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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 29, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill in westminster, where, after more than four decades as a member of the european union, the united kingdom is officially setting off on its own path. this was the moment when the letter triggering article 50 was handed over in brussels to the president of the european council. in the letter, the prime minister said the uk was "leaving the european union, but not leaving europe." we are going to take control of the things that matter most to us and we are going to take this opportunity to build a stronger, fairer britain, a country that our children and grandchildren are proud to call home. i'm ben brown at the european commission in brussels where the clock is now running on two years of negotiations — on the terms of the uk's exit from the eu. receiving the six page letter, the president of the european council, donald tusk,
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said there was no reason to pretend that this was a happy day either in brussels or london. here it is. six pages. the notification from prime minister, theresa may, triggering article 50. we'll bring you all the latest news and reaction throughout the day from here at westminster and across the uk and european union. also this afternoon: there has been a moment of silence on westminster bridge to remember the four people who died in the terror attack here, exactly one week ago. good afternoon from westminster.
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after 44 years as a member of the european union, the formal process to take the united kingdom out of the eu has begun. this lunchtime a letter, signed by theresa may, has been handed to the president of the european council, donald tusk, in brussels. in it she says the referendum was a "vote to restore britain's national self—determination". is that the uk's view that a future deal needs to be discussed alongside a withdrawal. near the end of the letter it says, "we recognise it will be a challenge to reach such a comprehensive agreement within. the two—year period set out for withdrawal discussions in the treaty." but we believe it is necessary to agree the terms of our future partnership. alongside those of our withdrawal from the eu.
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our political correspondent carole walker reports. this was the moment the uk really began its departure from the european union. the british ambassador to the eu, sir tim barrow, handed the president of the european council, donald tusk, the letter signed by the prime minister. it was the formal notification triggering the start of brexit negotiations. minutes later, the prime minister confirmed the significance of the moment. the article 50 process is now underway and in accordance with the wishes of the british people, the united kingdom is leaving the european union. this is an historic moment, from which there can be no turning back. britain is leaving the european union. we are going to make our own decisions and our own laws. we are going to take control of the things that matter most to us. she spoke of her fierce determination to get a deal that works for everyone, but acknowledged the consequences of brexit. we know that we will lose influence over the rules that affect
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the european economy. we know that uk companies that trade with the eu will have to align with rules agreed by institutions of which we are no longer a part, just as we do in other overseas markets, and we accept that. however, we approach these talks constructively, respectfully, and in a spirit of sincere cooperation. earlier, she'd summoned the cabinet to downing street to brief them on the document. she wants to continue co—operation on security, a deal on transition periods to avoid a cliff edge for businesses and investors and she wa nts businesses and investors and she wants an early agreement on the rights of eu citizens in the uk and british citizens in eu states. it is clear just british citizens in eu states. it is clearjust how hard it is going to be for the prime minister to fulfil her ambition of bringing the country together. there are
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stark divisions in her party, in parliament, and across the country. people have very different views on what they want and expect from a brexit deal. the snp dismissed the prime minister's talk of unity. on this issue, it is not a you can united kingdom and the prime minister needs to respect, respect, the difference gci’oss to respect, respect, the difference across the united kingdom. if she does not, if she remains intransigent and denies scotland a choice in theirfuture, she intransigent and denies scotland a choice in their future, she will make scottish independence inevitable. the vote having been taken, the decision having been given to people of the united kingdom, that we should now respect that vote and get on with the job of delivering for everybody across the whole of the united kingdom. the labour leader warned her not to listen to hard—line tory ideal ogs. the direction the prime minister is
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threatening to take this country in is both reckless and damaging and labour will not give this government a free hand to use brexit to attack rights, protections and cut services. or create a tax dodgers paradise. some conservatives urged her not to walk away without a deal. it is time to start talking facts and sense to the british people rather than rhetoric and ideology and in particular, rejecting the idea that no deal and a reliance on wto rules would somehow be ok. theresa may said she would work hard to reach a comprehensive trade deal. so we have the prime minister's objectives in writing. now, the work begins to get an agreement which is a cce pta ble begins to get an agreement which is acceptable across the eu, and across the uk. germany's angela merkel is giving a
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news conference. we see the live shot from that news conference. germany's chancellor has been saying that the eu 27 must stick together, the remaining members of the eu must stick together and we understand that she had a shown conversation yesterday with theresa may in which britain's prime minister said she will be taking a constructive approach to what is to come. so those are the first comments there coming from angela merkel speaking in berlin. we will keep an aacross that because there maybe more, one would imagine, lots of questions for angela merkel about today and article 50. let's speak to gisela stuart, labour mp who campaigned for leave. finally what does today mean? finally what does today mean7m finally what does today mean? it is significant in terms of actually it will change the way the united kingdom and the european union looks
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at itself. up to now people talked about triggering article 50, now that it has, both sides have an opportunity to rewrite the rules in a way that makes both sides stronger andi a way that makes both sides stronger and i thought that theresa may struck the right tone. i was pleased she put uk citizens and the european union at the top of her agenda and recognised that ireland and northern ireland have to be a priority, but also her commitment to employment rights and workers' rights. as a labourmp, rights and workers' rights. as a labour mp, that was important. there isa labour mp, that was important. there is a long way to go, inevitably, and i have interviewed so many people in the last few weeks who have said there is no way it can be achieved within two years. does that, does the prospect of what is to come fill you with any anxiety because a lot of domestic agenda is surely going to be on the back burner?” of domestic agenda is surely going to be on the back burner? i think it's going to be as complicated or as simple as we choose it to be because remember trade deals for example, it is political will which
