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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 29, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's wednesday, it's 9am, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. our top story today — after 44 years of membership, britain will today formally serve notice on brussels that it's leaving the european union. it means there's no going back. here is what voters think. i'm happy that we're moving in the right direction. i want to see the government hold their nerve and not buckle under pressure from the eu. it isa buckle under pressure from the eu. it is a historic mistake and two years is not long enough in negotiations. i hope we get the best dealfor britain. don't negotiations. i hope we get the best deal for britain. don't we all? in downing street the prime minister calls for an end to the disunity and division that scarred the brexit referendum as britain begins its departure from the european union. also on the programme today, ex—royal marine alexander blackman has spoken of his "profound sense of his "profound sense of relief" after his sentence for shooting dead a wounded taliban
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fighter in afghanistan was reduced — he'll be out in weeks and we'll speak to his wife claire blackman in her first tv interview. relief initially. i think it took a little while for the news to sink m, little while for the news to sink in, but absolutely delighted. the result we were hoping for. and the dangers of co—sleeping with your new baby. when i woke up, i'd discovered that she wasn't breathing. i remember like lifting her up and then just running through to andy and screaming that she was gone. health professionals tell us they fear parents are lying about sleeping with their children forfear of being judged. we'll bring you the full story before 10am. hello and welcome to the programme, we're live until iiam. throughout the morning really keen to hear your views as article 50
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is triggered and a little later in the programme we'll introduce you to an incredible man — this is 53—year—old bill kochevar — he's paralysed — but he's been able to feed himself by using his thoughts to send messages from implants in his brain to ones in his arm. well bring you his full story before iiam. do get in touch on everything we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today — theresa may has signed the letter that will formally begin the uk's departure from the european union. the letter will be delivered by hand to the president of the european council, donald tusk, at 12.30 this lunchtime. at the same time, the prime minister will make a statement to the commons in which she'll urge the country to come together as it embarks on a momentousjourney. alex forsyth has this report. more than four decades ago
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the uk first signed up to the then european community. today, those years of membership will start to come to an end. david cameron's promise back in 2013 was key in getting to this point. he said britain would get to choose whether to stay in or leave the european union, hoping to end years of debate about the relationship. it is time for the british people to have their say. it is time for us to settle this question about britain and europe. so last year, politicians of all persuasions took to britain's streets, making the case for leave and remain and then injune, the country decided. the british people have spoken and the answer is we're out. the consequences were immediate. for some, there was jubilation. for others, contemplation. even devastation. and for him, resignation. i think the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction. the new prime minister pledged
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from the start to honour the referendum result. brexit means brexit and we're going to make a success of it. and that process will begin in earnest today with a letter sent from here to brussels formally saying the uk wants to leave the eu. then some two years of negotiations will follow for a whole host of issues to be resolved. everything from the rights of eu citizens living here and elsewhere to britain's financial commitments to the eu and its future trading relationship and there are decades of eu legislation and regulations that need to be unpicked. the process of leaving is unprecedented. it will be complex and at times, uncertain. there will be challenges and opportunities and with the prime minister's signature on this letter, it all begins today. in a moment we'll speak to our correspondent, dan johnson
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who's at the european council buildings in brussels — but first let's head to downing street and our political guru, norman smith is there for us. there is a cabinet meeting going on. presumably that's when theresa may is telling her colleagues what's in the letter? this letter has been a closely guarded secret which mrs may and only her closest circle have been involved in. so for many cabinet ministers this is the first time to see what mrs may has written. a lot of the letter, i think, we can guess. it's going to bea think, we can guess. it's going to be a beefing up of what mrs may has already said about taking back control of immigration, not being pa rt control of immigration, not being part of the single market, those sort of things will be familiar. the really interesting pa rt sort of things will be familiar. the really interesting part of the letter will be what it doesn't say. are those areas where there is may is vague or ambiguous because those are the area where she has got flex and room to give, those are the
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areas where she is prepared to do a deal. the sort of things we will be looking at today is whether there is any talk about money or financial contributions or will mrs may be prepared to make some bill, pay a bill for the budget. people are going in and out. that was boris johnsonjust going in and out. that was boris johnson just leaving there. will she be prepared to make financial contributions to ensure key sectors of the british economy can still trade with the single market? what will she actually say about immigration? will eu nationals continue to be able to come here for the next couple of years? might they be given priority in any new immigration rules? will the european court ofjustice still have some sort of role perhaps as a trade body andi sort of role perhaps as a trade body and i suppose lastly, will there be any room for a transitional time? in other words we won't have to leave in two years, it could be a slightly slower process. so we will be examining that letter in minute detail to get some clues as to the sort of areas where mrs may might be
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prepared to strike a deal and a compromise. thank you, for the moment, norman, more from norman throughout the morning here on the programme. let's go to brussels. it has to bear a wet signature. so the stroke of mrs may's pen. danjohnson, wubz the letter is received. what is after that? -- once the letter is received, what happens after that? we will get reaction from politicians in brussels, eu politicians in brussels, eu politicians about what is in the letter and what they think about it, but we won't get detail until a few weeks down the line when the other european nations have had a chance to consume what's in the letter to think about what their in thing position is going to be and then to come up with a set of guidelines that they want to be implemented as this negotiation goes forward. hopefully, that signature has dried on that letter, the uk's ambassador to the eu has come into the council building with a bag, we don't know if the letter is in that, but we
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suspect it is. he has got a couple of meetings to attend and then he has got a small window when he will physically hand over the letter to donald tusk, the connell president and that's the moment when the clock sta rts and that's the moment when the clock starts tick that the two years of negotiation begin, unless everyone can agree on an extension. lots of politician in brussels think that two years isn't long enough to get the detail worked out and to reach a deal so it's possible they will seek an extension, but everyone would have to agree on that. if they can't agree then in two years time the uk would drop ut of the eu, suddenly the so—called hard brexit, that's what everyone is trying to avoid. they say they want to negotiate a deal, and they want a smooth divorce, but there is so much complex detail to be worked out. it will be tough and it will take a long time and there is a lot of talking to go on and most of it will go on behind closed doors after the symbolism and the images that will go on around the world, we won't hear a lot of what is going on in
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the negotiations. in two years time, we will have a deal on the table. supposedly for politicians to approve or not. and than that will be it, britain will be out of the eu. so although practically, nothing actually changes today, no one will notice any difference, there is a huge change on the way in two years time and it all starts here today. cheers, dan. we will talk to voters in the next half an hour. let us know your views. how are you feeling today? once the letter is received from theresa may in brussels at 12.30. let us know. get in touch in the usual ways. community leaders and children plan to link hands across westminster bridge this afternoon as a memorial to those killed and injured in the attack there a week ago. khalid masood ran over and killed three pedestrians, before stabbing a policeman to death outside the houses of parliament.
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inquests into his victims‘ deaths will also begin today. the former boss of the language school in luton where khalid masood taught for two years, has told the bbc that he doesn't believe the attack was motivated by religious extremism. the man, who wishes to remain anonymous, has not seen masood since 2012, but says he wouldn't have believed him to be capable of such violence. an american man, who was paralysed from the shoulders down, has been able to feed himself and hold onto a cup of coffee, after surgeons placed implants in his brain and arm. bill kochevar was unable to use any of his limbs, after he hit a lorry while riding his bike. doctors say it is the first time that implants controlled by the brain have been used to help someone reach and grab objects once again. health professionals have told this programme they think parents are lying to them about sleeping with their babies for fear of being judged or told off.
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in the uk, just under 300 babies die suddenly and unexpectedly in their sleep every year and nhs guidelines say there is an "association" between those sudden deaths and co—sleeping. the language being used by the health service is simply gobbledygook. it means the public don't understand what is going on. conservationists say they've found a new breeding population of a critically endangered species of tiger. hidden cameras filmed a small population of the indochinese tiger. a mother and at least six cubs were found in the jungle in eastern thailand. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. thank you very much. you are telling us your views today
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as article 50 is triggered. get in touch using twitter. let's get some sport now withjohn — and the video referee played a key part in the match between france and spain last night. following another successful trial in the match between france and spain. the outcome could have been different were it not for the use of the technology employed by the on—field referee. france thought they had ta ken on—field referee. france thought they had taken the lead when they scored and that goal was given by the on—field referee, but as you can see it was overturned following some assistance by the video referee who sat ina assistance by the video referee who sat in a truck outside the ground. the second one was that one, as well, that goal was given for off side, but was then overturned using that technology which meant spain came away with a 2—0 win. it would have been very different had the
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technology been used. it goes to show that it is likely it will be used going forward quite considerably. do you think we will see it in the british game? there is talk of that, yes. the fa said they would be really interested in using the technology, a trial of their own, from the third round of the fa cup onwards next year and as well, the fifa president, desperate as well to implement this at the next cup. you might remember, of course, there was that big incident, wasn't there? we all remember it, the goalfrom frank lampard at all remember it, the goalfrom frank lampa rd at the all remember it, the goalfrom frank lampard at the 2010 world cup, that led to the introduction of goal—line technology. they want to go a step further and we could see the use of this technology and an ouf field referee being able to overturn the decisions on the field of play, and not just decisions on the field of play, and notjust goals, decisions on the field of play, and not just goals, but decisions on the field of play, and notjust goals, but red card incidents. we could see it at the world cup as well. cheers, john.
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a viewer, "brexit day. wonderful. independence once again. europe needs us more than we need them. a day of history, today marks the day when the uk serves its divorce maips on the rest of the eu." the prime minister has already signed the letter. a day of history, of freedom, of stepping into the unknown — call it what you want — today marks the day when the uk serves its divorce papers on the rest of the eu. the prime minister has already signed the letter that will trigger article 50 and our two year countdown to exiting the eu — and it'll be delivered to the eu in just over three hours' time. we'll reflect a range of your views throughout the programme this morning. but first, are we heading towards a conscious uncoupling or a bitter brexit break up? brexit, britain's divorce from the european union. as seismic for the country as this marriage split, as closely watched as theirs, will it be as smooth as a conscious uncoupling?
