feel extreme pain. the survey found 12% of women had to wait up to two years for treatment. endometriosis can cause painful periods and lower back pain. it is estimated to affect one in ten women in the uk. 40% of women said they needed ten or more gp appointments before being referred to a specialist for the condition. joining is now is dr geeta nargund,
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senior consultant gynaecologist, and anne little who was diagnosed by fibroids. lots of people getting in touch with us lots of people getting in touch with us and it's something that's not discussed a lot, is it? anne, let's talk about you, first of all. you had ongoing issues and how long did it take you to find out what was wrong? it took a while because it's a sensitive area and topic, so, i teach exercise in the community and i was getting symptoms when i was exercising. i put up with it for about 12 months. then i eventually went to see the gp and she diagnosed fibroids and that was confirmed with a scan. right. how long did the whole process take? the actual scan? until you managed to find out? whole process take? the actual scan? until you managed to find ounm was very until you managed to find ounm was very quick. over a year before you found out what was wrong? yes, that was because i was reluctant to pursue it because it's a sensitive area and sensitive topic. it's
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understandable but i suppose the problem trying to get to the bottom here is that some women are going with different problems and having to see a doctor on many occasions before they get to the bottom of things. yes, dan, this report highlights key gaps, i suppose in a way to demonstrate in the system and also has some robust recommendations which i am delighted about. first of all, as anne said, you put up with it. women don't talk about it, don't go to the gp quickly. they really feel they can't talk about it, feel isolated and they wait longer, but having said that the report also highlights they have to have repeat gp appointments before they could actually get a diagnosis. so, those findings are extremely important. one thing it does show is that nice guidelines and best practice
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guidelines and best practice guidelines recommended are not used across the nation. that's a problem in healthcare we are having, in fertility it's a huge problem. i am saying if nice guidance was used across the nation to reduce this u na cce pta ble across the nation to reduce this unacceptable regional variations we have got we could swallow a lot of this rather than having a patchy treatment options and all of this, that's fundamental to ensuring that we get consistent treatment options, information throughout the nation. anne, i know that once you were diagnosed there was the treatment options, you found that confusing, didn't you? i was worried about it. the first option was to do nothing and wait for the menopause because i was told fibroids can shrink during the menopause. the other option was to possibly pursue surgery which frightened me. there was no mention
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at that point about... that's the one. no mention of that. i did research myself really because i was scared about having the surgery. so, i was lucky, because i was a lecturer at the university at the time so! lecturer at the university at the time so i had access to research papers and a database so i did my own research and that's how i came across that process. lots of people are having to do the research themselves on the internet. to touch on what ann said. you didn't use the word "embarrass" but it was something you didn't feel co mforta ble it was something you didn't feel comfortable talking about. how much is ita comfortable talking about. how much is it a taboo subject? it is quite common for women not to talk about it and what i think from this report, it is clear that we need education ok and one of the things
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that i would actually highly recommend is to include more details about menstrual health, what is normal period, what is normal period flow and menstrual health and pelvic pain, to include more about it in the secondary school curriculum. if we look at it and if young women are empowered with this information and knowledge they are more likely to do something about it if symptoms come. you know this ten appointments. somebody maybe embarrassed and they go to theirgp somebody maybe embarrassed and they go to their gp and it will be weeks before they perhaps go back, ten appointments before they get a diagnosis. if the nice gloids were in place, do you think it would help with that number for example? in place, do you think it would help with that number for example ?m would. we could go into one—stop clinics, like one—stop diagnosis clinics, like one—stop diagnosis clinics so a scan is done quickly and there are no delays. lots of people getting in contact and saying they've had issues like this. debbie
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said it took seven years for a gp to refer me to a consultant which resulted in major operation. kim said she was fobbed off by a gp and finally got a hospital appointment and it turned out she had fib fib. ali says, "when they investigated my concerns, i ended up having a hysterectomy aged 35." an nhs england spokesperson said, "the nhs takes women's health and satisfaction with the services provided extremely seriously and will carefully consider the report and recommendations". thanks for getting in touch today. it is clearly an issue that's very important for so many people. a lovely spring weekend for many of us. this morning, we're looking at how you can you make your garden more bee friendly. this is important stuff for pollinators everywhere. the habitat of our wild bees are in