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drives these ones. so i know these things will be trickyjust to reach a consensus. i things will be trickyjust to reach a consensus. i know things will be trickyjust to reach a consensus. i know deadlines always focus the mind. i would be surprised if there weren't in some areas some transitional agreements, but the principles will be agreed, but it must be this commission and this european parliament that agrees the broad principles so that the two year time period is important. and in between that, provided both sides come to it with goodwill and i hope the prime minister's tone today made that clear, that she intends that, we should be grown—up enough to reach agreement. there is one striking passage in theresa may's letter to donald tusk where she talks about what happens if britain leaves without an agreement. we would have to trade on world trade organisation terms, but a lot of people are pointing to the fa ct a lot of people are pointing to the fact in that paragraph is a reference to security saying in security terms a failure to reach an
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agreement would mean our co—operation between terrorism would be weakened. do you see that as theresa may tying those two issues together? is that threat, saying if we don't get a trade deal, we will not co—operate? we don't get a trade deal, we will not co-operate? i wouldn't read that that way. our intelligence gathering abilities, a lot of our security expertise, we are doing that on a by lateral basis, we are doing it with other european pa rters, lateral basis, we are doing it with other european parters, but not within the union structure and it is more of a case to say it is in no one's interests to have no deal, but we bring things to the table as well. and she was stressing something which was that we're leaving the european union, but we will be reliable strong european partners and that has to be seen in that context. it is in no one's interest to have no deal, but plenty of other eu countries are not, are they, going to want to make it easy
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for britain because they don't want lots of other countries making the decision that this country made last june, isn't that true? decision that this country made last june, isn't that true? i think economic interest will prevail in the sense of trading relationships. it doesn't serve any of our industries not to go on trading with each other, that's why i think frictionless trading is what we should aim for and politicians when they go to the voters, the voters will expect them to say did you do things that were in our interests? almost like acts of self—harming to put others off. it is tempting language at the outset of negotiation, but once they sit around the table and start talking about it, do you know in my experience, people tend to be more reasonable than we often give them credit for. that's a good note toned! let's end on positivity! thank you very much for being with us. the president of the european council made a statement after he received that letter at lunch time
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today. he said this isn't a day that he's going to pretend to be happy about. there is nothing to win in this process and i am talking about both sides. in essence, this is about damage control. our goal is clear — to minimise the cost for the eu citizens, businesses and member states. we will do everything in our power and we have all the tools to achieve this goal. and what we should stress todayis this goal. and what we should stress today is that as from now, nothing has changed. changed until the united kingdom leaves the european union, eu law will continue to apply
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to and within the uk. let's get the business angle now — with me isjeremy brown, who is the special representative for the eu to the city. your thoughts going into these several years your thoughts going into these several yea rs of your thoughts going into these several years of negotiations. about the potential impact whether it is positive or negative for business in this country? well, business doesn't generally doesn't like uncertainty and this is certainly a period of uncertainty that we're entering. but i don't think we should be too bleak and downcast. we have our own fortune in our own hands to some extent and certainly the city of london is the dominant financial centre of europe. it's europe's globalfinancial centre of europe. it's europe's global financial centre and it is centre of europe. it's europe's globalfinancial centre and it is in the interest of the city of london and britain on one and side and the european union on the other to make a success. european union on the other to make a success. i'm sure i've heard lots of banks and big companies saying
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they'll pull out of london. they'll leave ca nary wharf? they'll pull out of london. they'll leave canary wharf? i'm not sure they have. some have. some banks said they need to relocate staff into cities that will remain in the single market once london is not in the single market. but i think that london will remain the dominant financial centre of europe and will be europe's only global scale financial centre. so i think there will be some adjustment and we will have to see how that works out and some businesses which are affected are making contingency plans, but at the same time i don't think people are seriously contemplating london losing its primacy in the financial services market. when you work within financial services, you work in that sector. what's the mood? what are people saying they want for the next couple of years? different companies are affected in different ways. it is hard to generalise. some
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this is marginal significant, others it isa this is marginal significant, others it is a bigger significance. the reason the city of london is a successful global financial centre is not because a committee in brussels decided to make it a financial centre. it has all kind of attributes. i'm not saying that brexit is not a factor, but it is not the overwhelming factor and there are many other factors that make london successful and i visited all 28 member states of the eu last year and all 28 member states of the eu last yearandi all 28 member states of the eu last year and i have spoken to politicians and people in finance across europe and they recognise that this is europe's indense penceable global financial centre. it isa penceable global financial centre. it is a european—level asset, it is not just a british it is a european—level asset, it is notjust a british asset. we need to say to people across europe, nurture the city of london, value the city of london, it is your prize, your asset, not just ours of london, it is your prize, your asset, notjust ours and it helps to drive the whole european economy and make people across europe more prosperous and successful. jeremy browne, thank you.