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or will it be a bitter break—up instead? there is a lot to sort out, like money. the eu is likely to slap an exit bill on the table for money the uk has already promised to pay to eu coffers, and brussels' opening bid could be as much as 50 billion quid. where are the family going to live? more specifically, eu citizens living in the uk and uk citizens living in the eu. are they going to be able to stay where they are and what rights will they have? both sides say they want this side of the divorce deal sorted out pretty quickly. ok, so we are splitting up, but what sort of future relationship are we going to have? how will the uk and the eu do business? a full trade agreement between the two is going to take years to figure out, but if there is a divorce deal that might help smooth over the split. this is also a divorce
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with a deadline. there are just two years to hammer this out, and the clock starts ticking now. it's 279 days since the uk voted to leave the eu — at the time there were lots of promises about what lay ahead but what is the reality now? let's speak to our political guru norman smith who is in downing street for us — where theresa may has been holding a cabinet meeting. it has just finished. fill us it hasjust finished. fill us in. thank you very much. it is blast of day, the big day when we begin our departure, but what sort of deal might we get? what is it that brexit britain might look like? well, to getan britain might look like? well, to get an idea, we have to go back and look at some of the promises that we re look at some of the promises that were made to voters in the run—up to the referendum about how britain might be different and the sort of opportunities and benefits we might gain from leaving the eu. here is a
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brief reminder. there it is, five things we could do on day one. we can reform our immigration system so it is fair and balanced, and keeps the numbers down toa balanced, and keeps the numbers down to a sustainable level. threw if we wa nt to a sustainable level. threw if we want to cut vat to help families who their homes, we should be free to do so. their homes, we should be free to do so. we want our country back. if we leave the european union, can we give the nhs millions more each week? yes we can. can we create more trade deals? yes we can. can we have a new fair points—based immigration system? a new fair points—based immigration system ? can we a new fair points—based immigration system? can we deport dangerous foreign criminals, can we deport the very poorest in our society by making —— give them a tax cut that will
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transform their lives for the better? yes we can. # promises, promises, promises, that is all i get from you. let's go through those pledges in a bit more detail to nail them down. legend one was money, the famous pledge to get £350 million every week to put into health service. pledge number two was the economy, that we would be able to strike our own trade deals with countries beyond the eu to create new job opportunities. with countries beyond the eu to create newjob opportunities. pledge number three, borders, to take back control of immigration. so it is the british government to decide soon comes in and we end eu freedom of movement. pledge number four, security, we would be able to kick out violent foreign criminals because they could no longer use eu rules to stay here. lastly, taxes.
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we would be able to cut vat on domestic fuel which at the moment eu stops is doing. but how easy will that be to deliver? i suppose one of the big difficulties facing purposes may, we know that european leaders are cobbling together a brexit bill for our departures, some suggesting it could even come to £50 billion to leave the eu. listen to the president of the european commission, shall claw president of the european commission, shall clanunker, when pressed about that recently. —— jean—claude juncker. pressed about that recently. —— jean-claude juncker. there will be no sanctions, no punishment, nothing of that kind. britain has to now and i suppose the government does know it, they have two on the former commitments. to the june £50 billion? it is around that, but that
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is not the main story. we have to calculate scientifically what the british commitments were and then the bill has to be paid. the immigration publication would mean that there would be fewer immigrants coming in but ministers are much more cautious about that because they are worried about what in fact it may have on the national health service. listen to david davis suggesting that far from going down, immigration might at times go up. have a listen. ithink down, immigration might at times go up. have a listen. i think most people are in favour of migration, so people are in favour of migration, so long as it is managed and the point is it will need to be managed. myjob is to bring the job back and it is for the home secretary to
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decide on what the policy will be but i can imagine it will not be in anything other than the national interest. for time to time, we will need more, and from time to time we will need less migrants. that is in everybody's interests, for the migrants and for the united kingdom. timing could be a problem for mrs may. we know that she wants us out in two years' time, so by the spring of 2019 we should be out, but a lot of 2019 we should be out, but a lot of people are worried is it going to be possible to do all this in two yea rs be possible to do all this in two years because the eu are not going to sit down and negotiate with us seriously until probably after the summer, the french and german elections, which means it could only be about 12 months to nail down a massive, massive deal. some people are suggesting actually come you know what, we might happen to have a transitional time to give us a bit more space to engineer our departure
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from the european union. have a listen to foreign office diplomat simon fraser. it is certain we will not have resolved everything in the period before the expiry of the article 50 process. as we know, the eu side want to start with negotiating the terms of the separation, and the british side on top of that wants to move rapidly to discuss the future relationship, both political and economic, between britain and the eu. and that is a very complex second set of negotiations. there is no way in my view that we will complete all of that in years. the truth is we know what we were promised in the referendum that we now into an entirely different ball game, it we are into deal—making and negotiation and compromise, a sort of tough series of talks with eu leaders who have a very different set of pirate
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is, which inevitably means we will not get what we want probably. significantly this morning we heard from the chancellor philip hammond, who ina from the chancellor philip hammond, who in a direct contradiction of the foreign secretary borisjohnson said this morning, you cannot have your ca ke this morning, you cannot have your cake and eat it. in other words, we will get some things but we won't get other things. this is what stuart says. brexit will be fantastic. carl in surbiton says i'm feeling utter despair, sadness and disbelief that the uk is actually going down this road. those who voted to leave will rue the day that they stupidly decided to vote for it. those of us who can clearly see the benefits of staying in our being dragged into a messy, divisive, reclusive and selfish process. stuart in bedford says i am fed up with the gutless moaners spreading doom and gloom, they need some backbone and british spirit. let's speak to former cabinet minister, and conservative
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mp iain duncan smith, who was a prominent leave campaigner. i have slightly moved on because we have been knowing that this day has been coming and in a sense it is a formality because the rest is about how that relationship between the eu and the uk settles in the next two yea rs and the uk settles in the next two years and what are the arrangements we have to make. i must say i did find that norman's statements today we re find that norman's statements today were really quite depressingly negative. the reality is, we always look at it from the uk side, this is what they want, their troubles and problems. the truth is the european union also has to arrive at a position weather don't want to damage themselves in the course of this. what we are getting, the finance minister of germany the other day said let's be absolutely clear, this has to be a proper arrangement, we don't want a stand—off with the uk, we absolutely need to continue levels of trade, and he said importantly that the
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city of london, the financial services are vital for the european union for cheap capital. we want to give them like that. so there might be some special arrangements for the city of london for example. general sense building among the nations of europe as opposed to some of those characters of the commission saying hang on a second, the uk is arguably the single most important trading partner for us we wa nt to important trading partner for us we want to make sure that continues. yes, they are leaving but it does not mean that we end up having some kind of war between us —— some kind of wall. pascal lambie in france said exactly the same in the imf previously, he said at the end of two years we want zero tariffs and access two years we want zero tariffs and a ccess o n two years we want zero tariffs and access on financial services and we can sort the rest out as we go along. just explain why the eu would be likely to give us something pretty close to what we have now when they sort of have to to show eu membership mean something?” disagree. this is again be
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com pletely disagree. this is again be completely narrow view about what does the eu represent? we have chosen to leave, and the reality for most neighbours of the eu, it is a political project. only in this country do we settle and spend our time talking about the marketplace. the marketplace was always a device to drive this coming together of nation states where the point where there is a supranational process. that is what they want, those people that believe in the eu. so for them, they already think that the uk is taking away into a direction because they are not going to be a part of they are not going to be a part of the supra national is they are not going to be a part of the supranational is taking place. the rest about access to markets is a wholly different issue to settle. my a wholly different issue to settle. my point here is they don't believe by the way that other nations of europe will want to abandon the european union, because they believe in the project. we don't. that means it isa in the project. we don't. that means it is a different discussion that ta kes pla ce it is a different discussion that takes place as a result. what is the
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goal? immediately to settle the discussions and what they are about. the german finance minister has said inbee .com you can't have a settlement, because the two are com pletely settlement, because the two are completely in the related and you will find that is exactly how the discussions will pan out. the goal at the end of it is that we leave the european union, out of the customs union and the single market as members, but actually accessing and having a relationship with the eu and then with us in terms of free trade, and also in terms of the services industry. more importantly, this is already grasped by various national leaders, they need the uk involved in the exercises on defence, anti—terrorism and intelligence, so we have to remain good friends, cooperating and trading, butjust good friends, cooperating and trading, but just not good friends, cooperating and trading, butjust not as direct members of the eu, thus a slightly
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different path lies ahead of us than it does for the european union. should theresa may go ahead and agree quickly the brexit bill, whatever it may be, 50 billion euros, 60 billion euros, in a show of good faith? actually i think that isa of good faith? actually i think that is a back of the envelopejohn —— job done by the commissioner. it is not going to be like that. there is not going to be like that. there is no legal device why we have to pay any money at all to the european union, but at the end of it all there is another pursuit us. we have put a lot of money into the european union, half £1 trillion. therefore we have invested in assets that are wholly—owned by us of the european union, such as intellectual property rights, elements of things we have built, invested in. there is a corresponding question for us which is have you valued the assets that we own in the european union? when you get down to this kind of discussion about money, you have two balance assets versus supposedly
