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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 30, 2017 6:45pm-7:01pm BST

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two surgeons decide to speak out about one of britain's biggest children's hospitals. five members of the same family have died a their helicopter crashed in knot wales. police have suspended the rescue operation due to bad weather and a look at the markets. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. an houran 50 an hour an 50 minutes to end of trading n the state, the dough and the nasdaq are both up. —— dow and the nasdaq are both up. the government has set out how it plans to transfer thousands of eu laws into british legislation. the great repeal bill is how ministers plan to ensure eu law no longer applies in the uk. the bill would get rid of the european communities act 1972. the european communities act 1972 put eu law above uk law. the bill will mean uk parliament can then "amend, repeal and improve" the laws as necessary. it is likely to be one of the largest legislative projects ever undertaken in the uk. with me is oliver ilott
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from the institute for government. how long will this take? the government only has two years to get through it. it has to take less than that, so yesterday, the government triggered article 50, which begins the process for us leaving the eu. article 50 gives you two years to negotiate a deal with the eu. if you don't get a deal in that time, then you are out. so that puts a time line on these thing, what government is doing today, is it is copying gci’oss is doing today, is it is copying across eu regulations on to the uk statute book. there is a chance we don't get a deal after two years and we are out. we need them to have been copied across. that process that will see going for the next couple of year, it is worth bearing
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in mind this piece of legislation, the so call great repeal bill, more a great copy and paste bill. that is is only one of the pieces of legislation we will get. we will get others on trade and immigration, this will take up parliaments time. if laws are being co—copied and pasted over and the government says is that is is a dodgy law, let us change it now, would that happen or are they literally simply copying and pasting now and worrying about the details two years' time? well, the details two years' time? well, the more you try and change thing, the more you try and change thing, the harder it s copying and pasting is the easiest bit. not all of it can be be copied anded. some make reference to eu bodies, eu institution, regulators and that won't apply in the uk, so where that is the case, where you can't copy and paste and you do have to make some changes, then changes will be inevitable. then the question is, how do you do that? if you go
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through the normal procedure, for editing this type of legislation, it is going to take a long time and there is is a lot to get through. those are the henry viii powers you referred to earlier. government has suggested it might take powers that allow it to take short cuts so it can make necessary changes in time. that is concern from some of the labour bench, they believe if they invoke some of these powers they can change laws without the full scrutiny of parliament. that is the contention. it, there will be a bit of give—and—ta ke, it contention. it, there will be a bit of give—and—take, it is such a large task, there is always going to be some change to the normal process in order to get through this in time. the key thing is that government can do this in some kind of accommodation in parliament. what we have seen today, is government committing that these sorts of rhiannon henry room 8 power will be time limited. —— henry viii powers. is that the two years of the brexit
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talks? it implies they are not trying to take these powers indefinitely. if we do get to two queen indefinitely. if we do get to two queer, and the copying and pasting isn't finished, what happens? that isn't finished, what happens? that is what they might refer to as a legal hiatus, what so what happens at the end of two years depends on whether or not we have a deal with the eu. if we video a deal with the eu, then we might move into some kind of implementation phase as the government is calling it, where you slowly disentangle. you the deal and slowly disentangle. you the deal and slowly disentangle. you the deal and slowly disentangle. that would be the point of a trap sipsal period. the jargon at this stage gets confused. technically, when they talk about a transitional period they are saying we don't know what they are saying we don't know what the agreement is, we need more time to talk, when they talk about implementation phase, they say we have done the implementation phase, we are slowly phasing it. in in a
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transitional phase you are negotiating and in implementation you are implementing it. you will be visiting the studio many time, oliver, many thanks for that. is the us senate intelligence committee is holding its first open hearing into russian alleged interference into the 2016 us election campaign. us intelligence agencies believe russia tried to help mr trump win in november by damaging hillary clinton's campaign. in his opening remarks, the vice—chairman of the committee mark warner, accused president putin of deliberate interference. russia's president vladimir putin ordered a deliberate campaign carefully constructed to undermine oui’ carefully constructed to undermine our election, first, russia struck at our political institution, by electronically breaking into the headquarters of one of our political parties and stealing vastment as of information. russian operatives also
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hacked e—mails, to steal personal m essa 9 es hacked e—mails, to steal personal messages and other information from individuals relating from clinton campaign manager to former secretary of state colin powell. this stolen information was then weaponised. this stolen information was then weaponised. meanwhile, in the white house, it has been confirmed that ivanka trump, the eldest daughter of the president will be officially joining his administration as an unpaid employee with the title assistant to the president. the 35—year—old will get her own office and access to classified information, but will not receive a salary, an official confirmed. ivanka, who has her own fashion brand, willjoin her husband jared kushner, who is a senior adviser to the president. the couple's reported influence on president trump has raised questions about possible conflicts of interests. let's cross to our correspondent in washington, gary o'donoghue. those allegations of a conflict of interest, clearly cut no ice with
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president trump. no, ithink interest, clearly cut no ice with president trump. no, i think he in a sense he has already crossed that rubicon with his son—in—law, jared kushner, ivanka trump we understand won't be paid but be in no doubt that the description, snint to the president sounds lowly. it is not. —— assistant. it means you have the direct ear of the president. she will be within feet of the oval office, she has been present at a lot of the meetings when you look at the photo opportunities with i'm coming to visit the president. she is often there any way, and i think this is perhaps a recognition of the reality, but it is not what was expected from the start of the presidency, we thought she would carry on like with the other children, running the businesses, etc, etc, but he has decided to take her into the inner circle properly. sure, she won't be be getting his