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let's continue to get reaction. let's get some reaction from around the country. lorna gordon our scotland correspondent is at holyrood while chris page is at the northern ireland border town of caledon in county tyrone. chris. yes, i'm standing at one of 260 crossings between northern ireland and the republic. actually, this bridge was not always here. it has been only been built within the last seven been only been built within the last seve n years been only been built within the last seven years because in the past there weren't so many crossings. the british army created craters in roads just to stop it because of security reasons. it is different days now. look behind me, and you can see the divide. the dividing line of the river, but the truth is nobody really sees it like that. they travel from one town to another just to get services, public services, including health treatment and to do their shopping, to see family and friends and that's why nobody wants this border to change
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again and for road blocks to be put in place. the british and irish government have made clear that they do not want to see any change to these open roads, but there are issues within that, of course, as well in terms of customs posts and everything else. the idea of blowing up everything else. the idea of blowing up roads and craters and creating old divisions they are all something they want to put in the past. theresa may made a point today of talking about the unique relationship between the irish republic, also talking about the fa ct republic, also talking about the fact that you know, in the past, those days whenever they had to put the blockages in place, they don't wa nt to the blockages in place, they don't want to jeopardise the peace process that changed all of that. so, what we're seeing today is brexit potentially causing more division here and certainly at stormont where the power sharing government has collapsed that's the case. now, it wasn't the cause of the collapse, but it could add to the problems there and certainly when you listen to irish republicans they are calling at this stage for a border poll and they say because northern ireland did vote to stay within the
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eu just like scotland and as scotla nd eu just like scotland and as scotland pushes for an independence referendum, they want a referendum on irish unity. so there can be more divisions to come. chris, many thanks. let's head to holyrood as well and join lorna gordon. yes, as chris was saying, nicola sturgeon, scotland's first minister got a mandate from the scottish parliament here at holyrood yesterday to seek the right to seek the authorisation to hold a second independence referendum. with me is mike russell who is the scottish government's minister for brexit. what's your reaction to the triggering of article 50 today? well, having read the letter, i think it is clearer than ever that scotla nd think it is clearer than ever that scotland will need during the process a very strong voice standing up process a very strong voice standing upfor process a very strong voice standing up for scottish interests and at the end of the process which and be
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required to make a choice because this will be a hard brexit. the prime minister says now is the time to come together. the uk is going to enter the very difficult negotiations. she is right, isn't she? this is the time to focus all the energy on getting the best deal for the united kingdom? she created a constitutional crisis in every pa rt a constitutional crisis in every part of this country. northern ireland has no government because of brexit issues amongst other things. there is a resolution asking for an article 30 order and in scotland labour and plaid cymru have come together to submit plans on europe. she has created in nine months an unprecedented mess within these islands. if she wants that unity and if she needs that unity, she has to start behaving in a way that will produce that unity. you say there is a resolution to seek a section 30 order. do you think there is an appetite amongst scottish voters for appetite amongst scottish voters for a second referendum? it is in two
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yea rs' a second referendum? it is in two years' time at the end of this process when the european parliament and the uk parliament will be voting upon this. there will be a package on which there will have to be a vote and the scottish people have the right to do, they did not vote for brexit. they voted against brexit and they find the type of brexit and they find the type of brexit being forced upon them is very unpalatable indeed and there are no assurances in these documents to anybody let alone to the scottish parliament. in terms of even getting back the powers we presently have but which are held in brussels. theresa may did say today there is an expectation that significant additional powers will come to the devolved administrations as a result of the brexit process. surely that's a good thing? no, there is no expectation is not currency. there are no guarantees given. and forgive me, but! are no guarantees given. and forgive me, but i have heard the word significant a great deal over the last seven months trying to negotiate with the uk and there was meant to be a significant involvement in producing a common approach on the article 50 letter. we haven't even seen it, until it
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was issued so i'm daultful about whether the words mean anything. if they do, theresa may can prove this, but she has to prove it with an attitude that's willing to bring people together. she has turned out to bea people together. she has turned out to be a dedivisive figure. this is a divisive letter and we need to bring people together, and she can do that, but if she chooses not then clearly there will have to be a clearly there will have to be a clear choice. mike russell, the scottish government's minister for brexit, thank you very much for that. so, nicola sturgeon, scotland's first minister, will at some point over the next few days or weeks send a letter to the uk government. she says she is seeking constructive dialogue on the way forward , constructive dialogue on the way forward, but she is clear that she does want a section 30 order, the right to hold a second independence referendum here in scotland. let's discuss the practicalities
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now. now we can speak to the legal commentatorjoshua rozenberg. donald tusk has the letter. what actually happens now? well, he has a couple of days to respond and he's going to tell us his response on friday, but tomorrow we will get a white paper. we will get the government telling us what it intends to do in practical terms to give effect to what it did today, triggering article 50. i don't think we will see the term of what theresa may has referred to as the great repeal bill because she says in her letter to donald tusk she needs to consult on how we design and implement that legislation. so it will be a much more open document, talking about the way in which you give effect to brexit when it actually happens, around two years down the line. right. and when we talk about some of the european