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abilities before you come to a figure so this is not quite so clear cut as the commission might lead you to believe. do you get cross when you hear the chancellor philip hammond saying you cannot have your ca ke hammond saying you cannot have your cake and eat it. i have never really understood that phrase. he is saying we are going to have to compromise. of course, but that doesn't mean to say you can't do what you want. i have not heard the interview so i don't really know. my point about this is that you move away from this phraseology and ask ourselves what is this all about at the end of the day. it is about what the eu thinks is good for them and what the uk thinks is good for us come and the coming together of those to of the overla ps. coming together of those to of the overlaps. the requirements from both sides are beginning to become very clear. we both i think at the end of it all want to have good easy access to the market, they do more trade with us, one millionjobs in bavaria alone rely on their car exports to
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the uk, so there is an overlap of genuine common interest, financial services, they are the ones that mostly services, they are the ones that m ostly co m e services, they are the ones that mostly come to the city for their capital. they need cheap capital. it is important to them to continue to do that, so the these things begin to settle down, then we ask ourselves the question, as we leave the eu doesn't the eu want to make sure they have full support and access to our markets and also arrangements with us on a wider range of issues about defence, international relations, problems over russia? international relations, problems over russia ? so international relations, problems over russia? so i think those things begin to become the main principles that lie behind what is at the end of the day a good agreement. the good agreement to finish is a one where both sides say we have got something out of it and that is what we will do now. david says it is sad and apprehensive. consumer confidence kept the economy going so far, but it is no guarantee this
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will continue. i predict we will be worse off. debbie in luton says, "we are pleased that today has arrived without being successfully scuppered by those who don't want to leave the eu. well done theresa may. hello world. " says eu. well done theresa may. hello world." says debbie in luton. what do we think of that? by trying to pose that this is making us look more global, you're not fooling anybody. it is this protectionist mentality makes us look more insular. it has been very much more a focus on immigration and i think thatis a focus on immigration and i think that is something hasn't disappeared. i think you can be patriotic withouting in nationalistic in view. i disagree there. i'd like to see britain being more international. we're not pulling up any draw bridges. i mean for a start we should renew our relationship with the old
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commonwealth countries. we should look to major markets. i see the britain i want as being an international uk sort of thing.” just think overall ijust feel anxious about it. there is no... is there that your overriding emotion today, anxiety? there is no real plan. a bunch of kids, "i really wa nt plan. a bunch of kids, "i really want to do it. i really want to do it." and want to do it. i really want to do it. " and suddenly want to do it. i really want to do it." and suddenly mum says, "you can do it." and they're like, "i don't know what to do." do it." and they're like, "i don't know what to do. " you voted leave? do it." and they're like, "i don't know what to do." you voted leave? i think there is a lot for them to get through and we will watch it closely and see how they go about it, but i'm hopeful and excited. i'm really concerned for politicians to think about what will be best for as many people as possible. notjust about what is best for us in britain where they get votes, but if we can form
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trade deals where people in the poorest parts of the world will get more for their produce for example rather thanjust more for their produce for example rather than just keeping all the wealth in europe as we have been doing for a long time. i would like to see some of these billions of pounds that are going on admin going to the people in the world who are really, really suffering right now because we've pretty well off in the uk in general. britain can try and make trade deals with whichever country it wants to, it is just that it will take a bit of time. we have got this trade deal with the eu at the moment because we're part of it, we will withdraw from that and we will start to negotiate that trade deal and about 50 or 60 others.” would like to see tariffs, money going to people producing the things rather than eu bureaucrats.” going to people producing the things rather than eu bureaucrats. i take huge issue with the premise of the contribution that we received online. for me, the european union is not necessarily us trying to work with other nations, but as iain duncan smith might have suggested broadening our conception of what we see as home. we have four
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fundamentals freedoms as an eu member state, goods, services, workers and capital and when you do that, you're almost creating a new country across which you don't have any of these tariff barriers and regulations. so what are you worried about most of all? i was a remain voter because the eu is a creates a state as iain duncan smith might have suggested. so that's why this is worrying for me. can i just have suggested. so that's why this is worrying for me. can ijust in? yes, of course you can. i don't think anybody has taken into contribution that europe is a shrinking continent. it is the only shrinking continent. it is the only shrinking continent. it is the only shrinking continent in the world so in terms of trade partners europe is smaller than asia and, america, china. so in terms of getting better
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trade deals i think we're doing the right thing by leaving. over here, what do you think? how how feeling today? excited, but anxious at the same time. my hope is the government will negotiate a good deal for britain that will give jobs and services in this country and keep more of the money we were giving to the eu into britain. invest in things we need, the nhs is a big thing. we always talk about it and also education, the police service, all the functions of government will be better. so you're excited and anxious. what about the gentleman next to you? i'm excitedment you think it will be good for britain. all the doom and gloom is around what the bureaucrats in brussels are saying because they want to keep their project together. countries
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have said regardless of what the eu says they are going to push for what's right for their citizens as well. economic self interest will override the poll tesco's of it all, and the eu will come up with a deal that works for bt of us and in the e nwe that works for bt of us and in the enwe can start looking towards these emerging economies across the world. i take issue it is a noble project because there is a large section, i think a lot of people who voted brexit, i think it is like a cry for help in a sense because there is a lot of people who feel that they have been left behind and they haven't got a voice in modern politics. what about change? how will those people suddenly get a voice? ijust hope they will be included. why the british prime minister? by the politicians... at the moment, you know, you look at the moment, you know, you look at the likes of nick clegg and all that, there is like a denial there that, there is like a denial there that some people have been left behind by europe and i think that's why brexit won and i think politicians have got it start
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speaking up for the people who actually vote for them rather than their own agenda. i think it is misguided to think all of these problems will be solved by us leaving the eu. people that are feeling behind is not a direct result of our membership of the eu. i think giving parliament more powers, that does not necessarily mean that the people who are disenfranchised are going to get more of a voice. shall we read some more of a voice. shall we read some more messages from the people around the country. kelly says, "today, i feel ashamed to be british. i will never unite behind brexit." it will be the theme of theresa may's address to the commons. this person says, "i have decided to leave the uk and emigrate as a proud european and british citizen. this is a sad day."john says, and british citizen. this is a sad day." john says, "why should anyone be worried? this country has ruled itself in the past. get a backbone, everyone." thank you very much everyone." thank you very much everyone. thank you for coming on
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the programme. thank you. co—sleeping with your baby, but there are fears that the danger of doing so aren't getting through. many parents feel the only way to get their baby to sleep is by lying in the same bed as them — but there are fears that warnings about the danger of doing so aren't getting through. in the uk, just under 300 babies die suddenly and unexpectedly in their sleep every year — nhs guidelines say there is an "association" between those sudden deaths and co—sleeping. now health professionals have told this programme they think parents are lying to them about doing it forfear of being judged or told off. our reporter amber haque has been speaking to people who co—sleep, and meets one mother whose baby daughter died as they slept together — you may find some of the details upsetting. about 90% of people that i mention we co—sleep to look absolutely horrified. most parents will do it at some point, not thinking that could happen to them.
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for some mums, sleeping with their baby can feel like the most—natural thing in the world. but are warnings about the dangers of doing so getting through? when i woke up, i had obviously discovered that she was not breathing. i thought i had killed my baby. do parents feel they can't tell the truth to professionals forfear of being judged? so in the end, ijust ended up lying to the health visitors because they were putting so much stress. she told me that they would not give me any information because they don't want you doing it. so you don't tell anyone. you keep it to yourself. it's your baby. she's part of you.
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she's been part of you for the past nine months. so to have her close isjust the most—natural thing in the world. dawn barclay and her partner andy had their second child fern in 2014. i just loved her before she was even born. a tiny baby, fern would only sleep by her mum's side for the first few weeks of her life. ijust gave fern me, and what she wanted was to lie cuddled in with me, and it's just what i did for her. i tried every night to try to put her to sleep in her moses basket. she was not happy there. so to let her have sleep and be settled and feel safe and secure, ijust cuddled her in. in the bed, yes, i did it the safest way possible. can you take me back to the night when it happened? it was a normal morning.
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fern had slept quite well that night in her moses basket, until about 5am. she woke up and had a feed. we both had fallen back asleep, but we were lying on the couch. when i woke up, i had obviously discovered that she was not breathing. i remember lifting her up and just running through to andy and screaming that she was gone. andy was amazing. he started doing cpr. i thought he had managed to bring her back. he managed to get the colour
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to come back in her cheeks. so her daddy gave her her last breath. and i just remember falling to the ground and just screaming. i didn't understand what else was going on, apart from i thought i had killed my baby. fern was eight weeks old when she died. the cause of death was recorded as sudden unexpected death in infancy associated with co—sleeping. there was underlying... like an underlying condition with her brain. for them to put down on her death certificate
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that it was to do with co—sleeping is really unfair. it is horrible. it's having it down in black and white about the co—sleeping, and then all of the guilt came back. there have been all these studies done about the risk of co—sleeping. i was quite naive. you think it will not happen to you. thinking about it now, my entire chest aches with the pain of it. dawn's story isn't rare. the nhs estimates thatjust under 300 babies die unexpectedly in their sleep every year as a result of sudden infant death syndrome. half of those are thought to be related to co—sleeping. it's difficult to say what exactly causes
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it, but nice guidelines say there is an association between sleeping together and sudden death in babies under one. health visitors are told to lay out the risks of co—sleeping to parents and stress that it is particularly dangerous in some circumstances. so what are some of the dos and don'ts? the nhs advice says to place your baby on their back when they sleep. a baby sleeping on their front is up to six times more at risk of sids. the safest place for your baby is in a crib or moses basket in the same room as you for the first six months. don't sleep with your baby on a sofa or in an armchair, it can increase the chance of sids by up to 50 times. you should not sleep in the same bed as your baby if you smoke or if you have drunk alcohol, even one glass.
