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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 27, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may will meet nicola sturgeon in scotland later for the first time since the snp announced their proposals for a second independence referendum. labour says it will not support any brexit deal negotiated by the government unless it meets the party's six tests. the family of one of the westminster terror attack victims, kurt cochran, are due to give a news conference in the next few minutes;we‘ll bring it you live here on bbc news. survivors of the caliphate; we hear from the mosul residents who've escaped the fighting. bt is hit with a record fine of £42 million because of delays in installing high—speed business lines. also this hour, refused from boarding a flight because of leggings. an american airline is criticised after two girls were told they couldn't fly because they didn't meet the company's dress code. a new quid on the block; the new 12—sided pound coin
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is about to come in to circulation but at what cost to businesses? good morning. it's monday, 27th march, i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may will meet scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon later today for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. the visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. it's an important time for brexit negotiations with a number of key discussions across the week. later today, the prime minister is expected to give a speech on unity, saying uk's union will become even more important as britain leaves the eu.
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tomorrow, msps in the scottish parliament are to vote on a whether scotland should have a second independence referendum following the brexit negotiations. on wednesday, the prime minister will officially begin britain's two year exit from the european union in which she'll write a letter to the eu commission triggering article 50 of the lisbon treaty. on thursday, the government will publish its white paper on the great repeal bill which outlines how it plans to transfer european legislation into british law. and on friday, the european commission president donald tusk is expected to outline the 27 nation's plan for brexit just 48 hours after receiving the formal confirmation. our correspondent catriona renton looks at today's visit by the prime minister to scotland. brexit was top of the agenda when these two leaders met for the first time, shortly after theresa may took office.
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later today, they are set to meet again. but first, the prime minister will meet at the office for national development. on wednesday, she will trigger article 50, initiating the uk's exit from the eu. but 62% of scots voted to remain. nicola sturgeon has therefore called for a second referendum on scottish independence. not only is there no uk wide agreement on the week ahead, agreement on the way ahead, but the uk government has not moved even an inch in pursuit of compromise and agreement. but theresa may has said not now. we should be working together to get that right deal for scotland and the uk. so i say that is myjob as the prime minister. so for that reason, i seated the snp that now was not the time. so for that reason, i say to the the snp that
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now was not the time. lastly, the scottish parliament started debating whether to seek permission from the uk government for a second independence referendum. it was halted due to the terror attack on london. it is expected that with the backing of the scottish green party, the first minister will achieve a majority in favour. a representative for the scottish government says they understand the uk government wants to discuss article 50, and they hope there are areas that the prime minister can provide answers. earlier this morning, keir starmer spoke about this. norman smith is in westminster. what has he said, what are the demands? he's set out the conditions which he says mrs neigh will have to meet, will have to be
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in herfinal brexit will have to meet, will have to be in her final brexit deal if labour are to support the package. there are to support the package. there area number of are to support the package. there are a number of conditions in which you probably think she will be able to meet, such as ensuring the package protects our national security, getting a deal that reflects the interests of different parts of the uk having a fair and managed migration system. but there is one condition which has raised eyebrows at westminster, and that is that mrs may must ensure the deal gets britain exactly the same benefits as we currently enjoy. now, a lot of people say, how on earth is this possible if we are not in the single market, how can we have the benefits of being in the single market, if we are not in the customs union, how can we have the same benefits, labour say, but union, how can we have the same benefits, laboursay, but that union, how can we have the same benefits, labour say, but that was what the brexit secretary david davis promised, those were his words. some brexiteers suspect labour is trying to position itself so labour is trying to position itself so that it can reject the final deal that mrs may eventually strikes. keir starmer this morning though
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warning mrs may not to be tempted or pushed around by hard brexiteers in the tory party who might want no deal at all. once a small minority in the conservative party, the brexiteers are now in office and in power. this ideologically—driven approach to brexit would be disastrous and divisive. and it would stand as a roadblock to continued co—operation in the important fields of technology, research, medicine, security, science, art and culture. the prime minister needs to face down these brexiteers. norman, as we have said, theresa may meets nicola sturgeon later. how difficult is that meeting likely to be? i think it's likely to be very strained, not just be? i think it's likely to be very strained, notjust because of the personal difficulties these two women seem to have, their relations do not seem great, let's be honest.
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they have been publicically trading blows with each other. but also politically, they seem to be heading for a right old stramash because nicola sturgeon said clearly she wa nts a nicola sturgeon said clearly she wants a second independence referendum before brexit or possibly just a few months afterwards. we know theresa may has said now is not the time and both it seems are not for budging, indeed downing street making very clear this morning mrs may is going to set out in forthright terms her views that now would not be the appropriate moment to hold that second referendum. although interestingly in a speech later today, she will float the idea of strengthening the devolution settle m e nt of strengthening the devolution settlement which has led some to suggest that perhaps she could look at transferring more powers to scotla nd at transferring more powers to scotland as an olive branch for nicola sturgeon. again, downing street playing that down so i suspect this is going to be a difficult meeting between the two women later this afternoon. tonight there's a special edition of question time featuring
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brexit secretary david davis and shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer. that's tonight from birmingham at 8pm on bbc one. later today we'll be putting your questions to bbc journalists on the triggering of article 50. throughout the day, we'll be speaking with our europe editor katya adler and economics editor kamal ahmed. you can get in touch via twitter using the hashtag bbc ask this or text your questions to 61124. amber rudd is having meetings today
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to discuss terror attacks and how khalid masood may have used whatsapp shortly before his attack on westminster. the iraqi city of mosul has had an agonising weekend. the jihadists of so—called islamic state seem determined to fight to the death. it is now clear that at least 100 and maybe many more were killed in an air strike on 17th march. yalda hakim has been talking to some of the mosul residents who survived the militant snipers and coalition airstrikes. they arrived with what little they had. these are the desperate survives of the caliphate. they've managed to flee notjust isis snipers but coalition and iraqi air strikes. this is the entrance to the refugee camp. these buses bring people to the actual camp. as soon as people start to arrive, the men and the women are separated because
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they want to screen some of the men to make sure that they're not isis fighters or sympathisers. near a makeshift school, i meet 12—year—old mohammed. mohammed tells me first isis snipers killed his father and then his mother as they tried to get away. he fled here with his two brothers. the camp, now home for the orphans. the camp is overflowing and people are being asked to go to other camps or to east mosul. we travel to the east where injanuary after a battle, thejihadis were driven out. on the side of the road in east, omar his wife and two daughters are waiting for a relative to pick them up. in the dead of night, they left their homes and the fighting in west mosul. translation: the fighting was still
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happening. we didn't know what we we re happening. we didn't know what we were stepping on. sometimes even bodies. it was dark and our kids kept falling over. duecht isis gone from your city? —— do you want isis gone from your city? translation: god will have revenge on isis and those who helped isis enter the city. this is one of the bridges that leads to west mosul. here in the east, life is starting to go back to normal. the traffic is slowing. people are coming out of their homes. it's hard to imagine that just a few weeks ago, isis was beheading people in these streets. everywhere you look, there is a co nsta nt everywhere you look, there is a constant reminder of the battle that was fought here. 67—year—old alia and her family have just rebuilt their home after an air strike destroyed it. how did you find out your city was liberated?
