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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 27, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's monday, it's 9.003m. i am victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. this morning, is this police risk assessment, known as form 696, racist? promoters fear it is. now this programme understands the government is going to raise concerns about it. i have done shows where it's not predominantly black form, i don't have to do the form. when i am performing in oceania, it's middle—class white kids, certain areas don't have to do the form at all. also on the programme, an exclusive interview with a man who wants to change the law to allow people with incurable conditions which badly affect their quality of life to end their life in this country. we will bring you that exclusive
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interview after 10 am. and, you may think this is a video of peppa pig and is safe for your young child to watch on youtube, but it actually goes on to show fairly disturbing content not suitable for children. we will bring you the details. hello, welcome to the programme. we are live until ii.00am. throughout the morning the latest breaking news and developing stories. later we will bring you more details on a story that two girls aged 10 were stopped from boarding a united airlines flight because they were wearing these — leggings. they were flying as guests of employees and were subject to the company's dress code. today we want your examples of leggings discrimination. for some reason leggings really annoy people. do get in touch on that and all the stories we are talking about this morning.
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use the hashtag victoria live and if you text you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today, labour shadow brexit secretary, keir starmer, has set the terms his party will judge whether to support any final brexit deal. he announced six tests for brexit, asking for a deal that delivers the same benefits as the uk currently enjoys as a member of the single market and customs union. let's talk to norman. what are the conditions? these are the tests labour say will have to be met if they're going to vote for the deal that theresa may comes back from her negotiations. we are now moving into the sort of second phase of brexit, we are going to trigger article 50 that begins the process, now we get into the deal—making. we heard from the head of the eu negotiating team this morning saying that brexit bill, the amount of money we are going to have to pay is central to their negotiations. labour setting
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out the six tests. let me run through what they're suggesting theresa may will have to secure agreement on. one, fair migration system, retaining a strong collaborative approach with the eu, protecting national security, delivering for all the uk, preventing a race to the bottom in terms of changes to workers' rights and ensuring exactly the same benefits as we currently enjoy as pa rt benefits as we currently enjoy as part of the single market. keir starmer also issued this warning to theresa may, not to come back with no deal. have a listen. once a small minority in the conservative party, the brexiteers are now in office and in power. this idealogically driven approach to brexit will be disastrous and divisive and it would stand as a road block to continued co—operation in the important fields of technology, research, medicine,
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security, science, art and culture. the prime minister needs to face down these brexiteers. will theresa may be able to meet the six tests? most of them, yes, because they're slightly motherhood and apple pie. one of the tests which it seems will be difficult to meet, that's the one i talked about, having to ensure that the uk retains exactly the same benefits as we currently enjoy. when you think about it that's difficult because theresa may has already said we are not going to be in the single market, not in the customs union, so having the same benefits is going to be very difficult indeed. labour make the point it was david davis, the brexit secretary who first suggested that's what the government would try to achieve, that would seem to set the bar very high indeed. so, you are thinking at the moment it's going to be very tough for mrsmay to meet that which means labour would, i expect, for mrsmay to meet that which means labourwould, iexpect, have for mrsmay to meet that which means labour would, i expect, have to vote
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against the final brexit deal. there's a long way to go, thank you very much. now the rest of the morning's news. the home secretary, amber rudd, will meet european ministers today to discuss ways of preventing further terrorist attacks. she's called for the authorities to be given access to encrypted messaging services. the westminster attacker, khalid masood, may have used whatsapp shortly before he began his assault. this afternoon's deadline to form a new devolved government in northern ireland following the elections is likely to pass without an agreement. sinn fein say they won't go into an executive led by the democratic unionist party leader, arlene foster, while a public inquiry investigates her handling of a failed green energy scheme. mps must introduce tougher measures to tackle childhood obesity in england, including controlling supermarket price promotions on junk food and food high in sugar. a report out today by
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the health select committee argues missed several important opportunities and don't go far enough. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. a levy on sugary drinks was the main element of the government's childhood obesity strategy when it was announced last year. while many health experts and campaigners said it was a start, they also thought the government could and should have gone further. now a group of mps has agreed that much more needs to be done to tackle childhood obesity. in particular, they want action to curb discounts and price promotions on unhealthy food. the committee also calls for clear goals on reducing overall levels of childhood obesity and for the levy on sugary drinks to be extended to milk—based products that have added sugar. we know that one in three ii—year—olds are overweight or obese, and that's notjust about individual choices, it's about the environment that children are growing up in and really the key thing that's missing from the current strategy is regulation around marketing and the promotions to children. representatives from the food industry itself told the committee that responsible retailers are being disadvantaged by those
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who continue to offer big discounts on food high in sugar and fat. in a statement, the department of health in england defended its use of a largely voluntary approach from the food industry to the reduction of sugar and fat, and said ministers had not ruled out further measures if results are not seen. but the mps argue the situation with childhood obesity is so serious and urgent, ministers need to take much more robust action. dominic hughes, bbc news. we will be talking to one of the mps involved in that report and some moneys later here on the programme. bt has been fined a record 42 million pounds by the communications regulator ofcom. it found bt‘s openreach division had cut compensation payments to other
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telecoms providers for delays in installing high speed business lines.the company said it "apologised wholeheartedly" for the mistakes. there are claims that changes to disability benefits, called personal independent payments, could lead to an increase in mental health problems. the government has reversed a court ruling which would have allowed more people to claim the benefit. people with severe mental health issues who suffer distress when they travel alone. nobody who already gets the benefit will see a cut. and more on that later in the programme. nine out of 10 local authorities in england are increasing their level of council tax from april, a new survey has found. residents in some areas will see their bills rise by the maxiumum 5%, as councils use new powers to top up their charges with money ring—fenced for social care. only 22 councils out of 353 in england are freezing council tax in the next financial year according to the press association. the government is to respond
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to fears a police risk assessment form has been used in a "racist" way to target grime artists. promoters and licensees in many areas are asked to complete a form 696 before hosting some music events featuring "djs and mcs". culture minister matt hancock is set to raise concerns with mayor sadiq khan about the use of the form in london. the met police denies the voluntary form targets certain genres of music. we have a special report on that coming up. a man is seeking to take his case to the high court to change the law on assisted suicide which is currently unlawful in the uk. the 54—year—old father, who cannot be identified by name, was diagnosed in 2014 with a rare degenerative disease. his illness is not terminal, but means he is largely confined to his bed and he needs constant care. the judgement is expected to be announced in the coming days. and we have an exclusive interview
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on this programme. an american airline has been criticised after two young girls were stopped from boarding a flight because they were wearing leggings. the incident at the airport was seen by another passenger, who took to social media to tweet united airlines. the airline responded by saying they had the right to refuse passengers for not following their dress code. they later clarified that the girls were not on a general ticket and had to meet certain standards. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. let's get some sport. olly foster is with us. three wins out of three for the home nations playing world cup qualifiers yesterday, butjermain defoe and a young boy called bradley stole the show. good morning. yes, they forged a premiership and friendship. jermaine defoe and bradley, who is five years old and has a terminal disease. he has cancer and sunderland the club have been giving him and his family lots of support and jermaine defoe
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at 34 lots of support and jermaine defoe at 3a was recalled to the england squad for the firs time in over three years and there he is with bradley and joe hart pushing jermaine defoe out first. joe hart given the captaincy but says you lead bradley out. a special night for bradley and jermaine defoe, as well. would you believe it, defoe actually scored england's first against lithuania. it wasn't a great match this world cup qualifier. but a lovely finish and the manager says if he keeps on scoring there is no reason why he can't go and play in russia next summer. jamie vardy scored their second. 2—0. england remain unbeaten and top of their group. the match wasn't great but lovely scenes before, very poignant. gordon strachan has more time in the scotla nd gordon strachan has more time in the scotland job. it was the expectation that had scotland not won against
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slovenia that would have pretty much made it very difficult for them to qualify. but chris martin who came on in the last eight minutes was booed, a lot of affect scotland fans. he scored that late winner. now a couple of points behind second place in that all—important play—off spot. let's hear from place in that all—important play—off spot. let's hearfrom gordon strachan who has still got himself a scotla nd strachan who has still got himself a scotland job. all you can ask as a manager is do certain things, they did they were asked. they pushed themselves another level there. so i was calm enough, what will be will be. but i was enjoying their performance as a manager. so scotland now fourth in that group. a couple of points in england's group, but still going strong. their next match is against
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england in june. northern ireland are still going strong in their group. michael o'neill says remember we got to france at the euros and that's driving them on trying to get to back—to—back major championships and eight unbeaten now at windsor park. they were playing norway and they won 2—0. it helped that they scored inside a couple of minutes. they we re inside a couple of minutes. they were 2—0 up by half—time. connor washington with their second. a lovely finish. northern ireland making it a clean sweep for the home nations yesterday. wales getting that draw last week in the republic. thank you. this is a police event risk assessment form known as form 696. clubs and bars who want to put on an event with a dj or an mc performing to a backing track are asked to fill it out. it's been used in london
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by the metropolitan police for a number of years but has been branded racist and divisive because people in the music industry feel it targets music performed by black and asian artists — whereas pop or rock acts don't have to fill it out. and depending on what goes on that form, police can shut down events they think pose too high a risk to those attending. now this programme understands that the culture minister matt hancock is set to raise concerns with london mayor sadiq khan about the use of the form in london. we've also discovered some police forces outside of london still ask for the ethnic make—up of the audience attending and the music genre being played at an event, on the form. our reporter chi chi izundu's been looking into this one, and a warning, this piece does contain some flash photography. if you submit your details through a 696 and an event gets shut down, you kind of know it's the police. we don't question it no more, we just know they're just trying to shutdown a grime night. there should be a review of the whole 696 process. so would you say that form 696 is racist?