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or if you have taken drugs. do not sleep in the same bed if you are really tired or if your baby was born prematurely. and finally, remove all pillows and thick duvets. do not let your baby get too hot. in the uk, it's estimated that half of all mothers have slept with their babies by the time they are three months old. about 90% of people i mention co—sleeping to look horrified. it is a strange thing, it is completely natural for us to want our babies next to us and for them to want to be near their mothers. how much does it worry you that something could happen? any first—time parent is worried something will happen to the baby, especially with how young she is. if anything would happen, you could not live with yourself, in case something goes wrong.
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it goes back to making sure you do it safely. everybody says to persist putting her down, leave her crying. but it gets to the point where i say, i'll leave her half an hour, and listen to her crying, and after 15 minutes it is horrible, she starts choking herself and coughing, she is clearly not happy, so i would rather my baby be happy in my arms whilst i am awake and happy with me in bed whilst we are sleeping than her choking herself. health visitors need to be impartial from their own opinions. i spoke to my friend about co—sleeping, and i had no information from my health visitor or midwife, she said they would not give information because they do not want you doing it. if parents are going to co—sleep, regardless of the warnings, are the guidelines being ignored? i believe there is a risk.
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that parents are not telling the truth to the health visitor. elaine mcinnis advised health watchdog nice about their guidelines on co—sleeping in 2014. three years on, she says there's a concern parents are not being truthful, and the guidelines on how to do it safely not getting across. can you put a number on how many parents you think are lying to their health visitor about co—sleeping ? it is a difficult question to measure. but we put these questions out to the health visiting community, and we have a 6000 reach on that very question. overwhelmingly, the responses we had from health visitors across the country was, yes, they were afraid that parents were not telling the truth.
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they would go as far as to say that they are scared that they would be told they are a bad mother and have their children taken away from them, which is not the case at all. do you think that health visitors themselves can do more? health visitors are doing the best that they can possibly do. but the issue is the numbers of health visitors that we have on the front line is reducing on a daily basis. no parent would want to lose a child. there are 200 plus babies a year that die unintentionally of sids, we have no idea why, and that should be no babies, no parents should go through the trauma. is it the fear of that potential trauma that makes parents feel like they have to hide it? sophie co—slept with both her
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daughters as babies. i really was upset by my decisions to co—sleep. but i was breast—feeding at the time, and i could not see a way out of co—sleeping. it did not make sense, so in the end i ended up lying to the health visitors, because they were putting so much stress, and they can really undermine you, because you are in a very vulnerable situation. but nowadays they are just so scared about giving out the wrong advice. because on their head be it. it is just creating this awful atmosphere between the health care professionals and the families, and it is not doing anyone any good. five years on, sophie still co—sleeps and breast—feeds her
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two and five—year—old. she and partner chris sleep with the girls in two double beds pushed together. we would never have imagined five years on we would be shoving two double beds together and sleeping all together as a family. it is a bit like the waltons! without the grand house! we do not normally tell people that we co—sleep, because we have had so muchjudgment over the years, the judgment just gets greater, the older a child gets. we enjoy it the way it is, we feel it brings us closer to the girls. lie down. i think you have to be more creative when it comes to our personal relationship. it does make it awkward. you would not want to be all
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intimate with the kids right there. it does, but you do not have the time, the two kids. just go downstairs. we are married, so that goes out the window anyway, doesn't it! the cards that were given when she was born, and outfit she was meant to wear at christmas, her first hat and toy. it has been over two years since dawn lost her baby girl, fern. flynn still remembers her everyday. he just loved her. to have that taken away, at such a young age, he did not understand where his baby had went.
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13 months later, dawn had another baby, called faye. she did not co—sleep with her. faye knows that if she waves of the windows, she is saying hi to her big sister fern. there are loads of bits and pieces of her all over the house. we have had a patchwork quilt made with her old clothes. a hat i have got, a teddy made with one of her old outfits. anyone can get a leaflet or guidelines about how your baby should sleep, but without putting a face to it, to make people realise that it does happen, it is still tearing families apart... she has made an impact on so many lives. but i wish people would learn from my mistakes and from what happened to fern. we have heard lots of comments from
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you on this, as you would expect. thank you. cam is baffled about why it is so controversial. their baby sleeps in the super king—size, sleeps in the super king—size, sleeps in the middle, no pillows or sheets on him, we have a bedroom thermometer and a ceiling fan, and bed cards and a video monitor —— bed guards. if either me or my house and have had a drink with friends, that person will sleep on the sofa. we all sleep better. on facebook, nikki says i am a nurse all sleep better. on facebook, nikki says i am a nurse on a all sleep better. on facebook, nikki says i am a nurse on a neonatal intensive care unit and i have said perfect babies having intensive care treatment because of co—sleeping. it is notjudgment, treatment because of co—sleeping. it is not judgment, it treatment because of co—sleeping. it is notjudgment, it is concern the
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ba by‘s is notjudgment, it is concern the baby's life. is notjudgment, it is concern the ba by‘s life. this is notjudgment, it is concern the baby's life. this one says babies need to be with their mums, we are sanitising motherhood. bev says my heart goes out to the lady on your film. it is common sense if you just think a little, it is dangerous to fall asleep with your baby next to you or on top of your tummy. the best thing you can do is to start your baby out in their own crib was moses barker from the day they come home. —— basket. there is an abundance of information available to reduce the risk of sids, so please use common sense. and if you've been affected by any of the issues in that report, there are details of organisations who can help. just go to our website: bbc.co.uk/actionline. there are 3.3 million eu citizens living in the uk. over the next two years, as negotiations on brexit take place, decisions will be made
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about whether they will be able to stay in the uk, whether they will have to apply for visas, like non—eu residents, or be kicked out altogether? many are worried about what the future holds for them, especially when it comes to immigration, job security, social services and how welcome they'll be in a place many call home. though the chancellor philip hammond has made it clear today that there will be no cut—off from today to the rights of eu nationals arriving in britain. let me introduce you to various people. fatime al—badri is a dutch student who has lived in the uk for 13 years. olivia vicol is romanian and a phd candidate at oxford. conor sheridan is an irish actor who has lived in the uk for 16 years on his irish passport. and ta nja bueltmann, a german professor, who says she has been abused in the street since the referendum. all are eu residents and would have voted to remain had they had a vote in the referendum and all are worried about how they will get to stay in the uk.
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because that is your aim comey want to continue to stay here?” because that is your aim comey want to continue to stay here? i did have a vote, by the way. i voted to remain. very important thing to do so. remain. very important thing to do so. and you want to remain? absolutely, there are so many issues we don't have time to talk about. try us. it is notjust about economics, it is about social situation, world wars, people forget that this has happened as a result of world wars in the 40s and was agreed in 1957. there is a whole lot of things and it is about being together, and the importance of that. brexit has unleashed an awful lot of differences in people. racism and fascism. i think it is very unhealthy. i think it is very sad, andi unhealthy. i think it is very sad, and i don't think our government are telling us the entire truth, and i don't think they are dealing with it
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particularly well. you are all effectively going to be bargaining chips in these negotiations. theresa may is giving her cards close to her chest. you know, first of all, how do you feel about being part of the negotiations, the bargaining chips, if you like? it is very hard to feel passive, especially as an academic, somebody who researches migration, all of this conversation happens above our heads effectively and we can only sit back and listen to it and be alert and try to become secure on our own as much as possible, secure our savings, perhaps establish the more connections back home or elsewhere. but yes, it is very frustrating just to witness it from a passive position. i think theresa may needs to provide some sort of reassurance will stop people are uncertain in general, let alone the eu citizens living here. we already know that the mps refused to amend the motion to protect eu citizens and allow
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them the definite right to stay. i think that the mayor of london has already gone to france and has requested that too is that reassurance to the citizens. and i think that in order to protect what we currently have here in the uk, i think that reassurance needs to be provided. tanja bueltmann, you are bargaining chips because theresa may knows we have about a million eu citizens living in other european countries, so until their status is sorted, those cannot be sorted. that is the logic. i think it is extremely illogical. we came here in good faith, that is my view. i came to the uk to contribute to society here, that was the choice, i am sure eve ryo ne here, that was the choice, i am sure everyone else would agree with that. so we contribute to live here every day. if the government can't do the
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decent thing and not actually make as part of the negotiations, i think that sends a really clear message to us. you have experienced racism in the street, i think, as a german in the street, i think, as a german in the uk. tell us about that.” the street, i think, as a german in the uk. tell us about that. i was speaking in german on the mobile phone to my mother, and i got shouted at two f off back to my country. i think this is a new thing. it did not happen before. also connected to that, certainly we are all often cast as foreigners. they have never been called a foreigner before 2016. all of this was stirred up in the referendum, and now this limbo status makes it worse because it basically tells racists that our status is not clear so racists that our status is not clear so they are pushing that to push their xenophobic agenda. what is it like living in a limbo state?”