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coffee and getting his laundry, but as far as the hearings, from the senate, intelligence committee on potential russian interference in the us presidential election last year, the senate has got going, what happened to the house investigation? the house investigation is in chaos at the moment. the leading republican, the leading democrats are at one and other‘s throats. some democrats are calling for the charm to stand down. you will recall in the last week or so, it emerged that he was invite on to the grounds of the white house, kind of in the dead of night, to read some secret documents, which seem to suggest that donald trump's conversations have been caught up accidentally, in surveillance operations, though he seemed to need to take that evidence to the president on the following day, despite the fact it was given to him on white house grounds, the
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democrats don't like it at all. nunez was part of the transition team. they don't think he is acting as an independent chairman. however, like most things in the american congress, there are two of everything and the senate has its own intelligence committee, and we had a rather forceful i suppose you would call it yesterday, between the republican and the ranking member, the democrat, sorry senior democrat. they have opened their investigations today, witnesses they have had this morning have not been terribly interesting, some academics and people like that. this afternoon they are getting a former director of the national security agency who was round until 2014, so slight will i predates some of the allegations around russian interference but it will certainly warm up next week
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when they have jared kushner the president's son—in—law when they have jared kushner the president's son-in-law and you will be there for us. many thanks. the lives of young children are being put at risk at one of the uk's biggest children's hospitals — because of the intense pressure to tackle waiting lists. that's according to two senior surgeons at the royal manchester children's hospital. they decided to speak out after one little boy died when his urgent treatment was delayed. with me is our health editor. explain the background to this? with me is our health editor. explain the background to thi57m was a tragic shock story, last april, one—and—a—half—year—old caiden was admitted for emergency surgery. he had a heroinier in his chest, that was on a monday. by friday, he was still in the hospital and the operation hadn't happened. he fell into a critical condition and didn't pull through. his family we re very and didn't pull through. his family were very angry, feel they have been
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let down by the hospital. two surges have come forward to say they were voicing concerns before caiden's death about the lack of operating theatres and beds in the hospital. after his death they say they wrote to management saying there were major concern, they said they felt they were under pressure to reduce waiting lists rather than urgent cases but the management didn't listen. that is why they came forward to the bbc. royal manchester children's hospital made clear it doesn't have a policy of prioritising waiting lists. it is up to the surgeons they say to deal with them. they say their safety culture is acceptable from their point of view. their own investigation we have seen into the death recommended that urgent lessons royal manchester children's hospital made clear it doesn't have a policy of prioritising waiting lists. it is up to the surgeons they say to deal with them. they say their safety culture is acceptable from their point of view. their own investigation we have seen into the death recommended that urgent lessons is should be royal manchester children's hospital lessons is should be royal manchester child ren's hospital made clear it doesn't have a policy of prioritising waiting lists. it is up
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to the surgeons they say to deal with them. they say their safety culture is acceptable from their point of view. their own investigation we have seen into the death recommended that urgent lessons is should be learned about "prioritising non—elective care above elective cases. " "prioritising non—elective care above elective cases." they have apologised to the family. thank you for that. let usjoin darren let us join darren for all the weather news. good evening. it has been mixed fortu nes good evening. it has been mixed fortunes today. an early taste of summerfor some fortunes today. an early taste of summer for some part of the country but the same winds have brought rain to others as well. this was the scene at kew gardens earlier on, lovely colourful scene, nice blue skies and in the south—east, 22 degree, the warmest march day since 2012. but further north, although we got warm sunshine in north east scotland, in between, we have add this area of cloud and rain. that has been mostly over the irish sea but it has been affecting a god part of north—west england, so much poorer weather here. and there is more rain to come as well. even in that warmer air, towards the south—east, there might be one or two hit—and—miss showers but much wetter further west. that rain will develop more widely in south—west england and wales. northern ireland, north—west england and scotland. some heavy rain over the hills too. but with a lot of cloud round and
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after warmth with temperature winds it will be a very mild night. into tomorrow though, and heading to the south—east and east anglia, where there may be early sunshine we have this band of cloud that could bring showers eastwards. hit—and—miss and many places will be dry. quickly it should be drying off, in the south—west of england, we have the rain in western parts of wales, through the irish sea, still wet start for northern ireland, cumbria, lancashire, the pennines the and rain in scotland. more rain for the southern uplands. that focus of wet weather shifts to scotland, away from wales, away from north—west england and northern ireland, but turning wetter across central and northern scotland. elsewhere but for one 01’ northern scotland. elsewhere but for one or two northern scotland. elsewhere but for one 01’ two showers northern scotland. elsewhere but for one or two showers it should brighten up. sunshine round and although we have fresher air, 15—17 degrees should feel plea isn't a. showers for northern ireland, just in time for the start of the weekend. so as we normally get, we
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can get april shower, chilly overnight as they fade away. east anglia and the south—east will see few showers again. this is where we will see the hiring temperatures. ale cooler day on saturday with showers around, some of them heavy and slow—moving too. but they shouldn't last overnight, because we have got this ridge of high pressure building in across the uk. that is settling it down across all areas on sunday, keeping the weather fronts and rain at bay. a fine day, dry day on sunday, we will see spells of sunshine, particularly sunny after the chilly start in the morning. a bit nor cloud in the afternoon but get a temperature of 17 degrees it shouldn't feel too bad. it may be warmer in england and wales on monday but to scotland and northern ireland we will get cloud and hello and welcome to 100 days.
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brexit is under way and the eu is fighting back. "those who would challenge european unity threaten their own communities", so says the president of the european council. we must say, loud and clear, that nationalisms and separatisms which try to weaken the eu are the opposite of modern patriotism. the french president tells the british that talks on trade will only begin once the uk has agreed a divorce bill with the european union. in london, parliament prepares to convert thousands of eu laws to the uk legal system. we want a smooth and orderly exit and the great repeal bill is integral to that approach. also...

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