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course, it's all like... it's all like a big tidal wave of positive things, that's why i'm not complaining, it's a lot, but it's all great things, it's all blessings, yeah, so... stormzy hit number one with his debut album gang signs & prayers a couple of weeks back, and broke records, including racking up the most first—week streams for a number one album in chart history. attention is so strong on grime right now, when he freestyled about the brits failing to acknowledge anyone from it in 2016, brits bosses called him in and changed their voting structure. grime's exploded, it's absolutely exploded. there's been a massive explosion in consumption, in the retention rate of people that are coming across the grime shutdown platform, and the people that
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are searching for grime artists. if you look at someone like skepta, for example, or someone like stormzy, they get several millions of streams per month. # you're getting way too big for your boots. # you're never too big for the boot. # i've got the big size 125 on my feet...#. i would say grime is like a musical representation of london street culture. like, so, it's fast—tempo, it's high—energy, it's an attitude, it's a whole culture. it's fashion, it's the way we speak, all rolled into like ilio—bpm electronic dance hall—inspired fusion. you've got to listen to it, you've got to experience it to fully understand what it is, yeah? one way to experience grime, like all genres of music, is by going to a gig. but people in the industry say that this form used in london, known as the metropolitan police's promotion event risk assessment form 696, is stopping those experiences, and is targeting music like grime. because djs and mcs performing
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to a backing track have to fill out this form, so that can be things like garage, r&b, grime — predominantly music enjoyed and performed by black people. other genres like pop or rock don't have to fill out a special risk assessment form, and even though it's voluntary in theory, those who do have to fill it out feel obliged. it was an idea that you'd be able to identify in advance potential issues. so would you say that form 696 is racist? if an artist seems to have a following where there's a lot of incidents occur, or if an artist is seen as proclaiming, encouraging a certain kind of dynamic with different groups or what people call gangs coming together, they are seen as a problem and they are then identified, and i think that that's a way that people see the 696 form can work to prevent those things.
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people get into habits and they start hearing certain things and then they think that this music means there's going to be more problems because it's going to mean these types of people. so actually the form isn't a racist form, the form is a form. it's sad to say, but i do feel it is. in my experience, when it's normally a night where it is predominantly black people, without fail 696 form comes out of nowhere, have to do it. when i've done shows where it's not predominantly black people, i don't have to do the form. when i'm performing in oceana, it is mainly like middle class or upper class white kids and stuff, certain unis, certain cities, certain areas don't have to do the form at all. to me, it does feel like a race thing. just going back again to the wording of the form, like it's implicitly explicit, if that makes sense? like, you're targeting a specific genre of music that you know a certain demographic is going to listen to. you haven't written anything about any other type of demographic.
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they can say it's not racist, but it's definitely targeted, which, to me, is the equivalent. so let's be clear on how form 696 is supposed to work. you want to put on a gig featuring, let's say, stormzy. he's an artist that would mc, spit bars, rap to a backing track as specified by the form. details needed include the venue, the promoter, name of the event, stormzy‘s real name, date of birth and address. that's then sent to the metropolitan police's central licensing team, and the met told us they do research with the information they've received. they wouldn't go into detail, but it's likely to include criminal background checks. the met then grade that event. the gradings can go from low risk to medium to high, but again police wouldn't tell us what constitutes a high, medium or low risk event. that grade is then sent to the venue and to the local licensing police unit, and according to the metropolitan police it's then up to the venue or the promoter, or the local licensing police unit, whether to cancel the event. last year, a club in croydon
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in london hit the headlines after it was revealed that, through form 696, police had told the owner to ban bashment, a form ofjamaican music. i received this letter from them, and it said that bashment plays unacceptable forms of music and that if we continue to play it we'd literally risk losing our business. we were told that bashment may attract the wrong type of people. i don't think they actually wanted to see too many black people coming to the town centre. at the time, police disputed that was the case and the club has remained open after many local people protested. my birthday bash was nearly shut down unless i took an artist off. it turned out to be because his brother had some sort of court case. wasn't even the actual artist. they said, yeah, basically he had to come off otherwise your birthday bash isn't going to happen, so i actually had to take
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him off the line—up. i've definitely been booked at an event where the promoter's like, last—minute, more time on the day had to say, "can't put this event on no more, police have said no, we haven't got a reason why." the metropolitan police refused to do an interview with this programme on form 696, but they did answer a variety of questions, including some sent in via a freedom of information request. we found that they have reviewed nearly 2,500 696s since 2016 alone, that's up 89% from five years ago. through an foi with the met, this programme has discovered that the form encourages licensed venues, police and local authorities and promoters to share information. it gives licensees up—to—date information about past and future promotions, plus it helps reduce crime and disorder around licensed venues. but the met said it's rare for police to advise that an event be cancelled.
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if you say it straight, you do not get more crime with young black men than you do with young white men or anyone else. when there's an incident, it tags a whole genre and a whole piece of music. it's a bit like saying, well, we're not going to have rock and roll or any music whatsoever of any kind because some guys from essex orfrom hampstead have had a punch—up or stabbed each other. you can't then say, "we're not going to have any pop music of any kind." and that's where the tension lies, you know? the metropolitan police's promotion event risk assessment form 696 was introduced in london back in 2005 after police said club owners and promoters were concerned over a spate of violent attacks at venues around the capital in the early noughties. so are gigs where someone performs to a backing track more likely to attract serious violent crime? the only figures we have are from 2009, when police looked in detail at the form.
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this 2009 review looked at violent crime linked to pubs and clubs which had hosted music events. officers looked at reports in particular of serious violent crime, things like murder, gbh, threats to kill. they also looked at crimes where a weapon had been used and also where there'd been group fights. they found 85 cases. all of these events were listed as having a variety of music styles. the review says funk, house, indian, pop. at the top of the list, with 48 events where there were serious violent incidents, was music which included r&b. at 32 was house music. and in at number three was pop, with 31 events which had had violent serious crime. now, let's look at the list below that — all variety of music going. the other interesting thing that the review found
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was that the victims of these crimes were largely white europeans, and it was the same for the suspects. but, despite that evidence, the review still concluded that the likely profile of the music events where a serious violent or weapon—related crime happened was with recorded music, djs, and the music type of r&b, house, funky house and similar. now, despite a recommendation to, there has not been a review of form 696 since 2009. and when we asked, police were unable to update us with more recent figures of crime linked to pubs and clubs which host music events. a bunch of young men all dressed in black dancing extremely aggressively on stage. it made me feel so intimidated, and it's just not what i expect to see on prime—time tv. in a statement, they said the 2009 review was done by the clubs and vice unit, which no longer exists,
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and that they now run regular forums where promoters are able to exchange views and air grievances, as well as meetings for those who want advice on the form. we asked to see the minutes of those meetings and the met told us they were private one—to—ones, so we asked to see the minutes of the forum meetings, and the met said if we wanted any more information we'd have to submit a freedom of information request, so we have. and they said they are confident the majority understand the need forform 696. there's trouble at all types of gigs. and i know for a fact many other different types of genres and gigs don't have to do the form. say, for example, ed sheeran had a show and a fight broke out — he's not going to do a 696 form on his next arena tour. he's not. it's different for them. why is it different?
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there's situations everywhere, whether it's punk, rock, hip—hop, pop, whatever. things can happen in places, so if you're going to do that to protect people, it should be for every single club. why only these ones? it's notjust these ones that have problems. but grime isn'tjust a london thing, it's found love up and down the uk, in places like south yorkshire, the midlands, even here in northamptonshire. and now this programme can confirm that there are forces across england that have their own version of a promotion risk assessment form, or they've taken the questions from the met version and added them to a generic form. i got taken off a festival in leeds. they basically said, "we've got to take off these grime acts." we never actually get to talk to the police, they don't really respond to the artist at all. it's almost as if they don't have to tell us why. for me, that's wrong, because at least if we know why, then we know how to change it or how to go about it. we wanted to know whether forces
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england have their own version of the metropolitan police's promotion event risk assessment form 696, so we asked them and, of those that responded, we now know that at least 15 have their own version, or have taken questions from the met‘s one and added them to a generic risk assessment form. bedfordshire police actually ask for the music genre being played at an event, and they warn that if you don't fill out their form correctly it could jeopardise future events for the promoter and a venue. leicestershire police ask for a music genre, but they also ask for the ethnic make—up of the audience, and they also want to know the dress code. and nottinghamshire police say they are open to discussions on their form 696. we generally know what the ethnic make—up's going to be from what comes in anyway, so, you know. it's about those types of events that bring certain risks, and it's not necessarily any particular genre of music, although there are particular performers that have a following
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that bring with them a certain amount of problems. by risk—assessing them, we can then make sure that we identify problems, work with promoters and venues to make sure that all of the mitigation is in place to prevent those incidents happening, or at least to minimise wherever possible the risk of those serious incidents happening. # you trying to say he's better than me? # tell my man shut up! # mention my name in your tweets? # rude boy, shut up! # how can you be better than me? # shut up!# we did ask a number of promoters and venue owners to appear in this film, but a lot said no overfears that they or their event might become a target, because for years there's been rumours about a police blacklist with acts, their followers and their associates. # man called me a back—up dancer.
