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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 31, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11:00: the president of the european council, donald tusk, suggests a phased strategy for brexit negotiations, allowing trade talks to begin once progress is made on the divorce deal. starting parallel talks on all issues at the same time, as suggested by some in the uk, will not happen. there's a warning that nhs waiting times will be longer for routine operations, such as hip and knee replacements, as a "trade off" for improvements and better treatment in other areas. the defence secretary michael fallon has refused to rule out future cuts to the number of royal marines in the british armed forces, we will be live at his news conference at1145 a. m. also... full steam ahead for the flying scotsman at the re—opening
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of settle—to—carlisle rail line. the world —famous train is back on its scenic route through the yorkshire dales and the eden valley, a year after a major landslip closed the line. and, recycling rockets — a californian company has made history by launching a rocket into space for a second time. good morning. it's friday, 31st march. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the eu has outlined its strategy for brexit negotiations, suggesting talks on a trade deal could begin once sufficient progress is made on a separation settlement with the uk. the draft guidelines, issued by the president of the european council donald tusk, argue for a phased approach in talks.
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the document will now be sent to the 27 member states for approval. the draft guidelines, seen by the bbc, will outline the tone of the talks ahead and say "a non—member of the union, that does not live up to the same obligations as a member, cannot have the same rights and enjoy the same benefits as a member." they also reveal the aims of the talks, saying the first phase will look at settling "the disentanglement of the united kingdom from the union and from all the rights and obligations the united kingdom derives from commitments undertaken as member state". speaking in malta earlier this morning, mr tusk acknowledged that the talks ahead would be tough. only when we have achieved sufficient progress on the withdrawal, can we discussed the framework for our future relationship. starting parallel talks on all issues at the same time, as suggested by some in the uk, will not happen.
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and when talking about our future relationship, we obviously share the uk's desire to establish a close partnership between us. strong ties reaching beyond the economy and including security cooperation, remain in our common interests. let me conclude by saying that the talks, which are about to start, will be difficult, complex and sometimes even confrontational. there is no way around it. the eu 27 does not and will not pursue a punitive approach. brexit in itself is already punitive enough. after more than a0 years of being united, we owe it to each other to do everything we can to make this divorce as smooth as possible.
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0ur correspondent chris morris is in malta, where eu leaders have been meeting. chris, four trial are to study other 27 member states outlined by donald tusk this morning. what are those, please? the biggest thing is the phase of negotiation, which runs counter to what the united kingdom and theresa may were hoping for, which is we start with separation arrangements and only if sufficient progress has been made, and it is the eu 27, donald tusk insists, not the eu 27, donald tusk insists, not the uk, which will decide what sufficient progress means. 0nly the uk, which will decide what sufficient progress means. only when that happens, perhaps in the autumn we could talk about a potential trade agreement. if those talks go well, only then could we maybe talk
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about the prospects, if it is legally necessary, he says, for a transitional arrangement. but the small print, transitional relationship means a different relationship means a different relationship in the future. it means eu laws and eu budget contributions would have to continue to apply. that would be the uk paying into the european budget, a continuing role for the european court ofjustice. like the government in london, donald tusk is saying we want an ambitious and positive partnership in the future, but this is a tough opening position. it is an opening position, it is a negotiation but it is cleared the eu, the remaining 27 believe they are clearly in control of this process. chris morris, in malta, thank you. let's cross live now to aldershot in hampshire, where simon stevens, the chief executive of nhs england
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is outlining a new strategy for the health service. we are we a re halfway we are halfway into the next steps, so we are halfway into the next steps, so let's listen in. cancer survival rates now are at a record high. heart attacks and strokes, down by 40% over the course of the last decade. we know there is pressure, we know there is a lot to be proud of, but the question is, what are the practical improvements we can make over the next several yea rs 7 we can make over the next several years? the reason we are here in aldershot this morning is because actually much of the work many of you are doing are the proof positive that the practical improvements we wa nt that the practical improvements we want can, in fact be brought about. you are already doing many of the things we want to see more of right across england. it is great to be
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here with sir andrew morris, the chief executive of frimley park hospital, which is an outstanding hospital, which is an outstanding hospital and has been helping its neighbouring hospitals become even better over the course of the last year and better over the course of the last yearand a better over the course of the last year and a half. it is great to be here with doctor gareth robinson and frank 0'connell, a local gp and paramedic, who together have teamed up paramedic, who together have teamed up to ensure that frail, older patients and people sick at home can get direct access to a paramedic in the form of frank, who i think had worked ten years prior in the ambulance service, now working directly attached to the gp surgery that doctor robinson offers. and across england, what we want over the next two years is a big expansion, not only in gps, but also in the other staff who make up the tea m in the other staff who make up the team that he see in wonderful places like this centre we are standing in.
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we are going to see, but every two, three gp practices in a town or city, they will also be able to make use of a mental health therapist, their own clinical pharmacist, more practice nurses, so the full team of staff available to patients and as pa rt staff available to patients and as part of that, the ability to get easier appointments on evenings and weekends as well as during the daytime. we know that a&e services are under real pressure. and as we speak today, around five fives and, 6000, often older people are in hospital but ready to go home if they had the right support at home, either home help or community nursing or a place in a care home. so if we can better link of what the community health services and the social care services are doing, then
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we have the ability to provide a better quality of life for some of the most vulnerable people in our country and also free up the equivalent of opening five or six new hospitals if we free up those 5000, 6000 beds. that will make a huge difference in the ability for a&e departments to make sure that people who need a bed can get one quickly. we know that cancer is a condition that is going to affect more than one in three of us in our lifetimes. so that means that i be you, your partner or family lifetimes. so that means that i be you, your partner orfamily member, we all have family experiences of cancer. although cancer survival rates are at record highs, the fact is, we can do better. in order to do better we need to, first of all, make sure people get the checkups and the screenings they need so they get diagnosed earlier. we are here with alex greenway, her team from
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mike miller can relieve who have been working in local shopping centres and parts of town to reach out to make sure people get those checkups. and also with ian laidlaw, a surgeon who has been leading the improvement of cancer services across this part of the country. dramatic improvements actually, with which the speed people then get the quality cancer care they need. and pa rt quality cancer care they need. and part of that is making sure we have the most modern equipment, cancer treatment equipment in every cancer centre across the country. so today, we are also setting out the biggest upgrade in radiotherapy machines with the details of all of the hospitals across this country which are going to get those new cancer treatment equipment over the course of the next 18 months. the country has also woken up to the fact that at least one in four of us is likely
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to have some form of mental health issue, be it stress, depression, anxiety or something more severe. we know that mental health services have often been the poor relation in the nhs. so, this morning we are being very clear that alongside improvements in a&e services and gp services and cancer services, it is time mental health gets its fair share of attention and that is why we are increasing the number of mental health therapists across the country. a big increase in the speed of which people will be able to get appointments for, mental health condition as part of the gb services, the primary care services we see in centres like this. but also, frankly, tackling the fact there is growing pressure for
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children and young people in the mental health services. in some parts of the country, children, when they need specialist care are having to travel far too far. so we are announcing an investment in a big increase of specialist young people mental health services to dramatically undercut the extent to which people have to travel far away from home to get those services. this is just from home to get those services. this isjust a from home to get those services. this is just a set of practical next steps we want to take in trying to improve care for patients in this country. we know front line staff are under pressure. we know we are going to need more doctors and nurses in the future. that is why it is so important we are increasing, by 25%, the number of places in medical school for doctors in the future. it is why it is so important we have new ways into nursing with nurse apprenticeships and today, with the chief nursing officer, who is here as well, we are announcing the launch of something called
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nursed first which is like the teach first project. and we know that there are a set of pressures to do with how much efficiency we can take out of the system. the nhs is, i believe, the most efficient health service of any major industrialised country, but despite that, every nurse, doctor, patient can still see areas where we can do better. so we have to go full speed ahead in making sure all of the money that the people of this country are making available to others in the health service, is used wisely and then putting it to work on the improvements i have talked about this morning. if we do that, i think we can be confident that trust the people of this country place in the nhs, is not only deserved by virtue of the brilliant things our staff are doing today, but will continue
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to get better in the ways we have set out. thank you very much. applause i think we have an opportunity for questions or discussion. before we come to the pros, can we come to the other pros, the staff and patients, can give russians, then the media, if that is all right? —— questions. tell people who you are.” if that is all right? —— questions. tell people who you are. i am a gp here in aldershot and medical director for the ccg. how confident are you in implementing some of these changes in other areas of the country? it is great we are developing a model of care locally,
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how about elsewhere ? developing a model of care locally, how about elsewhere? how confident are you in terms of replicating the new models? we are here in aldershot because you guys are getting it right, but there is good news, there are other parts of the country i could take you to that are as infused and active as you are. what we are wanting to do is to bring about the sorts of changes that are being led here, in every part of the country. it will have to be on a staged basis. we know that gps and community nurses, social care services and hospital outpatients, the a&e, ambulance service, when they work in fragmented units, it gives us a chance to offer better care. results out show that when we do this, it is not only better for patients, it reduces the number of people who have to go to hospital as