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drastic decline. 97% of low land meadow in the countryside has disappeared and the habitats in the towns and the cities is disappearing rapidly. particularly as people start to pave over their front gardens for parking, but there is little things we can do to help preserve the bees and encourage them. anything from some planting to something a little bit more drastic. this is a living willow sculpture and the bee approximates, especially when this comes into flower, the bees just love it and the bees probably loved the sunshine of the weekend as i think many of us did. a stunning weekend in which we saw the warmest conditions of the year so far. temperatures reached 20 celsius in scotland yesterday. we will be getting close to that again today for some of you. we start on a chilly note. the warmth by day is replaced by clear skies and chilly
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conditions by night. it is mistier this morning for central and eastern parts of england. lots of low cloud at the moment. it will take a while for some of you to see the sud shine. that low cloud will remain across eastern coastal counties, but for most, the sun will be out all day even if there is a few more pockets of cloud in the sky above. that makes for another warm day. we reached 20 celsius in scotland yesterday. we could see 18 or 19 celsius in the highlands through today. shetland seeing more cloud. the potential for more cloud in across the south east of scotland later. eastern coastal counties of england may remain grey and misty all day long. temperatures only nine or ten celsius. if you're in southern counties of england, you will probably notice a breeze. that chilled things down a bit, but the breeze is lighter today so it will feel warmer today and there will be plenty of it towards the south—west of england and indeed, across wales. it is shaping up to be another fine
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day. sunny spells and temperatures along the west coast and across parts of gwyneth could get to 19 celsius. northern ireland also seeing good, sunny spells. temperatures 17 or 18 celsius. of course, warmth by day, quickly disappears as we head into the evening. the evenings are lighter at the moment. your commute home should be lighter than it was on friday with the sun setting after 7.30pm tonight. tonight, with clear skies in the west, there will be a touch of frost. mist and low cloud becomes abundant once more. it will keep temperatures up into the morning and notice in plymouth things turning milder into the morning. that's because here the air is coming from the south. with it a few showers to start the day across south—west england and wales. most will start dry and grey and misty in many parts. into the afternoon eastern areas will be sunniest and showers breaking out across central parts of
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england. highs of 20 celsius in the south east corner. warm where you have got the sunshine on wednesday. showers more abundant in the west. a breeze to go with it. in the sunnier moments it should still feel warm, but not quite as sunny as that stunning weekend. back to you both. thank you. two people were seriously hurt and dozens more were injured when several buildings collapsed following a major explosion on merseyside at the weekend. a children's dance studio, being used just an hour before, was destroyed. the scene has been likened to an earthquake. it has since emerged that residents reported smelling gas at least 24 hours before the blast in bebbington in wirral on saturday. our reporter clare fallon is at the scene. lots of people had a really lucky escape, didn't they? good morning. this is as close as we can get to the scene of the explosion this
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morning. a cordon is still in place. emergency crews are still here, but now that the sun is up, even from this distance you can get an idea of the scale of the devastation here. as you mentioned two people were seriously hurt. many more walking wounded as they were described by the emergency services who were here on saturday night when this explosion happened and let me bring infor explosion happened and let me bring in for you at this point christopher power, you were at home on saturday night, weren't you, watching the telly. it was 9.15pm and suddenly all the windows came in. i heard a loud bang and initially i thought it was a bomb. sol loud bang and initially i thought it was a bomb. so i ran outside. there was a bomb. so i ran outside. there was screaming. people were crying. and then someone mentioned that a building had collapsed to my right. when i went back home, all the glass from our windows were out. the door was off. devastation everywhere. but what was great is that the whole community came together and helped and the pastor down the road in life