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translation: they knocked on the door, they were calling out, army, army. they were with tanks and humvees and before that we wouldn't even open the door. are you worried about the future of your city? yes, aim worried because west mosul hasn't been liberated yet. the battle to retake west mosul is complicated. the frontline is now in the old city and the area is densely populated. i first came to mosul four—and—a—half years ago, it was tense even then with curfews and complaints from the local sunni population that they were being mistreated by the shia—led military. this battle is now in its final stages. iraqi forces may be fighting to free the people of mosul from the tyranny of the so—called islamic state and their caliphate, but in
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even more complex tasks lie ahead, reuniting a very divided city. hakim, bbc news yalda mosul. it has emerged that people living close to the site of a major explosion on merseyside, reported smelling gas at least 2a hours beforehand. the national grid has confirmed that reports of leaks were investigated, before the suspected gas blast in bebbington in wirral on saturday. two people were seriously hurt and dozens others injured when several buildings collapsed. bt has been fined a record £a2 million by the communications regulator ofcom. it found bt‘s openreach division had cut compensation payments to other telecoms providers for delays in installing high speed business lines. the company said it "apologised wholeheartedly" for the mistakes. simon clemison reports. whether at home or at work, cable switch connectors are still provided by bt. some carry large amounts of data at great speed. but there are cases where the company has been slow to deliver the lines. and the uk relies on the bigger cables, which make up the network,
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as they support mobile and broadband operators, as well as big businesses, schools, and hospitals. where bt fails to meet deadlines for ethernet services, as they are known, they need to pay compensation to the likes of vodafone and talktalk. but they have been using a clause in the contract to reduce payments. now, bt has been hit with a huge extra bill. in a record fine, ofcom has ordered them to pay £a2 million on penalties. this is the highest fine we have imposed. we feel it reflects the seriousness of the breach in question and the importance of this particular sector of the uk economy. of course the fine needs to be seen in context and in the round with the significant compensation package. the scale of the fine is said to reflect the importance of bt to other companies, who offer services
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such as broadband. bt has apologised, adding that it should never have happened, and that measures have been put in place to stop it happening again. but in addition to the fine, it will need to find the additional £300 million owed to companies in compensation. the family of the us tourist killed in the westminster terror attack have been speaking at a news conference in london. they've said that they've been through a humbling and difficult experience but they've felt the love of so many people. we are hoping to bring you their words shortly. he was with his wife, melissa, on the last day of a trip celebrating their 25th wedding anniversary. he was killed, she was badly injured. the family are speaking and we'll bring you that when we can. the headlines: theresa may will meet
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nicola sturgeon in scotland later for the first time since the snp announced their proposals for a second independence referendum. labour says it will not support any brexit deal negotiated by the government unless it meets the pa rty‘s government unless it meets the party's six government unless it meets the pa rty‘s six tests. survivors of the caliphate, the mosul residents who've escaped the jihadistand mosul residents who've escaped the jihadist and coalition air strikes. in sport, england have reached the half way point of world cup qualifying, unbeaten and top of their group. they were 2—0 winners against lithuania at wembley. jermaine defoe scored his 20th international goal, as did jamie vardy. a late win against slovenia for scotland at hampden park. chris martin scored. northern ireland beat norway to stay second in their group too. and andy murray could be out for longer than anticipated. jamie has revealed his brother has an elbow tear. the world number one is unlikely to play in the david cup
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tie against france. a full update in the next 15 minutes. mps must introduce tougher measures to tackle childhood obesity in england, including controlling supermarket price promotions on junk food and food high in sugar. a report out today by the health select committee argue that plans published by government ministers last year miss several important opportunities and don't go far enough. a levy on sugary drinks was the main strand of the government's strategy against obesity last year. many said it was a start, but they also thought the government could have and should have gone further. now a group of mps has agreed that much more needs to be done to tackle childhood obesity. in particular, they want action to curb discounts and price promotions on unhealthy food. the committee calls for clear goals on reducing overall levels of childhood obesity and for the levy
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on sugary drinks to be extended to milk—based products that have added sugar. we know that one in three ii—year—olds are overweight or obese and that's not just ii—year—olds are overweight or obese and that's notjust about individual choices, it's about the environment that children are growing up in and really the key thing that's missing from the current strategy is regulation around marketing and the promotions to children. representatives from the food industry itself told the committee that responsible retailers are being disadvantaged by those who continue to offer big discounts on food high in sugarand to offer big discounts on food high in sugar and fat. in a statement, the department of health in england defended its use of a largely volu nta ry defended its use of a largely voluntary approach from the food industry to the reduction of sugar and fat and said ministers have not ruled out further measures if results are not seen. the mps argue the situation with childhood obesity is so serious and urgent, ministers need to take much morrow bust action. dominic hughes, bbc news.
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the number of first time buyers relying on gifts from their parents is atan relying on gifts from their parents is at an all—time high, according to research. one in three are relying on parents to buy their first home. the social mobility commission warns families on lower incomes are increasingly missing out. home ennership among young families is in free fall. the number of people in their late 20s who own their own home has halved in the last 25 years. in 1990, 63% had bought property, that's fallen to just 31%. those who manage to buy are increasingly relying on parents for help. 34% now turn to what the commission describes as the bank of mum and dad. the fact that over one in three first time buyers are having to rely on the bank of mum and dad to get them on to the
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housing ladder is really concerning. what it means is that millions of lower income families who do not have access to that type of financial support, their prospects are becoming a disfan dream. this report warns that difficulties in buying homes is damaging social mobility. those on lower incomes find it virtually impossible, it says, to get a foot on the housing ladder. the department for communities and local government said that since 2010, more than 300,000 households have been helped to buy a home through government—backed schemes. they admit the housing market is broken but say the recent housing white paper sets out plans to build more homes and improve affordability. more than 6 million people in somalia are reported to be in need of assistance due to a severe drought — that's more than half the population.
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aid agencies have warned that areas of the country face famine, if help doesn't get there in time. even if famine is averted, for many families this drought has already had a devastating impact, as andrew harding reports from harfo, in puntland, northern somalia. this is nomad country. we are deep in northern somalia where roads are as rare as rivers and every drought isa as rare as rivers and every drought is a test to be stoically endured. but not this one. we find a thousand nomadic families gathered in the stifling heat outside harfo, a skeleton stifling heat outside harfo, a s keleto n of stifling heat outside harfo, a skeleton of a town. they've travelled miles in search of help. guns everywhere of course, clam wars, pirates, militants. trouble is a lwa ys wars, pirates, militants. trouble is always simmering here. but this drought is something out of the ordinary. the women beg the mayor for food.
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they say they've never lived through anything like it before. he tells them to be patient. there's not much in town except for a well. the nomads have set up camp here. this man and his wife are accomplished builders. a few sticks and rags. five of you sleep here. it's a squeeze? you might assume they are used to this sort of poverty. then a mobile phone appears from the woman's pocket. it's a useful reminder that these aren't poor people at all, they're middle class nomads. and what they're experiencing today is what we'd recognise as a banking crash. and here is the bank. outside town, like rock paintings, the nomads dead livestock. across somalia, the
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drought‘s already killed millions of goats. some have the equivalent of almost £10,000 in savings. translation: we were wealthy before this, now we are destitute, we eat rice once a day. some of the sickest children have been taken to a clinic in town. but the youngest child never made it this far. they show us the unmarked grave of nine their nine—month—old who died last week. translation: if this drought continues, ifear my translation: if this drought continues, i fear my other children will die too. we have only two goats left, it's not enough. i'll have to beg now. our life as nomads is over. for now, of course, the priority is to save lives and to drag somalia away from famine, but beyond that,
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with the climate changing and the droughts here getting tougher, it's tempting to wonder whether the days of the nomad are numbered. sun set and the wind picks up. but still no rain. andrew harding, bbc news, in northern somalia. in mosul, is fighters seem determined to fight to the death. our correspondent is in a camp in mosul. we heard from her earlier. what is the latest in the battle for mosul now? the battle rages on. we heard a few days ago that fighting had stalled. that is incorrect. our middle east editorjeremy bowen is in west mosul and he's been telling us that he continues to hear air strikes,
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mortar attacks, so the fighting there does continue. i don't know if you can just see there does continue. i don't know if you canjust see right behind me the frontline is just over there and it's from there that thousands of people are fleeing the fighting in west mosul. they're arriving about 5,000 people a day to this camp and the position you're looking at now is where the buses are. the buses are bringing these internally displaced people to this camp. the situation for them in west mosul is dire. they're running out of food, water, sanitation, they have to electricity, and they‘ re water, sanitation, they have to electricity, and they're being used as human shields by is fighters. the air strikes by the us—led coalition also continues. so when they do come here to the camp, the men and women are separated, the men are screened, they're given food and shelter. you can probably see the tents just behind me. the area here in hammamal—alil is completely
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destroyed, it was one of the first places liberated when the battle began. here used to be a headquarters, it's utter destruction here but at least the people who've arrived here in this camp are safe for now. how many have left mosul in all and how many remain? we are being told by humanitarian agencies that more than 200,000 people have fled the fighting from west mosul. the area that the fighting is in now in the old city is densely populated, the streets and alleyways are incredibly narrow so there will be street—to—street, house—to—house fighting and people are being caught in the crossfire. those lucky enough to escape come to camps like these and the un and other agencies expect another 300,000 people to flee the fighting. we are being told more than 400,000 others are still stuck, trapped in the city, and are being used by isis and caught in the ross fire. they have very few choices. if
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they stay, they'll be killed. if they stay, they'll be killed. if they try and flee, they could be killed as well. thank you very much. a united airlines has faced criticism after it barred two women from boarding the flight because they were wearing leggings. the united said paying customers would have been able to fly but as they were flying on discounted tickets, they had to meet certain standards. it's the online argument that's been called leggings—gate. it was started with this tweet by shannon watts, a campaigner in the united states. she saw two girls stopped from going on a united airlines flight because they were wearing leggings. a united airlines flight because they were wearing leggingslj a united airlines flight because they were wearing leggings. i was really stunned because i'm the mom of four daughters who travel, live and work in leggings and yoga pants. also because i wanted to understand
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the policy as a new member on united andi the policy as a new member on united and i thought it was really shocking. shannon tweets at the airline and this was their tweet back. we do have the right to refuse transport for passengers who're barefoot or not properly clothed. transport for passengers who're barefoot or not properly clothedm led to a twitter storm with some celebrities joining led to a twitter storm with some celebritiesjoining in. led to a twitter storm with some celebrities joining in. sarah silverman said she wouldn't fly on united and a model said she'd try jeans and a scarf next time. keegan allen called it petty. united clarified their position in a tweet, saying that the girls were pass riders. they said they had a dress code which means you can't wear lycra. the company have since tweeted, reminding normal customers that their leggings are welcome. regardless of what tickets they hold, shannon still says she thinks this policy is sexist and needs to be changed. what do you think? let us know your
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thoughts on that. let us catch up with the weather with jay. a mixed bag so far today. some have had lovely sunshine but some started the day with quite a lot of low cloud, mist and fog. i think we are going to lose a lot of that from parts of wales and the midlands. it's burning its way into the eastern side of england. elsewhere, good spells of sunshine, not as windy as it has been in the south. feeling pleasant out there. temperatures into mid to upper teens. if you are stuck underneath the cloud, single figures for some. the cloud will become extensive across the night. mist and fog as well. down towards the south—west, it's cloud and a breeze is coming m, it's cloud and a breeze is coming in, elsewhere in single figures.