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personally feel like i have to be very alert. to what? nobody knows what is going to happen, it looks like this government will prioritise migration over everything else, which means that the pound will probably continue to fall, as it has so probably continue to fall, as it has so far. myjob as an academic, a wannabe academic at least, is not secure wannabe academic at least, is not secure because much funding comes from the european union, so i feel like i have to constantly engineer ways of becoming secure, thinking where i will work. what is it you? in what sense? you are still no clearer? nobody is clear. there was a lot of lies in the referendum campaign. a lot of spin. i mean watching question time the other night, watching david davis, david davis says one thing, one minute and another, another. he acknowledged
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that immigration may go up, as well as go down? he doesn't know. he says one thing one minute and boris, i mean, he was then inof the leave. i think he is a disaster. he is a bit ofan think he is a disaster. he is a bit of an embarrassment. he doesn't a nswer of an embarrassment. he doesn't answer questions and just laughs things off as if it doesn't matter. your country, your union is divided politically and socially. scotland has a chance to leave. northern ireland, the dup are only one seat ahead of sinn fein now in the northern ireland elections as we found out two weeks ago. i think we can see a united ireland sooner than we may. the united kingdom, and one thing to say nobody talked if france wa nts to thing to say nobody talked if france wants to leave the eu, france leaves the eu. if the uk wants to leave the eu, you're four countries, two of which wants to stay, two of which wa nt to which wants to stay, two of which want to leave. nobody has spoken about that and nobody had a contingency plan. we live in a country, in england, that's a
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culture of contingency. people did talk about that. we talked about it on this programme. what's the plan? i don't know what the plan is. i'm just a humble journalist. regarding that feeling of disunity from conor and others, theresa may will talk about that in the commons later when she address her fellow mps later when she address her fellow m ps after later when she address her fellow mps after prime minister's questions at 12.30pm which is the moment of brexit because that's when the letter is handed over to donald tusk. news and sport are on the way. before that, the weather. good morning. it is grey skies for most today. north—east scotland should stay dry. sunshine here. we could hit around 17 or 18 celsius.
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temperatures will hold up through tonight. we've got south to south—westerly winds. still bringing outbreaks of rind across scotland and western england and wales and later northern ireland. coldest of all, shetland at four celsius, but temperatures will rise into tomorrow. after starting 10, 11, 12 celsius celsius, southerly winds tomorrow and we have got sunshine across central and eastern areas. it means that things will warm up quickly. an isolated chance of a shower across the south east corner. another cloudy day. further rain especially west wales and lancashire and cumbria. in the sunshine in the south east we could hit 22 celsius. bye for now. hello. it's wednesday. it's just after 10am. i'm victoria derbyshire. our top story today — the triggering of article 50. the prime minister will today formally start the process to take britain out of the european union. what do voters think?” what do voters think? i think it is this protectionist mental crit. it
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makes us look more insular.” this protectionist mental crit. it makes us look more insular. i would like to see britain being more international. we're not pulling up any draw bridges. this morning, the chancellor tells colleagues we cannot have our cake and eat it. in other words there have to be compromise, but britain will get a brexit deal. also on the programme, ex—royal marine alexander blackman could be home in a matter of weeks, after having his sentence for shooting dead a wounded taliban fighter reduced. his wife, claire blackman, tells us about his reaction to the outcome. i spoke to him shortly afterwards andi i spoke to him shortly afterwards and i think it took a little longer for the realisation to hit. i think he'd worked very hard to prepare himself for not such good news. so, onceit himself for not such good news. so, once it had finally dawned on us that we were going to be together soon, we that we were going to be together soon, we were very that we were going to be together soon, we were very happy. and the dangers of co—sleeping with your new baby. you think it's not going to happen
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to you. still thinking about it my entire chest aches with just the pain of it. health professionals tell us they fear parents are lying about sleeping with their children forfear of being judged. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. theresa may has signed the letter that will formally begin the uk's departure from the european union. the letter will be delivered by hand to the president of the european council, donald tusk, at 12.30 this lunchtime. at the same time, the prime minister will make a statement to the commons in which she'll urge the country to come together as it embarks on a momentousjourney. let'sjoin ben brown. a carefully
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choreographed day? very much so, joanna. we know the choreography very much. tim bar owe, who is britain's permanent representative at the european union, he is in his offices over there in the european council buildings in brussels. he has got that letter with him that theresa may signed last night in downing street. we gather it is several pages long and sets out theresa may's vision of how the brexit negotiations will go. the broad parameter she set out in january in her lancaster house speechment he at 1.20pm, 12.20pm yourtime, speechment he at 1.20pm, 12.20pm your time, will walk over to the president of the european council, donald tusk and hands him that letter and it is when donald tusk acknowledges that he received that letter that article 50 is triggered. we gather he will acknowledge receipt of that letter with a tweet
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and a video statement later on, but his formal response and much more detailed response won't come for another 48 hours, until friday, and that's when he sets out his para meters that's when he sets out his parameters and he will send that out to the other 27 leaders, but the negotiations themselves, they may not really get going until may or june and may not get going in earnest until after the french and german elections in may and september. so it may all not really start properly the negotiating until the autumn. so a will the of people here are saying the time frame is very tight indeed because the negotiations have to be completed by october of 2018 in order for the agreement to be ratified by the european parliament. ? thank you very much, ben. we'll have live coverage of the theresa may's statement on triggering article 50 to the commons. that's on the bbc news channel at 12.30pm. an american man who was paralysed from the shoulders down, has been able to feed himself and hold onto a cup of coffee, after surgeons put implants into his brain and arm.
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bill kochevar had paralysis in all four of his limbs, after his bicycle ran into the back of a lorry. doctors say it's the first time implants controlled by the brain have been used to help someone reach and grab objects once again. the family of mark duggan whose shooting by police marksmen sparked riots have lost a court case that he was lawfully killed. here's some sport now withjohn. there was another successful trial of video technology which was used to correct two wrong decisions in spain's 2—0 win over france in their friendly in paris last night. antoine griezmann thought he'd put france ahead but the video referee overruled the decision. gerard deulofeu scored spain's second and was flagged offside, but again the video was checked
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and the goal was given. the fa have said they want to trial the technology from the third round onwards in next yea r‘s fa cup. brazil have become the first country to qualify for next year's world cup. they went through with four games to spare after uruguay‘s surprise defeat to peru. sale sharks winger denny solomona said he had the support of his family and coach after declaring himself available to play rugby union for england. solomona represented samoa in rugby league and was playing for castleford in super league when he controversially switched codes late last year. he's eligible for england, after completing his three—year residency. roger federer‘s impressive start to 2017 shows no signs of faltering. he's lost only one match this year after returning from five months out and he's through to the quarter—finals of the miami open after beating spain's roberto bautista agut in two tie—break sets.
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his fellow swiss, top seed stan wawrinka is out, though. maria sharapova will return to the women's tour at next month's stuttgart open having served a 15 month doping ban. her last professional tournament was the 2016 australian open where she failed a drugs test and she's happy to have her "day job" back. iamat iam atan i am at an age and a stage where you are closer to thend than you are to the beginning, you always want to end your career or a chapter in your life on your terms and in your voice. that's why i fought so hard for the truth to be out. you don't realise how much you love something and how much something means to you until you lose it for sometime. she is set to return next month. that's all the sport. britain takes a step into the unknown today when it
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formally serves notice on leaving the european union. for some it's a day ofjubilation, for others a day of dread, but there's pretty much no going back. whatever happens — very little will change immediately — as we're faced with two years of negotiations and wrangles. our reporterjim reed has been talking to voters in luton. thank you. it looks so nice. if we want brexit to bring better opportunities for young people, young people need to make their voices heard, and we can appeal to parliament about what that should be. i am a masters student at warwick university, i voted to leave. we did not get chance to have a democratic vote for 40 years. the eu was becoming a much bigger organisation than we signed up to. it has got to come at some point. why wait? it will be a long process, messy. i am 50, i am a freelance pr and event consultant with my own business.
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i thought some of the legislation and regulations were prohibitive to business and we could do it better, so i voted to leave. what questions would have made the difference for people, would have taken the emotion out? i have lived in the uk for 13 years, i am a proud british citizen. i voted remain with reservations. the people have spoken, this was not an opinion poll, it is a command to parliament, so i am on board. what does it mean, instead ofjust saying these are possibilities, what does it actually mean for us? i am 21, i voted remain. i was very upset. it is important to move on now, there is no use throwing a tantrum and getting upset about what people voted for. theresa may has two things going for her. she came to office after the vote was taken, so she is not sullied by the mudslinging that went on, even though she did not say a lot. in her public statements so far, she seems to be quite
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measured and reassuring. she has got a tough job to do. i do not envy her. it's measured and balanced. we're not going to go off the rails one way or the other. so i am a bit concerned. i think it is either the case that only now has a real plan begun to develop, or there is not one, as i believe what the government is trying to do is hide its negotiation as much as possible from the eu. i have been very concerned, i cannot lie, with theresa may. she did come at a very difficult time, and i do not envy her, but i feel as though she did not stand as the leader i would have hoped to have had in such an uncertain time. with brexit we have to make sure we do not throw the baby out with the bath water, and to keep the parts of the eu
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that we like as much as possible. the government needs to make sure that there are easy routes open for international students to come here and for british people to go to europe relatively hassle—free. mine is from a business point of view, it is free trade. we have international clients. i work overseas a lot. so i need to be able to travel quickly and easily and nothing too prohibitive to affect my business. people need to feel they have control of their own cultural destiny. we need to feel we are making laws in this country that, if we don't like the law, we can evict the lawmaker. and the management of migration, find the best resource to bring people in. at the moment it is being overplayed. you have people saying that they want to be independent from the uk, but they wanted be part of the eu. is that logically consistent?