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# on stage at the brits i'm a back—up dancer. # if that makes me a back—up dancer, the man in your vids? # back—up dancer. ..# now some licensees are telling us that they are having constructive conversations with the police over form 696, and, to quote one promoter, on ways to get around the system. that same promoter, though, asks, why should he have to get around the system? we've been talking to central licensing and we've done some good work with initiating a conversation, because we said that there's a real concern around 696s, and particularly how it plays out with certain genres of music and certain demographics, particularly around grime and garage. and we've bought some managers and labels in together with the promoters and said that we would address it, and that's a work in motion. we actually think there should be a review of the whole 696 process. we think that it's got challenges, and it's flawed. but, despite that, and the intervention
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of the culture minister, there are no plans to get rid of form 696. your views on this are, of course, welcome. this comment, isn't the form basically a form of racial profiling? don't tarnish everyone with the same brush. nightlife is struggling as it is. this tweet, the nature of the event including the genre is a relevant risk assessment criteria. gail says on twitter, there is a discriminatory element to
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this form, keep people safe but it's too far. another says, some musics a tt ra cts too far. another says, some musics attracts people that are attracted to knife, guns and violence, so it's a sensible form. the. the met say the form doesn't target any particular group — leicestershire police say their form is under review and some questions may change. the mayor of london's office say it's very rare for police to assess after 10am, we'll speak to grime act post diddy. the online videos that mimic popular children's programmes like peppa pig — but deliver disturbing content. we'll look at what's being done to combat the problem. and we'll discuss how proposed cuts to disability payments are affecting the disabled — ahead of a vote on the issue later today. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. willjudge on whether to support
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any final brexit deal. he announced six tests for brexit — asking for a deal that delivers the same benefits as the uk currently enjoys as a member of the single market and customs union. once a small minority in the conservative party, the brexiteers are now in office and in power. this ideologically—driven approach to brexit would be disastrous and divisive. and it would stand as a roadblock to continued co—operation in the important fields of technology, research, medicine, security, science, art and culture. the prime minister needs to face down these brexiteers. and later today we'll be putting your questions to bbc journalists on the triggering of article 50. throughout the day, we'll be speaking with our europe editor katya adler
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and economics editor kamal ahmed. you can get in touch via twitter using the hashtag bbc ask this, or text your questions to 611211. theresa may will meet scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon later today for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. the prime minister's visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. the home secretary, amber rudd, will meet european ministers today to discuss ways of preventing further terrorist attacks. she's called for the authorities to be given access to encrypted messaging services. the westminster attacker, khalid masood, may have used whatsapp shortly before he began his assault. the government is to respond to fears a police risk assessment form has been used in a "racist" way to target grime artists.
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promoters and licensees in many areas are asked to complete a form 696 before hosting some music events featuring "djs and mcs". culture minister matt hancock is set to raise concerns with mayor sadiq khan about the use of the form in london. the met police denies the voluntary form targets certain genres of music. this afternoon's deadline to form a new devolved government in northern ireland following the elections is likely to pass without an agreement. sinn fein say they won't go into an executive led by the democratic unionist party leader, arlene foster, while a public inquiry investigates her handling of a failed green energy scheme. a man is seeking to take his case to the high court to change the law on assisted suicide which is currently unlawful in the uk. the 54—year—old father, who cannot be identified by name, was diagnosed in 2014 with a rare degenerative disease. his illness is not terminal, but means he is largely confined to his bed and he needs constant care. the judgement is expected to be announced in the coming days. an american airline has been
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criticised after two young girls were stopped from boarding a flight because they were wearing leggings. the incident at the airport was seen by another passenger, who took to social media to tweet united airlines. the airline responded by saying they had the right to refuse passengers for not following their dress code. they later clarified that the girls were not on a general ticket and had to meet certain standards. but apparently their dad was able to get on wearing shorts. something about leggings annoys people so much, i don't know if people think if you are wearing them you are lazy or you can't wear them if you are too curvy. people discriminate against leggings and it needs to stop. i frequently wear leggings, isn't it comfort first on a plane, that's the most important thing, surely. we will talk more about that later. if you have your own examples, later. if you have your own exa m ples, let later. if you have your own examples, let me know. now the latest sport. england won 2—0 against lithuania,
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jermaine deforewith his first appearance in three years and scoring. jamie vardy also scored. scotland, and chris martin scored in the 88th minute. they're two points offa the 88th minute. they're two points off a possible play—off spot. northern ireland remain second in their group behind germany. they had a 2—0 win. andy murray is unlikely to be fit for the davis cup tie. he has a tear in his elbow and needs rest. i will be back with more sport after 10am. this morning, claims that changes to disability benefits called called personal independence payments,
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or pips will lead to an increase in mental health problems. the government has reversed a court ruling which would have seen more people able to claim personal independence payments — people with severe mental health issues who suffer distress when they travel alone. nobody who already gets the benefit will see a cut. earlier this month we heard from brian rollinson, who lives with ptsd after serving in the army in northern ireland in the 80s. i had a bad time. i don't think that these people making these decisions realise the impact. it was a very difficult time yet again. you feel like a criminal. because of what i had to go through in the last couple of years i didn't want to be here any more, i think that speaks for itself without me saying those words, but this really got me down, it really did. and i think ministers, government, need to
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have a look at the system in hull and see how we can improve it. peers in the house of lords will try to force a vote on the issue today; let's talk to lib dem peer baroness thomas, celia thomas — a member of the house of lords and and one of those opposed to what the government has done. good morning. what is it you are objecting to specifically? well, what we are objecting to is the government very quickly is seeking to overturn the two very carefully considered judgments of the upper tier tribunal by bringing in new regulations to make it much harder for people with a very overwhelming psychological distress in their impairment. they are not going to be able to get higher rates mobility from pip if they go out on a journey alone. the government are
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overturning this, they're still appealing the decision, so they don't have to do this, what they're doing now, they don't have to do it quite so fast. they're doing it without consultation. they've just brought in the regulations and we think that they should consult more, they should consider it more. after all, thisjudgment they should consider it more. after all, this judgment was a carefully reached one and they're saying no, we don't think the judge has got it right. so your vote today, what would it achieve, assuming you win the vote, which is unlikely, unless labour peers in the house of lords support you? we would be able to get rid of the regulations. the government could introduce them tomorrow or new ones tomorrow, but we would get rid of these particular ones today. the government claims
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that if these changes, if they — they've ignored the two judgments. they say if they follow what the judgment say it's going to cost £3. 7 billion in extra spending by 2023. that's an enormous sum of money. 7 billion in extra spending by 2023. that's an enormous sum of moneym is, but that's a long time in the future. you could say all sorts of spending is going to go up by that amount if you go far enough into the future. we have got an ageing society. what we don't want is for disabled people to be isolated in their houses because they can't afford to have somebody with them or to get a taxi to go even on a familiarjourney to get a taxi to go even on a familiar journey and a to get a taxi to go even on a familiarjourney and a lot of people are in that position. do you think what the government has done will lead to an increase in mental health problems? i do, because it really will isolate people. the government think that people can find a
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strategy around this problem. well, the strategy a lot of disabled people find is to stay put. stay in their home. stay where they know they're their home. stay where they know they‘ re safe their home. stay where they know they're safe and not to worry. and we are not talking aboutjust a bit of anxiety or a bit of stress, we are talking about people who have overwhelming psychological distress and some of the groups, the impairment groups that speak up for these people, mind, mencap, all sorts are saying don't do this. here isa sorts are saying don't do this. here is a statement from the disabilities minister, she said that pips were designed to give non—physical conditions the same recognition as physical ones, but added, now over two thirds of claimants with mental health conditions get the higher daily living award. well, if they're
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reassessed some people only have their pip assessment, only have their pip assessment, only have their award for a year. the next time they're assessed it might be in a few months‘ time, time they‘re assessed it might be in a few months‘ time, might be next year, under the new regulations they won‘t get the higher rate. they might get the lower rate but they won‘t get the higher rate. so the government has changed the policy although they say they haven‘t. government has changed the policy although they say they haven't. what they have done, are you clear, do you believe that it means there is not parity between mental health and physical health? this is exactly what thejudgment physical health? this is exactly what the judgment wanted to ensure and what the government are now overturning. there is no longer parity. and this is something the government were very proud that pip did give parity of esteem to mental and physical health and my colleague in the commons, norman lamb has made
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a really big campaign that the government should do this, put their money where their mouth is and this is them doing the opposite. thank you very much. coming up: it‘s peppa pig, but not as you know it. we‘ll look at the disturbing trend of fake children‘s programmes delivering disturbing content online. it can feel like a challenge to eat healthily when the food that‘s the most affordable, is often also the most unhealthy; when supermarkets add the big discounts to the stuff we know we should be trying to avoid. today a group of mps has attacked the government for not doing more to stop this, and says it could be fuelling childhood obesity. it wants ministers to reduce the number of cut—price and multi—buy offers on unhealthy food, saying the government‘s official obesity plan contains vague statements that are inadequate. one quick example is that most supermarkets sell packs of eight chocolate bars forjust £1, whereas a bag of apples costs around £2. a third of ten—year—olds in england
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is overweight or obese. the head of the mps committee who published that report, conservative sarah wollaston, is with us. as are two mums. meliny tim and jo nicholas both work in helping people to eat healthily so that they can avoid the cheap option. hello all of you. this is the committee‘s second report, a follow—up to what you published previously. the government responded to that first one with a sugary drinks tax. that was sort of it. what else do you want? we know there are around 37% of what we buy is bought on these deep discounts and promotions and we would like to see a rebalancing of that so that more of them are on healthier food and like to see an end to the check—out chicanes where people have to pass through long stretches of getting to the tills of unhealthy food and
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snacks, it‘s about rebalancing and taking the british cycling approach, if you like, the marginal gains. so many things we need to do to tackle childhood obesity, if we focus on one thing we are missing a trick. it's one thing we are missing a trick. it‘s around diet and exercise, as well. we need to do everything and the whole host of things are in our report that we think are missing from the strategy and it matters because one in four children now are leaving primary school who are the most disadvantaged children, not just overweight but obese and huge and widening inequality every year for the last nine years. the government say voluntary approaches have been shown to be very effective, but we have not ruled out further measures if results are not seen. well, the trouble is they‘re missing several yea rs trouble is they‘re missing several years here because they‘re saying they‘re not going to review this properly until 2020. we are already losing generations of children to this because we know once you become obese, it is much more difficult to get to grips with it than it is if
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we ta ke get to grips with it than it is if we take a preventative approach. we would like to see a greater focus on this. do you want that to be volu nta ry this. do you want that to be voluntary or do you want the government to introduce legislation to stop supermarkets doing the buy one, get one free? well, the trouble is, because this is such a huge part of profit margins we know if one supermarket goes ahead and introduces these measures, it is easy for them to be undermined by other supermarkets because it is a huge part of their profit margin and we know that the british retail consortium said they would rather it was mandated and there was a level playing field and we agree. it is more likely to be effective. let's bring injo and melanie. more likely to be effective. let's bring in jo and melanie. good morning. from the children's food trust which helps to teach parents about the value of good, over cheap. it is not, it can‘tjust be about the buy one get one free, offers, can it? it has got to be more than that? we agree with the health
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select committee that we need to find actions on a number of areas to really help parents. we surveyed pa rents really help parents. we surveyed parents recently and asked them about the sorts of things that would help them to support their children to eat better because we know pa rents a re to eat better because we know parents are worried about it and they identified that children are having more opportunities to learn to cook as well as changes in environment such as the supermarket where they get pestered by their children to buy the unhealthy snacks. that's when the parent has to say no? absolutely. and it was really interesting, 40% of parents said they found it difficult or very difficult to say no to that pestering and it can be really relentless as a parent i know that. i‘m often greeted by my children and instead of hello, it‘s, "mum, is there anything to eat?" it is within of those things that happens multiple times of day and it can be really tough for parents. melanie, you reckon that supermarkets have a lot to answer for when it comes to discounting in particular, what sort of things are they discounting that you don‘t feel they should be?