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that signals a sign of a change. this bigelow will take over from tuesday and spread some cloud and youed breaks of rain. the winds will be coming in from the south. that will keep things relatively warm over the next few days by day and night. there'll be some cloud and rain to go with that. in an this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines at 1130. theresa may will meet nicola sturgeon in scotland later — for the first time since the snp announced their proposals for a second independence referendum. labour says it will not support any brexit deal negotiated by the government unless it meets the party's "six tests". the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir are starmer, says it's more important to get the right deal than to get a quick deal. the family of one of the westminster
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terror attack victims, kurt cochran, have spoken publicly for the first time since he was killed. they said they had been through a "humbling and difficult experience", but they said that they "felt the love of so many people". thousands of civilians continue to flee the iraqi city of mosul as government forces step up their offensive to reclaim the city from the so—called islamic state. bt has been fined a record £42 million over delays in installing high speed business lines. the regulator ofcom found that it's openreach division failed to pay proper compensation to rival firms. an american airline is criticised after two girls were told they couldn't fly because they were wearing leggings. the airline says they didn't meet the company's dress code. and a new £1 coin is about to go into circulation. it's hoped the 12—sided coin will be harder to forge than the current one. on sport update. leggings?
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leggings? we have reached the halfway point in world cup qualifying, england are still unbeaten and top of their group after beating lithiania 2—nil at wembley. it wasn't the best of games, lithuania did their best to try and stifle england but jermaine defoe , at the age of 34, got the opener, his 20th for england over 3 years after his last appearaance, jamie vardy came off the bench for england's second, if he stays fit he should be sure of a place in world cup squad next summer, but what about defoe? it's really important were able to call on the likes ofjermaine and get the impact he had on a game like he had today. if he's scoring goals in the premier league and playing as well as he has the season then there is absolutely no reason why he couldn't. england's next qualifier is against scotland injune. gordon strachan might been out
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of a job had they failed to beat slovenia last night. they left it late, but chris martin's 88th minute goal for the 1—nil win has moved them up to fourth and just a couple of points off 2nd, that could be good enough for a play—off. strachan said their first half was the best since he's been in charge, and they certainly deserved the win. everybody who is involved with us, they will go away feeling good about themselves. so i hope they enjoyed it. we are available for people to come along and supporters next time. they will be welcomed. i know you will give us that support. i know you will give us that support. the best that northern ireland can probably hope is a play—off spot because germany are running away with it in their group, but michael o'neill‘s side are 2 points clear in second after maintaining their brilliant home form. they beat norway 2—nil, jamie ward scored inside two minutes
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and conor washingtone added another by halftime. they haven't been beaten in 8 competitive matches at windsor park. their two remaining home matches are against the czech republic and the germans which will be key to them making it back to back major tournaments. we wa nt we want to build momentum and belief. we have carried out on. we had the experience in france, the experience of the finals and it is all credit to the players. they still have the dream making get to russia as well. with every dream —— with every game you get closer to reality. ellie downie finished with three gold medals at the british gymnastics championships in liverpool the 17 year old had already won the all—around title but also came out on top in the vault and she won on the bars as well after her older sister becky fell. andy murray is unlikely to be fit for the davis cup tie against france a week on friday. his brotherjamie, has revealed that the world number one has a tear
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in his elbow and needs rest. we already knew about the injury but not the severity, murray had already pulled out of a tournament in the us with the problem and had hoped to return for the start of the clay court season in about 3 weeks time that's all sport for now. more for you in the next hour. thank you. this afternoon's deadline to form a new devolved government in northern ireland following the elections is likely to pass without an agreement. sinn fein say they won't go into an executive led by the democratic unionist party leader, arlene foster, while a public inquiry investigates her handling of a failed green energy scheme. our correspondent chris page is in stormont for us. what will that mean? it means that northern ireland will remain without a devolved government. the parties have held one of the regular monday morning meetings in the last hour, but it was a meeting of a committee which decided to cancel the full
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city of the assembly which had been scheduled to take place today and ntv nominate deputy and first ministers. but it is game up as far as this first phase of the top process is concerned. it will be the end of a three—week period allocated for talks after the election earlier this month. sinn fein will not be going into government. one of the issuesis going into government. one of the issues is the position of arlene foster, the leader of dup. they say they will not go into government with her as long as there is a public inquiry going into a controversial green energy scheme which went over budget. there are other issues which need to be resolved before they discuss mrs forster‘s position. one is legal recognition for the irish language. the nationalists are keen on i new
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irish language act and unionist parties have resisted this demand. also, something which has affected the political process again, which is new agencies to resolve —— to investigate killings from the troubles which have not been resolved. the british and irish governments have not agreed details about how these agencies can be run. overall, the talks broke down and sinn fein said they had run their course. the deadline will pass at four o'clock this afternoon without a government in place year. thank you very much. let's look at some of today's other developing stories: the russian opposition leader, alexei navalny, has appeared in court following his arrest during sunday's mass anti—corru ption protests. the marches, which took place across the country, appeared to be the biggest show of defiance since anti—government protests five years ago. the lawyer has previously spent time under house arrest. the european union has demanded
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the release "without delay" of hundreds of people detained in protests across russia on sunday. the us state department also said protesters should be able to "exercise their rights without fear of retribution". at least eight japanese students and teachers are feared dead following an avalanche injapan. they had been taking part in a mountain trip near the town of nasu in centraljapan. about 60 people are said to have been in the area at the time. rescue efforts are underway. campaigners are claiming that planned changes to disability benefits, called personal independent payments, could lead to an increase in mental health problems. the government has reversed a court
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ruling which would have entitled more people to claim the benefit — people with severe mental health issues who suffer distress when they travel alone. ministers say no one who already receives the benefit will see a cut. thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes in queensland in northeastern australia as a cyclone moves in towards the coast. the storm is expected to bring winds in excess of 200 kilometres an hour when it makes landfall early on tuesday. cyclone debbie is expected to cause extensive flooding in low lying areas of the state. thousands of videos on youtube look like versions of popular kids cartoons but actually contain disturbing and inappropriate content not suitable for children. bbc trending has found hundreds of similar videos of children's cartoon characters with inappropriate themes — featuring characters from the disney movie frozen, the minions franchise, thomas the tank engine, and many more. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on. —— on all stories.
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theresa may is meeting nicola sturgeon later today. let us remain with that story. let us go live to glasgow and our correspondent, how difficult is this meeting likely to be? i think it will be extremely challenging because you had to do political leaders with completely different agendas. tories me is saying she wants the united kingdom to be strengthened. she wants the devolution settlement to be strengthened. she does not want bonds between the nations to be weakened. —— theresa may. on the other hand, nicola sturgeon‘s key
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issues are about the referendum issues are about the referendum issue and there will be a debate tomorrow morning at the scottish parliament which we expect to be in favour of a referendum. theresa may says no is not the time for this. this could be a meeting of minds but probably that will be quite a long way from the truth. we expect to hear comments from theresa may in a moment. she is said by downing street to be considering giving scotla nd street to be considering giving scotland additional powers after brexit, is it clear what those would be andi brexit, is it clear what those would be and i be enough of a sweetener? essentially these are powers which reside with brussels at the moment over issues like fishing and farming. there is a bit of an argument about whether they are repatriated to westminster or to scotland. that is one of the few areas where today is user may could possibly offer some sort of
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concession to nicola sturgeon. it sounds like she is not ready to offer anything concrete at this point, she suggest that the possibility in the future. thank you very much. we are still waiting to get those comments from theresa may and we will bring in as soon as we get them. business leaders in lancashire are calling for what they call ‘tough action‘ against protestors who target companies supplying the fracking industry in the area. a protest group is planning two weeks of direct action from today against businesses in the industry supply chain. the local chamber of commerce says members are facing a campaign of harrassment and intimidation. events are also being watched closely in north yorkshire where another fracking site is proposed. here's our north of england correspondent danny savage. a protest outside a company which supplies the meant to the fracking industry. it is about to get ugly. bleeping. get out of your car. the man at the
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wheel of the 4x4 was fined for his driving. the aim of the protest was to get the company to stop selling to get the company to stop selling toa to get the company to stop selling to a fracking company called quad avella. we will resurrect every business which is facilitating fracking and we will do the same thing everywhere we go. protest as they are as a result a number of companies have agreed to stop supplying the fracking industry here in lancashire. none of those companies would comment to us when we approach them but the local chamber of commerce say what has happened amounts to a campaign of intimidation and harassment. the real concern is this could escalate very easily so could go from intimidation and harassment and we can seek compensation and aggression escalate towards physical violence. and he fracking protest a regular occurrences. this was outside the
