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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 2, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and kat downes. six people are arrested for what the police describe as a brutal attack on a young asylum seeker. it happened at the 17—year—old stood at a bus stop in south london — detectives say they are treating it as a hate crime. good morning, it's sunday second of april. also ahead: more than 250 people die in columbia after a massive landslide — many more are still missing. should doctors be forced to tell the authorities when a patient is no longer fit to drive? we hear calls for a change in the law. johanna konta wins the biggest tennis title by a british woman in a0 years — she beats caroline wozniacki to win the miami open. it motivates you more to keep working hard and keep enjoying. also in sport — a surprise defeat
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for premier league leaders chelsea. their lead is cut to seven points after a 2—1 defeat to crystal palace at stamford bridge. and tomasz has the weather. it promises to be a nice day today. lots of sunshine on the way. yesterday we had to dodge a few showers but not today. good morning. first, our main story. four men and two women have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a young asylum seeker was attacked in south london. police say they're treating it as a hate crime. the 17—year—old victim suffered severe head injuries but his life is not now believed to be at risk. andy moore reports. the young man believed to be kurdish iranian was waiting at a bus stop late on friday night with two friends when he was approached by a group of about eight people. he was attacked after telling them where he came from. we believe it's a hate crime.
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prior to the attack taking place, the young person was asked where they were from and when they said they were an asylum seeker, that is when the frenzied attack took place. police say the gang chased the man round the corner and into this street where they kicked him in the head and left him on the floor unconscious. after that, members of the public came to help him. the attack only stopped when the sound of sirens was heard. the gang made off in the direction of this nearby pub. the young man was left with a fractured skull and a blood clot on his brain. he is in a serious but stable condition in hospital. his two friends escaped the attackers and received only minor injuries. the local mp said croydon had generally very good relations between people of different backgrounds. he called the incident an appalling crime against somebody who had come to this country to seek sanctuary. andy moore, bbc news. more than 250 people are now known to have died in landslides
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in colombia, with many more injured and missing. heavy rains on friday night caused rivers to burst their banks in the town of mocoa, flooding homes with mud. greg dawson reports. from the ground you get a sense of the force of the mud which pushed cars through buildings and ripped trees from the ground. but it's from the air that the scale of the damage is apparent, with the stew of mud and water stretching for miles. in some areas there is no way in or out, with roads, bridges and entire neighbourhoods swept away. this is how many spent the night, surrounded by their belongings, which have now become debris. people without homes, in a town without power or running water. by torchlight, rescue workers continue to look for signs of life. hundreds of people are still missing, many of them children. a list of their names and ages have been pinned to the walls of the family welfare unit. translation: we've lost a baby.
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it has gone missing and the rest is as you can see. a little baby. we can't find him anywhere. unusually heavy rain on friday evening caused the mocoa river to burst its banks. landslides might be common in this mountainous region but residents are shocked by the scale of the damage. more than 1000 troops and police officers have been sent to the region to help with the rescue efforts but authorities have warned the death toll is likely to keep rising. greg dawson, bbc news. at least 18 people have been injured after the lighting of a carnival bonfire went wrong at an event in a north—east suburb of paris. dramatic video posted on social media showed a pyre exploding seconds after a fuse was ignited, sending debris over the crowd. police said a wooden figure had been doused with petrol before being lit. the incident happened at the end of the yellow carnaval at villepinte. the chancellor is to urge indian businesses to use the expertise of the city of london in the latest
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attempt by ministers to build trade links outside the european union. philip hammond's trade mission to delhi and mumbai is part of an effort to build a partnership with india as it tries to forge a future as a global manufacturing powerhouse. our business correspondent joe lynam has more. depending on how britain quits the eu, the city of london is set to lose thousands ofjobs in the coming years as some banks and insurers leave to remain in the single market. now the chancellor philip hammond is hoping to court new customers for britain's financial services expertise. he leads a delegation of business leaders as well as the governor of the bank of england mark carney to india this week, hoping that indian companies will use the city of london to fund the estimated £1.2—trillion of spending needed to modernise indian‘s infrastructure. the government also hopes to use the trip to open new markets in india for companies like transferwise, part of britain's
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rapidly growing financial technology or fintech sector. all of this forms the backdrop for a comprehensive free—trade agreement which britain hopes to sign with india once it formally leave the eu but that won't be easy. india is yet to sign any free—trade deal with anyone and one stumbling block could be a demand by india to allow its citizens free movement to and from britain. great britain'sjohanna konta is celebrating the biggest victory of her tennis career. it's her third world tour title, but easily the most significant. she won the miami 0pen last night in 100 degree heat, beating former world number 0ne caroline wozniacki in straight sets. it moves konta up to seventh in the world rankings. it's the most notable victory by a british woman since virginia wade at wimbledon a0 years ago. and a credible a competent and not
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just for myself but also for my team and family back home, it's always nice to get these sorts of moments in your career. it gets, what's the word? a bit of a pat on the back for the work you are putting in and continuously putting in. it motivates you more to keep working hard and keep enjoying. at 7:20 we'll be speaking to the bbc‘s tennis correspondent russell fuller. the organisers of the university boat races say they have no plans to postpone the event — despite the discovery of what's thought to be an unexploded second world war bomb in the thames. the device was spotted near putney bridge, close to where the race begins.