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of things are they discounting that you don't feel they should be?m particular, it is the confectionery. so the chocolate bars, the crisps, the biscuits. when we were really, really —— the biscuits. when we were really, really — — what the biscuits. when we were really, really —— what we would like to see, supermarkets are doing the big five. they select five fruit and vegetables that are at a discounted rate and that's helpful. more emphasis on fresh products, roots, vegetables, that would go a long way. and i think even in terms of the leaflets that they do into supermarkets, perhaps ideas on using fresh fruit and vegetables for healthy snacks. i know certain supermarkets have the healthy eating project which as your other guest mentioned really helps with the education of teaching children to cook and that was part and parcel
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with healthy eating is making those good choices, knowing your ingredients, where they come from and how to use them in its most nutritious format. you gave an example of good discounting, pick five pieces of fruit. what about bad discounting? right, so, it is a lot is part of the meal deal that you find at the supermarket. a lot of it is, it is the sugary drink, crisps and a sandwich. when it comes to children, you know, could we perhaps do more in terms of emphasising the positives and really pulling back on the negatives and the unhealthy foods? jo, is it true that unhealthy foods? jo, is it true that unhealthy food is cheaper than healthy food? it is. and that‘s the challenge for families when they‘re trying to budget for theirfood families when they‘re trying to budget for their food shopping, what they want to be sure of is what they
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buy and what they spend their money on are things that their children will eat. the feedback from parents when we teach children to cook, their amazement at the sorts of food their amazement at the sorts of food their children will try if they have prepared something and cooked with it. they always say, "well, they will never eat that at home." it is about that variety because that‘s the key to eating well is a variety. so we have got to support parents and make it more comfortable for them to buy those sorts of healthy foods so they‘re confident the children will eat them. go on melanie. i think also again, in terms of the supermarkets, where it is promoting, you know, the cheaper and the unhealthy foods, if we could really put that in the fore front of all their aisles and advertising and things like that because children are perceptive to visual prompts and again asjo said, if we can are perceptive to visual prompts and again as jo said, if we can visually prompt the children to make those selections when they're with mum,
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the pester power could turn instead from chocolate bar to sort of a pack of fruits and it would be interesting fruits, pineapples, mangoes, notjust interesting fruits, pineapples, mangoes, not just the apples and the oranges and bananas. is that realistic we will see pester power change from your seven—year—old saying, "can i have a bag of fruit? to, "i really want a kitkat." saying, "can i have a bag of fruit? to, "1 really want a kitkat." if we teach children cookery skills in school, that‘s really important and getting children more education about getting children more education a bout lifestyle getting children more education about lifestyle and education and why that matters and it will have knock on been fits for families at home as well. is it right that politicians like you, like your committee are suggesting ways, possibly legislation to intervene in the market in order to help parents and their obese children? the market in order to help parents and their obese children7m the market in order to help parents and their obese children? it is about the of the problem and as i say, one in four of the most disadvantaged children leaving primary school actually obese, not
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just overweight, that‘s storing up a lifetime of problems for them. it really is the scale of this that demands action. so it is not a small problem. this is a major problem. so why is your government reluctant to intervene? why is it saying let the market work this out? well, it is understandably people are worried about cost of living ip ceases and people who are managing on a tight budget. but that‘s why we feel it should be about a rebalancing. so we‘re not calling... should be about a rebalancing. so we're not calling... does that mean the government is susceptible to lobbying from big food companies? there is too much listening to the big interests and not enough listening to what is a public health emergency for our children and that‘s why it demands action and this is about children‘s well—being and the whole of their future and theresa may on the steps of downing street talked about wanting to deal with health inequality, the life expectancy gap between the richest and the poorest, if she doesn‘t tackle childhood obesity we‘re going
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to see that getting worse. every yearfor to see that getting worse. every year for the last nine years when we look at the data from the child measurement programme, we can see the gap is getting wider so it does demand some action and there is progress being made on reform lation, it is fantastic news that the money from the sugary drinks levy will go into school sports and brea kfast clu bs levy will go into school sports and breakfast clubs and there are many missed opportunities and the scale demands action. can i add something in terms of evidence? yes. where government has taken action and put regulation in place in relation to school food standards that it does change what children eat in school at lunch time. so the evidence is there, that where it is appropriate, regulation does work and it does make a difference. thank you very much. i‘ve got comments here, but i‘m waiting more my tablet to update. thanks melanie and jo. next, rio ferdinand on how he
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struggled to cope with his grief following the death of his wife, rebecca. i had rebecca. ihad an rebecca. i had an amazing wife, great kids and bang, the moment rebecca was diagnosed with cancer, that all changed. you don‘t believe the worst scenario can happen. at this point i am just ain‘t into seeing a therapist. i want to see people who have been through the situation experience what i have experience and who can give me some knowledge first hand. what i have experience and who can give me some knowledge first handlj needed someone who was going through the same thing as me to say, "you know what mate, it's going to be all
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right. i raised this kid and he's doing all right. " right. i raised this kid and he's doing all right." i started this blog. the blog turned into a private group for young widowers, it is referred to as fight club because the stuff we talk about in there doesn't get spoken about anywhere else. grief gets you at some point. she will come into my head and i‘ll try and put it a box there and try and get on with something. try and put it a box there and try and get on with somethinglj remember and get on with something.” remembergoing to my and get on with something.” remember going to my wife's funeral and everyone said, "be strong. you're doing so well. you arary doing so well." on reflection i thought, "i'm not. i'm in shock. this isn't me. this isjust something that's kicked in." i thought but what if i'm weak tomorrow? am i failure then? how are you supposed to grieve like a man when you don't know what it is to grieve? when do you come to that point when you say you‘re not married or rur ring finger?” point when you say you‘re not married or rur ring finger? i needed to move on so i can use the last
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line in the vows that says, "until death do us part and we're not married anymore." it brings it back to life again. there is a lot of my life where i know i‘ve not moved on and it is because of little things like the wedding ring. i don‘t see myself taking off my wedding ring and they‘re saying that was the thing that was holding them back. you need to do those things to be able to breathe properly again and move on with your life. very moving. you can watch rio ferdinand being mum and dad at 9pm tomorrow night. thank you for your messages about the risk assessment form that the metropolitan police and other forces send out to assess gigs being put on particularly by grime artsts and others and some in the music industry feel the form is effectively racist. this is from sue, "my son works with grime artsts
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and said their events are definitely treated differently. form 696 does discriminate." this texter says, "i think 696 is another way of racial profiling and i think it should be stopped." simmy, "the 696 form is racial profiling. let‘s not try and lie about this." phil says, "if people want to have safety, you need to have risk assessment. to say it is racist is wrong because you might be aggrieved by this process." dee says, "more leftist reporting. 696 advises cops to keep an eye on gigs." thank you for those. in a couple of minutes time, we will bring you the news and sport. before that, here is the weather with jay wynne. in the highlands of scotland yesterday, we did very well. temperature wise we got to 20 celsius for the first time this year. it started off pleasant across
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much of scotland. here is a photo from this morning in north queen‘s ferry. in northamptonshire and eastern england started off on a grey note. some fairly extensive low cloud. some patches of mist and fog to go with that. but things are slowly improving. all that low cloud is drifting back towards that eastern coast. some eastern coastal areas will keep the low cloud into the afternoon keying it on the cool side. elsewhere, it is another lovely afternoon with sunshine. that‘s the case across most of scotland. maybe up towards the northern isles in the way of cloud. even here we will stay cloud and across the highlands we could get to 17 or 18 celsius. a lovely afternoon in northern ireland. if you‘re stuck under the cloud, temperatures may struggle to get to double figures. across the south of the uk, we‘ve got much lighter winds than we saw through the weekend. a better feel to things. 17 celsius in the capital. now, through this evening, we start to see the low cloud and
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the mist and the fog coming back in from the east and by dawn on tuesday, i think that low cloud, mist and fog will be extensive across many central and eastern areas and some of the fog will be quite dense, but not so in the south—west, more of a breeze with cloud and patchy rain, ten celsius here, but elsewhere it is four, five, six celsius and that‘s in larger towns and cities. rural spots lower than that. but basically, over the next few days, it is all change. this area of low pressure out towards the west will start to become the dominant force. it will bring ina become the dominant force. it will bring in a south—westerly breeze and it will feel things mild and it will throw quite a bit of cloud at us. that cloud will bring rain. always wettest on tuesday. scattered showers getting across the eastern side, still doing well temperature wise, 16 celsius, 17 celsius. so looking ahead towards the middle pa rt looking ahead towards the middle part of the week. it looks like there will be a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain and probably a wetter day on wednesday. most of the
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rain coming into the north and the west. the south east staying dry and breezy and cloudy as well. so a different day, a different week ahead from the last few days. much more in the way of cloud around. there will be outbreaks of rain, but with a southerly breeze it will stay warm and on tuesday, in the south east, probably getting to 20 or 21 celsius. hello, it‘s monday, it‘s 10am. i‘m victoria derbyshire. this morning, questions over whether the police have adopted a racist approach to how they assess gigs put on by grime artists. it's it‘s fast tempo, high energy, it‘s the attitude, it‘s the whole culture. it‘s fashion. it‘s the way we speak all rolled into electronic dance hall inspired fusion. we will hear how the government is to respond to fears the form is being used in a racist way to target grime