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rules and laws, coming on to the statue books here, what about people who are listening thinking, "well, if we voted to leave the eu, i thought we left all that stuff behind." explain why we need some of it? absolutely and you can understand that because the prime minister referred to it, i think, perhaps not today, but originally at the party conference as the great repeal bill. well, it will repeal the 1972 legislation, the european communities act which took us into what is now the eu, but rather more importantly, it will bring across into the laws of the united kingdom the different legal systems, here in the different legal systems, here in the uk, eu law. so that on the day we leave, we won't fall off a cliff. there will be large areas of law that will be brought into effect in the uk, under laws passed by parliament over here, so that things can carry on and after that the government can decide which bits of the law it wants to keep and which bits it wants to scrap. when you say so bits it wants to scrap. when you say so things can carry on. some of it
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is real minutia, fisheries policies? employment, there is a lot. obviously, the eu has been legislating for the uk for more than 40 legislating for the uk for more than a0 yea rs. legislating for the uk for more than a0 years. so a lot of our laws derive from europe. now, some of them, you may want to change. man you want to keep. certainly, you wa nt to you want to keep. certainly, you want to continue the status quo. you wa nt to want to continue the status quo. you want to continue the status quo. you want to continue the status quo. you want to continue the existing law until the government has time to decide what it wants to change. if we we re decide what it wants to change. if we were to simply fall off the edge ofa we were to simply fall off the edge of a cliff and drop all eu originating law on the day we actually leave in perhaps two years' time, a lot of people would lose employment rights and the environmental and reg latetry rights that you mentioned. a lot of people used the word, "scale "and talked about the scale of the task in terms of the negotiations and everything you've just described. i of the negotiations and everything you'vejust described. i mean, as a
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legal man, is this a boom time for lawyers ? legal man, is this a boom time for lawyers? it is. there is a lot to be done by parliament, because it is not just one done by parliament, because it is notjust one piece of legislation, it will be several. a lot of regulatory structures will have to be set—up to replace eu based structures. a lot of thought has to be given, that's why the government are talking about taking a power to allow ministers to overturn an act of parliament which give considerable power to ministers. now, that may not be constitutionally attractive, but it shows how important it is to make sure that everything is done to keep people's rights, constant after we leave the eu. this is a huge task. we've got a0 laws and 50,000 laws, a large number, it sounds easy to say we'll bring them all across, apart from a few like the right to vote in european elections, it has got to be thought through and that's a huge job for parliament and the legal profession. joshua, thank you very
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much indeed for that insight. let's return to business. let's head back to the city. rachel horne let's return to business. let's head back to the city. rachel home is there. i'm here and over my shoulder you can see the city of london. the iconic buildings. a sector that brings £120 million into the uk economy and employs 1.1 million workers. those workers will be watching today's events closely wondering what it could mean for their future and what it will mean for their jobs. their future and what it will mean for theirjobs. we'rejoined by anthony brown. thank you forjoining us. anthony brown. thank you forjoining us. we'rejoined by the chief economist of the crib. cib. you are the voice of banking. how manyjobs do you think the city of london could lose as a consequence of brexit? we don't know the number of jobs that are going to move because banks are in the process of working out which operations they might need
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to relocate in order to carry on serving their customers the day after the uk leaves the eu. they have to plan for the basis that there is no trade deal in place on that day. some banks made some announcements about it, they don't wa nt to announcements about it, they don't want to move staff. they want to move as few staff as possible because the staff themselves, they live here, they have got homes here and children who work here, it is clearly bad for the city, but we don't know how big the number of jobs will be. you members of the juried that day. we have got this two year window to negotiate the exit. lots of people are focussing on today, the historic events of today, you're focussing on this day in two years' time. what do you think the banking industry kneads in order to make a seamless transition on that day? avoid a cliff-edge effect where all the rules that under pin the services that the banks use to sell to customers in the eu, they all fall away unless you have a transition deal in place that allows you to smooth over that, particularly if there is no partnership deal at that time. that
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could happen at some point in the future. the prime minister wants to get both agreed at the same time, but if we don't have that, we have to have something else in place to make sure it is an orderly and smooth transition. you represent businesses on an international level. if you were heading up the negotiations what would you tell the government to do? what businesses both here in the uk, when i tack to businesses in belfast and manchester, they want to have a focus on a good trade deal and that's also when we talk to our sister federations in europe and around european businesses, they wa nt around european businesses, they want to see that real focus on a good trade deal and i think also the acknowledgement that we need some sort of implementation plan, when we move from one set of rules to thorment we want to avoid those cliff edges. that's true for financial services, but it is true for ourcar financial services, but it is true for our car manufacturers, for chemical companies and for small businesses up and down the country. and i think the other thing we'd like to see is acknowledgement now
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around people and there is more we could do now to reassure the eu citizens who are here now and contributing to our economy all around the country that they have the right to remany. you talk about about a good trade deal, but what is about a good trade deal, but what is a good trade deal? we're not going to get the same trade deal as we have with the eu? what we do know wherever we go from here, it will be different. i this a good trade deal is about minimising tariffs. we want to see tariffs as low or eliminated. we want to recognise rules and standards. if i'm an airline, i need people in european arp ports to recognise my health and standards are good enough for me to land my aircraft in europe. we have all the rules and acknowledgements through out rules and acknowledgements through our membership of the european union at the moment, it's possible we just need to have recognition of the current rules as we move to that new arrangement. thank you very much. over my