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if you want to be independent, why rush to join the eu? i hope that it does not break up the uk, we need to stick together now more than ever. i voted to leave, but i am pro—european, and the uk is still a nation. i do not see why it should result in any more break—up. i hope it does not. what you were saying, "i am pro—europe but i do not want to be in europe," that frustrates me you can't say we want as part of europe. if you are going to say brexit means brexit, sever the arm off. now we have got to deal with leaving. but i voted to leave, i did not vote to cut our arm off, i did not vote to have no tie at all. it is far more complex than that. i think a second referendum is unnecessary. the people gave parliament
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an instruction. it was not an opinion. it is not up to former prime ministers to tell us that we were too intellectually lightweight to understand what we were doing and that we should now have to rethink it. graeme because we have been led into a fool's paradise. i do not hold that. the argument that david cameron should not have even offered a referendum to the british people, since it has not been on the ballot box for 40 years, is outrageous. the british people deserve the chance to rethink their membership of the eu, they have not had it before, and this is how they voted. i partially disagree. if we are to say, could we have another referendum, let people know what they are voting for. that is the bit that frustrates me, the uncertainty. be clear on what it is, be truthful, let people vote for a reality. the main criticism is we do not
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have enough information, so if there were to be a second referendum, we would need a lot more information, things would have to be different, and we do not have all the answers. so at 12.30 today the divorce papers will be served by hand to the president of the european council, donald tusk. actually, at 12:20pm, we are now told. actually, at 12:20pm, we are now told. as it's delivered, the prime minister will make a statement to the commons in which she'll urge the country to "come together" as it embarks on a "momentous journey". here we have four mps to discuss what they think will happen once article 50 is triggered. they are the labour mp gisela stuart who campaigned to leave the eu, hannah bardell from the snp who campaigned to stay in the eu, anne marie morris who wanted britain to leave the european union and is a conservative mp, sarah olney who won a byelection for the liberal democrats, after campaigning on the issue of brexit and ousting the sitting mp, zac goldsmith, who was a supporter for leave.
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are you desperate to get your hands on this letter that mrs may has written? i don't think it is going to give us any clues. the more important thing to remember is that there are 19,000 articles according to the commons library, pieces of legislation, that will be coming back from europe. the greatest cut and pastejob back from europe. the greatest cut and paste job we back from europe. the greatest cut and pastejob we have back from europe. the greatest cut and paste job we have ever seen. eu legislation that we will import into british law? we are not going to do that until we get the great reform bill. it is about the trigger, but then will be the great reform bill or the great power grab. a number of academics have said they are very concerned of the fact that the government will change legislation, bring back power from government will change legislation, bring back powerfrom places government will change legislation, bring back power from places like scotland, a bone of contention, and there is a question about whether we will get to properly scrutinise that
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legislation and have proper debate and vote on it. there were 147 amendments to the scotland act. scotla nd amendments to the scotland act. scotland bill. we had the ability to push seven votes and it took the electric over two and a half hours. so you are worried about time and lack of scrutiny. what are you looking forward to today?” lack of scrutiny. what are you looking forward to today? i am less worried about what i think is the challenge, but we don't have to solve it overnight. for me it is a great opportunity for trade, for large business. we will have international trade agreements with countries we have never been able to have bilateral agreements with before. for our smaller businesses, they get a win as well because they will need to start recreating supply chains within the united kingdom for some of our larger companies who wa nt some of our larger companies who want now to build in britain rather than import parts for the main product into the uk. we also have an
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opportunity for import substitution and the food industry has been looking at it very carefully. we have not really been able to pull together all of our food businesses and let at how we can industrialise, and let at how we can industrialise, andl and let at how we can industrialise, and i don't mean make it into a factory but i may make it efficient, bring in some of the high—tech, which we can do but together we can applaud it. —— afford it. there is a huge opportunity. i can see your buoyancy and your joy.” huge opportunity. i can see your buoyancy and yourjoy. i was going to say that today is the start of a process but the problem is we don't know what the end is. anne—marie is talking about all this marvellous things that will happen but we just don't know. today we start the process of a negotiation. at some point there will be some agreement but we still don't know who will make the decision about whether we acce pt make the decision about whether we accept those terms or not. we have always said we think it should be the people, they should get the final vote on the terms but theresa may hasn't used to make any
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commitment on this and i think that is rarely important because yes, the country voted to leave the european union last june, but country voted to leave the european union lastjune, but we still don't know what they were voting for. we still don't know what our future looks like. let's ask the zealous stuart, a labourmp, looks like. let's ask the zealous stuart, a labour mp, do you know what people voted for —— gisela stuart. we were quite clear that it was about taking control over your borders, taxes, laws and trade negotiations. what will happen after todayis negotiations. what will happen after today is both the united kingdom and the european union will have to take a new fresh look at itself. it is a huge opportunity for national renewal but also for the european union to address some of their problems. if we are grown up about these negotiations, then we will ta ke these negotiations, then we will take things like workers' rights, all of those things currently enshrined in eu legislation, take them in uk legislation. a process of saying we have the final say on this. but the final endgame for me
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is we have to take those communities who voted in large numbers to leave far more resilient so they can actually withstand the threat of globalisation. on the food & drink industry, and i have met with the food and rincon industry and federation. they are very concerned about regulation because of the moment we have unified regulation. which means we can easily import and bring stuffing. exactly. two of the biggest exports from scotland, salmon and the ski, if there is not unified regulation and systems, we will have stuff stuck at the border. it seems somewhat extraordinary. you talk about trade deals, they can ta ke talk about trade deals, they can take years. now they don't take years. they do, that is not doom and gloom, they do. only because you have been talking about trade deals that take 28 countries to agree. it will be relatively straightforward, lam not will be relatively straightforward, i am not saying walk on the part, but you said earlier these are things we could do before that is
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simply not right. we could not enter into bilateral agreements with other people. mrs may wants today to effectively draw a line under the divisions caused by the referendum. can that happen? it very much depends on her approach. i think one of the things that really concerns me is the agenda at the moment has very much been driven by the brexiteers, the right—wing levers. i think if she is being honest about wanting to be more consensual then she needs to start listening to the voices of those who wanted to remain. does at how the chancellor has signalled today there will be no cut—off today, today is not being seen as a cut—off today, today is not being seen as a cut—off point. is that a softening of her position?” seen as a cut—off point. is that a softening of her position? i guess so. softening of her position? i guess so. what we have always asked for is a unilateral degree —— agree for the
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rights of eu citizens to stay in this country and we think there would be an excellent way to start off, because it would show britain is serious about maintaining good relations with the eu. is a conservative mp, doesn't make across when you hear your chancellor say we can't have your cake and eat it? give me a context. he is making it clear that there will be a lot of compromises over the next couple of yea rs. compromises over the next couple of years. sometimes when you listen to leave campaigners, they make the negotiation sound like a walk in the park. i don't think it will be a walk in the park but i don't think we have the doom and gloom scenario that we will have to give away a lot to get the freedom we have fought for. i think the focus on this 60 billion. the so-called exit bill. exactly, that is completely unreal. the figure is far from clear. but you accept that britain has to pay its liabilities. i think you will
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find that in any divorce, and i'm sure many of us have experienced this. speak for yourself! what we actually do is we look at what the liabilities are and the assets and look at what is fair but what i don't think is fair is that we in the uk should be paying for benefits that we are not going to receive after we have left. what about paying in order to get access for a particular sector in this country, like the city of london?” particular sector in this country, like the city of london? i think paying from ship of some of the science research schemes, they are well worth it, but this regard for the city, we are incredibly strong there and to think that we are in there and to think that we are in the weaker bargaining position, in terms of forward about the city is not the right position to take. thank you all very much. pmqs at midday followed by theresa may, the
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prime minister, standing up to address the commons with a letter to donald tusk and what it says in it, and giving some more clues about her negotiating position when it comes to sorting out that brexit deal over the next couple of years. next — the wife of the former royal marine who shot dead a wounded taliban soldier in afghanistan tells this progrmame of her relief and delight that he'll be released in weeks. sgt alexander blackman — who was inititially known as marine a — has been in prison for three and a half years. but after his original conviction for murder was reduced to manslaughter, his sentence was also cut. sgt blackman and his men were on a tour in afghanistan in 2011 when the shooting took place. after being targeted by the taliban, he found an injured taliban fighter in a field. footage from a helmet—mounted camera showed him shooting him in the chest after saying this. there you are shuffle off this mortal coil, you... it's nothing you wouldn't do to us. i know, exactly.