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artists. a man with an incurable but not terminal disease. he tells us about his fight to change the law on assisted suicide. and, the two us girls stopped from boarding a flight because they were wearing leggings. a huge row‘s erupted on social media after the airline said the girls‘ tickets meant they had to follow a dress code. why do leggings cause such offence? your examples of leggings discrimination, please. good morning. here‘sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today‘s news. labour shadow brexit secretary kier starmer has set the terms his party will use to judge whether to support any final brexit deal. he announced six tests for brexit — asking for a deal that delivers the same benefits as the uk
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currently enjoys as a member of the single market and customs union. once a small minority in the conservative party, the brexiteers are now in office and in power. this ideologically—driven approach to brexit would be disastrous and divisive. and it would stand as a roadblock to continued co—operation in the important fields of technology, research, medicine, security, science, art and culture. the prime minister needs to face down these brexiteers. and later today we‘ll be putting your questions to bbc journalists on the triggering of article 50. throughout the day, we‘ll be speaking with our europe editor katya adler and economics editor kamal ahmed. you can get in touch via twitter using the hashtag bbc ask this — or text your questions to 611211. theresa may will meet scotland‘s first minister nicola sturgeon later today for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum
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on scottish independence. the prime minister‘s visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. the home secretary, amber rudd, will meet european ministers today to discuss ways of preventing further terrorist attacks. she‘s called for the authorities to be given access to encrypted messaging services. the westminster attacker, khalid masood, may have used whatsapp shortly before he began his assault. this programme has learnt that the government is to respond to fears a police risk assessment form has been used in a racist way to target grime artists. promoters and licensees in many areas are asked to complete a form 696 before hosting some music events featuring "djs and mcs". culture minister matt hancock is due to raise concerns with mayor sadiq khan about the use of the form in london. the met police denies the voluntary form targets certain genres of music. this afternoon‘s deadline to form a new devolved
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government in northern ireland following the elections is likely to pass without an agreement. sinn fein say they won‘t go into an executive led by the democratic unionist party leader, arlene foster, while a public inquiry investigates her handling of a failed green energy scheme. in an exclusive interview for this programme a man with an incurable disease says why he‘s taking his case to the high court to change the law on assisted suicide. the 54—year—old father, who wants to be identified by his first name, omid, was diagnosed in 2014 with a rare degenerative disease. his illness means he is largely confined to his bed and he needs constant care. the judgment is expected to be announced in the coming days. the government must do more to reduce the number of cut—price offers on unhealthy food to help
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curb childhood obesity, according to mps. the health select committee, also calls for rules on junk food advertisements to be made tougher. it argues the government‘s official obesity plan contains "vague statements" that are "inadequate". but ministers say the strategy is the world‘s "most ambitious plan on childhood obesity". one comment, unhealthy food is not cheaper. steven, i have seven children, all healthy. i don‘t allow crisps or sweets, it‘s called parenting. leave the supermarkets alone. this tweet says supermarket discounts are not the problem, kids don‘t buy food, educate parents instead. if you are get in touch, you are very welcome. if you text you are very welcome. if you text you will be charged at the standard network rate. here is the sport. england are unbeaten and top of their world cup qualifying group. they beat lithuania 2—0 yesterday. not the greatest of games. lithuania did their best to stifle england but jermaine defoe at 34, got the opener, his 20th goal for england,
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three years after his last appearance. jamie vardy got england‘s second. if he stays fit he should be sure of a place in the world cup squad next summer but what about defoe? it's really important that we are able to call upon the likes ofjermaine and for him to have the impact that he had in a game like today. if he is scoring goals in the premier league and playing as well as he has this season, then there is no reason why he couldn‘t. england‘s next qualifier is against scotla nd england‘s next qualifier is against scotland in june. gordon england‘s next qualifier is against scotland injune. gordon strachan might have been out of a job had they failed to beat slovenia last night. they left it late but chris martin‘s 88th minute goal for the 1-0 martin‘s 88th minute goal for the 1—0 win moved them up to fourth in the group. a couple of points off second, that could be good enough for a play—off come the final reckoning. hampden was less than half—full. fans unhappy at recent performances but gordon strachan said the first half was the best since he has been in charge. all you
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can ask as a manage certificate go and do certain things. they did everything they were asked. they pushed themselves another level there. so, iwas pushed themselves another level there. so, i was calm enough, what will be will be. but i was enjoying their performance as a manager. the best that northern ireland can probably hope for is a play—off spot because germany are running away with it in their group at the moment. michael o‘neill‘s side are two points clear in second after maintaining their brilliant home form. they beat norway 2—0. jamie ward scored inside two minutes. connor washington added another by half—time. they haven‘t been beaten in eight competitive matches at windsor park. their two remaining home games are against the czech republic and the germans which is going to be key to them making it back—to—back major tournaments. results build confidence and momentum and belief. we have carried that on. we had the experience of qualification for france. we had the
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experience of the finals. it‘s credit to the group of players that they‘ve not let their standards drop. they‘re still wanting it and dream they can go to russia, as well. with every game obviously you are closer to reality. another tennis line this morning. andy murray‘s unlikely to be fit for the davis cup tie against france a week on friday. his brotherjamie has revealed the world number one has revealed the world number one has a tear in his elbow and needs rest. we already knew about that injury but not the severity. murray had already pulled out of a tournament in the us with the problem. he had hoped to return for the start of the clay court season in about three weeks. that‘s all the sport. i will be back in about half an hour. this is just hour. this isjust in. terry adams, former gangster, has lost his court of appeal challenge over how much money he has to pay back from his days of crime. he says he has insufficient funds to meet a debt of £651,000. he has told a judge this morning that
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he was so broke that he was living off his actress wife ruth. and denied having hidden funds that were behind a lavish lifestyle. the cps do not agree with him. they say there is a strong case that terry adams possessed substantial undisclosed assets and the judge said she was not satisfied that adams had provided full and candid disclosure. terry adams denied he was using his wife, family and associate to create a sham income and loans to pay for visits to the opera and restaurants, spa memberships and treatment at private clinics. thousands of videos on youtube — like this — look like versions of popular kids cartoons but actually contain disturbing and inappropriate content not suitable for children. it may look like peppa pig — but in this video a dentist appears with a huge syringe and her teeth get pulled out. there are fake videos that contain
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content there are fake videos that contain co nte nt not there are fake videos that contain content not suitable for children. bbc trending has found hundreds of similar videos of children‘s cartoon characters with inappropriate themes — featuring characters from the disney movie frozen, the minions franchise, thomas the tank engine, and many more. there was an episode where i saw a popular character,
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i think it was peppa pig again, they actually set fire to a house with one of the other characters in it to try and kill them. i mean, these are things that, for a child to see, they are not quickly going to forget that. the youtube kids app sort of starts to recommend at the bottom underneath the videos, and i heard something that didn't sound right after she'd been watching for maybe ten minutes one morning. she was not aware. she thought it was peppa pig. she just wanted me to not take it away from her because she was engrossed in what the video was. youtube could come out and say, you know, this is not a place for children. you can't have an algorithm that is filtering out the videos from youtube and, you know,
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helping you catch the bad stuff in it. i hope parents see this and they realise that that peppa pig video that their children are watching might not be peppa pig. we can speak now to mike wendling a producer for bbc trending who‘s also a parent and spotted these offensive videos. we have also keith white, whose young son watched one of these videos on their ipad and professor sonia livingston, who looks at child online safety. hi, mike, how did you come across them? it was on the youtube recommended videos, you might see them on the right of the screen, sometimes at the bottom if you are using the app. like some parents i am not proud of it, but use youtube to entertain children every once in a while, noticed something funny about one of the videos that was suggested because my children were watching peppa pig. the team looked into them and found, as you say,
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hundreds, probably thousands of these videos are on youtube that are fa kes. these videos are on youtube that are fakes. who is behind them? we don't know because nobody actually came back to us. we tried to contact dozens back to us. we tried to contact d oze ns of back to us. we tried to contact dozens of the people who are making these films. we think it‘s a combination of pranksters, people who think that this stuff is funny. but then also people who are clearly aiming them at children and trying to make money off advertising. right. that could be the motivation. keith, what did — how old is your little boy? i have an eight-year-old and and a six—year—old. they've been using youtube since the age of one really. i do think a lot of parents use it to try and entertain their kids, sometimes to separate fighting siblings. it does add some downtime but it has to be used in moderation. there are a lot of the videos like you asked, why do people make these,
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they're easy hits, easy views and you can get paid a lot of money with multiple views coming to your videos. there's an easy way to make money because even a one—year—old can use youtube and understand the picture of peppa pig is appealing and they can press that button and the next video will come up and that's how you can get so many hits making these inappropriate videos. what did your children watch? there‘s been a number of incidents i have come across of inappropriate content on these pretend videos. peppa pig was one. there was another which was a favourite at the time, thomas the tank engine. there is been a lot. were the children scared? at the timei were the children scared? at the time i don‘t think they realised what they were being exposed to.