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main site in blackpool last week. i group called reclaim the power is banning direct action against countries in the fracking chain. this is a campaign tactic, normally to stop things. it is usually a last resort. if someone turns up with theirface resort. if someone turns up with their face covered and their fit up, that looks like an anarchist, it is quite intimidating. we have a strict policy of not intimidating. we respect the workers. we want to say, if you remove the supply chain, fracking cannot continue. those in favour of fracking are watching events in lancashire close life.|j did not like it over in lancashire we re did not like it over in lancashire were companies were backing down and capitulating to the police. or in yorkshire, i will we have more grit and determination and we will not
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back down to these bullies. but a nti —fra ctu res back down to these bullies. but anti—fractures say they have spent yea rs anti—fractures say they have spent years following proto— —— protocol and protest is the only option they have left. it is hard to say anything but a growing sense of conflict over the issue. ina in a moment we will have a summary of the business headlines. this hour but first —— the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may will be meeting nicola sturgeon shortly. the family of kurt cochran, the us tourists killed in the westminster terror attack have been speaking for the first time since he was killed. they say they have been through a humbling and difficult experience. hello, these
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are the top business stories. bt has been fined £42m by the telecoms regulator ofcom for delays in installing high—speed lines. the largest fine the regulator has ever imposed. it comes after bt‘s openreach division cut how much it paid telecoms providers for delays in installing lines between 2013 and 2014. banks need to prepare for a wide range of potential outcomes and avoid sudden changes to lending as the country gets ready to leave the european union. the warning from the bank of england comes just two days before prime minister plans to trigger article 50 — the process of formally notifying the eu that britain is ready to start two years of exit talks. and more change on the trains. a hong kong firm has been awarded the franchise to run south west trains for seven years from august — replacing stagecoach. it's joined forces with uk transport firm first group. mtr runs the hong kong metro system and will operate london's crossrail line when it opens. the new franchise promises faster
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journeys with new trains. more on the news that telecoms giant bt has been fined more than £40m for failing to pay proper compensation for delays to installing high—speed lines. it's a record fine — and reflects what ofcom calls ‘the seriousness of the issue'. it relates to bt‘s openreach division that installs cables and lines for other telecoms firms and ofcom found it committed a "serious breach" of its rules by cutting how much compensation it paid to customers. here's ofcom's director of investigations and enforcement. this is basically the backbone of our digital network and bt was found to have breached its contracts with its customers and others telecom providers such as vodafone and talk talk in the week it do read the
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roll—out of these broadband lines. it should have given notice in a reasonable time frame. if that is delay, bt may well be obliged to pay compensation. we have found that bt did not pay the appropriate compensation. it's a big week for the pound as the uk government prepares to start the divorce proceedings against the eu. it fires the starting gun on the process by triggering article 50 on wednesday. but what could that mean for business? well, a study published this morning by the business group, the cbi, says financial services businesses are feeling pretty calm about the future after sentiment fell last year. their study includes banks, building societies and insurers. but at the same time, this morning the bank of england has warned banks to prepare for various different scenarios — to make sure they're ready for what happens next as we prepare to leave the eu. let's speak to the cbi's chief economist, rain newton—smith. good to see you. let's start with
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this, businesses know, financial services, feeling all right about what happened and approaching the brexit negotiations from the decent standpoint? yes, that's right, it is good to say our financial firms have a spring in their step at the moment with hiring up and investment intentions strong, especially in it. this has followed four tough quarters for our financial services. there are plenty of challenges for our financial services firms, they are adapting to intense competition. regularity conditions changing and thatis regularity conditions changing and that is all set against the back —— backdrop of brexit. paint a picture of the importance of financial services, we hear from of the importance of financial services, we hearfrom different parts of industry, car—makers and
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manufacturing, we have heard from the big banks, how important is the financial services industry? the big banks, how important is the financial services industry7m the big banks, how important is the financial services industry? it is really important to remember that passporting is notjust about our big banks. it touches so many parts of our economy. so many of our members are concerned about passporting, like the car manufacturers, they actually provide financial services alongside buying cars. financial services in some way is the glue of our economy, it keeps businesses hiring and the finances how they grow businesses, it stretches across all sectors of the economy. so banks need to prepare for what happens next, how important is this warning? i do not think the warning itself is that important. we know ours —— our financial services
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firms are making contingency plans. they need to plan to live your eventual scenario out there in the economy. brexit and our relationship with the eu. banks and financial services are really focused on this different scenario. what about your nextjob different scenario. what about your next job potentially, different scenario. what about your nextjob potentially, your name has beenin nextjob potentially, your name has been in the ring for potentially the bank of england deputy governorjob, any update for us? i am doing a job i really enjoy at the moment but what is important as we say diversity of voices at the bank of england. mark carney has a lot to try and improve gender diversity among them rank staff. when i was a young economist working at the bank of england, it was important for me to have a strong female at the top of the bank. absolutely. watch this space, we may be talking to you again about this job. thank you. let
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us have a look at the numbers. —— numbers. bc the pound picking up a little. more to do with america rather than worries about the eu negotiations, it's more about trompe policies. gold was back up earlier in the day, reflecting nervous as —— nervousness as we approached eu negotiations. crude is back up again. more from me a little later. thank you. the family of two of the victims of the westminster attack have been speaking in scotland yard this morning. kurt cochran and his wife were hit by the car driven by khalid massoud over westminster bridge. kurt cochran died and his wife is steadily improving in
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hospital. we have heard from his family. good morning, ladies and gentlemen. thank you for coming this morning. thank you especially for your kindness and consideration of ourfamily. this your kindness and consideration of our family. this has your kindness and consideration of ourfamily. this has been a humbling and difficult experience. but we felt the love of so many people during these past several days. it has been attended experience for our family to be together with melissa o'hare. her health is steadily improving. she has been strengthened by the presence of her family. she is so grateful for the outpouring of love and generosity. herfamily is so grateful for the first responders, the medical personnel. the assistance of government agencies in the united states and great britain, along with the
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generosity of delta airlines in arranging for our travel to and from london. so many people have been so kind. we are deeply touched by berg gudmundsson generosity. your notes, prayers, donations and love have helped us. —— touched by your generosity. the most difficult part of all of this is that kurt is no longer with us and we miss him terribly. he was an amazing individual who loved everyone and try to make the world a better place. he left a legacy of generosity and servers that continues to inspire us. we are deeply saddened to lose him but are grateful that the world is coming to know him and be inspired by him. thank you for your many stories that
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have touched our family and helped us remember and celebrate his life. thank you. we can take some questions no. “ now. —— now. questions down year?|j -- now. questions down year? ijust wa nt to -- now. questions down year? ijust want to say sorry for everything that you and the family are going through, is the family hear as well, just to clarify? yes. i know melissa is dealing with a lot of grief, how is dealing with a lot of grief, how is that impacting on her current recovery? she's very emotionally sad
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obviously. wright knows she isjust trying to focus on healing herself and getting to the point where she can be healed and be evil to go home. —— rate now. —— and be ready to go home. that is melissa cochrane's sisters speaking at that news conference. she had a broken leg, rib and a cut head. headlines coming up in the moment. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather. thank you. here's a picture from fife, a lovely start with plenty of sunshine. many central areas so a
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lot of cloud, mist and fog this morning. a lot of that has been burning away but this process will continue for the large part. that cloud will stick around for eastern england. elsewhere, light winds and a good deal of sunshine coming through so pleasant afternoon across the bulk, scotland and the northern isles his workload. still dry picture. reasonable temperatures. a nice afternoon in northern ireland. underneath the cloud, cold and grey. temperatures in the mid teens in the west. a pleasant afternoon in the south of the uk, temperatures up to 1617 degrees. this low cloud becomes quite extensive across parts of scotland, perhaps parts of wales as well. 16—17 . temperatures nine or
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10 degrees in the south—west. a bit ofa 10 degrees in the south—west. a bit of a chill in the ear first thing. we say a change into tuesday and wednesday, this big area of low pressure in the atlantic will drive our weather which will bring a south—westerly breeze and bring cloud and outbreaks of rain. some sunshine on tuesday but equally showers dotted around in england and wales, perhaps persistent rain in northern ireland. the far north—east staying dry longer, cold in here. elsewhere, 17 or 18 degrees in the south east corner. towards wednesday, a breezy day in many regions. rain coming in from the west. turning much more unsettled as west. turning much more unsettled as we go through the week. and it's the weekend, a lot more cloud in the sky with outbreaks of rain. —— compared
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to the weekend. temperatures not looking too bad. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at midday. theresa may will meet nicola sturgeon in scotland later — she will say in a speech that brexit strengthens the union. labour says it will not support any brexit deal negotiated by the government unless it meets the party's "six tests". the family of kurt cochran, the us tourist killed in the westminster terror attack, have spoken for the first time time since he was killed. they say they had been through a ‘humbling and difficult experience‘. he was an amazing individual who loved everyone and tried to make the world a better place. he left a legacy of generosity and service. that continues to inspire us. survivors of the caliphate: we hear from the mosul residents who‘ve escaped the fighting.