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shoulder in the city, traders are going to be watching sterling. the currency markets closely. sterling is the way the brexit tale is going to be told. in the last 2a hours, it was up yesterday and down this morning. it has recovered some of its losses. volatile, but flat seems to be the prognosis on this historic day of article 50 and there is going to bea day of article 50 and there is going to be a lot of bumps in the road ahead as well. thank you, rachel. we are gauging opinion around the country. let's head tojon kay in bristol. we are on board the great britain, brunel‘s famous ship in bristol docks. tempting as it is to bring this bell, all is does is squeak, sadly. thousands of people come here every week to have a look around the history. on this historic day this
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seems like a good place to come to assess what the future is. bristol is an interesting city, because politically it is very mixed. there are conservative, labour lib dem, green says. last year, this city, by 60% plus, voted to remain in the eu. today we have been on the water and around the docks to find out how people are feeling. the ss great britain, built by brunel. but where is great britain heading now? out. out, but here in bristol nearly two thirds of voters wa nted bristol nearly two thirds of voters wanted to stay in the eu. on the river taxi, many thought it was a bleak day. the government is barking ona bleak day. the government is barking on a journey and it has no idea where it is going, it doesn't know what it is doing and it is not in control of negotiations from now on. the brexit journey may
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control of negotiations from now on. the brexitjourney may be under way, but among remainer to there is a sense all is not lost. it is fine to happen? i don't believe it is. i believe the narrative will change and people's voices will be heard eventually. they have been heard in the referendum, haven't they?‘ eventually. they have been heard in the referendum, haven't they? a very mild squeak. it was so close. at the end of the day people may change their minds. at that point article 50 can be revoked. it is not a case of clinging on. it is a case of campaigning for the things you believe are important. traders have sailed into bristol docks for centuries from all over the world. this boat builder has seen orders increase since the referendum due to the fall in the pound. we don't need immigration that will take work away from the on skilled. forjohn, the boss, this is a good day for britain. the main reason was sovereignty. the second reason, i wa nt to
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sovereignty. the second reason, i want to open us up for the rest of the world. back on the ferry, the skipper says it is time for both sides to back the government as it stays its way through negotiations. it isa stays its way through negotiations. it is a fait accompli. we have to get on with it whether we like it or not. but in this pro-remain city, many are nervous today and expect the next two years to be tough. there is nervousness here but a lot of the levels of cold us they are frustrated and impatient, and that is on both sides. a lot of people have said today it is important for the politicians to begin these brexit negotiations. but when are we, the people, going to know what this deal is going to be? two years seems like a very long time. the
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prospect of it going on beyond two yea rs prospect of it going on beyond two years only adds to the sense of frustration and impatience. back to jane in westminster. thank you. jon kay. what those brexit mean for you and all of us? tonight we will bring you a special programme. you can put all your questions, comments, queries to our panel of experts. get in touch in the usual way. you can send an e—mail. on twitter, the hash tag is bbc ask this. that is at half past eight tonight. any questions and queries you have about article 50. we can get the view from brussels now with ben brown. thank you. i think the reality of britain's departure from the european union is still sinking in. obviously it wasn't a shock. the
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delivery of the letter was carefully choreographed. it is still sinking in. let's talk to vicky ford, a conservative member of the european parliament, and chair of the single market committee. and also, alan beattie, european editorial writer for the financial times. how do you feel on this day? it is an historic day. we knew it was coming. i have had many colleagues from across europe were sorry to see this day happening, but also wanted to work together to find a future relationship. i'm pleased by how many colleagues have said they want this to be amicable and to work towards a long—term relationship. alan beattie, theresa may's 6—page letter was pretty conciliatory, talking about how we need the negotiations to be respectful and constructive, and a deep and special relationship? the tone was more
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conciliatory than her party co nfe re nce conciliatory than her party conference speech or other speeches she has given. i think the news in it, which is sort of interesting and may lead to more attention, is the idea you can link conversation on economics and trade with security. i'm not sure they will get away with that. they think security is a strong card they have to play. and so strong card they have to play. and so they are going to put that into the general mix. how do you see the negotiations? although two years sounds like a long time, it is actually a very tight timetable. can it be achieved? there is a huge amount that needs to be agreed and a lot of work to be done. key issues straight up, citizens rights, financial contributions, both sides wa nt to financial contributions, both sides want to resolve them. if they can agree them in principle quite quickly and leave the detail to the lawyers and accountants, then we can move on. then we've got to look at the long—term trade relationship,
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which affects summary different sectors of the british economy. but also many european countries exporting into the uk. i hear a lot of people wanted to have this cooperation, agree the principles over the next couple of years, i agree the transition periods, and then work of the long—term details in the future. as for security, i hear many colleagues say they value the uk contribution on security, they want to have that special relationship. there is a need under the european treaty to have special relationships with your neighbouring countries. this is the sort of relationship i hear many of my equivalents across europe say they wa nt to equivalents across europe say they want to see delivered. theresa may talked about a free—trade agreement. other people say you can't get a trade deal, it may take five to ten yea rs ? trade deal, it may take five to ten years? you can't get any meaningful trade deal within two years. the us and australia concluded one very quickly, which basically said,