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they were maybe a bit too young to understand the language and the images being used. now as they‘re getting more sensible they actually do come and tell me, "daddy, i have seen something on the video or i‘ve heard something that i didn‘t like or was wrong." ."i heard something that i didn‘t like or was wrong." i am more wary of them using youtube unattended now. i discovered it over looking one of the videos they were watching and suddenly realised it sounded the same as peppa pig, but some of the images being used were very wrong. professor sonia livingstone. you look at child online safety, the a nswer look at child online safety, the answer is not to give your kid the ipad? no, there are many more answers than that. children want to be entertained and have the right to have fun and the internet is a key place for them to do it. i think, and youtube is, you know, families numberone and youtube is, you know, families number one favourite app. but what our research says is children are often upset when they come across
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something that shows actually especially cruelty to children or animals and it seems some of the videos show exactly that. whose responsibility is it then? well, it isa responsibility is it then? well, it is a mixed responsibility. this is a new world that we're all working out. so, parents do need to upped stand what it is that the internet offers which is a mix of wonderful and some weird and sometimes frightening content, but i wouldn't say that means parents should never leave their kids alone on the internet or that they have got to watch over them the whole time. we do also want children to learn and to have the freedom to explore and have fun, you know, sometimes by themselves without a parent kind of breathing over their shoulders. sol do think that the companies, especially youtube bear some responsibility for really making clear what kind of environment this is and doing what they can to make it safer for children. mike in terms of your attempts to contact youtube,
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where are they on the responsibility side of this? so they did send us a statement. they said there is a couple of things that parents can do to protect themselves. one is to turn on restricted mode. it is interesting, i didn‘t know about restricted mode even though i look at this stuff every day. at the bottom of every youtube page there isa bottom of every youtube page there is a setting that you can change. that will turn off any video that‘s been flagged for inappropriate content. you won‘t be able to view it. you can use the youtube kids app. ourteam it. you can use the youtube kids app. our team found that those methods filtered out quite a lot of these videos, not all of them, but they did help and then, of course, as we have been talking about, it is up as we have been talking about, it is up to parents to monitor their children‘s internet. up to parents to monitor their children's internet. it really is. a lot of parents getting in touch saying this is, you know, you‘re a parent, do yourjob. ithink saying this is, you know, you‘re a parent, do yourjob. i think that's afair point. parent, do yourjob. i think that's a fair point. go on, sonia? on the
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bottom of the youtube screen it used to be called, "safe" and they call it restrictive. if youtube want parents to take their responsibility they could call it safety or for kids or for parents that makes it clear and they could bring it to parents attention because i have interviewed lots of parents and no one is telling them that there is a mechanism. tell us what that is mike? it is called restricted mode. it is at the very bottom of any youtube page. hit that and hopefully you won‘t get the fake stuff? youtube page. hit that and hopefully you won't get the fake stuff? turn the restricted mode on and that will limit, likei the restricted mode on and that will limit, like i say, quite a lot of these videos, not all of them. it depends on users to flag them up and ifa depends on users to flag them up and if a user hasn‘t flagged the particular video up t might be new thenit particular video up t might be new then it won‘t pick tip, but that will really help filter out some of this stuff. go on... there is an
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opportunity for parents, when they see the inappropriate videos to report them to youtube so they don't come up in future searchs for other kids and you can teach their kids if they hear videos with inappropriate language which sometimes going to happen, you cannot protect that from ever happening entirely. if you teach them how to report the videos, that can protect future kids. sonia? we have a lot of voice recognition software that can understand what's being said, i don't understand why youtube doesn't use that technology to flag them as inappropriate for children and then we don't have to rely on each individual parent flagging. good idea. thank you. still to come: an exclusive interview with a man suffering from an incurable but not terminal disease. he wants the government to change the law over assisted suicide. hear his story later in the programme.
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next, this programme has learnt that the government is to respond to fears a police risk assessment form has been used in a "racist" way to target grime artists. promoters and licensees in many areas are asked to complete a "form 696" before hosting some music events featuring "djs and mcs". culture minister matt hancock is set to raise concerns with london mayor sadiq khan about the use of the form in london. the met police denies the voluntary form targets certain genres of music. our reporter chi chi izundu bought you the full story at 9.15am. here‘s a short extract from that film. the metropolitan police promotion event risk assessment form 696 was introduced back in 2005 after a spate of violent attacks at gigs in london. like, you‘re targeting a specific genre of music that you know a certain demographic is going to listen to. you haven‘t written anything about any other type of demographic. they can say it‘s not racist, but it‘s definitely targeted, which, to me, is the equivalent.
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the met says the form does not target specific genres of music, event types or demographics. but the bbc has found a number of forces across england who have adopted aversion to ask those questions, like leicestershire adopted a version to ask those questions, like leicestershire police, who want details on the ethnic make—up of the audience attending a gig. northamptonshire police told us they are open to discussions on their form. we generally know what the ethnic make—up is going to be from what comes in anyway, so by risk assessing them we can then make sure that we identify problems, work with promoters and venues, to make sure that all them mitigation is in place. many other types of genres and gigs, they don't have to do the form. say, for example, ed sheeran had a show, and a fight broke out, then he's not going to do a 696 form on his next arena tour, he's not. it's different for them. why is it different? we did ask a number of promoters and venue owners to appear in this
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film, but a lot said no overfears that they or their event might become a target. because for years there have been rumours about a police blacklist with acts, their followers, and their associates. now some licensees are telling us that they are having constructive conversations with the police over form 696. and to quote one promoter, on ways to get around the system. that same promoter, though, asks, why should he have to get around the system? we‘ve been talking to central licensing and we‘ve done some good work with initiating a conversation because we said that there is a real concern around 696s and particularly how it plays out with certain genres of music and certain demographics. particularly around grime and garage. we brought some managers and labels in together with the promoters and said that we would address it. and that is a work in motion. we actually think that there should be a review of
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the whole 696 process. we think that it has got challenges and it is flawed. but despite those conversations and the accusations that the form does target certain genres of music there are no plans to get rid of form 696. let‘s talk to post diddy, a grime scene veteran who runs the grm daily blog, vincent olutayo from an organisation called urban development which helps young people get in to the music industry. alan miller is campaigning to get form 696 reviewed — he‘s from the night time industries association. jenna jarrett works in the music industry and is a grime fan. it form 696 racist? i believe so. i feel it is an infringement on civil liberties and a form of racial discrimination even the form itself refers to an mc and a discjockey
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which is clearly an attack at grime and sort of garage events. i mean old form referred to what kind of minorities were attending the event, whether it was ethnic minorities... not anymore. not anymore. but it is volu nta ry. not anymore. not anymore. but it is voluntary. not many venues have to fill this form in. it‘s voluntary? yeah, of course, it is. ifeel like the police, you know, tend to bully like actual events and you know, actual clubs and stuff and let them know that if they don‘t actually fill out the form then they can threaten their licences and stuff like that which is really cruel. right. | like that which is really cruel. right. i mean we haven‘t got any evidence of that in particular. what the met say is, effectively it is about protecting people like yourself, people who go to these nights and it‘s about your security? i agree it's about security, but i don't see why as you were saying why
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they target kind of discjockeys and mcs when primarily, the majority of mcs when primarily, the majority of mcs are black and i don't see why they have to kind of target people in that way. if you were going to an event and it was aimed at middle—class and it was like disco music, i can't see, you'd have to fill out a 696. the met say it will only become a condition of a licence when serious public disorder occurred at a venue? i agree and doing research, they do it from low risk to high risk. if they spoke and let people know how they categorize it and identify low risk and high risk the venues can work with them and understand what they need to do to prevent the event being shutdown, but they don't reveal how they measure it. that's right. vincent the form does say recommended guidance to music event, organisers, management and of licensed premises
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or event promoter on when to com plete or event promoter on when to complete the form, featuring djs or mcs performing to a recorded backing track? just from the guidance alone you can see the criteria is specific. so i think that's where theissues specific. so i think that's where the issues have come about in the fom. it feels discriminatory in that it narrows the use of it. if you are looking at mcs and djs and those sorts of genres as far as the music landscape is concerned, it is very much grime and hip—hop and very much garage. again, if we're looking at it from a racial prospective if you like, can be perceived as very much within the black music sector. sol think that's specifically where the issues have come from. if it was blank in the sense that there were no guidance around specific genres or per se no guidance around specific genres or perse then no guidance around specific genres or per se then i don't believe there would be that much opposition to the
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form because it would be a level playing field for everybody. let's put that to keith price he is a conservative councillor. if it was non discriminatory and fair, then surely all music events would have to co m plete surely all music events would have to complete it? i can see what you‘re saying. the issue is around about keeping people safe though, isn‘t it? about keeping people safe though, isn't it? therefore all music events should have to complete it? well, i‘m not disagreeing that all events should have to complete it. my problem is that clearly, by having these forms, we are able to keep more people safe. so i don‘t see that as being a problem myself. right. but potentially you would be able to keep even more people safe if every venue had to fill it in? well, i don‘t disagree with that.