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an emergency admission. it relieves pressure on front line staff and means we can use a&e for the sickest patients who need it. yes, the lady at the back. hello. i am patients, i live in this area. i am a community ambassador and i am involved with a local gp practice, patient forum. i wa nt local gp practice, patient forum. i want to say very quickly, i love the nhs. it is not about trusting the nhs. it is not about trusting the nhs for me, i have an emotional attachment to it. ok? 0ne nhs for me, i have an emotional attachment to it. ok? one of the things i wondered when i was reading the paper this morning and also listening to you now, in this new plan, we hear some patients will have to wait a lot longer for surgery and other treatments. can you tell us a bit about that, please? we don't want people to be waiting longer. 0ne please? we don't want people to be waiting longer. one of the great
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triumphs of the nhs over the last ten or 15 years, we have reduced the number of people who are waiting longerfor number of people who are waiting longer for operations. the average time people wait for operations is about ten weeks. it used to be 18 months. we are going to fund more operations on the nhs over the next few years and there will be more surgeons doing them. but that is not the only thing we need to get right. what we are saying today is we also need to make sure we make progress mental health, cancer and gp services as well. hugh pym. just to pick up that point, you have indicated there are trade—offs to be made, the nhs can do so much and improved in certain areas, but on waiting times they will drift. is that something you just have to acce pt that something you just have to accept given the money and resources you have got? we have got to tackle the most urgent problems or the most
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urgent opportunities facing the nhs is right now and everybody would ee, is right now and everybody would agree, sorting out the pressures in a&e has got to be number one. having done that over the next several yea rs, done that over the next several yea rs , we done that over the next several years, we absolutely want to make sure we are expanding the availability of nonurgent operations so that we can keep waiting time is short. but there is an issue about the order in which we do it and making sure we don't lose track of the other things we have got to get right as well. can i stay on this question of what is being downgraded. as a public servant, it is yourjob to be straight with people about what they are losing. people are losing certain things on prescription and they will have to wait longer for certain operations because you are telling the health service there are priorities. what is your message to patients who will have to wait longer in pain or discomfort because there isn't
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enough money in the system? we don't wa nt enough money in the system? we don't want that, but on your first point on the question about the things gps prescribe. gps have come to us, the nhs nationally and said, there are certain things on the list of prescriptions that probably don't make sense any more. rather than these being postcode decisions made in different parts of the country, can we have a national consultation, be clear with the public about what that looks like and then have it as a polity across the nhs. that is what we are going to do and generally thinking, people will understand that when people know we need to use the money we've got four things we have been talking about this morning, we shouldn't be spending more than 100 william pounds on remedies for upset stomachs and travel sickness and other things readily available at the local chemist. operations? we
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are going to be doing more operations over the next several yea rs. operations over the next several years. that is something that is building on the fact we have very low waiting times now, probably the lowest of any major western country. most people are getting their operation within ten weeks. most people are getting their operation within ten weekslj most people are getting their operation within ten weeks. i am from itv news. you acknowledge that has to be a trade—off, given the funding you are dealing with, how soon can people expect to see improvements in a&e waiting times? sir bruce keogh has said it won't happen next year? we are seeing improvements now. at the height of winter we were fewer than nine out of ten patients getting their a&e treatment completed within four hours. now, we are back to nine out of ten and then during the course of the year, we want that to improve
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further and then during the course of next year, to get to the 95%, in other words, 19 out of 20 people within four hours. it is worth saying that we should remember we have the fastest a&e waiting times measured anywhere in the western world. so, the uk is a leader on the extent to which the nhs offers convenient access to a&e services, but what we are saying is, we cannot solve this problem byjust solving a&e, we have to look at the community services, free up 5000, 6000 hospital beds that are out of action and if we do those things, over the course of the year, we will see improvements. catherine jones from channel five news. see improvements. catherine jones from channelfive news. unique key people for this, you need mental health nurses, there is a shortage. who need radiologists, there is a shortage, unique district nurses,
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there is a shortage. where will you get these people from now? not in twe nty20 get these people from now? not in twenty20 when the train, but now particularly as you cannot get them from the eu? we have been clear about what the extra staff are we can bring into providing patient services over the next year and two yea rs. services over the next year and two years. this is not a few years off, this is what is happening this coming year. that is why we will see another 1300 clinical pharmacists working with gp surgeries and communities like we see today here. and another 1500 mental health therapists working in these community health settings over the next two years. not in five or ten yea rs, next two years. not in five or ten years, but two years. paul kelso from sky news. the obvious conclusion what you are saying is there isn't enough money, and rather than having this conversation with
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patients and tell them what they won't get an telling staff how hard they will have to work, shouldn't you may this case the government and say, you have to spend more money in the nhs? we are doing this in a very public way, we are saying these are the things that realistically other practical improvements the nhs can bring about over the next 12 and 2a months. we think it is right that a&e and access to your family doctor and cancer services and mental health are areas the public want us to improve. that is why we will put our shoulders to the wheel to make those practical changes for people across the country. what do you say to the government about money? we are saying these are the things the nhs can improve over the next couple of years. nhs can improve over the next couple of yea rs. we nhs can improve over the next couple of years. we understand the budget for the nhs has been set for the year ahead. within that budget, he is how1.3 year ahead. within that budget, he is how 1.3 million staff are going to do the work for the people we all look after. you are not making the
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case for more funding when it is so clear that solves some of the issues you are setting out today? what we are doing today is setting out the actions we can take with the funding the nhs has got. we know the nhs is an incredibly efficient and in some ways, low—cost health service. we know that despite that, there is some waste and opportunity to improve. and all the good things, if you talk to the surgeons, volunteers, paramedics and the doctors, nurses and others sitting here this morning, they will tell you these are changes they can make right now. we want to see more of that across the country. right now. we want to see more of that across the countrylj right now. we want to see more of that across the country. i am a gp in at that across the country. i am a gp inata that across the country. i am a gp in at a surgery here in aldershot i am also clinical lead for mental health, so i am gratified to hear the focus on mental health. we live
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ina very the focus on mental health. we live in a very deprived area, one of the tenth deprived in the country. how doi tenth deprived in the country. how do i tell a patient who has got housing problems, employment problems, take a pill or refer to the mental health service? that is not going to work. can you guarantee to work with the social sector so we don't get any more cuts on that site? you make an important point. the health service can help prevent illness and help people when they get sick, but a lot of that depends on having a job, housing, good schools for your kids. what happens across the rest of society has an impact on how we live and who gets ill. so yes, what we have got to do is break down some of the barriers between what the nhs has been doing and what local authorities and the volu nta ry and what local authorities and the voluntary sector are doing. where
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that happens, we see big improvement. so what we're trying to do today is bring that about, right across the country over the course of the next several years. thank you very much, it is great to have a chance to meet and chat and we will carry on our discussions just now. studio—macro simon stephens, head of the nhs in england talking about his plans for the next two years in the nhs. they are halfway through the five—year plan he outlined two and a half years ago. but circumstances have changed. he was talking about making sure money is used wisely. as you have heard, reported today that there is a warning waiting times could be longerfor there is a warning waiting times could be longer for routine operations such as hip and knee replacements as a trade—off for improvements in other areas. so he was outlining areas where there will be investment such as mental health services, mental health the children
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and young people. but hoped routine operations would not be affected, but warned that they could be. we will bring you lots of analysis throughout the morning. but some breaking news, the driver of the bin lorry that crashed in glasgow in 2014, killing, you will remember six people has been given a community sentence for a separate driving incident. harry clarke, who is 60, had his licence revoked following the crash in glasgow. he admitted culpable and reckless driving nine months after the crash. because neighbours had reported him to police after seeing him getting into his carand police after seeing him getting into his car and drive onto the road from a private car park at his home in the east end of glasgow. so in his defence, harry clarke said he had driven 30 yards from the car park to his front door. but his licence had
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been revoked following the fatal crash in glasgow. he has been given a community sentence including 150 hours of unpaid work for that separate incidents of culpable and reckless driving. let's see how the weather is shaping up let's see how the weather is shaping up as we head into the weekend. the weekend is not looking too bad but we might need our umbrella at some point. but there is some sunshine as well. there is some sunshine as well. there is some sunshine for this afternoon but it is not a perfect day. we have had rain across western and northern areas and now it has pushed into scotland. it has been raining in northern ireland and scotland but the weather has improved so you have some sunshine here as well. but the best of the weather i think will be across england, certainly these eastern areas. cooler compared to what we had yesterday. top