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a final decision on whether the races get the go—ahead will be made this morning. the women's race is due to start at 4.35 this afternoon with the men's race an hour later. for bob dylan — it was definitely a case of better late than never when he finally received his nobel prize for literature. dylan collected the award in person during a very private ceremony in stockholm. he was awarded the prize last year, but failed to travel to sweden to pick it up. the death toll is continuing to rise in columbia, where the red cross now says more than 200 people are known to have died following mudslides in the town of mocoa. more than 1000 soldiers and emergency service personnel have joined the rescue effort, which is continuing as we speak. let's speak now to dimitri o'donnell, a reporter in colombia's capital bogota. all we know, the last official
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figures which were released by the military, stated that at least 254 people have died in this mudslide and it is unfortunately likely to rise as the day goes on. 400 people have been injured and more than 200 people are still missing. 300 families in this densely populated mountainous area have been affected due to these landslides thatjust deluged the town after three separate rivers broke their banks and flooded entire districts and communities. 17 different neighbourhoods have been affected and five of those completely destroyed. we are looking at some incredible pictures at the moment of the flooding and towns that have been badly affected. i wonder about the rescue efforts. i know a number of the major roads there have also been washed away. that's right. in the early hours of these rescue operations, the biggest hurdle is trying to get access to macoa. many
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towns were just washed away orjust blocked. that prevented a lot of aid reaching. as darkness fell in macoa, they have been thermal cameras attached to drones and they have been flying over the some of the affected areas, try to locate the people still trapped under the rubble. the survivors of this deluge, this massive mudslide, are being temporarily housed. the colombian air force are due to the deliver more water, aid and medicine to 90 parts of macoa. truck arrived earlier tonight with water which is badly needed by some residents. an interested as well in some of the
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challenges for this and emergency services as it gets into day two. you talk about them tried to rescue people trapped under the rubble. any indication of how long it will go on for? what the civil defence and colombian governments have said are that for the first 72 hours, the crucial first 72 hours, that for the first 72 hours, the crucialfirst 72 hours, it that for the first 72 hours, the crucial first 72 hours, it will remain in recovery operations. they wa nt to remain in recovery operations. they want to find people live and that remains the case. they are deploying 1100 soldiers and police to the region and 2500 people. that will be the case as this day goes on and it is still very early on in the morning in colombia and as the day goes on, more and more people are likely tojoin the goes on, more and more people are likely to join the search. as the authorities have indicated, u nfortu nately, authorities have indicated, unfortunately, the toll is likely to rise. there was one good story earlier today. 13 children were airlifted out of a very affected region in macoa. they hope that as
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first light dawns, they will be able to perform several tasks to get the people out of the region out of the area that need it most. landslides like this are not uncommon in that pa rt like this are not uncommon in that part of colombia. what are the authorities doing to make the area safe to prevent future disasters like this? yes, they are very common in this south—west region of colombia. last year, two minor ones killed around 20 people. it is due to the fact we are in the middle of a rainy season in colombia. a lot of the buildings are unstable so if you are adding movement in land or a river bursting its banks, it will cause a lot of devastation. interestingly, a lot of the locals in macoa are saying that deforestation around the watershed of these three rivers did contribute a lot to the devastation and the death toll even though there was a warning put out at midnight on friday. they say if those forests
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we re friday. they say if those forests were left intact, that could have acted as a buffer and prevented a lot of the deluge of water reaching some of those areas that were set out in macoa. they are also leading a combination of climate change. they said that the rains this year in particular, they haven't seen anything like it. it has been worth than in previous years. really good to talk to you. keeping us across those devastating landslides that have already affected so many people. the death toll is at 254. many, many more are still missing. the time is at 13 minutes past seven. it is time to go over to the weather. a bit of a mixed bag over the next few days? yes, today is looking pretty beautiful. look at this nice picture. a double rainbow from yesterday. i suspect it has been a little bit stressed out. rainbows are usually a bit more
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curves, but really beautiful. these showers came from big clouds like this one. this isn't quite a cumulonimbus cloud, nearly. it looks a bit likea cumulonimbus cloud, nearly. it looks a bit like a cauliflower! the very mixed day yesterday. we are going to get these smaller clouds today, so for most of us it's a fine and dry day. this is the big picture in the next couple of hours. lots of sun around and the chance of a couple of lighter showers developing later across some eastern parts of the uk. around lunchtime it is looking beautiful. if you can, get out there and enjoy the weather. hardly a cloud in the sky. very light winds. the sun will feel pretty strong. moving into the midlands, northern ireland. notice if you can squint at the screen you can pick out showers in eastern areas, but most of us will miss them. fine in scotland as