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basically involved in the us telling australia what to do. it will take a long time. the uk has concluded agreement with canada, which took seven years. agreement with canada, which took seven years. if the uk once anything like its current relationship with the eu, it will have to be longer than that. alan, you are right that we need a much deeper trade relationship because it is a larger amount of trade. however, we are starting from the same place, which is helpful. and in the letter today, the prime minister has set out some helpful comments on the direction of travel, such as british business exporting into europe. they will need to comply with european standards. those are helpful comments. but even so, two years, it can't be done. it is important to
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use this window to agree the principles, to agree we don't want to have cliff edges that would affect exporters. to agree what happens on our borders between northern ireland and ireland. that we wa nt northern ireland and ireland. that we want the minimum amount of disruption to people and businesses. ido disruption to people and businesses. i do believe that that can be established in principle. there is detail that will take time. but remember, we are starting from a closer pace —— my place. remember, we are starting from a closer pace -- my place. we haven't heard what the eu red lines are going to be. is there a sense in which the eu will be pretty tough because they don't want anybody else to follow the uk example? the eu thinks the single market they have works well. they want to maintain the integrity of the single market. they don't want anything that is going to pick that apart. some of the things the uk government have talked about in the past, which they seem talked about in the past, which they seem to have backed away from, like
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leaving some sectors of the economy in the uk within the eu customs union, i don't think that is a goer. i think that is so inimical to the way the eu does business, it is not for the happen. the other thing that will be enormously important as financial services. here is one where you can't take world we are now and use that as a basis, that's where we are now is a system where the eu could guard the uk financial situation as good enough in itself. there is a passport in issue. there will have to be some deal done which is more deeper, more comprehensive than any financial services part of any trade deal anywhere, if the uk is going to maintain its export into the eu. the prime minister has been clear she doesn't want an a la ca rte, clear she doesn't want an a la carte, which is one of their red lines. on the other hand, there are sectors where it is clearly in the interest of both sides to find
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agreement. i hear many of my collea g u es agreement. i hear many of my colleagues from across europe saying they need to have agreement on access to the financial capital that is london. there is a need to find a way that works. there are models on regulatory cooperation from other parts of the world. you sound very optimistic. there is a lot to be agreed. but we need to keep working on what the options are instead of saying it's too difficult. we need to move on. we have all known article 50 was going to be triggered. london has been doing a lot of work. michel barnier, who leads the eu negotiators, he has been doing a huge amount of work. there is a willingness to try and resolve these issues. we need to not get distracted by those who want to create drama on the edges and keep focused on trying to resolve these long—term issues. ithink focused on trying to resolve these long—term issues. i think there are a lot of people who want to work to help that. although we talk about two years, help that. although we talk about two yea rs, we help that. although we talk about two years, we have to wait until the french and german elections for a
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meaningful negotiations, and it has to —— has got to be done and dusted by october 20 19. it is a shorter window? it is. it is important to get an outline agreement on where we are going to go and crucially some kind of transition. people talk about the transition. what does that mean? european parliament have been talking about three years. limited at three years. if you are trying to negotiate a trade deal in three years, that is very tight. the uk government has suggested different things could be phased in at different speeds. three years is an absolute minimum. the question is, what does the uk except during that time? does it accepted under the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice? that was one of the key things of the leave campaign. if the uk is still under the ec —— ecj five years from now, the eurosceptic part
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of the conservative backbenchers will get extremely act —— actor. there has to be compromise on both sides? there has to be. it is in the interest of both sides to find this long—term partnership. there is willingness on both sides. the transition may need to be longer in some areas. that is the level of detail which i hear colleagues on the backbenches of the european parliament say they want to deliver. thank you. vicky ford and alan beattie. we will get bored detail from donald tusk, president of the european council, on friday, when he was one through the broad parameters of the eu position. thank you. with me now is matthew elliott, who was chief strategist of the vote leave campaign, now a senior fellow at the legatum institute. welcome. what does today mean for
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you? it is a huge day, it really historic day. we are finally in the process of leaving the eu. what struck me from the prime minister's statement is she said we were leaving the european union, not europe. that is important. it shows we wa nt europe. that is important. it shows we want to cooperate and trade with other european member states who will be part of the political entity. one hell of a process to go through now? it is. an exciting two yea rs. through now? it is. an exciting two years. it will be a challenge. i think the process could be simpler than people think. the point is we now have perfectly free trade between the uk and the rest of the single market. to actually reach a trade deal should be relatively straightforward. we have lots of process in terms of agreeing regulations and how to harmonise things. think should be straightforward of both sides realise there is a win, win situation. you referenced theresa
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may's statement. we have been looking over the letter she wrote to donald tusk. very striking, the reference in terms of trade, saying if we don't get a deal we will revert to wto rules, but then goes on to talk about the issue of security. almost tying those issues together. is that how you read that paragraph? that she is saying, we wa nt paragraph? that she is saying, we want that trade situation to work because we need to concentrate on security? i think it is right the prime minister made it clear that no deal is better than a bad deal. there has to be a bottom line in any negotiation. you have to say you would be willing to walk away from the table if you don't get the deal you want. she had to make that perfectly clear. when it came to security and intelligence, i think about the lancaster house speech, when she made the point that as a european country on the continent of europe, with the biggest armed forces, the best intelligence services, we will continue to cooperate with other member states.