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temperature, maybe squeezing out 18. yesterday we had 22.1, so quite a bit warmer. the nights, a few showers getting into western areas with clear spells around. not raining everywhere. around eight or nine in city centres but in the countryside, it could be as low as 5 degrees. 0n countryside, it could be as low as 5 degrees. on saturday, sunshine and showers so very hit and miss. some will get rain, some will not get any rain at all. but sunday is looking brighter and dry across the country. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines now: the president of the european council, donald tusk, has suggested a phased strategy for brexit negotiations. he says any discussions on future deals must remain on hold until the terms of the uk's departure are finalised. starting parallel talks on all
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issues at the same time, as suggested by some in the uk, will not happen. there's a warning that nhs waiting times will be longer for routine operations, such as hip and knee replacements, as a trade—off for improvements and better treatment in other areas. the defence secretary michael fallon has refused to rule out cuts to the number of royal marines in the british armed forces. we'll be live at his news conference with american defence secretary james matiss at 11.45am. the flying scotsman is up and running again on the settle to carlisle railway line. it's more than a year since a major landslip close the route. and recycling rockets. a californian company has made history by launching a rocket into space for a second time. now it's time to sport. we can get
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all the latest from jessica. joanna konta continues to impress. she's become the first british woman to reach the miami 0pen final. konta beat venus williams, and will now play caroline wozniacki for the title. amazing to think konta was just six years old when williams first won this tournament 19 years ago. konta has said venus is one of her all time heroes, but dispatched of her opponent in straight sets. i was very happy to have come through that. i wasn't able to serve it out the first time that the second time around i was able to soakit second time around i was able to soak it is relief and excitement that i get to be part of the last day of the tournament. in the men's tournament roger federer‘s great run of form continued with a three set win over tomas berdych. federer will play nick kyrgios in the semifinals late this evening the enigmatic australian was at his crowd pleasing best during his win against alexander zverev, producing an array
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of astonishing shots. just watch this. iam i am reliably informed that that particular shot is called a hot dog. iam sure particular shot is called a hot dog. i am sure viewers will correct me if iam wrong. i am sure viewers will correct me if i am wrong. i wonder he will will try such amazing shots against someone like roger federer? we will find out. what a couple of years it's been for manchester city women. they did the league and cup double last season, now they're through to the semifinals of the champions league in their debut season. lucy bronze headed home the only goal of the match against fortuna hjerring, to give them a 2—0 aggregate win over the danish side. next up city face the reigning champions lyon. and their captain steph horton is excited by the challenge. we don't stop here. we are excited
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to be involved in a semifinal and we know that they are a very experienced team and we have a team full of world—class individuals as well so it will be an excited game for sure. a shocking claim from stoke city striker saido berahino. he served an eight week doping ban earlier this season whilst at his former club west brom, but he says it was because his drink was spiked in a nightclub. berahino insists that there was such a small amount in his system, it proves he couldn't have taken the drug intentionally. for me to get banned for something that you really haven't done is hard to take. so it was spiked? guild definitely. if i was going to get high, like the specialist said, you would have taken an amount where there was enough in your system to get high but it was really low so why would you want to take someone get up buzz off it? that was the question, but because i am in the
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premier league, the fa have two zero tolerance. and you can watch the the full interview on football focus on bbc one on saturday from 12.00pm. premier league clubs feel aggrieved at the lack of recognition for their community work, according to chief executive richard scudamore. he was speaking at the launch of premier league primary stars, a scheme to provide teaching resources to 10,000 primary schools by 2019. we have the power to energise and motivate people, particularly young people. because we can we should and thatis people. because we can we should and that is why we are doing it and the other programmers to make sure the schools engage and make the scheme a success and hopefully some minds will alternate toward some of the things that the premier league stands for. england's charley hull is in contention at the first women's major of the year, the ana inspiration in california. she's three shots off the lead. but the woman grabbing the headlines is this young golfer. this is south korean amateur seong eun—jeong.
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and she made a hole in one at the fifth. she liked that. she really enjoyed it. yes. she's only 17. that's all the sport for now. thank you. loved that hotdog tennis shot! scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has signed a letter to theresa may formally requesting a second independence referendum. in it ms sturgeon repeats her call for a vote within the next two years. the prime minister has already said it won't happen before brexit is complete. a man remains in a critical but stable condition in hospital after being stabbed in the chest and back at his home in stourbridge in the west midlands. peter wilkinson's wife tracey and his teenage son pierce were killed in the attack. detectives are continuing to question a man in his 20s, who was arrested nearby.
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the foreign secretary borisjohnson is in brussels for a meeting of nato foreign ministers. among those joining mrjohnson will be the new us secretary of state rex tillerson, who'd earlier said he was too busy to attend. he's expected to repeat a call for european countries to pay more for defence. opening the meeting, secretary general of nato, jens stoltenberg, said it was in the interest of europe to spend more on defence. increased spending is not about policing the united states, it is about investing more in the european security because it is important for europe. europe is close to the turmoil and the violence that we see in north africa and the middle east and iraq and syria and europe is close to a more assertive russia, willing to use force against her neighbour in the ukraine. so
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investing in defence is in the interest of europe. president trump's former national security adviser has offered to give evidence about possible links between the trump campaign and russia, if he's given protection from what has been called unfair prosecution. general michael flynn was forced to resign in february after he misled the vice—president over phone conversations he'd had with the russian ambassador. his lawyer says he has a story to tell. more now on our top story. theresa may has suffered an early setback in her brexit negotiations, after the european union ruled out discussing any future trade deal at the same time as finalising the terms of the uk's withdrawal from the eu. the negotiating position was announced by the european council president, donald tusk, who is in malta. 0ur europe correspondent, chris morris asked mr tusk for more detail about his strategy. president task, your document talks
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about the fact that there will be no separate negotiations between individual member states and the uk. you talked a lot about unity in the past week but this makes it sound like you are worried that the uk will try to pick off individual countries and have those kind of negotiations. how can you be sure it will not happen? secondly the document talks about you won't move on to document talks about you won't move ontoa document talks about you won't move on to a second favour of negotiation involving trade talks on future trade relationships until sufficient progress has been made in the initial phase, what does an initial —— sufficient progress mink was an act is it simply the european council who will define it? this is my first divorce and i hope the last one. this is why i want to be very cautious and precise and use my notes. first of all, when it comes
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to our unity notes. first of all, when it comes to ourunity and notes. first of all, when it comes to our unity and solidarity i have no doubt, especially after our summit in rome, and after our rome declaration that this is not only a declaration that this is not only a declaration or propaganda but this is the truth, that all 27 want and will be united during the negotiations and i have no doubt that this is in our common interest, but also in the interest of the uk. if they want to achieve constructive agreement it means that they should discuss and negotiate only with the 27 asa discuss and negotiate only with the 27 as a unity. this is the only way to achieve anything during this very difficult process. from my side it is obvious that the british government is in contact with all member states. i don't think that
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there is any instruction from brussels or any institution not to have regular and normal relationships with our british counterparts. we will continue to engage with the united kingdom and i think all member states will. but this is a clear demarcation line. when it comes to negotiations on this issue, on brexit and on future relationships there is a clear congress from the 27 to have just one point of contact. that negotiation is led exclusively from the european side and i do believe, as donald hasjust said, that this is not something of lip surface, but this is a true political commitment from each side. when it comes to your question on sufficient
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progress. yes, we are seeing that the sufficient progress is determined exclusively by the european council. . iwant determined exclusively by the european council. . i want to be very clear, it must be clear that you, as the 27, decide if sufficient progress has been achieved. probably in the autumn, at least i hope so. donald tusk. teaching assistants are facing challenges as a result of growing financial pressures across the education system. unions also say teacher shortages and budget cuts mean too many are being left to teach classes on their own. the department for education says savings can be made without having to cut posts. with me is peter morris a support staff representative at the atl education union. thank you forjoining us. what sort of evidence do you have that
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teaching assistants are being required and asked to teach classes instead of a teacher? we conduct an annual survey of our own members and our own support staff members and the increasing trend is upwards in terms of all forms of teaching assista nts terms of all forms of teaching assistants and sometimes even admin staff and librarians and other grades being corralled into taking full classes and effectively teaching, to all intents and purposes. the survey we conducted long last year showed that cover supervisors, which are a form of teaching assistant, nearly four fifths were saying that when they ta ke fifths were saying that when they take classes, when they are in front of classes they are actually teaching and not just of classes they are actually teaching and notjust covering the class and minding the class and working to preset plans etc. massive numbers. i don't know what sort of notice they are given of being required to do this, but obviously teachers prepare lesson plans and teaching assistants may not have the
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opportunity to do that, so what is the impact on the quality of education? it is a very severe impact. it is the impact in terms of having people, teaching assistants and others, who are not qualified and others, who are not qualified and trained to deliver lessons and there is also an issue around, as you say, the preparation of lessons, which is an exclusive teacher pravin tambe often support staff are thrown in at the deep end and expected to get on with it. i must apologise, we have to leave you because we need to go to lancaster house for a news conference that is being held. the defence secretary michael fallon is meeting his american counterpart generaljames mattis in london today. britain and the us are to step up calls for other nato member states to meet the alliance's target on defence spending to counter russian aggression and the threat of terrorism. they're just about to give a press conference. 0ur prime minister wants to agree a deep and special partnership with