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but i do disagree with not having a form, just... inaudible because people perceive it to a particular culture. i don‘t think it is. at the end the end of the day everybody likes garage and mcs and hip—hop andi everybody likes garage and mcs and hip—hop and i don‘t think it is aimed atany hip—hop and i don‘t think it is aimed at any race or creed and these forms have been proach to be effective and that‘s what it is about keeping people safe. alan, what do you say in terms of the future use of this form? well, we're calling for a review because i mean firstly people say it's voluntary, but the amount of pressure and it depends which police force, but the amount of pressure that's put on licencees and promote tors do it means it is not really optional in many cases. it is pretty much mant dre tree and if you don't go along with it, you are put under enormous pressure. safety, no one in their
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right mind would disagree with in the abstract or specifics, everyone being safe, when you get specific about what it means is, what it means is that certain activity and certain genres and certain people are prioritised in a particular way if there happens to have been an ins didn't and fight in the way that others aren't. put that back to keith price who is the conservative on the london assembly? it is keith prince by the way. i'm sorry. i don‘t get it. what‘s the beef? it keeps people safe. have the organisers got a problem with filling ourt a form that keeps people safe? yes, it would be better if more people were to fill out the form and if it was to apply to everybody in the industry, of course, but have they really got a problem with filling out a form that
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keeps people safe? how do you respond? you haven't addressed that it isa respond? you haven't addressed that it is a form of discrimination. you're clearly attacking a certain group of people and a certain group of artists in a country that encourages people to create a sustainable income for themselves, you have to consider the adverse effects that these forms are presenting to them and you haven't really addressed the situation. how do you feel about that? at the end of the day, i think going to all organisations is right and proper, if it‘s working in one particular sector of the music industry, the entertain. industry, why not roll it out to all the sectors, i haven‘t an issue with that. i have an issue with people saying it shouldn‘t be done because it affects just one particular section. but i agree, it shouldn‘t just be aimed at one particular
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section. it should apply to the whole of the industry. that‘s good. the fact it‘s keeping people safe, that‘s good too. so, i don‘t see the problem other than having to ultimately address the issue that maybe it should be used for everybody, otherwise i don‘t see the problem. i am not sure this thing about keeping people safe that actually happens, we see there are incidents in life, there is an attempt in british society to have a completely risk averse world where nothing happens but things do happen. there is a different response if we call it what it is, if there is a fight with a group of white guys at a club or a bar or outside, there is a different response sometimes in terms of tagging that incident to the djs and promoters, than there is if there is a grime night or garage night. it's like there is not an intention of a particular officer to do that, but there is a broader thing that
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happens that ends up having that effect. the context of that, even if you end up saying let's roll out more of these forms in all these different places, it doesn't address the actual problem because there is a different nuanced and context that's put on with particular types of genres and activity and that's more of a legacy of some thinking and attitudes and approaches which has been more endemic for an ongoing period in britain that we need to address. just to add what the met police tell us, information provided on this form gives police details of a promoted event before it takes place so that research of the event can be carried out and where necessary in consultation with local police additional measures can be put in place to mitigate any risks. they point out they rarely cancel any event. would you agree with keith prince, the london assembly member, that this form should be extended to all venues? not at all,
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because not until we tackle the entire premise of the form in the first place. i think once we look at the premise of the form and understand that it is discriminatory and is very much targeted to a particular sector and genre and we aleave ate that as the issue, then we can look at the issue of how do we can look at the issue of how do we then keep people safe in these venues? the issue is the fact is that as you said previously, the problem is generally with the venues, not necessarily with the promoters or artists or musicians. however, the form asks for names, addresses and details of every single musician that is going to be performing. it‘s almost like saying if you have a trouble at a football match that every one of the players is responsible for whatever the fans do at that match. or, whatever the clu b do at that match. or, whatever the club does or the security or lack of security that the club offers. so i think until we are able to address that, the specific inception of the
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form, then no, i don‘t think we should be rolling it out because you are rolling out a bad problem essentially. thank you all. appreciate your time, thank you. you can watch the fulfil am on form 696 on our programme page. and you can read plenty more about it on the bbc news website. one of the most popular read articles on the news website this morning. still to come: an exclusive interview with a man suffering from an incurable, but not terminal disease. he wants the government to change the law over assisted suicide. hear his story later in the programme. why did an american airline refuse two young girls access to a flight? because they were wearing leggings. the latest news headlines now. labour is warning the prime minister not to let the uk leave the european union without a deal.
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labour shadow brexit secretary kier starmer has been outlining six tests by which the party decide whether or not to back the final deal. theresa may has said that leaving with nothing would be better than signing the uk up to a bad arrangement. the process will be triggered on wednesday. theresa may will meet scotland‘s first minister nicola sturgeon later today for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. the prime minister‘s visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. the home secretary, amber rudd, will meet european ministers today to discuss ways of preventing further terrorist attacks. she‘s called for the authorities to be given access to encrypted messaging services. the westminster attacker, khalid masood, may have used whatsapp shortly before he began his assault. this afternoon‘s deadline to form a new devolved government in northern ireland following the elections is likely to pass without an agreement. sinn fein say they won‘t go into an executive led by the democratic unionist party
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leader, arlene foster, while a public inquiry investigates her handling of a failed green energy scheme. that‘s the latest news. now the morning sports headlines. england are top of their world cup qualifying group, they won 2—0 against lithuania. jermaine defoe scoring his 20th international goal at the age of 34. his first appearance in over three years. jamie vardy also scored. scotland have kept alive their hopes of qualification. thae beat slovenia 1-0 at qualification. thae beat slovenia 1—0 at hampden park. chris martin scored in the 88th minute. they‘re two points off second and play england next in june. two points off second and play england next injune. northern ireland remain second in their group behind germany. jamie ward and connor washington with their goals against norway in the 2—0 win at windsor park. andy murray is unlikely to be fit for the davis cup
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tie against france a week on friday. his brotherjamie has revealed that the world number one has got a tear in his elbow and needs rest. murray had already pulled out of a tournament in the us with that injury. that‘s the sport. i will be back after 11.00am on bbc news. this morning an exclusive interview with a father who wants to change the law to allow people with incurable conditions which badly affect their quality of life to end their life in this country. the 54—year—old father, who wants us to only use his first name, omid, was diagnosed in 2014 with a rare degenerative disease, which is not terminal, but is incurable, it means he is largely confined to his bed and needs constant care. assisted suicide is currently unlawful in the uk, but omid is seeking to take his case to the high court. his lawyers have asked for a full hearing. the judgment is expected to be announced in the coming days. our reporterjean mackenzie has spent some time with omid. this is his first ever interview, and his speech is very much affected by his condition.
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he‘s difficult to hear, but we hope you‘ll stick with him. what‘s going to happen in the future? how is your condition going to progress? when did you decide that you would rather die? there have been a number of attempts to pass assisted dying bills through parliament but they have not been successful, why do you think there is opposition to this? and why would it make your
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life better if you had control over dying? so you have an incurable disease and part of what you want from the courts is to recognise that people
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with incurable diseases, even if they have a long time to live, should have the right to choose how to die? but what if, one day, your condition was curable? do you think about that? and how do you feel about growing old with your condition? very, very sad. saimo chahal is omid‘s lawyer, she also represented debbie purdey and tony nicklinson, two other people who have gone to court to change the law on assisted dying. just going through the key reasons
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that you will be putting, that you hope to put to the high court to try to persuadejudges on hope to put to the high court to try to persuade judges on this. hope to put to the high court to try to persuadejudges on this. on behalf of omid, obviously. yes, so omid is asking for the ban on assisted suicide to be lifted. he suffered from an incurable condition. so he has years of pain and misery ahead of him. he says that he has made the decision that he doesn‘t want that sort of life and that he should have the right to be able to decide when he can die. he wants doctors to be able to help him end his life. that's right. he has already attempted suicide once. that was in march 2015. he took about 30 pills. it was unsuccessful. he doesn‘t want to have another go in case it goes wrong and he ends up ina in case it goes wrong and he ends up in a worse condition so what he wa nts in a worse condition so what he wants is the help of a doctor to
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have a painless and a safe death. you have to recognise that suicide itself is legal and were he able to do it himself painlessly and safely he would do so but he can‘t because of his condition. he‘s already tried. he has failed. he wants a safe and painless death. at the moment his only option is to go to switzerland to do it there. what he saysis switzerland to do it there. what he says is why should he have to do that? why should he have to travel in his condition abroad to have a death? he would need an air ambulance, it would be a logistical nightmare for that to be organised. it would be extremely costly. he doesn‘t have any money. it would be extremely costly. he doesn't have any money. hence, i think in trying to raise money on a crowdfunding website to pay for his legal case. he can go through at arguments that have become familiar to us in this country around this debate, that what if somebody
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changes their mind, what if they feel under pressure to have help from a doctor to end their life because family members want access to their inheritance and so on. those are legitimate arguments and one of the things that omid‘s case intends is for those arguments to be aired in front of the courts. so what we‘re going to be asking for is a hearing, probably lasting two or three weeks in which all of the evidence is tested out. the argument that for example the weak and vulnerable may suffer and so on. those arguments need to be tested. parliament has not had the opportunity to do that. you can‘t do that in a two hour debate and that‘s why we‘re saying nobody who wants to present any evidence should do so in this court case so that the court can hear the arguments for and against and then weigh up the evidence and we are certain that if the court had all of the evidence
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before it that it is likely to conclude that there should be a safe way for people like omid to end their lives in this country. 0k, their lives in this country. ok, thank you very much for talking to usment thank you. —— us. thank you. theresa may will hold talks with theresa may will hold talks with theresa may will hold talks with theresa may this afternoon. norman smith is with us. what, i mean, you‘d like to be a fly on the wall in that room, what is mrs may going to say to nicola sturgeon? these are two women who over the past few weeks have been taking lumps out of each other and this is the first time they have met since nicola sturgeon floated the idea of another independence referendum. mrs may is going up there to deliver a tough message to nicola sturgeon. downing street say she will be forthright in rejecting the idea of a second independence referendum. sticking by her line that now is not the time.