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well. temperatures of about 11 degrees. that's lunchtime across the country. this is... the graphics are little bit jerky. we country. this is... the graphics are little bitjerky. we will get through this! clear skies across the uk. temperatures of about six degrees. there might be a little bit of mr round. —— mist. 0n degrees. there might be a little bit of mr round. —— mist. on monday, weather fronts coming in out of the west, which means the weather will go downhill little bit through the course of monday. i've got a feeling that these graphics are about to crash, guys, so what i will do is hand back to you afterjust summarising that monday is looking like a pretty good day. that's it! back to you. those early—morning gremlins! 0h, they are working now. i could see that the thing that's moving
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around isjerking see that the thing that's moving around is jerking around, see that the thing that's moving around isjerking around, so the graphics were all over the place. we didn't know what was going to come next! may be some holiday snaps, your shopping list! we got through it, anyway. see you soon. coping with it like a true pro! thank you. when three—year—old poppy—arabella clarke was killed crossing the road by a pensioner who'd been told to stop driving because of poor eyesight, her parents called for a law requiring medical professionals to report people unfit to drive to the dvla. their calls now have the backing of government medical advisor daniel sokol, who says the authorities shouldn't rely on the honesty of the patient to admit they're no longer safe behind the wheel. he joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning. how does this proposal differfrom good morning. how does this proposal differ from the current medical advice and currently what gps are or
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aren't obliged to do? it isn'tjust gps, it is other medical professionals as well, like surgeons and other specialists. when a patient is deemed on the drive, the doctor will advise the person to inform the dvla, but the legal obligation on the part of the patient, and advise that they shouldn't drive. most of the time the patient says, absolutely. 0ccasionally the patient says, absolutely. occasionally the patient says, no, i will continue to drive because it will continue to drive because it will be so disruptive to my life. in those situations that doctors should try to persuade the patient that he should not drive and disclose the fa ct. should not drive and disclose the fact. if the patient refuses, then the doctor should tell the dvla himself if the doctor thinks this would pose a danger to the public. the problem at the moment, as you've indicated, is that doctors rely on honesty of the patient. if the patient says, of course, i will stop driving, and doesn't, then that
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usually isn't followed up. so you may have someone on the roads at the moment who is blind as a bat or could have an epileptic seizure and could have an epileptic seizure and could cause the mendip harm to other people. -- tremendous harm. but talk about the doctor first. does this raise concern about that doctor— patient confidentiality? if i went to the doctor, would i be deterred from seeing that doctor if i thought they could potentially tell the mac on that i should drive and it may stop me going in the first place? —— tell the dvla. currently, if you refuse to tell the dvla the doctor can breach of confidentiality if he or she thinks you are putting others at risk. that's the current situation, but the current situation doesn't make it mandatory for doctors to disclose that information. in my view it should be, a cause that is human nature that many people will lie to their
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doctor in order to keep their licence and continued their way of life. in the introduction we talked about that devastating impact it can have, when people who are unfit to drive are still on the road, and he would very much like to see doctors deal with this in the way they deal with infectious diseases, making people aware of the state of the patient so they deal with infectious diseases, making people aware of the state of the patient survey can do no damage? that's right. the law already recognises that although conti —— confidentiality is important, it isn't absolute. there are certain circumstances when there can bea are certain circumstances when there can be a breach. with certain notifiable diseases, especially unpleasant diseases like kolarov and the plague —— the plague, you must tell the authorities. the rationale of course is that it is to protect members of the public from
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potentially very serious harm. the same principle applies in my view to patients who are unfit to drive, who get behind the real and can cause death and other serious injury. interesting talking point and i'm sure it will go on. thank you and good to talk to you. as we've been hearing this morning, johanna —— johanna konta as we've been hearing this morning, johanna ——johanna konta on her match last night. more on this brilliant story for british tennis now. talk to a little bit more about the context of this. a big win for johanna konta, but how big an achievement is it for her?|j johanna konta, but how big an achievement is it for her? i think it's a very strong case for saying it's a very strong case for saying it is the biggest win by a british woman since 1977. the structure of the tour has changed over 40 years, but this is one of the big four event that the women play every year on the wta tour, just one tear ——