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the european union encompassing not just economic, but security cooperation. when our security is more fragile than at any time since the end of the cold war, it is in both of our interests to bolster this partnership. but this historic week is also an opportunity for us to build a global britain. 0ur armed forces embody that internationalist approach, from afghanistan to south sudan servicemen and women are working with allies and friends to defend the international rules —based system. we have no close friend than the united states. our relationship endures because it is founded firmly on the values that we share in common and last week ‘s terrorist attack at westminster,
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which claimed the lives of four citizens, including us citizen curt cochrane, reminds us that those values are under attack. we began today by reviewing our international effo rts today by reviewing our international efforts to confront global aggression and extremism. in iraq and syria we stand shoulder to shoulder as leading members of the counter daesh coalition. today daesh is failing, in iraq it is clinging onto its last stronghold, although 40% of west mosul has now been liberated and hundreds of thousands are returning to their homes. meanwhile our two nations are providing reassurance to our eastern european allies in the wake of russian aggression. we are leading nato ‘s enhanced forward presence. by nato ‘s enhanced forward presence. by next week britain will have 800
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troops in estonia and 150 personnel ina troops in estonia and 150 personnel in a reconnaissance squadron serving alongside us forces in poland. in may we will send four rsa —— raf typhoons to romania as part of the mission to protect blacks keith —— black sea skies which is part of the biggest deployment in eastern europe since the end of the cold war. the second item on our agenda was about making the nato alliance fitter and faster. pharaoh burden sharing is the key here. only five members of nato meet the 2% target and the us and the ua are among them. our defence budget here in britain grows every year and remains the biggest in europe, but secretaryjames mattis and i have agreed that others must now raise their game and those failing to meet 2% commitment so far
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should at least agree to year on terms increases. —— year—on—year real terms increases. we have also agreed that nato must modernise and streamline its military structures to ensure faster decision—making. we must take a 360 degrees view of all of the security threats that face us. nato has the experience and resources to combat international terror. finally secretary james mattis and i agreed steps for an even more dynamic bilateral relationship. 0ur collaboration is already as deep as it is broad, our troops serve together around the world. we cooperate on everything from intelligence and innovation to nuclear and conventional capability. 0ur joint
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nuclear and conventional capability. 0urjoint work on the f 35 fighter isa 0urjoint work on the f 35 fighter is a prime example. i was immensely proud when the united kingdom recently proud when the united kingdom rece ntly wo n proud when the united kingdom recently won the f 35 maintenance, repairand recently won the f 35 maintenance, repair and overhaul contract and was appointed the hub of all european f 35 ‘s. but there is more to come to the deep end that relationship even further. today i am announcing a £90 million contract for bae systems to support the upkeep of these fifth generation fighters, sustaining hundreds of highly skilled jobs and keeping that great partnership flying high. at the end of this year we will own 14 f35 aircraft and i welcome the continued commitment of the united states to deploying them on the first operational deployment of hms queen elizabeth in 2021. let me say in conclusion, almost exactly 100 years ago america joined the
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allied effort to fight for victory in the great war. 100 years later, ata time in the great war. 100 years later, at a time of unprecedented uncertainty we continue to stand together. today we are accelerating our endeavours so that we can continue fighting for freedom side—by—side now and far into the future. thank you for the very warm welcome on this, my first visit to your country as the secretary of defence. i have been many times to the united kingdom, building my respect and affection each visit, and the close cooperation between our two military highlights the special relationship between our countries. it is good to be standing beside you, especially at this time and place, soon after a senseless murder kill citizens of both of our
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countries. the united states and the united kingdom stand together in good times and bad, united by values that took root here so long ago. i am grateful for the determination of our two countries to defend those values down through the generations because we stand here together today to show that our people are worthy successors to those past generations that defended the freedom that we enjoy today. i cannot visit this country without a sense of humility and respect for the uk lives lost since america was attacked in 2001, andl since america was attacked in 2001, and i am speaking about your troops here. we in america acknowledge and deeply respect the uk families that have lost their loved ones, and those grievously wounded. 0n have lost their loved ones, and those grievously wounded. on behalf of the american people i thank the people of this country for being with us to confront our foes. if necessary we will follow them to the ends of the earth to stop their mayhem. britain's global leadership
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role is as needed today as at any time in history. in the words of president reagan, the essence of our special relationship is a special concern for democracy and liberty and that includes the responsibility to pass those freedoms intact to the next generation. we see each other on an equal footing in our assessment of the security challenges and in crafting our partnerships way ahead. because our two nations are boardwalks against the maniacs who think by hurting us they can scare cars. but they do not understand and we do not scare. to paraphrase one of your former wartime leaders, as descendants of allow domain and normandy and iwo jima and many other challenges, our people are not made of cotton candy. the special relationship between our countries is not a historic
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artefact. it is a source of strength today between our two nations, committed to standing together in defence of our freedoms and it is demonstrated daily in our military to military interactions, such as you noted, and across a host of domains, never taking the special relationship for granted at any time. in fact, our relationship grows in strength with the commitments we make and the threats we share in trying times. sir michael and ijust finished a highly productive meeting that he summarised, one in which we shared a mutual appreciation for the security challenges that we jointly face as strong members of the nato alliance. in that regard i point to britain's leadership in the european reassurance initiative, providing a formidable reinforcements of our celtic allies. with our shared history and values and shared commitments we will always stand
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together with our british allies, bound by inseparable ties of friendship. thank you. we have time for a few questions. generaljames mattis, first to you, back in 2012, when i think you are still in uniform, and when asked what the three gravest threats facing the united states were, you said iran, iran. now you're out of uniform and ina suit iran. now you're out of uniform and in a suit and defence secretary, and in light of their recent ballista ill missile threats, what you going to do about it? and also the eu has said deal or no deal, security across europe will not be affected. the british government has said if there is no deal, that will weaken security, can you clarify the british governmental position and explain why it is not a threat. iran, at the time when i spoke about
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iran, at the time when i spoke about irani iran, at the time when i spoke about iran i was commander of us central command and that was the primary exporter of terrorism, frankly. it was the primary state sponsor of terrorism act, and it continues that kind of behaviour today. in the larger scheme of things obviously in a global situation it is dynamic and you have highlighted appropriately i think the north korean threat. this isa think the north korean threat. this is a threat both rhetoric and growing capability and we will be working with the international community to address this. we are doing so right now and working through the united nations and working with our allies and we are working with our allies and we are working diplomatically, including with those that we might be able to enlist in this effort to get north korea under control, but right now it appears to be going in a very, very reckless manner in what its conduct is portraying for the future and it has to be stopped. as far as
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the european union is concerned, we benefit at the moment here, and europe benefits from the cooperation between our police forces, our intelligence and securities services and from the judicial arrangements that allow us to have criminals that we wa nt that allow us to have criminals that we want to have tried here returned to us. we benefit from those arrangements and we want to see that cooperation continue. if there is no deal on that then we are all weekend, we are weaker here and europe is weakened because that is a joint effort to tackle organised crime and to combat terrorism. what we are seeking in these negotiations isa we are seeking in these negotiations is a deep and special partnership with the remaining european union on both economic issues and on security. now let's take an american
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question. a question for both of you, if i may, in recent days we have heard of concerns about russian threats to european allies and the need for the united states to increase its military presence on a permanent basis, not just rotational, but permanent. although decisions may not have been made about this sort of thing, as a general matter, do you think it is time for the us to increase its permanent military presence footprint in europe? also may i ask you both about the alleged russian violation of the inf treaty. realising that this is a us/ russian treaty by itself, nevertheless, do you think it is the sort of thing that requires some kind of response in kind in terms of missile deployments in europe. 0n the same
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matter, is it time for the united states to exit that treaty? certainly. thank you. russia's violations of international law are now a matter of record, from what happened with crimea to other aspects of their behaviour in mucking around in other people's elections and that sort of thing. the point i would make is that stands united and the transatlantic bondis stands united and the transatlantic bond is united... we will continue to listen to james mattis and michael fallon here on the bbc news channel but we first say goodbye to the on bbc two. —— the viewers on bbc two. on the inf issue we are in consultation with our allies and we are still formulating the way ahead. it will be addressed very soon, as a
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matter of the highest level concern. so far as enhanced forward presence is concerned, we want to see that presents as persistent to the threat as it is designed to deal with, to reassure those allies on our eastern flank and to deter the kind of russian aggression we have seen recently. military build—up, use of hybrid techniques and indeed, interference through cyber and other techniques. so, we need to stand up that presents for as long as is needed. as far as the inf treaty is concerned, we reviewed that in our meeting this morning and we look forward to the more formal response from the united states and we do think it is something that needs to be taken forward. notjust by the united states but by nato in general
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once we have those violations confirmed. now, a british question, the daily mail. one of your generals has said russia may be arming the taliban in afghanistan and there is also the presence of islamic state in the country. how concerned are you buy these factors and what will you buy these factors and what will you do about it? sir michael, the same question for you about russia and will be uk send combat troops back to afghanistan as it steps up its global role post—brexit? thank you. we have seen russian activity via the taliban. i am not willing to say at this point if it has manifested into weapons and that sort of thing, but certainly, what they are up to their in light of their other activities gives us concerned. i would just say we look to engaging with russia on a