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obviously, this doesn't go anywhere, fellas. roger. i've just broken the geneva convention. roger. sergeant blackman's wife claire led the campaign for his murder conviction to be re—examined, and yesterday their lawyer said "she kept the flame alive when the legal system had completely abandoned her husband", and described her as "the lioness who inspired us throughout". in her first tv interview since the case, she told us of her huge relief and delight at his release. relief initially. i think it took a little while for the news to sink in that absolutely delighted, the result we were hoping for. and your husband was there via video link. what was his reaction? the same actually. i spoke to him shortly afterwards and i think it took a little longer for the realisation to
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hit. he had worked very hard to prepare himself for not such good news, so want it had finally dawned on us that we were going to be together soon, we were very happy. so he had braced himself for the worst westerner that is generally our way of coping with things, professor the worst and you never know we might get a better result than that. what have you been told about when he will be free? we are hoping in the next day or so. but you are expecting it at the next couple of weeks or so? the sentence was just over seven years and he's just over three years, five months, so just over three years, five months, so it should be imminent. is it true on video link you manage to get in that he loved you yesterday? the court staff have been absolutely fantastic. we have been a regular
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appearance in court and the staff have got to know us and look after us very well. they allow us at the end of the video link to have a quick word with each other on camera. idid quick word with each other on camera. i did warn him that the court had not yet cleared, but yes, he did tell me he loved me. court had not yet cleared, but yes, he did tell me he loved me” court had not yet cleared, but yes, he did tell me he loved me. i wonder if you could give our audience and insight into the mental state of your husband ? insight into the mental state of your husband? he done so many tours of duty in very dangerous places, what condition was he in?” of duty in very dangerous places, what condition was he in? i never get to see the side of him that is under incredible stress at work. he is obviously thousands of miles away ina warzone is obviously thousands of miles away in a war zone and i will speak to him once a week by satellite phone. my him once a week by satellite phone. my role is to make sure that he knows that i am safe and well and he is not having to worry about anything, other than the job is not having to worry about anything, other than thejob he is tasked to do. so i think as we have
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talked throughout this whole process , talked throughout this whole process, only have i come to understand just what incredible circumstances our servicemen and women are expected to operate in. width at a previous hearing, judges described your husband as an exemplary soldier. the judges said although his responsibility was diminished, alexander blackman still retained a substantial responsibility for the deliberate killing of the telephone insurgent. is that fair? he has never suggested anything else, he has always taken responsibility, he has always regretted his actions, we now know they were the actions of a man suffering from combat stress disorder. if you asked him would he turned back the clock to undo that incident, absolutely he would. they
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went on to say that his actions could be used as a propaganda tool by insurgents. i think there are so many aspects of this case that if not carefully ta ken many aspects of this case that if not carefully taken in many aspects of this case that if not carefully ta ken in context can be described as propaganda tools. the video clips themselves have not been made available for exactly the same reason. i am not in a position to try and second—guess what terrorist organisations may or may not use. your husband has been dismissed from the royal marines. would he want to rejoin? that's a really important point. he has been dismissed. the previous sentence that was overturned was dismissed with disgrace and that's something that we found very difficult because of his exemplary career and the love of his exemplary career and the love of his time at the royal marines so to
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have that simply a dismissal is a fantastic relief. he has in the been reduced to rank so he retains his rank of sergeant going forward which is important to him and to us. would he want to serve again?” think that now is the time to look forward , think that now is the time to look forward, to spend sometime together, to bea forward, to spend sometime together, to be a married couple and to reassess what it is that he wants to do for the rest of his career. that's interesting. on his behalf, you're not ruling that out, that desire out? we have not really had that conversation. we have been focussed on getting yesterday's result and i can't answer on his behalf. what has been the lowest point for you in the last few years would you say? i think it has to be that day when the conviction was announced, the sentence was given for the original murder conviction,
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having snapped through a court martial process that we know the criminal cases review commission has described as flawed and has criticised the previous defence team and thejudge criticised the previous defence team and the judge advocate general. we knew that that decision was unfair and unjust, but it was the lowest point and yesterday saw that com pletely point and yesterday saw that completely overturned. did you ever believe, i mean, did you ever really think in your heart of hearts that yesterday would come? we obviously hoped and we continued to work and fight for that day and we had incredible support as you have seen from thousands of people who also felt that that day should come, but hes not to say there weren't days when we really wondered if it would ever happen. do you feel you and your husband have been let down by the army? in some ways, yes, absolutely. i think it is very clear that out on that tour the support
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that out on that tour the support that he needed and should have had was not there. he has had and continues to have a great deal of support and friendship from former collea g u es support and friendship from former colleagues and some of whom are very senior, but there has been a lack of support from other aspects of the royal marine corps. and what do you think about that? i think it is inevitable to be honest. we were in a court martial process on effectively opposing sides and that saddens me because what we should have done and should now do is work together to make sure that the lessons from this case are learned. well, what lessons would you draw from your husband's case then? there are many. and they start with the support that the men need in situations that they find themselves and a process that makes sure that that support is in place and is recorded, but there are also huge
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lessons to be learnt from the court martial process which failed him significantly in the original hearings and that needs to be addressed. when your husband is finally free, what will be the first thing you say to him? what will be the first thing you do together? i think we'lljust have a huge hug and spend sometime together, making sure that we set off on our re—established married life together and doing whatever it is that we decide we want to do. thank you very much. thank you very much for talking to us, clare. pleasure. phil says the way the authorities treat our soldiers are appalling. i'm really surprised they put their lives on the line for these unthankful people. a viewer says, "murder is murder. there is no excuse." audrey says, "i wish clare
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and alexander blackman happiness going forward." as many as half of all babies in england have slept in the same bed as their parents by the time they are six months old. but this programme has been told that many parents who co—sleep are so fearful about being judged they are not telling health visitors about it. experts say they're concerned that guidance on how to minimise the risks is not being passed on. our reporter amber haque bought you herfull report an hour ago. here's a short extract. it's your baby. she's part of you. she's been part of you for the past nine months. so to have her close is just the most—natural thing in the world. dawn barclay and her partner andy had their second child fern in 2014. can you take me back to the night when it happened? fern had slept quite well that night in her moses basket, until about 5am.
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she woke up and had a feed. we both had fallen back asleep, but we were lying on the couch. when i woke up, i had obviously discovered that she was not breathing. so i remember lifting her up and just running through to andy and screaming that she was gone. andy was amazing. he started doing cpr. i thought he had managed to bring her back. he managed to get the colour to come back in her cheeks. so her daddy gave her her last breath. dawn's story isn't rare.
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the nhs estimates thatjust under 300 babies die unexpectedly in their sleep every year as a result of sudden infant death syndrome. half of those are thought to be co—sleeping. elaine mcinnis advised health watchdog nice about their guidelines on co—sleeping in 2014. three years on, she says there's a concern parents are not being truthful, and the guidelines on how to do it safely not getting across. they would go as far as to say that they are scared that they would be told they are a bad mother
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and have their children taken away from them, which is not the case at all. 13 months later, dawn had another baby, called faye. she did not co—sleep with her. anyone can get a leaflet with guidelines, but putting a face to it, it is still tearing families apart. p°ppy apart. poppy says my son could have died when co—sleeping between my husband and i. i woke to find when co—sleeping between my husband and i. iwoke to find him when co—sleeping between my husband and i. i woke to find him very hot and i. i woke to find him very hot and red. this is from a doctor, i resuscitated babies in the emergency department. i co slept with my first daughter because she would never sleep in her crib. she would sleep on my chest and owicationly under cove rs on my chest and owicationly under covers breaking every rule. it was
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never my intention, just the result of exhaustion. it was clearly risky andi of exhaustion. it was clearly risky and i once found her under the cove rs o n and i once found her under the covers on her head in a position that could have compromised her airway and breathing, fortunately she was ok. now, with my second child, every night, i'm adamant she will stay in her crib, but exhaustion often gets the better of me and she is frequently sleeping on me and she is frequently sleeping on me by the morning. mothers need advice and support, not to feel judged and scared to talk to their health visitor. let's talk to alison walsingham a mum of two who shares her bed each night with both her eight—month—old and her four—year—old. let's talk to alison walsingham a mum of two who shares her bed each night with both her eight—month—old and her four—year—old. elaine mcinnes who advised the health watchdog nice on their co—sleeping guideline. let's talk to alison walsingham a mum of two who shares her bed each tell us why you sleep with your eight—month—old and four—year—old children? i would class myself as a lazy pa rent children? i would class myself as a lazy parent in that i don't want to
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have to get out of bed to feed my child. ifound have to get out of bed to feed my child. i found with have to get out of bed to feed my child. ifound with my son especially when i tried to put him in the cot, he was distraught. and the only time he was happy was when he was in the bed next to me. so for me, it made logical sense to have him in my bed with me. with my daughter, that was just the way we did things. how do you sort the room out? my other half as a full-time job. he doesn't want to be woken up by the baby feeding or being kicked. i have the children either side of me. at no point would the children be allowed to be in the bed on their own. and you have a duvet and sheets. where are the pillows? my son who is four shares a duvet, but the eight—month—old has her own blanket and no pillows. it is almost like two separate beds, but they're together, the beds on the floor so
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they can't roll out and... dud feel judged? absolutely. do you? i feel that with most of my parenting and i work with a lot of parents who talk about sleep problems with children and how sleep would be so much easier if they could bring their baby into their bed with them, but they can't because you get the usual, oh you'll never get your baby out of your bed or you're going to kill your baby if you bring them into the bed. so people dojudge you because it is not seen as a society norm. even though we are all doing it. we're not all doing tare we? even though we are all doing it. we're not all doing t are we? there isa we're not all doing t are we? there is a proportion that are doing it, as your e—mails have said, you know, it might not be purposely, but at some point most parents have shared their bed with their child. elaine, what's the advice to parents? the advice to parents is, the lullaby
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guidelines. so for the six months of baby's life guidelines. so for the six months of ba by's life they guidelines. so for the six months of baby's life they sleep in their own cot on their back in your room. there is 700,000 babies born aier and half of them, half of them, will, whether it is intentionally or non intentionally have co slept with one or both parents within the first three months. is that safe? there is associated risks and that's what the nice, the update of the guidelines three years ago through extensive evidence, looking at the evidence base, they found no direct correlation between co—sleeping and sids, but there was associated risks which if parents are smoking, drinking, drug tacking, and the baby is premature, or the