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the russian opposition leader flexing of arnie makes a defiant appearance in the court in moscow, after arrest on sunday for anti—corruption after arrest on sunday for anti—corru ption rally that after arrest on sunday for anti—corruption rally that you organised. also this hour: refused from boarding a flight because of leggings... an american airline is criticised after two girls were told they couldn‘t fly because they didn‘t meet the company‘s dress code. a new quid on the block — the new 12—sided pound coin is about to come in to circulation — but at what cost to businesses? hello it‘s monday the 27th of march, i‘mjoanna hello it‘s monday the 27th of march, i‘m joanna gosling, work to hello it‘s monday the 27th of march, i‘mjoanna gosling, work to bbc live. theresa may is due to meet scotland‘s first minister nicola sturgeon in the next few hours —
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for the first time since she rejected calls for a second referendum on scottish independence. the visit is part of a tour of all four nations of the uk before the process of leaving the european union formally begins on wednesday. it‘s an important time for brexit negotiations with a number of key discussions across the week. later today, the prime minister is expected to give a speech on unity — saying uk‘s union will "become even more important" as britain leaves the eu. tomorrow, msps in the scottish parliament are due to vote on a whether scotland should have a second independence referendum following the brexit negotiations. on wednesday, the prime minister is to officially begin britain‘s two year exit from the european union — in which she‘ll write a letter to the eu commission triggering article 50 of the lisbon treaty. on thursday, the government will publish its white paper on the great repeal bill — which outlines how it plans to transfer european legislation into british law. and by friday, the european commission president donald tusk
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is expected to outline the 27 nation‘s plan for brexit — just 48 hours after receiving the formal confirmation. our correspondent catriona renton looks at today‘s visit by the prime minister to meet nicola sturgeon. brexit was top of the agenda when these two leaders met shortly after two ease a maid took office, later today they are set to meet again but first the prime minister will meet staff at the department went to national development. on wednesday, she will trigger article 50, paving the way for the uk exit of the eu. 62% of scots voted to remain in the referendum lastjune. 62% of scots voted to remain in the referendum last june. the 62% of scots voted to remain in the referendum lastjune. the first minister says the uk government has refused to negotiate on terms that would help reflect scotland‘s position. she has therefore called for a second referendum on scottish independence. not only is there no
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uk wide agreement on the road ahead but the uk government has not moved even an inch in pursuit of compromise and agreement. but theresa may has said not now. we should be working together to get that right, that is myjob, as prime minister. and so for that reason, i say to the snp, now is not the time. last week the scottish parliament started debating whether to seek permission from the uk government for a second independence referendum. it was halted due to the terror attacks on london. it is expected that with the backing of the scottish green party, the first minister will achieve a majority in favour. a spokesman for the scottish government said it understands the uk government wishes to discuss article 50 and says there are clearly a lot of areas where they hope the prime minister intends to provide answers. earlier this morning the shadow
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brexit secretary sir keir starmer outlined labour‘s demands ahead of the brexit negotiations. he said theresa may needs to stand up against what he described as a minority of brexiteers in parliament. norman is the start of the big week, a lot happening? it is really the start of the sharp end brexit, we have been talking about the clashes in the supreme court and the tussles and threatened house of commons but inafunny and threatened house of commons but in a funny way, getting to article 50 and triggering the whole process, thatis 50 and triggering the whole process, that is the easy part. now we get into the difficult negotiations to frame the sort of deal that we get with the rest of europe and to shape the sort of country that brexit britain is which is why labour is now piling in with their demands, with the conditions they say that mrs may has to meet if they want their support, when we get that
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final vote, among the conditions are, things you think mrs may can perhaps deliver, so for example to secure perhaps deliver, so for example to secure the deal that guarantees our national security, ensures continued good relations with europe. benefits all of the eu, brings about managed migration. but there is one crucial condition which many people think mrs may simply will not be able to meet and that is the suggestion that mrs may must secure a deal that secures exactly the same benefits as we currently get from being part of the european union. many people saying, how is that possible, how can we get the same benefits of being in the single market when we are leaving? how can we get the same benefits from being in the customs union when we are leaving it? the accusation is that labour is positioning itself so that it can vote against the final deal that mrs may gets. at the same time the shadow brexit secretary, issuing a warning to mrs may, not to come back
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with no deed at all. that would be the worst possible outcome. wants a small minority in the conservative party, the brexiteers are now in office and in power. this ideological driven approach to brexit will be disastrous, and advices. and it would stand as a roadblock to continue co—operation in the important field of technology, research, medicine, security, science, arts, culture. the prime minister, needs to face down these brexiteers. and at the same time, theresa may needs to face down nicola sturgeon about another referendum. you suspect it is going to be fairly difficult, mrs may spending the day in scotland to ram home her message that we‘ll benefit from being in the
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european union but when she does meet nicola sturgeon it is hard to have a meeting of minds. because they have been at loggerheads for they have been at loggerheads for the past few weeks, publicly sparring with each other. downing street insisting that mrs may will not give ground from her stance that now is not the time for a second independence referendum. the scottish government insisting that mrs may pass to get some sort of idea of the timeline that she envisages might be possible for iron and eventual second independence referendum. tonight there will be a special edition of question time called britain after brexit. live this evening from 8:30 till 10pm on bbc one. featuring the brexit secretary david davis, the shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer — they‘ll be joined by nick clegg, alex salmond, suzanne evans and melanie phillips. and all this week here on the bbc news channel we‘ll be putting your questions to our bbc editors on the triggering of article 50. today, in the next few minutes,
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we‘ll be speaking with our europe editor katya adler. you can get in touch via twitter using the hashtag bbc ask this — or text your questions to 61124 — and you can email us as well at askthis@bbc.co.uk . the family of two of the victims, of the westminster attack, had been speaking this morning. kurt cochran died from his injuries and melissa is steadily improving in hospital, melissa‘s brother clint a tribute to the family comedies started by thanking the emergency services for their efforts during the attack. ourfamily is so our family is so grateful for the first responders, the medical personnel, the assistance of government agencies in the united states and great britain, along with
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the generosity and assistance of delta airlines arranging for our travel to and from london. so many people have been so kind. and we are deeply touched by their goodness and generosity. your notes, prayers, donations, and love, have helped us so donations, and love, have helped us so much. the most difficult part of all of this, is that kurt is no longer with us and we miss terribly. he was an amazing individual, who loved everyone and tried to make the world a better place. he left a legacy of generosity, and service. that continues to inspire us. we are deeply saddened to lose him. but are grateful that the world‘s is coming to know him and be inspired by him.
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thank you for your many stories that have touched our family. thank you for your many stories that have touched ourfamily. and helped us remember and celebrate his life. thank you. downing street believes that social media companies can do more to fight terrorism. amber rudd the home secretary is meeting with corporate people to discuss it. it is understood that khalid masood access whatsapp minutes before the attack last wednesday, the prime minister‘s official spokesman says the ball is now in their court and if there are circumstances where law enforcement agencies need access to private m essa g es agencies need access to private messages they should be able to get it. there will be plenty more on last weeks terror attack on westminster in a panorama special tonight, 7:30pm on bbc one. this afternoon deadline to form a new devolved government is likely to
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pass without agreement, sinn fein say they will not go into an executive led by the dup party leader arlene foster while a public enquire investigates her handling of the failed energy scheme. miss foster has blamed sinn fein in the last few minutes for the lack of a breakthrough saying they had not come to the talks in the same spirit that the dup had. we entered the discussions after the election in good faith and as we indicated, we wanted to see a new in executive formed. our position in the talks was that we wanted to see a successful outcome based on recognition of all mandates. during these discussions it appeared to us that sinn fein were not in agreement binding mode. indeed their refusal to have the secretary of state chair the talks resulted in a total lack of structure. any further discussions will happen to be built on more solid foundations. we will
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be meeting the secretary of state shortly to discuss the way forward and we remain committed to further discussions to see how new agreements for northern ireland can be secured. negotiations can only ever be successful when parties are prepared to be flexible, in order to secure prepared to be flexible, in order to secure outcomes. this process did not fail because it ran out of time. while the assembly is unable to sit today, we will continue to try and find a way. the russian opposition leader, alexei navalny, has appeared in court in moscow, a day after being detained at a mass anti—corruption rally he‘d organised. the nation—wide demonstrations turned into the biggest show of defiance in five years, with teenagers playing a prominent role. the kremlin criticised the gatherings, and claimed children had been given money to take part. alexi navalny has long been the most prominent face of russian opposition to president vladimir putin. his rise as a force in russian politics began in 2008
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when he started blogging about alleged malpractice and corruption at some of russia‘s big state—controlled corporations. he‘s organised a number of large—scale demonstrations promoting democracy and attacking political corruption . he‘s used social media to reach out to predominantly young followers in sharp, punchy language, mocking the establishment loyal to president putin. and it was last year he announced his intention to run for russian president in 2018, saying it was important to have a "clash of ideas" and a real choice. let‘s go live to moscow, and our correspondent, sarah rainsford. so sarah how influential is he? well he‘s probably the only person in opposition who could have got so many people out onto the streets across russia. at this point, in russian history. he is influential. he is well—known, but he is limited as well in his reach because of