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political or diplomatic level. but right now russia is choosing to be a strategic competitor and we are finding that we can only have very modest expectations at this point, the areas we can cooperate with russia, contrary to how we were ten years ago, five years ago. it is no longer a cooperative engagement with them right now, it is where we will have to carve out diplomatically, some manoeuvre room , have to carve out diplomatically, some manoeuvre room, assuming russia can change its behaviour and act in accordance with international norms and international law. thanks, there isa and international law. thanks, there is a pattern of interference now by russia. in different parts of the globe. it needs is to be, when we engage with russia, wary of what russia is up to. that is why there cannot be, at the moment, any return to business as usual with russia. we
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work with russia to decrypt in areas where russian aviation may be involved on the edge of our flight information region or in syria. we engage with russia in discussions about parts of the world where russia has great influence. but otherwise, we need to be extremely watchful now of this persistent pattern of russian interference. you had a second part to your question? no, we are not committing combat troops back in afghanistan. last year, we increased our presence in afghanistan and we continue to wait for advice on the continuation of resolute support for 2018. as you know, we are helping staff the officer academy, we assist in counterterrorism and we are engaged
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in supplying most of the kabul protection force, but we're not planning to return to combat in afghanistan. now, final question please from reuters, phil stewart. thank you. just follow up on that la st thank you. just follow up on that last question on afghanistan. we note general nicholson will support more forces in afghanistan. secretary, would you support more forces? and to both of you, the previous long—standing policy in syria has been president assad must go. could you boat bring us up today, is that still the policy? if it has changed in any way, is the concerns as far as the islamic state fight benefits president assad, should he be around for the long term? on the question about the more forces for afghanistan, at the suggestion and recommendations coming into us from the nato
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commander in the field have been received and we are reviewing those right now with our chairman of the joint chiefs. obviously in light of our relationship with the uk, we always engage with them on issues like this, simply because we consider them an equal partner. their advice is always solicited. it doesn't come down to the number of troops in the field, so we will be working with our allies on the issue. we have not made a decision, i have not put a recommendation forward to our president at this time. andl forward to our president at this time. and i would say on the president assad issue, we are working this one day at a time as free throw isis onto the back foot. they have every intention of striking externally from the region and that immediate threat goes to europe and we are going to have to keep them on the back foot and that is what we are concentrating on at this point. thank you, the priority
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is to eliminate the threat from isis to syria and western europe which is why it is so important, the campaign to isolate and liberate iraq continues its momentum. we don't see a long—term future in syria for someone who has been bombing his own civilians, on the contrary. what we seek is a wider and political solution which can embrace all factions in syria and lead syria to a better and hopefully more democratic future. thank you all for your questions. thank you very much. defence secretary michael fallon and his us counterpart james matt is talking widely about possible deployments or otherwise of us and british troops. they talked also, one of the key aspects on their agenda about the future of nato.
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michael fallon talking about making the nato alliance fitter and faster with further burden sharing. the key to that, but the us and the uk talking about insisting allies in nato must move towards a target of spending 2% of gdp on defence. so that was a brief summary of that meeting at lancaster house. but now onto the main story. the eu has outlined its strategy for brexit negotiations, arguing for a phased approach to the talks. the president of the european council, donald tusk, insisted the first stage would concentrate on the uk's divorce from the union and only when there was sufficient progress would the talks move on. the government had said it wants to discuss its separation and a future trade deal at the same time. the draft guidelines, which will outline the tone of the negotiations for the member states, says "the european council will monitor progress closely and determine when sufficient progress has been achieved to allow negotiations to proceed to the next phase." speaking in malta earlier this
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morning, mr tusk acknowledged that the talks ahead would be tough. only when we have achieved sufficient progress on the withdrawal, can we discussed the framework for our future relationship. starting parallel talks on all issues at the same time, as suggested by some in the uk, will not happen. and when talking about our future relationship, we obviously share the uk's desire to establish a close partnership between us. strong ties reaching beyond the economy and including security cooperation, remain in our common interests. let me conclude by saying that the talks, which are about to i can speak now to lord hannay
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from open europe, a think tank that calls for reform of the eu. give us your first impressions of what donald tusk had to say? give us your first impressions of what donald tusk had to sawm brings home to anyone who doubted it how difficult and daunting this article 50 negotiation is going to be. it does cast a lot of doubt on some of the positions that have been set up by the government, particularly in the prime minister's lancaster house speech. less so in her letter to donald tusk, which was phrased more carefully and did not ta ke phrased more carefully and did not take an absolutist position on things like the european court of justice jurisdiction and on various other issues, which are going to
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bedevilled this negotiation. on the priorities donald tusk identified that the 27 members of the eu including the rights of eu citizens in the uk and vice versa, preventing a vacuum of laws and the republic of ireland are three of the priorities. and sufficient progress to be made on all of those before the talks can move on. how long do you anticipate that initial phase could take?|j don't think this rigid sequencing mentioned now will be sustainable. i don't think that position would stand up to the tests of negotiation. i don't see any reluctance on the uk cover‘s part to talk about
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northern ireland, the uk border. there is no reluctance to do that, but making a rigid division between that and the new partnership will, i think be unsustainable over time. so you think those parallel talks that donald tusk talked about earlier today and said that will not happen, talks on trade except, before these priority issues are dealt with, you think there will be a blurring of the lines? i would be surprised if there was not. if you follow the logic of the rigid separation, you will find that the whole of the period is likely to be used up on the first three priority items and yet article 50 requires the european union, that is all others to relate the divorce proceedings to the new relationship. it has got to be done. that is what article 50 says has to be done. as i say, i don't think the rigid separation will prove
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sustainable over time, but i don't think it is worth having an enormous row about it now because i think nature itself will bring all the issues onto the table. ok, thank you very much for your time. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. what were the key parts of that statement from donald tusk for you? one of the things he said was that pa rt one of the things he said was that part of the negotiations wouldn't happen. this was from a demand from theresa may to have negotiations are effectively on trade, our future relationship with the european union going alongside negotiations on, if you like, the divorce bill on britain leaving the european union. that is what she asked for. in his d raft that is what she asked for. in his draft guidelines, key has been very
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clear about what he says. on page four of those draft guidelines, he says clearly, the first phase of negotiations will aim to settle the disentanglement of the united kingdom from the eu, from the right and obligation the uk derives as a member state and give as much clarity as possible. then he goes on to say, crucially the european council will monitor progress and determine when sufficient progress has been achieved to allow negotiations to proceed to the next phase. effectively that means, not just no parallel negotiations, but u nless just no parallel negotiations, but unless the uk counts on the 27 other members, unless they are satisfied with that progress, they will not even begin negotiating on trade and their future relationship and that
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negotiation will not be concluded until after britain formally leaves the european union. so we had from lord hannay, he was quite upbeat about the fact the negotiations may have to collapse into each other. but the opening salvo from the european council is very clear, that pa rt european council is very clear, that part of the negotiations theresa may was looking for are simply not going to happen, according to these draft guidelines. borisjohnson to happen, according to these draft guidelines. boris johnson has to happen, according to these draft guidelines. borisjohnson has been speaking in the last hour or so and he remained upbeat about britain's prospects. donald tusk has said he doesn't expect the negotiations with britain to be punitive, because brexit will be punitive enough. to be punitive, because brexit will be punitive enoughlj to be punitive, because brexit will be punitive enough. i havejust to be punitive, because brexit will be punitive enough. i have just come from germany where i have had some good discussions with some of our counterparts. they were very struck by the positive tone and substance of the prime minister's article 50 letter. i think we really are moving
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forward now and there is a lot of goodwill, a lot of willingness to achieve what the prime minister has said she wants to achieve, which is an orderly transition and then a deep and special partnership between a strong eu and a strong uk. thanks very much, everybody. borisjohnson boris johnson accentuating borisjohnson accentuating the positive, but we have had the first tangible proof of some of the difficulties in this process that will lie ahead. some of the confrontations, as donald tusk himself put it. thank you very much, ian. donald trump has been tweeting about his former national security adviser, who you may remember was sacked not longer at he was appointed because he was found to have misled the vice president over
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conversations he, michael flynn, had had with the russian ambassador. donald trump saying michael flynn should ask for unity in that this is a witchhunt. michael flynn's lawyer has said his client has a story to tell about alleged contacts between the trump presidential campaign and russia. but he wants immunity from prosecution if he is going to tell that story. so donald trump is saying michael flynn should ask for unity in that this is a witchhunt by media and democrats of historic proportion. so donald trump blaming the media the democrats for all of this. he has previously called these allegations about links between his campaign and russia fake news. patients will have to wait longer for routine operations, such as hip and knee replacements, as a "trade off" so improvements can be made in other areas like a&e. that's according to the head of nhs england, simon stevens, who is today setting out a strategy for the next few years.