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drinking, drug tacking, and the baby is premature, orthe baby drinking, drug tacking, and the baby is premature, or the baby is premature, it could be any one of those four points, a premature baby isa baby those four points, a premature baby is a baby born before 37 weeks of pregnancy. have you lied to a medical professional or a health visitor about the fact that you sleep in the same bed with your children?” about the fact that you sleep in the same bed with your children? i did with my first. i was convinced if i was honest that they would take my baby away. really? the fear that you have when you're sat in front of a health visitor and they are saying, "where does your baby sleep?" when you say they sleep in a cot. no one said, "oh you're bed sharing, would you like to do this safely?" with my daughter i was aware of how to do it safely i was confident in my decision to say, yes, i share a bed with my children and di—it safely and i'm fully aware of the risks and how to prevent those risks. jenny,
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how to prevent those risks. jenny, how do you react to what alison does? we have got clear guidance that's there and health professionals have a good discussion with points and you have taken a really informed decision which is absolutely what all of us want to happen. we don't want anyone to be lying to health professionals. they know the advice that's out there, what we want parents to be doing is to realise that you are not a safe bed sharer is 100% of the time. you can have it really the safest way that you can do that co—sleeping and then that night you have a glass of wine, suddenly you are in the high ricks situation and everybody agrees the baby should not be in the bed are you saying it is ok for people like alison to co—sleep, because she has made an informed decision? we are saying it is her choice to make that. we will always say the safest
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places in the cot in the room. want the babies to be close but if you are aware of those risks and minimise them as them as much as possible then that is your decision. it isa possible then that is your decision. it is a slight increased risk, but if you take out all of those high—risk factors, it is a small risk. i was just high—risk factors, it is a small risk. i wasjust cant say that high—risk factors, it is a small risk. i was just cant say that we missed the point there are associated risks, no matter how your baby sleeps, even if baby sleeps in a cot. they are put down the runway there is a risk for them having sids ina there is a risk for them having sids in a cot. there is not anything that is risk—free. there is no way of your baby sleeping risk—free. every night whether you put your baby in a cot or next to you, you put your fingers crossed and hope that you make it through the night. but you remove the risk. exactly. of having had that glass of wine if the baby is in the crib. i suppose there might be fewer risks? there are fewer risks. they estimate half of
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sids are associated with co—sleeping and of those that 90% are co—sleeping with high risks. and of those that 90% are co-sleeping with high risks. angela says i am a health visitor who has been shared since birth, now seven months at work i always inform pa rents of months at work i always inform parents of the safe sleep guidelines. ashley, i co—slept with my daughter, we had no duvetjust a blanket. responses are that the health visitors help, i think they push more stress on to you, explaining your child could die due to co—sleeping. perhaps they should explain the percentage to first—time pa rents. explain the percentage to first—time parents. elaine, have you come across anecdotal evidence that pa rents across anecdotal evidence that parents lie about the fact they sleep in the same bed? absolutely, anecdotal evidence from other health visitors and parents too. exactly as alison said, there is still a stigma in this day and age that parents
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think we will take babies away, we willjudge them, think we will take babies away, we will judge them, they think we will take babies away, we willjudge them, they will be bad parents. actually, health visitors are the only service in the lives of every single parent in this country who has a baby, has a health visitor, alliance to them. so that isa visitor, alliance to them. so that is a key person for five years potentially they can build a really good relationship with, and building a trusting relationship with your health visitor means that you should be able to have those open and honest discussions and not feel judged. question, which i know you will have been asked a million times but i am really interested, your husband is in a separate room, at what point do you wean your children into their own beds? when they are ready. eight, ten? i will say into their own beds? when they are ready. eight, ten? iwill say when my son is 18 he will not want to share a bed with me but if he is eight or ten and that makes uncomfortable. does it impact on your relationship with your husband? i wouldn't say that when i have a
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new baby, clearly not! it is about being a bit more imaginative with your relationship. it is about putting your children first, but you can find ways to be intimate with your partner, you don't have to be ina your partner, you don't have to be in a bedroom where your children are sleeping. it isjust in a bedroom where your children are sleeping. it is just one of those things that people assume if you have your baby in your bed then you can't be intimate with your partner, which is completely untrue. thank you for being so honest, i was not expecting you to be as honest as you have, but i really appreciate it, because i know people will be thinking what is the deal? that's all right. if people are confused at all, where can they go to look for the latest up—to—date advice? all, where can they go to look for the latest up-to-date advice? there is loads on the lullaby trust's website, we have a helpline if you have any particular concerns but also speak to the health visitors. the vast majority now this advice and want to have honest discussions with parents and make sure they are
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aware of risks, and have made that informed decision. engage, and there are lots of us out willing to do that. thank you all very much, thank you for coming on the programme. if you for coming on the programme. if you have been affected by any of the issues we have talked about from our film, there are details of organisations that can help. pmqs first and then the reason gets up pmqs first and then the reason gets up and makes her address to her collea g u es up and makes her address to her colleagues about the letter she has written, which the process of britain leaving the european union. don says we voted to leave without knowing the possible outcome. just accept the consequences and move on because what is done is done. voted remain but so sick of the squabbling. no one knows what will happen post—brexit, not even the politicians. stephen said i voted remain, ican't politicians. stephen said i voted remain, i can't believe this government is going forward with
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such a small majority towards a catastrophe that would leave britain asa catastrophe that would leave britain as a cold, damp, overcrowded island on the edge of europe with no close friends. we were cold and damp in europe, we will continue to be cold and that once we leave the european union! next — this really is an incredible story. a paralysed man has been able to feed himself by using his thoughts to send messages from implants in his brain to ones in his arm. 53—year—old bill kochevar, who's from ohio in the states, was paralysed in a cycling accident. it the first time anyone with complete paralysis has ever been able to restore brain—controlled reaching and grasping. music. i remember up to the accident and then after that,
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i remember bits and pieces. i was on a 150 mile bicycle ride. it was raining really badly. i was following a mail truck and i was keeping my distance pretty good, but then it stopped to deliver a package. i ran right into the back of the mail truck. people have to do stuff for me that i can't do myself. they have to turn me every two hours. if i want water, they have to give me water. this research has enhanced my ability to be able to do things. the participant also uses a mobile arm support to support his arm against gravity, but that mobile arm support is also under cord control meaning by thinking about, he causes mobile arm support to raise and lower his shoulder. i'm still wild every time i do something amazing. i ate a pretzel. i drink water.
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it really got good. one day they had some mashed potatoes and lo and behold i was able to eat the mashed potatoes really well. raquel siganporia is a paraplegic and speaks for the spinal injuries association. professor kevin warrick is from the university of reading and is in our caversham newsroom. he was the first person to have a similar implant, is this right? yes, in an experiment 15 years ago back in reading, and it was very successful. i had it in my peripheral nervous system to show
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what was possible. explain how it works, then? in this case, someone who is paralysed through an injury, they have a break in the nervous system, but they still have the thoughts about moving in their motor cortex, in their brain. so the implant consists of a bunch of electrodes, it looks a bit like a very small hairbrush, fired into that part of the brain, so that when they think about moving, the electrodes pick up those signals, and they transmit them via a computer to electrodes in the nervous system. so it is like rewiring the nervous system over the break that was caused by the accident. we are showing pictures of it now. raquel, how do you react to this? i mean, it is fascinating, isn't it, to think how far technology has come, that you can move your arm, which through thought control alone, it is a bit mind—boggling. but it is one person, or very few people who do benefit
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from this. it is about being cautious. no one can go out tomorrow and get it ruled out. for the 1200 people that get it —— get it real doubt. as a trustee for the spinal injuries association, we want to help people who have become paralysed, and if this technology can take paralysed, and if this technology ca n ta ke off paralysed, and if this technology can take off and be real doubt nationally, that would be amazing for everyone. how does your organisation help people? we support people from the moment they first become injured by going in, giving support to both the person who was injured but also their families because it is their family mothers who have to pick up the pieces at the very early stages. it is about guiding them through what they can expect, this is what your injury means, this is how you can still work, how you can get benefits if you knew the benefits to support you in those early stages. and this is how you rebuild your life. we are here, you can use us as much or as little as you want but we are your
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port of call until whenever you need us. but there will be people who have become paralysed two will see this story, and will say i need what he has got. absolutely, and there is nothing more devastating, i have a client who was 15 when she became paralysed and she can't move her arms, she can't put her make—up on, she can't put keys through the doors. i can't begin to imagine the level of independence taken away from you when you can't do something as simple or basic as putting eyeliner on. for people like her, she will want to watch this and see what can we do to get it rolled out to benefit? professor warwick, what are the chances of it being —— professor warrick, what are the chances of it being rolled out? professor warrick, what are the chances of it being rolled ounm is very experimental at this stage, it was 15 years ago would the first
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experiments with this and it is already taking a look longer than it should do and it hurts me when i see people who are paralysed and they can't do things knowing that the technology is there that can help them. it is a case of money and research to make it happen. how many more yea rs research to make it happen. how many more years do you think? it is how much money. it could be a whole load of people, the technology works. this is the latest experiment. a year ago, there was another man who had signals passed to the outside, to stimulate the outside of his arm. now this is another step forward but particularly for hand movement, like movements are a bit more difficult because the legs have to support the body, so they need extra power requirements. but for our movements, we can see what is possible from this latest experiment. thank you very much —— arm movements. thank you both. thank you very much
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for your company today. stay with bbc news for coverage of the triggering of article 50 at about 20 past 12 this lunchtime. quite a mild start to the day, away from the far north, but quite a cloudy start as confirmed by this satellite sequence. a lot of cloud out there and some rain. not much for the eastern side, most coming to the western side with a bit of a breeze as well. it much as it's way steadily northwards and eastwards. there will be some rain eased of the pennines but most of it is across the western side. here we will see temperatures of 16 or 17, not bad at all for the time of year. 12 and 13 under the all for the time of year. 12 and 13 underthe rain, all for the time of year. 12 and 13 under the rain, quite cool in the eastern side of scotland, only six or7
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eastern side of scotland, only six or 7 degrees in aberdeen. through this evening, the rain continues across the north and west of the uk, maybe some dribs and drabs in the south—east but it went about the much. the wind is still a southerly, so much. the wind is still a southerly, so that will keep things quite mild, double figures for those places but it is the north and scotland that will see places slipping into single figures. thursday looks fairly similarto figures. thursday looks fairly similar to the day, fairly cloudy and breezy. there will be some rain in the north and west but of the south—eastern corner, it could get to 21 or maybe even 22 degrees. this is bbc news — on the day that brexit finally begins. i'm jane hill in westminster on the day that brexit finally begins. britain will formally tell the eu it's leaving, after 44 years of membership.
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a letter — signed by theresa may — will be handed over in brussels to the president of the european council triggering article 50. the prime minister has just left downing street for the house of commons — she'll tell mps this is "the moment for the country to come together" as it embarks upon a "momentous journey". the chancellor confirms today will not be the cut—off point for eu migrants who hope to retain their rights in britain — and insists a deal can be reached. we have to go into this discussion understanding and accepting that we will have to do some give and take to get the best possible deal for britain.

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