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course he is very rarely shown on state television, like president putin. and here. he managed to bring out tens of thousands of people onto the streets despite the fact that the streets despite the fact that the authorities had been warning protesters or potential protesters for some time that these were unsanctioned protests, and that they would be punished if they came out onto the streets to find that advice from the authorities. so there was a fairly big turnout, certainly in moscow fairly big turnout, certainly in m oscow eve n fairly big turnout, certainly in moscow even the official number was that there were 7000 people in central moscow. we can safely say that the numbers were considerably higher than that because the number of detentions alone was more than a thousand people. and navalny himself, was held overnight. we had separate charges, one of disobeying police orders and another of unsanctioned protest at what ward punishments? he has already been
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fined, he has been given the minimum possible fine, $350, the second hearing has just begun. possible fine, $350, the second hearing hasjust begun. he could be sentenced to 15 days maximum and police custody. but the authorities really here have a bit of a dilemma because if they put him behind bars as has happened before, then he becomes something of a martyr for his supporters had the potential rallying cause. at the same time it comes out again onto the streets he has that potential to call crowds to protest once again and he has already said in court today speaking there, but the fact that semi—people came out on sunday shows that if there were tens of thousands on the streets then there are millions who support those people against corruption, who wants to end corruption, who wants to end corruption here in russia and he says that those people are not going anywhere. the very defiant message, but the kremlin saying that these we re but the kremlin saying that these were illegal protests and that it was irresponsible of mr navalny to call people out onto the streets. an update on the headlines, theresa
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may is in scotland, in a speech this hour, she will say that brexit will strengthen the union. labour says it will not support any brexit deal negotiated by the government unless it meets the party‘s six tests. the family of kurt cochran, the us tourist killed in the westminster terror attack have spoken for the first time since he was killed saying they have been through a humbling and difficult experience. let‘sjoin or humbling and difficult experience. let‘s join or leave humbling and difficult experience. let‘sjoin or leave for a humbling and difficult experience. let‘s join or leave for a sports update. hello we have reached the halfway point in world cup qualifying, england still unbeaten on top of the group after beating lithuania 2—0. this un did their best to try and stifle indian. but jermain defoe at the age of 34, got the goal. jamie vardy came off the bench for england‘s second, they got
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13 points from their five games so far, four wins 13 points from their five games so far, fourwins and 13 points from their five games so far, four wins and a draw. well the next qualifier is against scotland injune, the next qualifier is against scotland in june, the scott next qualifier is against scotland injune, the scott speed slovenia 1-0 injune, the scott speed slovenia 1—0 and they should have won by more, chris martin 88 gold. they are up more, chris martin 88 gold. they are up to fourth in that group, just a couple of points of second place and a possible play—off spot. hamdan was less tha n a possible play—off spot. hamdan was less than half full. the scotland fa ns less than half full. the scotland fans voting with their feet after recent poor performances. anyone who was involved will go away thinking good about themselves. i hope they enjoyed it. when they are available for people to come and support us next time, they will be welcome. the best that northern ireland can properly hope for is a place in the play—offs because germany are running a wave with it in the group. but they are to — zero
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ahead, they beat norway 2—0, conor washington added another by half—time. they haven‘t been beaten in eight competitive matches at windsor park. their remaining two home games in the group are against the czech republic and the germans. ellie downie finished with three gold medals in the british gymnastics championships in liverpool, the 17—year—old had already won the all—around title, but she also came out on top in the vault, and she won at the bars there, that is after her older city becky, had fallen. andy murray is very unlikely to be fit for the davis cup tie against france one week on friday, his brotherjamie has revealed that the world number one has got a tearing his elbow that needs rest. we already knew about that injury but not the severity. murray had already pulled out of the tournament in the us with the problem. had hoped to return, for the start of the clay—court season in about three weeks‘ time. that is
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all of the sport for now, much more, see then. welcome to bbc ask this — where all this week we‘ll be putting your questions to the bbc‘s editors ahead of the triggering of article 50 by theresa may. you can send in your questions to use using the hashtag bbc ask this or text on 61124. we‘rejoined by our europe editor katya adler from brussels. welcome, hi there. let‘s kick off with a question, who says who are the negotiators and what qualifies them for these roles? of course eve ryo ne them for these roles? of course everyone in the uk knows david davis, known as mr brexit. but he‘s not the any person who is going to be involved in negotiations with the eu, sometimes it will also be the foreign secretary boris johnson, eu, sometimes it will also be the foreign secretary borisjohnson, it the same on the eu side, there is
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more one negotiator, there is one name that you do need to remember, shell barnier. he is the lead negotiator for the eu. shell barnier. he is the lead negotiatorfor the eu. the mainly sitting there with david davis. he has a formidable reputation, at least in the city of london, he was seen as least in the city of london, he was seen as being very tough indeed. he says he is going to be friendly and fair -- says he is going to be friendly and fair —— michel barnier. but not naive. what'll happen with people who live and work in the uk? naive. what'll happen with people who live and work in the uk7m naive. what'll happen with people who live and work in the uk? it is a very good question, it applies to lots of people of course. 3 million european citizens who live in the uk, 1.5 million british citizens who live all across the european union. luckily this is something that both sides agree on. in theory at least, the uk and eu, say this has to be a top priority, 4.5 million people
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secure top priority, 4.5 million people secure about their futures, unlike everything, it is more than anything. it is not like people who can stay where they are but it is about pension rights, to medical access, what happens if you get divorced, what about your children. all of that will be fought over and discussed nicely in the negotiations. an anonymous text asks when we be better off because we will be able to trade with the rest of the world without the shackles of eu regulations? were according to the british government we will be much better off because we will be free to peel to make a trade deal with whomever we wish. at the moment as part of the european union, we‘ve uk are not allowed to make r.n. trade deals, the european commission makes those trade deals for us and the other 27 member states, that is with more than 50 countries at the moment but not free sample with china. the british government says we could make r.n. deal with china and the united states as well, and this is absolutely true. —— our own
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deal. but when it comes to the trade ilk on each side wants to get the best dealfor ilk on each side wants to get the best deal for themselves and eve ryo ne best deal for themselves and everyone who wants to make a deal with the uk including the eu knows that britain will need these trade deals once it needs the eu, so the eu thinks that puts the uk in a much wea ker eu thinks that puts the uk in a much weaker position. why isn't there a eu trade deal with china for instance? it is not something that has been able to be worked out so far, has been able to be worked out so fa r, lots of has been able to be worked out so far, lots of trade negotiators in that building, there have been arguments about human rights law. you have to look at agriculture and medicine. there are similar aspects to every single trade deal, that is why here at least, in brussels, they don‘t believe that the dossier is that under article 50, —— the two yea rs. that under article 50, —— the two years. they think it would be enough to divorce and make the new trade deal because they are very competent at it. the one with canada took about seven years to complete. chain
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asks which national and regional parliaments will have the opportunity to vote on the brexit deal and which on trade deals? 0k for example we are talking about the different deals, brexit, leaving the european union, on that it is so—called qualified majority voting. that means george of eu member states had to say yes, but depending on the size of the country. they have more of the vote so it is a qualified majority vote. and also the european parliament. when it comes to a future trade deal with the uk, it has to be unanimous, amongst all of the 27 member countries of the eu and in some countries of the eu and in some countries like belgium for example that includes regional parliaments as well. there are also linguistic parliaments. that can get very competent at it. up to 38 parliaments, and in the recent canada trade deal, belgium, held the whole process up, a regional parliament there. somebody asks,
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after leaving the eu court jurisdiction will the courts in it you have on the uk? but in the uk we have heard a lot about to european courts, one is the european court of justice then as the ecj, the other one is the european court of human rights. first of all the ecj belongs to the eu, the road of that court is to the eu, the road of that court is to uphold eu law so as soon as we lead, the ecj has nothing more to say to britain. the european court of human rights does not belong to the eu, it belongs to something called the council of europe, it sounds similar but it is a different international body. it has 47 members, britain is one of them, britain is free to leave that court and itsjurisdiction, britain is free to leave that court and its jurisdiction, it britain is free to leave that court and itsjurisdiction, it is there britain is free to leave that court and its jurisdiction, it is there to uphold european human rights. theresa may says she wants to leave that court, she has talked about separating, exiting that court to leaving the eu. terry in sheffield has asked, surely there must be an
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obligation for that departing member to receive a view that represents his contribution to eu assets over the same period —— a fee. his contribution to eu assets over the same period -- a fee. is there an obligation to pay and exit bill? i spoke to the president of the european commission and he said there is no exit bill, there is no sanctions or punishments on britain but what eu believes is that as a member of the eu which the uk has been for more than 40 years, it has certain obligations. it has certain budgets that it has signed up two yea rs budgets that it has signed up two years in advance. it has got loan guarantee obligations. so the commission says it will add all of that up and yes it will balance against that whatever assets the uk has, and come up with whatjunker calls a scientifically calculated some. the sum that has been floating around is around about £50 billion.