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alexandra mackenzie has more. hugh pym has been speaking to him. we do once more operations and more surgeons, but we need extra funding to bring about improvements in cancer outcomes. we know that in mental health, particularly for children and young people, but people with anxiety, depression or stress, we can make services more convenient and that will make a huge difference to people'slives. so we have an advance on several fronts, not just choose have an advance on several fronts, notjust choose one over the other. what is your message about the waiting time targets and letting it slip? we are committed to the idea you should be able to get quick
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operations on the nhs, building on the huge progress that has been made over the last ten or 15 years. it used to be a case you will be waiting for your hip or cataract operation for a year or two years. now the average wait for an operation is ten weeks. so we have made huge progress and we want to build on that but we recognise it is not the only thing we need to do over the next few years. but might more patients be waiting longer and feeling more pain and might they be very disappointed with this? what we need to do is fix the most urgent problems first and i think most people can see ensuring our a&e and gp services are able to look after people across the country. it has got to be the top priority. having done that, obviously in the period ahead, we want to be able to also make sure we are meeting the waiting
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time guarantees that are the fastest guarantee for patients that any western country offers. simon stephens talking to hugh pym. let's talk to jonathan ashworth at westminster. do you think there has to bea westminster. do you think there has to be a trade—off in order to provide the range of nhs services? no, what we are seeing is quite appalling. it will mean many elderly people waiting in discomfort, waiting in pain for hip replacements, knee replacements, ca ta ra ct replacements, knee replacements, cataract operations. operations of that order. it is a direct consequence of the financial squeeze being imposed on the nhs by this conservative government. i have no criticism of nhs bosses like simon stephens, they are faced with huge dilemmas. but dying have huge amount of criticism of the government. if
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they give the nhs is the money it needs, and if they have not broken that promise on nhs funding, we wouldn't be in this situation. where wouldn't be in this situation. where would labour find the wouldn't be in this situation. where would labourfind the money wouldn't be in this situation. where would labour find the money from? being in government is a matter of choices. it has given away tax cuts for the rich, inheritance tax cuts, iam saying, for the rich, inheritance tax cuts, i am saying, when you have people waiting on trolleys in corridors, ambulances backed up outside hospitals, as we have seen in recent weeks, should those tax cuts be the priority? the nhs is on its knees, do something about it, make a different set of choices and give it the money it needs. patients deserve better. simon stephens was speaking in aldershot where he said it was a good example of an area that had got ahead of this joint working to improve services for nhs patients. does the nhs itself need to do more work on that before it asks for
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extra make? we want to see more joined up working and there are good exa m ples of joined up working and there are good examples of joined up joined up working and there are good examples ofjoined up working going on across the country and it should be rolled out. but there are exa m ples of be rolled out. but there are examples of things going wrong. the local hospital in jeremy examples of things going wrong. the local hospital injeremy hunt's backyard had to put patients in the gymnasium at this winter. that is how bad it is. the government say it is just how bad it is. the government say it isjust a small how bad it is. the government say it is just a small number of incidents, it is not, we have seen a crisis in the nhs across—the—boa rd. it is not, we have seen a crisis in the nhs across—the—board. now we are seeing waiting list targets being abandoned, targets being jettisoned and it is not good enough. it is a consequence of the government's underfunding of the nhs and their inability to get a grip of the staffing crisis. something that will only get worse with brexit as more and more nurses and doctors who work in the nhs from the eu, vote with their feet and leave. in the nhs from the eu, vote with theirfeet and leave. we havejust seen more figures that record numbers of eu staff are leaving the nhs. if that continues, we will have
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real problems in the nhs. jonathan ashworth, shadow health secretary, thank you very much. with me is nile dixon. jonathan ashworth, in his interview, do you think there has to be a trade—off as things stand in the nhs? yes, you cannot expect the nhs to do everything. the fact it is experiencing restricted funding, enormous pressures and hugely rising demand. that cocktail of factors means you then have to look at if you want to do some things, then there are other things you may not be able to do. it was inevitable the government would look at some of the targets. i hope we're not going back toa targets. i hope we're not going back to a period 17 or so years ago when
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people waited 18 months rather than the 18 week target at the moment. but some movement on that, hopefully a small movement. i think it is inevitable. we should remind our view is that 18 week target is not being abandoned but people are being warned it could slip. and the sort of announcements that simon stephens stalking about this morning, he talked about some cancer services, investment in mental health services for children and young people. would he be able to announce those if he wasn't also saying these targets might slip? it is a complex set of bala nces might slip? it is a complex set of balances you have strike. but you cannot start asking a service that is already very stretched to start doing new things. even meeting the new cancer targets, as it were, will bea new cancer targets, as it were, will be a stretch for the system. i think it is perfectly reasonable for nhs england to identify areas where it thinks there are priorities. it is
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also fair enough to say there are inefficiencies in the system that need to be tackled. our members would recognise that. even if every inefficiency in the system was tackled, that would not make up the shortfall. what is the amount of money you think the nhs, realistically needs to try to get everything to the level people like simon stephens, that every nhs worker would like? we certainly think there is a shortfall in the amount of money and simon stephens alluded to this, that the government itself was promising. the amount of money going to the service this year isa money going to the service this year is a smaller proportion than last year and it will be even smaller in 2018 and 19. so pressures will increase. our priority was to put money into social care. to be fair, the government put £2 billion into
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social care in the announcement in the budget but it still leaves a health care system which is over rall, underfunded. is it fair to say when simon stephens set out his five—year plan two years ago, that the particular pressures on the nhs he envisaged then, they have changed? yes, i think we have all underestimated just how much the cumulation of factors, mostly of elderly people, who are living longer, but have as well as healthy life years, also unhealthy life yea rs. life years, also unhealthy life years. the system at the moment is not geared up to deal with that and thatis not geared up to deal with that and that is why nhs england is right to suggest we need a morejoined up system suggest we need a morejoined up syste m tha n suggest we need a morejoined up system than we have had in the past. thank you very much indeed for your thoughts on that story today. a man remains in a critical but stable condition in hospital after being stabbed in the chest and back at his home in stourbridge in the west midlands.
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peter wilkinson's wife tracey and son pierce were killed in the attack. detectives are continuing to question a man in his 20s who was arrested nearby. i shot time ago we heard from the headteacher at redhill school who paid tribute to pierce. pierce was a loyal and caring member of the school. he met everybody with a smile and was kind and thoughtful young man. he was passionate about his football team, west bromwich albion and was devoted to his pet greyhound dog. he was a loving son and brother and our thoughts and prayers remain with his friends and family, especially his father peter and his sister lydia. today the school is open for pupils and we have people here to offer support and professional help. i would like
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to thank everybody in our community who has expressed their condolences and offered their help and support. let's get an update on this with our correspondent phil mackie in stourbridge. a horrific crime, what are the police saying about the investigation? we are still waiting foran investigation? we are still waiting for an update. 24 hours ago they arrested a man in his 20s about half arrested a man in his 20s about half a mile orso arrested a man in his 20s about half a mile or so away from here in a land rover, which had been stolen from a house. the land rover rammed a police car with offices in pursuit at the time. that was over 24 hours and they have an extension which ta kes and they have an extension which takes us up to this evening. but they may make a decision as to whether to charge or release him. there has been a steady stream of people laying flowers outside the family home this evening. that lovely statement from the school is summing up the feeling from a lot of them. we have just
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summing up the feeling from a lot of them. we havejust had a summing up the feeling from a lot of them. we have just had a tribute from the greyhound trust who rehouse this former racing greyhound with the wilkinson family. it still beggars belief that after that 999 call yesterday, at eight o'clock in the morning, this quiet, suburban, leafy street, when paramedics got here, they found tracy wilkinson dead, pierce dying and peter wilkinson suffering from stab wounds to his chest and back in the back garden. his condition has stabilised but he is still in a critical condition. we will hopefully have some kind of update later this afternoon from west midlands police. thank you, phil mackie for that update in stourbridge. let's get the weather forecast. not as warm as it was this time
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yesterday but it is a drying picture for many parts of the uk. the sun is returning to cornwall and on the satellite picture we are seeing that more widely. but it is still raining across northern ireland and this cloud across scotland is giving quite a bit of rain as well. for the next few hours we will see it withdrawing into the western highlands of scotland, drier weather from northern ireland and southerly breeze. it is quite mild and temperatures still above average, but not as as yesterday. it is still into the 60s fahrenheit. overnight, fine the many and the rain retreating but the showers come in on the south, south—westerly breeze. it was my last night for this time of year. maybe a touch of frost in the far northern glens of scotland. as for the weekend it is a split. saturday looks like sunny spells and scattered, heavy showers and sunday looks drier and brighter. i will
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have more later. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12:30pm. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has suggested a phased strategy for brexit negotiations. he says any discussions on future deals must remain on hold until the terms of the uk's departure are finalised. starting parallel talks on all issues at the same time, as suggested by some in the uk, will not happen. the head of nhs england has issued a warning over hospital waiting times — saying routine operations like hip and knee replacements will take longer. it's a "trade off" for better treatment in other areas. the defence secretary michael fallon has refused to rule out cuts
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—— he has denied the reports. he and his counterpart have allies to increase defence spending because of aggression. their twitter —— donald trump has taken to twitter to deny his links on russia. china has announced its closing half of its official ivory carving factories and shops today, with the rest due to close by the end of the year. the news has been welcomed by conservationists in the fight to protect the african elephant. the flying scotsman is up and running again on the settle—to—carlisle railway line. it's more than a year since a major landslip closed the route. more on our top story. theresa may has suffered an early setback in her brexit negotiations — after the european union ruled out discussing any future trade deal at the same time as finalising the terms of the uk's withdrawal from the eu.