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church called people in. although it was devastating, it was great to see the spirit of new ferry coming together and helping support each other. what's your situation at the moment. you can't get back home? we have been in touch with people and they said we are not allowed back for a few more days until they have checked everything so at the moment we're being put up bya checked everything so at the moment we're being put up by a friend. checked everything so at the moment we're being put up bya friend. when i call out of the house, i collapsed on the floor with shock and all i had was my pyjamas. you're worried about your cat? yes, i saw him run andl about your cat? yes, i saw him run and i haven't seen him for two days. i'm worried. hopefully we can get someone i'm worried. hopefully we can get someone in to find him which would be great. people are talking about the timing involved. this happened late on saturday evening. it was 9.15pm. that's a dance club over there. and young people were dancing
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hours before. so you can think of disaster if they were there an hour later. so people are really thinking this could have been a lot worse absolutely and you have to think that people walk up the presint every day to go to the pub or the shops and we're fort national that didn't happen. we did have casualties so that was terrible of the thank you so much for your time. i know it has been a really difficult couple of days. let's bring in pastor partington, you opened up your church? our church became' refuge centre for the people of new ferry and bebbington. for the people who lost their homes and the injured and we looked after them and until yesterday afternoon there was still people there that stayed there
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overnight and we supported them through that time. christopher was talking about the way the community really rallied. is that something you saw as well? the biggest thing and the biggest impression is the fa ct and the biggest impression is the fact that it hasn't beenjust one group of people that have come together, it has been a plethora of people from the emergency services. obviously to life scam church, but to the wider community that's been involved in this from the outset. thank you for your time. it has been a really tricky couple of days and much more difficulty ahead, i think, for this community. there is a police investigation that's underway here. as you mentioned a few moments ago, in the hours before this explosion people reported the smell of gas. engineers were called out and they couldn't find any problems, but clearly, now the focus is going to be trying to investigate exactly what happened here and what the cause was. clare, thank you very much. best of luck to chris and everybody else affected as well. thank you very much.
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every time you see those pictures, it is amazing. so lucky there wasn't a dance class going on at the time. we are talking about the new pound coin today. they come into circulation tomorrow. lots of people say they are worried about their old pound coins. what happens? fear not. you can spend your old pound coins until 15th october or take them to the bank and get them swapped. our the bank and get them swapped. our the post office can sort that out. there is 1.5 billion of these new coins which will come into circulation from tomorrow. there is a hologram underneath the queen's head which louise cannot see it!” cannot see the hologram. it could be something to do with my contact lenses or my age! anyway, if you can't see the thing, the hologram,
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let me now. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. what a lovely weekend it was. in scotland we got to 20 for the first time this year. this week we will see more cloud, it's going to deliver some rain. with the winds from the south or south—west it's still going to be relatively warm. it's a slow start today for many central and eastern parts. a fair bit of low cloud and mist and fog. that will slowly burn back from the midlands but it will take a while. it may take all day for that to clear for some eastern coasts. but in scotland through the afternoon lovely again in the highlands, 18 or 19. a good deal of sunshine and light winds. a decent afternoon in northern ireland. underneath the low cloud temperatures will struggle. but further west with sunshine it's around about 15 or 16 widely. could get to 17 in the south—east once the sun comes out. notably less windy thanit
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sun comes out. notably less windy than it has been recently. through the evening the low cloud and mist and fog will return from the east and fog will return from the east and by the end of the night the low cloud and mist and fog will become fairly extensive so poor visibility for some. in the south—west a breeze. for most places we are into single figures, most of us will be frost—free. tuesday and into wednesday this low pressure to the west will become the dominant force, turning things more unsettled. we start to see some cloud and rain coming in from the south—west during the day on tuesday. showers in the south—east hit and miss, probably driest for longest in the north—east where it will be cool. the western side of scotland could get 17. by the middle of the week a chance of seeing more cloud and rain, mainly in the north and west. this is business live from bbc news
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with ben thompson and sally bundock. tackling cheap oil. major producers consider another plan to boost prices. live from london, that's our top story on monday 27th march. swollen stockpiles are depressing oil prices but what can opec and non—opec members do now and what did they discuss over the weekend? we will tell you all you need to know. a record fine for bt with the firm setting aside hundreds of millions of dollars for delays in installing high—speed lines. this is
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