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and britain says absolutely not. this is one of the most contentious issues in what will be a very complicated divorce proceeding, never mind when it comes to that future trade relationship tween the uk and the uk. right at the beginning you said michel barnier has got a reputation for being tough. what sense to you have about the mood there? and whether there is any appetite to punish the uk for leaving? everyone you talk to in this town says they don‘t want to punish the uk, i do have to say, that the results of the referendum in the uk was met with enormous regret, not just here in the uk was met with enormous regret, notjust here in brussels but across the european union. wednesday this week, many say, across the eu will be a very sad day. they don‘t want the uk to leave but the uk is leaving, feels author don‘t want to have bad relations for the uk. first of all from a trade
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perspective but also because we live and work aside from each other, straightaway after the attacks on westminster bridge, the other night for example the eu said this is a clear exa m ple of even for example the eu said this is a clear example of even when britain leaves, we‘ll have two worked together on security issues to keep all of the citizens say. yes there isa all of the citizens say. yes there is a mood that we want to be friendly and fair, but they also have very tough guidelines which are going to emerge now over the coming days. within 48 hours you are going to hear the initial guidelines, at the end of april the 27 european union member countries will meet to issue their red lines as well as the guidelines. the commission has promised this will be a very transparent process, they will let the public know every step of the way but for the smiles and the friendliness and the regret, absolutely, but the eu will fight to protect the integrity of the european single market. and to try and keep the other 27 member states together and that in the end will give its priority. and many here say
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at least, that dossier period will not be enough to leave the eu and really fix the future trade relationship. and all this week here on the bbc news channel we‘ll be putting your questions to our bbc editors on the triggering of article 50. today, at five thirty, we‘ll be speaking with our economics editor kamal ahmed. you can get in touch via twitter using the hashtag bbc ask this — or text your questions to 61124 — and you can email us as well at askthis@bbc.co.uk. let‘s catch up with the weather. a good afternoon to you. bright enough through the door in central london, it wasn‘t like that to start with, we can look at some of the landmarks. and there is this contrast across the british isles still, much of what you see here,
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isn‘t fogged. it is low cloud. that isn‘t fogged. it is low cloud. that is gradually picking up, some of it breaking around the edges, there is no escaping the fact that we will be stuck with one quite a bit of cloud and an onshore breeze. that will put and an onshore breeze. that will put a dent in the temperatures. but somewhere, so too again in the highlands of scotland away from the coast. during the course of the night, we will find a lot of low cloud, maybe a bit of fog. they be not just as called cloud, maybe a bit of fog. they be notjust as called for some of you as has been the case through the weekend, something of a change on the way, i think you will notice that initially, we bring the atla ntic that initially, we bring the atlantic air in, pushing away that high—pressure influence that we have had for so long. and we have got showers eventually. we may even get a shower towards the east with a bit of brightness, you can say 18, 19, possibly 20. this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines at 1230. theresa may is to meet nicola sturgeon in scotland later — for the first time since the snp announced their proposals for a second independence referendum. it‘s expected the prime minister will say she wants the uk to become more united, to make it stronger after brexit. labour has been setting out its demands further talks with the eu. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, warned against the influence of what he called hardline conservative mps who want a sharp break with brussels. the family of one of the westminster attack victims, kurt cochran, had spoken publicly for the first time since he was killed. they said they had been through a humbling and difficult experience. he was an amazing individual who loved everyone and try to make the world a better place. he left a legacy of generosity and servers
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that continues to inspire us. —— service. —— service. thousands of civilians continue to flee the iraqis city of mosul after fierce fighting between government forces and so—called islamic state kills hundreds in western districts. the russian opposition leader, alexei navalny, has made a defiant appearance in a moscow court, after his arrest on sunday at an anti—corruption rally he organised. and a new £1 coin is about to go into circulation. it is hoped the 12 sided coin will be harder to forge than the current model. the iraqi city of mosul has had an agonising weekend. the jihadists of so—called islamic state seem determined to fight to the death. it is now clear that at least 100 and maybe many more were killed in an air strike on the 17th of march. yalda hakim has been talking to some of the mosul residents who survived the militant snipers and coalition airstrikes. they arrive with what little they could carry. these are the tired,
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desperate and hungry survivors of the caliphate. they‘ve managed to flee notjust isis snipers but also coalition and iraqi airstrikes. this is the entrance to the hammam al—alil refugee camp. these buses bring people to the actual camp. as soon as people start to arrive, the men and the women are separated because they want to screen some of the men to make sure that they‘re not isis fighters or sympathisers. near a makeshift school, i meet 12—year—old mohammed. mohammed tells me, first isis snipers killed his father and then his mother as they tried to get away. he fled here with his two brothers. the camp, now home for the orphans. hammam al—alil is now overflowing and people are being asked to go to other camps or to east mosul. we travelled to the east
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where in january. after a bitter battle which lasted 100 days, thejihadis were driven out. on the side of the road in the east, omar his wife and two daughters are waiting for a relative to pick them up. in the dead of night, they left their homes and the fighting in west mosul. translation: the fighting was still happening. we didn‘t know what we were stepping on. sometimes even bodies. it was dark and our kids kept falling over. do you want isis gone from your city? translation: god will have revenge on isis and those who helped isis enter the city. this is one of the bridges that leads to west mosul. here in the east, life is starting to go back to normal. the traffic is slowing. people are coming out of their homes. it‘s hard to imagine that
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just a few weeks ago, isis was beheading people in these streets. everywhere you look, there is a constant reminder of the battle that was fought here. 67—year—old alia and her family have just rebuilt their home after an air strike destroyed it. how did you find out your city was liberated? translation: they knocked on the door, they were calling out, army, army. they were with tanks and humvees and isis escaped. before that we wouldn‘t even open the door. are you worried about the future of your city? yes, i am worried because west mosul hasn‘t been liberated yet. the battle to retake west mosul is complicated. the frontline is now in the old city and the area is densely populated. i first came to mosul four—and—a—half years ago,
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it was tense even then with curfews and complaints from the local sunni population that they were being mistreated by the shia—led military. this battle is now in its final stages. iraqi forces may be fighting to free the people of mosul from the tyranny of the so—called islamic state and their caliphate, but an even more complex tasks lie ahead, reuniting a very divided city. yalda hakim, bbc news, mosul. we are expecting to hear from two daysin we are expecting to hear from two days in may. she will be speaking in east kilbride ahead of a meeting with nicola sturgeon. we expect her right no but there is no sign of
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her. we will bring her speech when she begins but she is going to say the strength and stability of the uk's the strength and stability of the uk‘s union will be more important as we leave the european union. her plan is to build a more united nation. there has been a plan outlined by nicola sturgeon for a second scottish independence referendum. the scottish parliament expected to back that tomorrow so it is an interesting and difficult visit between the two of them. we will bring you to his knee as she sta rts will bring you to his knee as she starts to speak. —— to rezone me. —— theresa may. bt has been fined a record 42 million pounds by the communications regulator ofcom. it found bt‘s openreach division had cut compensation payments to other telecoms providers for delays in installing high speed business
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lines.the company said it "apologised wholeheartedly" for the mistakes. simon clemison reports. the cables which unite us are still provided by bt and there have been cases where the company has been slow to provide the lions. the network supports mobile and broadband operators as well as schools, big business and hospitals. when bt fails to meet deadlines, the organisation has to pay compensation —— compensation but it has been using a clause in the contract to reduce the payments. no bt has been hit with a huge extra bill. in a record fine, ofcom has ordered the country —— company to make £42 million on penalties. this is the highest penalty we have imposed. we feel it reflects the seriousness of the breach in question. the importance of the sector of the economy is reflected. the fine should be seen in context, with a
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significant compensation package. the scale of the fine is said to reflect the importance of bt to other countries —— companies who offer services like broadband. bt has apologised and said measures have been put in place to stop happening again. in addition to the fine, it will have to find the missing £300 million owed to other in compensation. we are told to reason me is imminent so let us return to east kilbride and say what is happening. the prime minister will be speaking about her plans to build a more united nation when she begins the process of leaving their european union, a process which begins on wednesday. it is a big week this week, the triggering of article 50 is on wednesday and the powers to amend eu laws is triggered
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on thursday. eu laws can be transferred into british legislation. there is also the desire by the snp for there to be a second independence referendum and to leave me is in scotland‘s meeting nicola sturgeon after she gave the speech, having said no, it is not the time for scottish independence referendum with the brexit process due to begin. —— having said now is not the time. the prime minister has warned that a second referendum on scottish independence would make the uk looser and weaker and she will say this strength and union of the uk will be more important as we leave their european union. we have been told it is imminent but she is still not there so we will leave it for a moment. you will not miss a thing.
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it has emerged that people living close to the site of a major explosion on merseyside, reported smelling gas at least 24 hours beforehand. the national grid has confirmed that reports of leaks were investigated, before the suspected gas blast in bebbington in wirral on saturday. two people were seriously hurt and dozens others injured when several buildings collapsed. at least eight japanese students and teachers are feared dead following an avalanche injapan. they had been taking part in a mountain trip near the town of nasu in centraljapan. about 60 people are said to have been in the area at the time. rescue efforts are underway. the rail company first mtr has been awarded the franchise to run south west trains for seven years from august 2017, the department of transport have announced. transport secretary chris grayling said the firm will deliver the improvements that people say they want right across the southern western franchise area. campaigners are claiming that planned changes
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to disability benefits, called personal independent payments, could lead to an increase in mental health problems. the government has reversed a court ruling which would have entitled more people to claim the benefit — people with severe mental health issues who suffer distress when they travel alone. ministers say no one who already receives the benefit will see a cut. mps must introduce tougher measures to tackle childhood obesity in england, including controlling supermarket price promotions on junk food and food high in sugar. a report out today by the health select committee argue that plans published by government ministers last year miss several important opportunities and don‘t go far enough. ministers say the strategy is the world‘s most ambitious plan on childhood obesity. the number of first time buyers relying on gifts or loans from their parents in order to get on the housing ladder is at an all—time high, according to new research.