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the negotiating position was announced by the european council president, donald tusk, who is in malta. the foreign secretary has given his reaction to the draft guidelines issued by mr tusk. mr tusk this morning said that he doesn't expect negotiations with britain to be punitive because he said brexit itself will be punitive enough. your response to that? well, i think... i've just come from germany, actually, where it had some really good discussions with some of our counterparts there. they were very struck by the positive tone and substance of the prime minister's article 50 letter. and i think we really are moving forward now, and that there's a of goodwill, a lot of willingness to achieve what the prime minister has said she wants to achieve, which is an orderly transition. and then a deep and special partnership, a deep and special partnership between a strong eu and strong uk. i can speak now to ukip's deputy leader peter whittle,
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who is in our westminster studios. good afternoon. parallel talks will not happen, says donald tusk. the 27 will decide whether sufficient progress has been made in the first stage of talks before moving on to whatever might follow. are you concerned that the other 27 countries are very much setting the pace and the agenda in this? no, not really. the point about these d rafts, really. the point about these drafts, this draft statement this morning, isjust a share in flexibility of it which comes through. it's as though the eu has learned nothing. you know, we actually heard that, you know, as you heard in that clip, that brexit a p pa re ntly you heard in that clip, that brexit apparently is punitive enough in their language, which is utterly ridiculous. i think that they are
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trying to play hardball, but really what it actually shows is how brittle the whole thing is, actually. is it really in flexibility, or simply the eu as the uk is, setting out its store and wanting to appear reasonably tough about all of this? well, they are certainly trying to appear tough. the main problem is that there's got to be flexibility, certainly between the individual 27 countries when it comes to issues such as reciprocal rights and things like that, it differs very much from country to country. the idea that somehow you're saying there will be no basic consultation with these countries, it will just be consultation with these countries, it willjust be done through the eu, we've got to actually sort out our divorce settlement as they put it first. you know, these are all basically very intransigent points, it's the kind of thing with come to expect from the eu. it's not a great starting point. but frankly, ithink ina way starting point. but frankly, ithink in a way it's utterly predictable. on some of the detail than, one of
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the priorities that donald tusk outline was dealing with the rights of eu citizens in the uk and vice ve rsa . of eu citizens in the uk and vice versa. and we have heard from people in the hospitality industry today that they are very concerned that after the uk leaves the eu, they may not have enough people to filljobs. what progress would you like to see specifically on that point?|j what progress would you like to see specifically on that point? i think in terms of four example our position. our position has or has been quite clear when it comes to eu nationals living here. we've always said absolutely, they should stay. we've never had them as a bargaining chip or whatever. when it comes to reciprocal rights, particularly the case of poland, where there are about 1 case of poland, where there are about1 million case of poland, where there are about 1 million polls case of poland, where there are about1 million polls in britain but only about 30,000 british citizen in polenta —— 1 million polish people. basically you will have to have some kind of flexibility. that is not the kind of flexibility. that is not the kind of flexibility. that is not the kind of situation in all eu countries. you can't have a one law
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fits all for that sort of situation. do you think it will be possible to have a strict demarcation between this first phase of the discussions, the divorce proceedings if you like, and what comes next, trade and so on? do think there will inevitably bea on? do think there will inevitably be a blurring of the lines there are? i don't see why, use a blurring of the line. i don't see why these can't carry on at the same time, actually. i think that this figure of something like 50 billion has been put forward as they call it, a divorce settlement. simply outrageous, utterly ridiculous. there's no way we should pay anything like that amount. of course, you know, the eu is trying ina way course, you know, the eu is trying in a way to sort of punish britain, to discourage the others. a taste of things to come? you know, it's 27 versus one now, if you want to put it in that sort of adversarial perspective. and the 27 will dictate
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the agenda, the pace. they are saying that these parallel talks will not happen. no, well, look. we hold all the cards in this situation. you know, i mean it's not... we're not some sort of kind of naughty schoolchild that actually having to be penalised, or at least thatis having to be penalised, or at least that is the way that they are setting it out now. we hold all the cards in this situation. i think that the government should go into it utterly confident of its position. and not be cowed by this kind of, you know, very sort of brittle, very intra nsigent kind of, you know, very sort of brittle, very intransigent language. the deputy leader of ukip, thank you very much. waiting times will be longer for routine operations, such as hip and knee replacements, as a "trade off" for improvements in a&e performance, and better treatment in other areas. that's according to the head of nhs england, simon stevens, who's unveiling a strategy for the nhs over the next two years. some reaction now. with me is liz mcanulty,
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chair of the patients association. thank you forjoining us today on bbc newsroom live. we have been hearing different perspectives on whether a trade—off is acceptable. what is the view of the patients association? well, can i first say the patients association welcomes the patients association welcomes the majority of the initiatives spelt out in this report. they are what we have been arguing for for many years, improvements in access to gps, access to a&e departments, improved mental health services. u nfortu nately, improved mental health services. unfortunately, the trade—off appears to be longer waits for people, particularly hip and knee operations and others we are not sure of yet. this is not an acceptable trade—off. it's understandable that simon stevens has made this in an otherwise excellent report, but what he's doing is rationing the services
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in the best way he can to meet, to keep within the funding envelope that he's got, and it's not acceptable. not acceptable, but understandable. understandable because of the constraints which have been placed on nhs england by the government. what is not a cce pta ble the government. what is not acceptable is the impact this will have on patients. we already have a third of a million people in the country who are waiting longer than 18 weeks, so it is not as if we are starting from zero. in order to fund these new initiatives, which will cost a considerable amount, we're not convinced. we hope it will happen, but we're not convinced that even with these increased waiting times that these promises can be fulfilled. he has an impossible choice, really, hasn't he? you know, where does he cut? where does he say the waiting times might be longer, because if one person is made unhappy, another is made perhaps happier, hopefully. and vice versa.
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well, he has an impossible choice because of the constraints he's in. and there are some members of the public, some patients who actually have a choice. for those people who can have a choice. for those people who ca n afford have a choice. for those people who can afford a hip and knee replacement privately, they are going tojust go replacement privately, they are going to just go and do that now, rather than wait two or three years. but there is another choice. do you think they're getting into the realms of patients, or future patients being told "this is what you need to do to keep yourselves healthy, to try to avoid these conditions happening in the first place if you can, if they are avoidable conditions." are we getting into the ear of people being told, "if you want a treatment for something you have to prove to us that you have done your best to avoid being in this position in the first place"? there have been hints about that over the last year or so. but i sincerely hope we're not going down that road. that is blaming the
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victims of circumstances in many cases. yes, we all have a responsibility to look after our health, but the government is making huge revenue from sugar, tobacco, all of those things. they have cut the public health budget last year, which would help to educate people. that has been decimated. so it theresa may in her inaugural speech really gave us a great deal of hope at patients association and many others in the country no doubt, by saying that this government will work, not just saying that this government will work, notjust for saying that this government will work, not just for the saying that this government will work, notjust for the privileged few, but for the many. and that no one would be left behind. if these measures are taken, and we don't blame simon stevens, but the government has a choice. we have heard this morning, we are the fifth... we are fifth in the world in terms of what we spend on defence. now, that's a choice. there are choices that could be made to accommodate all patients. yes, there
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are waste, a lot of waste the need to be dealt with, there are other efficiencies that could be made, but making the most vulnerable patients in our society some of the most vulnerable, wait even longer, is not acceptable. there is a lot more you wa nt to acceptable. there is a lot more you want to say, but i'm afraid out of time. thank you much. china will close almost half of its official ivory carving factories and shops today, with the rest due to close by the end of the next year. the news has been welcome by conservationists in their ongoing battle against the illegal trade in ivory. despite a global ban on international sales, a surge in demand has resulted in the deaths of tens of thousands of african elephants in recent years. music plays
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first to john scanlon,
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general secretary for the convention on international trade in endangered species. thank you for talking and is —— talking to us today. how has got to the point where china is closing almost half of its official ivory factories and shops? it's a very big day in china today. china made the announcement back in december that it would close its domestic market. that was a very bold decision they took. and they are moving very fast took. and they are moving very fast to implement it. i have been looking at some factories and retail outlets today. they have closed over a third of them already, the rest will be closed by the end of the year. we
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are having some problems with your line. that is just tried to pick up with what you are saying. can you hear me? i think we are having real trouble with the line from beijing. we will see if we can get any improvements to that. to markjones, associate director from the born free foundation john has started outlining significance of what is happening in china today, but there are concerns about the black market there as well. and about the demand in general that still exists for ivory. 0h, general that still exists for ivory. oh, dear. double trouble, i'm afraid. problems with both lines, both east sussex and beijing. apologies for that. we will try to get back to those guests if we can.