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i'm sure we will do that. you are fa ntastically i'm sure we will do that. you are fantastically positive about what is to come. i would expect that. i am interested in practical terms where uc any problem areas? just simply because of the sheer scale, which is enormous. do we have enough negotiators? would do we have enough legal minds to make this happen? just the practicalities.” legal minds to make this happen? just the practicalities. i think is very good we waited nine months before triggering it. some people we shall —— we should trigger it the day after the referendum. it has taken nine months to build the department of international trade and the department rated in the eu, to work out our strategy. we have done all the preparation very carefully, so we're now well positioned to do a good negotiation. do you think there is any risk that the regular domestic agenda will be largely on the back burner, because the sheer scale of what is ahead so
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enormous, dealing with health and other issues, by definition, it will ta ke other issues, by definition, it will take a back—seat? other issues, by definition, it will take a back-seat? it is a lot for the government to deal with, that's true. the prime minister is right when she says this is notjust about the european union. it is also about the european union. it is also about the domestic agenda. we need a new policy for things like infrastructure spending. have the best educated people. avenue migration policy. it's notjust our relationship with eu. how quickly will this country feel different? how quickly will it feel the way you wa nted how quickly will it feel the way you wanted to when you voted? how quickly will it feel the way you wanted to when you voted ?|j how quickly will it feel the way you wanted to when you voted? i think it is different already. we are an independent country again. i think it is given us a bit of self confidence on the world states. no longer do we have two hide behind the european union when it comes to international negotiations. as the fifth—largest economy and the number one for a power, we should be a
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confident, independent you very much. we are trying to reflect a remarkable day, an historic day. we have been looking up and down the country. we have been in brussels. let's talk about market reaction. rachel has been following all the reaction. thanks, jane. behind me is the city of london. you can see the home of the most of the uk financial sector, worth about £120 billion a year to the uk economy. it employs more than 1.1 billion —— million people. they will be watching today's events closely wondering what it means to theirjobs and their future. what about the retail sector? that is worth £93 billion to the uk economy. it employs in 2.8 million people. the automotive industry employs 80,000 people. not to mention
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agriculture and health care. these sectors are vital to the uk economy and the sectors which will be affected by any big changes with customs, tariff and the easy movement of labour in and out of the eu. we are going to talk about those topics with ali rennison, from the institute of directors. we help wallace —— warwick lightfoot, an economist for free trade. we mentioned those issues of customs tariffs, easy movement of people, the impact it could have on the uk economy. if you were leading the negotiating team, what advice would you give them? the most important thing is to get the sequencing of the negotiations right first. if you have the divorce agreement and a trade deal done in parallel, that makes it easier to get done in a shorter time frame. when it comes to things like customs, that is bread—and—butter for businesses dealing in trade and goods. they need to be able to move things as
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fast as possible. work can begin on quickly as possible, the uk can set up quickly as possible, the uk can set upajoint quickly as possible, the uk can set up a joint customs committee to make sure those issues are now. you talk about doing those killed in parallel, the exit deal and the new trade agreements. how realistic eu agreed to do that? if you look at article 50, talks about a withdrawal agreement that takes account of a new framework. even if the divorce negotiations start first, very quickly they will need to move on to the new framework, because a lot of issues, money and movement of labour, for example, the rights of uk and eu nationals, they cross pollination —— cross pollinate both sides. do you think there could be a skills gap? there already is a skills gap? there already is a skills cab. it is a concern for business. business will have to learn that the government is going
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to come to a view about who should come here, the kinds of skills we need. we have to do more training of out need. we have to do more training of our own. one of the good things about the renewed relationship with out about the renewed relationship with our canton of the neighbours is we are looking at many things we should have been doing better in the years before. —— continental neighbours. we are examining those things again. yes, that will be imported. we have to leave it there. thank you both. over my shoulder in the city there hasn't been that much move in the markets because of article 50 being triggered. it is something the markets were expecting. but in the days and weeks to come, as details become clearer, maybe we will learn a bit more, it will see some movement. we should be watching the movement. we should be watching the movement of the uk currency. that will tell the true tale of brexit. thank u, rachel. let's head to
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sunderland and get more reaction from fiona trott. hello there. this is the city were three out of five people voted leave. they have been telling us today they wanted britain to take back control of its borders and its lawmaking. why is that? let's speak to grace bla kely. lawmaking. why is that? let's speak to grace blakely. please excuse the tannoy! your research, what has it told you about why people are feeling this way? we have done quite a bit of research. we have seen that there is, for example, a £1500 per capita public investment gap in transport between london and the north. we have also seen that wages, eve ryo ne north. we have also seen that wages, everyone outside of london has —— have stagnated. wages have declined by 10% outside of london. we are seeing kickback against the economic growth model we have chosen to pursue since the financial crisis,