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one in three young people are relying on the so—called ‘bank of mum and dad‘ in order to buy their first home. the social mobility commission warns that families on lower incomes are increasingly missing out. thousands of videos on youtube look like versions of popular kids cartoons but actually contain disturbing and inappropriate content not suitable for children. bbc trending has found hundreds of similar videos of children‘s cartoon characters with inappropriate themes — featuring characters from the disney movie frozen, the minions franchise, thomas the tank engine, and many more. we will check whether to leave me is imminent. theresa may. she is
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speaking to civil servants in east kilbride. she is due any moment. while we stay with these pictures, i will bring you some news coming from our business editor. it is about investment in the uk, following on from the brexit vote. interesting and breaking news about investment in the uk. it is the qatari finance minister saying his country will invest 5 billion in the uk for investments in infrastructure, financial services and technology. he is the prime minister know. -- heard is the prime minister now. hello everybody, it is very good to be with you today and to thank you all for the work you do on behalf of the government and the british people. vital work which helps
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millions around the world and speaks strongly to the values we share as a country. it is vital work. notjust because the things you do hear have a material impact on the lives of some of the poorest and most vulnerable people around the world, but also because the work you do in conjunction with your colleagues at the department of international development in london says something important about britain. it says we are kind and generous country. it says we are big country and will never let down or turn our back on those in need. it says we are a country that does and will always meet our commitments to the world and especially to those who desperately need our support. that is important to rememberfor we stand on the threshold of a significant moment for britain as we begin negotiations will lead towards
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a new partnership with europe. i wa nt to a new partnership with europe. i want to make it absolutely clear is removed through this process, this is not in any sense the moment that britain steps back from the world. indeed, we would take this opportunity to forge a more global britain. the closest friend and ally with europe but also a country that looks beyond europe to build relationships with old friends and new allies alike. the work you do will be at the heart of that effort because from this building work is coordinator that saves lives around the world, that builds a safer, healthier, more prosperous world for people in developing countries and that the external and country and people safer and better off as well. it is not all about charity of course, you know that better than anyone. so often the work you do is about empowering people to live better, fuller lives. for example your work is leading the world and
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effo rts your work is leading the world and efforts to end the outrage of violence against girls and women, a cause which is close to my heart. you insured the uk is working well with important international institutions like the united nations and the commonwealth and researchers hear are exploring the potential for new vaccines to fend the devastation caused by serious illness and epidemics. i know that the work to tackle the awful zika virus which is a source tackle the awful zika virus which is a source of such anguish across latin america is being led by research in glasgow university and supported by teams hear but sometimes events happen that simply require an immediate and significant response. it is because of the work you do we have been able to an insignificant support for the nation suffering major humanitarian crisis this year, somalia where we have pledged £110 million of uk aid to provide up to 1 million
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pledged £110 million of uk aid to provide up to1 million people pledged £110 million of uk aid to provide up to 1 million people with emergency food assistance, over 600,000 starving children and mothers. over1 million people with safe drinking water and people with emergency health services. our commitment to somalia goes further than money. we look forward to bringing the international community together in need for the second london— somalia conference where we hope to help that nation secure and build on the progress it has made in recent yea rs. build on the progress it has made in recent years. it is because of the work you do that the uk was one of the first major donors to respond to the first major donors to respond to the un appeal for south of the first major donors to respond to the un appealfor south of —— the first major donors to respond to the un appeal for south of —— south sudan. we are leading the way in a desperate nation to make sure millions of people get their food, water and medicines they urgently need. that includes 34/500 thousand people, life—saving nutritional support for more than 27,500 children, safe drinking water for
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over 200,000 people and emergency health services for over 100,000. it is because of the work you do that the uk is able to lead the way in helping countries elsewhere in the region, in uganda and ethiopia and in kenya where the hunger safetynet programme aims to reduce poverty and hunger in the short term and build economic resilience for the most vulnerable people in the poorest parts of the country. that is the week to give them a sustainable, long—term route out of poverty. across africa, vulnerable people are being helped by initiatives and projects that come with a simple badge of hope, a badge says uk aid. the same goes for other parts of the world as well, wherever people are in need, that same badge of hope appears. the uk is at the forefront of the response to the syria crisis
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with life—saving humanitarian support reaching millions of people inside syria and in neighbouring countries. in 2016, the uk was the third largest bilateral contributor to the humanitarian response and southern syria and the second largest overall since the start of the response in 2012. we have pledged more than £2.3 billion to support those affected by the conflict, our largest ever response to a single humanitarian crisis. that is a record of which we can all be proud. because we‘re a country that does not talk our responsibilities, let us remember the amazing work being donein us remember the amazing work being done in afghanistan today, one of the legacies of the years of conflict is the deadly phenomenon of landmines which remained strewn across hundreds of acres of that land. thanks to uk aid and especially the organisation such as you will trust which has its headquarters hidden scotland, almost 100 square kilometres of
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contaminated land has been cleared and half a million people have benefited as a result. we will continue with that work and continue to support the security of —— of aft ghana stand because that is in the interest and in the interest of britain too. —— afghanistan. uk aid is the badge of hope for so many around the world and i hope that eve ryo ne around the world and i hope that everyone he feels proud in their ability to bring their part in bringing light weather is darkness and bringing hope that is despair. that badge, uk aid, says something else, it appears on the side of buildings, books, medicine supplies and food parcels and some of the most difficult to reach places on the planet. it says this, when this great union of nations, england, scotland, wales and northern ireland, says his mind on something
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and works together with determination, we are not unstoppable determination, we are not u nstoppa ble force determination, we are not unstoppable force and that is why the plan for britain i have set out, the plan for britain i have set out, the plan for britain i have set out, the plan to get the right deal for britain abroad as well as at home, has as its heart one overarching goal, to build a more united nation. because i believe when we work together that is no limit to what we can do. more united nation means working actively to bring people and communities together by promoting policies which support integration and social cohesion. in scotland, wales and northern ireland, that means wales and northern ireland, that m ea ns fully wales and northern ireland, that means fully respecting and strengthening the devolution settle m e nt strengthening the devolution settlement is but never allowing our union to become looser and weaker or people drift apart. so in those policy areas where the uk government holds responsibility, i am determined we will put the interests of the union, both parts and the wall at the heart of our decision—making. international development is a prime example of that. work hear, on behalf of your
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fellow citizens across the united nation —— united kingdom, has a huge impact. the work we do as country on the world stage makes an elegant case for our union as a whole. it is about the values we share in our family of nations, that is the freedom of speech, democracy, respect for human rights and the rule of law. this proud, sheared heritage provides a bedrock of our lives together in the uk and on that foundation we have built a country where we share the challenges we face and bring all the expertise, ingenuity and goodwill we share across this union to be to tackle them. that allows us to do amazing things like the life—saving work which is led from this building. so is britain leads the european union, and we forge a new role for ourselves in the world, the strength and stability of our union will become even more important, notjust
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for the good that standing together brings to our own people year at home but also for the good we can do together in the world as a global britain, a force for good, helping to build a betterfuture britain, a force for good, helping to build a better future for everyone. so as we look to that future and as we face this great national moment together, i hope you will continue to play your part in the great national effort we lead to build a stronger britain, a fairer britain, outward looking britain, a more united britain that i am determined we should be once we emerge from this period of national change because as you prove every day through the work you do, and some of the most vulnerable people in some of the most desperate conditions around world can attest, this united kingdom and the values at its heart, is one of the greatest forces for good in the world today.
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when we work together and set her sights on a task, we really are an unstoppable force. thank you. applause . a fairly short speech by the prime minister there, talking about the importance of the strength of the union ahead of brexit. she is going to be meeting no, after giving that speech, nicola sturgeon. —— now. nicola sturgeon has made it absolutely clear she was a second referendum on independence and the scottish parliament is expected to back those plans tomorrow. trees are made is not accept that should be a referendum before the brexit negotiations are over. —— the prime minister does not accept. she talks
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about the triggering of article 50 and her overall goal of building a more united nation but of course scottish independence, but plans for another rafa then dump will cast a shadow over that. —— another referendum will cast a shadow. more coverage on those talks later and more on what the prime minister said there, plus the rest of the news coming up shortly on the news that one. first let us catch up with the weather. hello. your impression of the day will be changed weather you get sunshine or not. also for the weekend, it depends if you are exposed to an offshore breeze. if you have all of the cloud and that breeze, it will feel as cold as it did at the weekend. if you have more sunshine, less in the way of breeze,
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it will make a huge difference. you could be stuck at nine or 10 degrees. or with more sunshine, possibly 19 degrees. through the evening and overnight, quite a bit of low cloud in of the north sea. it is they are across many northern and eastern regions. notjust as cold for some of you. something of a change of food as we go into tuesday, especially across some of these western regions were cloud will second. eventually, ithink thatis will second. eventually, ithink that is the chance of one or two showers getting up to the west country and on two wheels. out towards the east, that cloud is sitting in the atmosphere. a lot of dry weather at this stage but do not get caught out by that because there is something of a change on the way. we are increasingly seeing an influence coming from the atlantic.
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something we have not seen for a while because we have had that area of high pressure for the weekend. this change is ushering in cloud, mainly to central and western parts. the further east you are, the drier your day will be. if you get some sunshine with the southerly breeze, temperatures will be well into the teens. except for the north quarter of scotland. that prospect tends to recede towards the middle of the week. these areas of low pressure will bring milder air across the british isles, it is much more south and south—westerly. with the sunshine, those temperatures will rocket away. a dry start to the week thenit rocket away. a dry start to the week then it turns cloudy and wetter. announced their proposals for a second independence referendum. the prime minister says brexit is an opportunity to strengthen the ties between nations in the united kingdom.
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when this great union of nations, england, scotland, wales and northern ireland, sets its mind on something and works together with determination, we are an unstoppable force. we‘ll be getting the latest from our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. also this lunchtime. the family of the american tourist killed in the westminster terror attack say he wouldn‘t have borne any ill will towards the attacker. he was an amazing individual who loved everyone, and tried to make the world a better place. a record fine for bt — for delays in fitting high—speed broadband.
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