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indeed, mrs sturgeon‘s people say they feel mrs may is not going to wa nt to they feel mrs may is not going to want to talk about a referendum. you rather sense this could be another pretty frosty meeting and there won‘t be a joint conference between the two of them which just fuels the idea that these are two leaders who really are on pretty difficult terms at the moment. and labour's brexit spokesman keir starmer has been speaking. what has he been saying? we‘re getting don‘t to the nitty—gritty of brexit. we have had this argument over article 50 which begins the process. now we get into the deal making what sort of new relationship are we going to have with the rest of the eu? today we got labour‘s tests of what they say mrs may should include, a managed migration system, ensuring we have good relations with the eu, a deal for the whole of the uk, one test that we enjoy the same benefits as
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we currently enjoy. a lot of people saying how is that possible? why would we get the same benefits if we‘re leaving the single currency and loafing the customs union and the accusation is labour is just positioning itself so they can vote against the deal when mrs may gets it. once a small minority in the conservative party, the brexiteers are now in office and in power. this ideologically—driven approach to brexit would be disastrous and divisive. and it would stand as a roadblock to continued co—operation in the important fields of technology, research, medicine, security, science, art and culture. the prime minister needs to face down these brexiteers. the other thing which keir starmer said which i thought was interesting, he said to mrs may,
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don‘t rush this. you don‘t have to don‘t rush this. you don‘t have to do it in two years. it would be difficult to do in two years. take your time. have a transitional deal, it is better to get the right deal than to get a rushed deal. norman smith at westminster. united airlines has been criticised after two girls were reportedly barred from flying for wearing leggings. the incident happened on a flight from denver to minneapolis on sunday morning. passenger shannon watts tweeted, "three girls inspected for wearing perfectly acceptable leggings. two not allowed to board. this behaviour is sexist and sexualises young girls. as the mother of four daughters, i‘d like to know how many boys have been penalised?" one of the girls is reported to be as young as ten. united airlines say the girls were travelling on a special pass for employees and their guests which has a dress code. they‘ve said that all regular, paying customers are welcome to wear leggings. celebrities have had their say on the matter.
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model christine teigen tweeted, "i have flown united before with literally no pants on. just a top as a dress. next time i will wear onlyjeans and a scarf." comedian sarah silverman wrote, "hey @united i fly a lot. about to go on tour all april and changing all my @united flights to other airlines." william shatner tweeted, "i‘m going to start wearing leggings! is that against the rules?" well, the passenger, shannon watts, has been speaking to the bbc. i was really stunned, because i‘m a mom of four daughters who travel and live and work in leggings and yoga pants. and also because i wanted to understand the policy. i am a premier member of united and ijust thought it was really shocking. and so what i tweeted at united, it was reallyjust questioning what is your policy around this? and it blew up. a lot of people couldn‘t believe
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that that was their policy. thisjust looked like a normal family, so if they were on a special pass, i‘m assuming they got it from someone else or they weren‘t told what the rules were. because the father was dressed very casually, with shorts on. i think the issue here is, why single out leggings? why is that an issue? women wear leggings in modern—day america. it‘s a staple of our wardrobe. and the idea that it‘s inappropriate i think is a sexist, gender—based policy, and it seemed to bejust about the leggings and nothing else. let‘s speak to the broadcaster and journalist, beverley turner who joins us on skype from west london. are you going to stand up for leggings? i can stand up for leggings. i am wearing them today! show me a woman who doesn‘t want to wear leggings on an aeroplane? there is nothing more comfortable to wear on aeroplanes than leggings? i have got two girls and i can‘t get one in
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anything other than leggings. what has been highlighted it does contain some prejudice. there isn‘t a male equivalent to the leggings. i heard some commentators saying they don‘t wa nt to some commentators saying they don‘t want to see girls as young as ten wearing tight leggings as though it is somehow a sexual statement. i think that says more about the blokes who are observing the girls than the girls themselves. i don‘t wa nt than the girls themselves. i don‘t want my girls to think of being a sexualised item of clothing. there are enough things that they want to wear like cropped tops and short skirts which i‘m less happy about. i say we should be defending the leggings. so there is sexism here, you think, but also there is snootiness. some people think that leggings are common? and sometimes leggings are common? and sometimes leggings are common? and sometimes leggings are common, victoria, let‘s be honest. we have seen sights, but again, there isn‘t a male equivalent and actually we should be teaching
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girls to wear what is comfortable and yes, they should dress appropriately for the particular circumstances and this airline, let‘s face it, emirates have old—fashioned policies when it comes to telling women how to dress. they are expected to wear high heels. there is something very out dated about the dress policy, you think that most airlines still like to uphold and hopefully this has shone a light on their policies and maybe they need to go back and have a look at them. we didn't quite see your leggings. you might have to stand on the chair because of where your camera is! go and stand up so we can see you standing up for leggings. they are just plain black leggings. show me a woman who doesn‘t love wearing leggings. as long as they wore something that covered their
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bottom over the leggings which is sinister. wearing leggings and a t—shirt for a ten—year—old girl, that‘s fine. we shouldn‘t be telling girls that need to see themselves and feeling about their body as sexualised, they are wearing trousers where you can see the shape of bottom. when when i saw this, i thought a person for donald trump had got his way and women could only dress as he deemed appropriate. the idea that they can be common or not particularly smart. donald trump would be happy to ban the leggings because it doesn‘t fit the idea of women that he likes. do not put ideas into that man‘s head! thank you, beverley. beverley turner. lots of you getting in touch on form 696, the risk assesment form which police ask music venues to fill out.
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a lot of people feel it is a racist form. mark carney simon says, "got in touch with us and he is asked to fill out the form regularly. hi simon, what do you think of it? i've got no problem filling out the form myself, but i have a problem with it not being mass for everybody who is per fortunatelying. that‘s not being mass for everybody who is per fortu natelying. that‘s my not being mass for everybody who is perfortunatelying. that‘s my only issue that i have with it. right, 0k. issue that i have with it. right, ok. i‘ve got some comments here, a texter, "696 is racist and i‘m a 66—year—old gran and white. i hope they‘re not pulling my leg." ann says, "what a joke this 696. these quys says, "what a joke this 696. these guys are trying to make a living and just want to please the people. she says she is a grime lover at 59. another viewer says, "i think 696 is
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another way of racial profiling." what can you do to protest? well, i mean, to protest it is ridiculous because it‘s something that the authorities want. they want to have it. if the authorities want something, and the promoterfor example has to provide something and his artist have to provide something and you‘re passionate about what you do, like! and you‘re passionate about what you do, like i am and there are others who are passionate about what they do, you have to fill out the form. they want to promote to their crowd. so you have got to accept it and get on with it? we have got to accept it and get on with it, whether you like it or not, and whether you appreciate it or not. the thing is victoria, the problem that i have and the issue that a lot of artists, particularly the grime ones, not everybody is getting this sort of racial profiling and this sort of attention in regards to them performing. if for example abigail
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who does folk music wants to go and do her show a the local pub, she is not getting a 696 why should stormzy and myself and so solid and so forth? that‘s where the problem lies. thank you very much, mark carney simon says. thank you for coming on the programme. tomorrow, in an exclusive interview, a rape victim, whose attack led to a judge saying drunk women were putting themselves in danger, defends the comments, telling us the judge was "right". thank you for watching today. we‘re back tomorrow at 9am. good morning. it was a lovely weekend across all parts of the uk with lots of sunshine. what about the rest of this coming week? we will see more in the way of cloud and there will be outbreaks of rain for the west, but with a southerly breeze
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temperatures doing quite well. there is sunshine to be had for many areas this afternoon. around the edges of this afternoon. around the edges of this area of cloud which is likely to burn its way back to the north—eastern area and underneath that, it will stay on the cool side, but if you get sunshine, top temperature 17 or 18 celsius. but quite cool underneath the cloud. some places struggling to get into double figures. this evening and overnight, that low cloud and mist and fog looks like it will be coming backin and fog looks like it will be coming back in from the east. it will become extensive. towards the south—west, its cloud and wind and rain moving in here, but double figures here. sixes and sevens elsewhere, rural spots go lower than that. then the big change really sta rts that. then the big change really starts to happen through tomorrow. a big area of low pressure in the atlantic. it will start to throw cloud and rain our way. this is bbc news and these are
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the top stories developing at 11. theresa may will meet nicola sturgeon in scotland later for the first time since the snp announced their proposals for a second independence referendum. labour says it will not support any brexit deal negotiated by the government unless it meets the party‘s six tests. the family of one of the westminster terror attack victims, kurt cochran, are due to give a news conference in the next few minutes;we‘ll bring it you live here on bbc news. survivors of the caliphate; we hear from the mosul residents who‘ve escaped the fighting. bt is hit with a record fine of £42 million because of delays in installing high—speed business lines. also this hour, refused
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from boarding a flight because of leggings. an american airline is criticised after two girls
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