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that has not included the vast majority of people in this country. taking back control is about taking back control for westminster, having some sort of control and empowerment over people's lives, as it is about taking back control from brussels. we have had a raw deal, we want things to be better. that is why they voted that way. 7000 people in this area work for nissan. they rely on its exports to eu nations. how can an area like this survive brexit? i would -- firstly, ijust wa nt to brexit? i would -- firstly, ijust want to say that in the wake of brexit we have seen a fair amount of elitism on the part of people in the south, basically saying the north voted against its interests. we can feel like we have seen the increasing gdp, we're seeing people in westminster telling you that your lives are getting better. that com pletely lives are getting better. that completely contrasts with people's lived experience of the economy, stagnating wages, zero hours
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contracts increasing fivefold. these things suggest things aren't getting better and we need change. areas outside of london are much more dependent upon the eu. for example, they are 50% to under percent more dependent on trade with eu and eu structural funds. dependent on trade with eu and eu structuralfunds. our dependent on trade with eu and eu structural funds. our research suggests some economies in the north are suggests some economies in the north a re less suggests some economies in the north are less resilient than london. there is a post brexit shock which comes as a result of brexit or as a result of our unsustainable economic model. it will hit the north harbour. that needs to be taken into consideration. richard halligan is here from the leave campaign. is this what you found with your findings? very much so. the north—east considers itself the poor relation of the south—east. we are always left behind. there is underinvestment in the northeast and has been for decades. under investment in industry and infrastructure. i was totally agree with you that it's a very real
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filling. thank you forjoining us. there you are. two views from the city that was the first to votes leave. our focus today primarily has been about the triggering of article 50 of the lisbon treaty. but you will remember that it is exactly a week since the terrorist attack here at westminster. and in ourfirst since the terrorist attack here at westminster. and in our first so ago, hundreds of people gathered on westminster bridgejust ago, hundreds of people gathered on westminster bridge just behind me to pay tribute to those who died and we re pay tribute to those who died and were injured in that attack exactly a week ago. the crowds walked slowly across the bridge. they stood for one minute in silence at 2:a0pm. that was the exact moment that calla rd that was the exact moment that callard massoud that was the exact moment that calla rd massoud began that was the exact moment that callard massoud began his attack. —— khalid masood. prince william laid flowers in memory of pc keith palmer, who was killed very close to
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where i am standing here. the prince laying those flowers at the national memorial arboretum in member —— in memory of that police officer who was stabbed to death. and we remember those victims as well today, exactly one week on. we will have much more from here afterfour o'clock. we were just catch up with the weather. good afternoon. it is a very cloudy picture across the uk today. in the south—west of wales it is not only cloudy, we are seeing outbreaks of rain. a little bit of sunshine has been breaking out across parts of suffolk, norfolk and lincolnshire. it is quite warm air. temperatures into the mid teens. most of the rain clipping the south—west of england area run. moving into scotland. this is how things look this evening. the
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heaviest burst of rain will be in the south of scotland, heading into the south of scotland, heading into the north of scotland. and later in the north of scotland. and later in the night, south—west england, london and the midlands. a cloudy night. a mild night for the time of the year. 11 to 12 degrees in a good pa rt the year. 11 to 12 degrees in a good part of the uk, except in northern scotland, were skies will be clearer. we should see early sunshine. warmer in the south—east of scotla nd sunshine. warmer in the south—east of scotland than for some time. we have got some rain moving into the borders, the south—west of scotland, clipping northern ireland. and close to the irish sea could catch rain from time to time. rain overnight running through the midlands will soon running through the midlands will soon clearer running through the midlands will soon clearer way. running through the midlands will soon clearer way. skies brightened already in the south—east and east anglia. warm air pushing in. helping to break up the cloud. cloudy skies over the irish sea. wetter weather moving into northern england and into southern scotland. where we do
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get some sunshine across the midlands, south east england, east anglia, temperatures could be 21 or 22 degrees. further north it should be warm as well. we have got an area of low pressure focusing most of the rain on friday. moving away from northern ireland. this weatherfrom very weak. very little brain across the south—east of the uk. more in the south—east of the uk. more in the way of sunshine as we head into the way of sunshine as we head into the afternoon. highs of 16 or 17 degrees. a weekend of two halves. saturday has sunshine and showers. they may be —— be showers may be heavy. those showers not too far away. as we had through the evening and overnight, we will find a ridge of high pressure across the uk. it will push away those showers. the second half of the weekend looks like it will be much drier, some brightness, some sunshine. with
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light mac —— like winds it should feel. it is only in the north—west later in the day we will see some cloud, wind and rain. ideologs this is bbc news. i'm jane hill live at westminster, where, after more than four decades as a member of the european union — the united kingdom is officially setting off on its own path. this was the moment when the letter triggering article 50 was handed over in brussels to the president of the european council. in the letter, the prime minister said the uk was "leaving the european union, but not leaving europe." we are going to take control of the things that matter most to us and we are going to take this opportunity to build a stronger, fairer britain, a country that our children and grandchildren are proud to call home. i'm ben brown at the european commission in brussels
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