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it is if we can talk tojohn. john, i hope the line has improved. can you hear me? perfectly, yes. fantastic. you were telling us about the big moment it was in china today, closing almost half of its official ivory carving factories and jobs. yes, it was a very big day. the government of china made this announcement back in december, and they are working very, very fast to implement that decision. over a third close today, i visited some that were closed today. by the end of year, the domestic ivory markets will be closed in their entirety, very big decision, bold decision and being rolled out very quickly. what about the black market? is that still a big concern? yes. closing down the legal ivory markets where there was a certain degree of laundering in some of these markets is one thing. but we have to maintain that enforcement efforts to tackle the black market as well. the black market was not working through
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legal outlets, it's a pure black market. as is understood by everyone here in china and across the convention, we need to maintain that strong enforcement effort to knock out the black market as well.|j think we can talk now to mikejones as well, hopefully the line has improved. mark, what sort of difference is this going to make two african elephants —— markjones?m important to remember why this news matters. in different populations across havoc have plummeted from amy 10 million to not much more than about 400,000 today. as many as 20,000 or 30,000 about 400,000 today. as many as 20,000 or30,000 are about 400,000 today. as many as 20,000 or 30,000 are being slaughtered for their tasks every year. if this continues, elephants could disappear altogether for much of the african continent. china is widely seen as being the biggest michael place and a major driver of demand for legal and illegal ivory.
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the news that the ivory markets will be closed down by the end of this year is usually welcome. the closures today, a significant proportion of its ivory factories, represent a significant step in that progress. what organisations like yourselves at born free foundation doing to try to get the message out, to try to curb the demand for ivory in the first instance? i'm afraid we are having problems with the line again. let us try and put that question tojohn in beijing. what is being done to try to curb the demand for ivory? there's a lot of work going on right across this illegal supply chain, and we have to work together as an international community. that is what we're doing. from source country where the ivory is being taken from two destination countries, we are seeing a wonderful collaborative effort underway. we are seeing poaching drop in a number
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of countries, including kenny. we are seeing good enforcement efforts there. in transit, the same. —— including kenya. this hasn't come out of the blue in china, they have been working actively to enhance enforcement and do a lot of work to tackle this illegal trade. there's an adamant that was made last year being rolled out today and being rolled out —— this announcement... we are rolled out —— this announcement... we a re really rolled out —— this announcement... we are really having trouble with this, aren't we? we thank you for bearing with us through that interview. i think we managed to hear most of the main points from the born free foundation and the convention on international trade in endangered species, but thank you to both our guests. huge apologies about the technical problems that we re about the technical problems that were really bedevilling the interview. hopefully no technical problems with this! it runs through some of britain's most stunning scenery along the yorkshire dales and cumbrian fells. but a year ago, a section of the settle to carlisle railway was forced to shut when 500,000 tonnes of earth gave way beneath the tracks.
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today, the flying scotsman reopened the route, and our correspondent alison freeman was there. the reason, as you say, it's such an important day is that this track is an iconic track. it takes in the beautiful eden valley in cumbria, travels through to north yorkshire. over the ribblehead viaduct, which people will surely recognise, its iconic arches. and just last month, they had a tornado travel across it. just in preparation, really, that this day was coming, that the carlisle to settle line was going to fully reopen once again after a year or so of closure. now, what happened was back in december of 2015, we had all that heavy rain. those terrible storms. and the railway line was yet another casualty. around 500,000 tonnes of earth was part of a landslide beneath the line. network rail had a mammoth task of trying to repair that. they've created what's been described to me as an underground viaduct beneath it. concrete pillars which will keep
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the railway line standing even if the rest of it falls away. it cost them £23 million. but today is the day that everybody got back on that first train at 5:50am this morning, i was there and chatted to some of those excited passengers. apart from the ungodly hour, it is really quite exciting. because for the first time in 13 months, we have a direct train from carlisle through to leeds. ijust think it's a great engineering feat and ijust want to be on the first train that passes over this structure. i was on one of the trains on the last day of all these stations in 1970. so it felt appropriate to come to the reopening! it's the most spectacular train ride in england. i like railways anyway. but it's a historic route, an iconic route, and it's nice to eventually come at last, see the railway line reopened.
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now, as part of the celebrations, there's going to be a very special visitor on the line today. it's going to be the flying scotsman, travelling along here around lunchtime. a train fact for you here: you see this pump on the left? that'll be used to fill up the scotsman's water supplies if it was travelling on that side of the tracks. that's the special visitor, but for other people living in the area it's just simply fantastic for them. that they are going to get this line back, back on track if you like, for the first time in over 13 months. a californian company has made history by launching rocket back into space for a second time. rockets are traditionally used only once before being scrapped but spacex has developed a way of landing its boosters safely on earth — allowing them to be recycled. it's been described as "one small step for the company, but a giant leap in the search for cheaper space exploration". greg dawson reports.
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you are looking at a rocket with a difference. unlike the rest, it is fitted with a booster that has been used before. lift—off, falcon 9. and now history, as it is successfully relaunched back into space. boosters cost tens of millions of dollars, and are normally discarded and destroyed during an ascent. but the private californian aerospace company spacex has found a way to eject them safely back to earth. after the successful launch, another key moment in the flight, to see if the second—hand booster can safely detach and fly back to its landing pad in the atlantic. cheering and applause. rapturous cheers from the mission crew tell you it's a success. minutes later, it's back on earth, an unprecedented double achievement of launching a reusable rocket, and recovering it for a possible third mission. this is gonna be, ultimately,
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a huge revolution in spaceflight. it's the difference between if you had aeroplanes where you threw away an aeroplane after every flight, versus you could reuse them multiple times. it represents a new era in the space race, where private enterprises compete against each other, instead of countries. the success will be a boost for a company with much more ambitious long—term goals, that include sending two unidentified space tourists to the moon next year. greg dawson, bbc news. in a moment the news at one. first the weather. yesterday was the warmest day of the year so far. although not as one today, we still see fairly decent sunshine breaking through. in aberdeenshire, more cloud. we had more cloud in cornwall, but it is
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here that the sun is coming out. you can see the rain heading into scotland, that in scotland and northern ireland. in england and wales, the club starting to clear away, hence more sunshine. it eventually gets brighter in southern scotla nd eventually gets brighter in southern scotland and northern ireland. there will be showers in cornwall this afternoon, cross into pembrokeshire. in many parts of england and wales, and in between the showers in the west, be decent spells of sunshine. highs round about 16 or 17 degrees. further north, and improving picture from northern ireland. towards evening we will see a few showers coming in. for scotland, drying and brightening up a bit in southern areas, but the rain stays in the north. it is still the this evening and overnight, it takes a while to ease away. mostly a night of clear spells and scattered showers, which means it will be cooler than last night, when it was very mild for the time of year. there could be a touch of frost in the grounds of northern scotland, but for most of us temperatures are maintained a seven
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to nine celsius. we see april showers. they'll be showers particularly in coastal areas in the morning. through the afternoon, they migrate inland. southern coast areas could do well, some parts of eastern scotla nd could do well, some parts of eastern scotland minority as many showers are on the coast for example. in between shows, lengthy spells of sunshine, the fact that the winds are lightand sunshine, the fact that the winds are light and not moving on very quickly. 13 to 16 is a little fresher than today for most of us. most of those disappear through saturday night, as high pressure built in for sunday. the second half of the weekend looks like the drier, sunny day for most of us. it might be chilly first thing, little frost here and there. perhaps even the odd patch of mist or fog. but more sunshine, fewer rain then on saturday. there might be fair weather cloud building inland. 11 to 16, fresher most certainly. the weekend looks set to be showery on saturday for many, with hail and thunder as well. chilly overnight,
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fine weather for most of us to enjoy during sunday. complex and confrontational: the eu warns britain about the road to exiting the european union. the president of the european council, donald tusk, says any discussions on future trade deals must remain on hold until the terms of the uk's departure are finalised. the eu 27 does not and will not pursue a punitive approach. brexit in itself is already punitive enough. also this lunchtime: longer waits for routine operations like hip replacements as the nhs in england tries to improve a&e and cancer treatments. the government denies reports of a £10 billion hole in britain's defence budget but admits there will be more cuts to come. warnings that britain's restaurants and bars rely on 60,000 foreign workers a year and it could take
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a decade to change that post brexit.
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