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level below the grand slams. there's so much history in miami as well. it has a strong pedigree going back many years. to win this, when you are playing the best in the world, over a 12 day period, she had to win six matches in ten days, it's a perfect dress rehearsal for winning a grand slam. to have won mac and on the final against the former world number one, in caroline wozniacki, it shows the pressure that konta was able to take into her stride. she has such mental strength these days, compared to how she was when she was coming up the ranks. do you think she has what it takes to win a grand slam? will she match andy murray's achievements in the coming years or even months? i think it is possible. we would never have dreamt of saying this two years ago. she has performance anxiety, which basically means she couldn't cope with
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pressure situations when the matches got tight, and it masked her now obvious talent. she said she always felt she could be world number one, or rather that that was the dream, something she wanted to be when she was small, but she admits it has taken her longer. sunrise to the top of game very young. when she was eaten, caroline wozniacki was world number one at 19. —— the player she has beaten. there is no reason why she couldn't win a grand slam at wimbledon. her successor she couldn't win a grand slam at wimbledon. hersuccessorfar she couldn't win a grand slam at wimbledon. her successor far has been on the hardcourt. at wimbledon is grass. it is a good surface for her. until you have a good run at wimbledon, for many people you don't really exist. i'm not being horrible, but a lot of people who aren't big tennis fans tune into wimbledon but they don't follow things all year round. we will have
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to watch and wait, but a really good start to the year forjohanna konta. thanks for bringing us up to date on that. more about that great win with richard in a few minutes. eddie mair‘s presenting the andrew marr programme on bbc one at 9am this morning. eddie what have you got coming up? i will be back at nine o'clock with a performance that's veryjerky, even more so than the weather! gibraltar is the big story and i'm happy to say the chief minister of gibraltar has flown in especially to sit there, or there. gibraltar has flown in especially to sit there, orthere. he gibraltar has flown in especially to sit there, or there. he will be here and we will talk about gibraltar with the defence secretary michael fallon. i expect wider questions of brexit will also come up. ed miliband, the former labour leader, hasn't been here since his defeat in 2015. he has written an article for the observer this morning, saying to remain —— remainers to "get over
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it". and we will also have a playwright talking about his west end play. thanks very much. sounds like a good show. a lot to fit in! we're here on the bbc news channel until 9am this morning, and coming up in the next hour: hold tight if you've not planned your summer holiday yet. the travel show team will be here with a look back on some of their globetrotting highlights of the year. angel is one of more than 200 horses killed in road traffic accidents since 2010. it is one year since we reported on a campaign to get drivers to slow down around writers, but astonishingly the number of incidents have gone up. we will speak to angel's on later. and johanna konta's win, more details on that later.
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this is where we leave viewers on bbc one. we will continue on the bbc news channel. good morning. time for a look at the newspapers. what's caught your eye this morning? nice to see you and good morning. let's drop straight inside. there's a lot to get through and you've been picking out some inside pages. this is in the sun. theresa may talking about brexit and what needs to be done. it is a column by a conservative mp and i think he reflects the opinion of many conservative mps. they feel it will bea conservative mps. they feel it will be a tough two years for the prime minister, getting this massive detail through. he says, minister, getting this massive
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detailthrough. he says, look, if mps failed tobacco she is always got the option of a general election. there was a lot of talk that that could happen. another prime minister said she would serve the full term. hamley times have we heard that? i think it is quite possible there could be another general election. so much uncertainty and unpredictable at it. we have some sort of clarity now that article 50 has been triggered. now who knows what? any expert you speak to, nobody can say they know how this will play out. it is so complicated. uncharted territory. and the remainers will say this is uncharted territory. the brexiteers would say this is the golden opportunity. all to play for, yes. you've also picked this one out in the sunday times. the revelation that prince charles needed years in therapy to get over
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the breakdown of his marriage to princess diana. yes, a new biography coming out. lots of people need someone to confide in and they go for professional advice. i think if you are there to the throne you have a lot of issues to get through. —— heir to the throne. if you are prince charles that it is understandable that you would need counselling. they also say he was bullied at school. it is well documented that his school life was pretty difficult and unhappy. i think compared to his sons', where there was a better support network in place, i think charles had a pretty grim time. interesting he has been very active in the mental health charities. an interesting parallel. let's have a look in the sunday mirror. this is of course george michael, finally laid to rest
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this week. but a campaign now for a proper goodbye. this is a memorial concert. yes, the sunday mirror macro have really got behind this. they say the royal albert hall in 0ctober it will be the ideal time and location for it. bob geldof and simon cowell are already backing it. surely there will be some big concert for george michael. he is one of the colossal figures to pop out over the last few decades. i remember when freddie mercury, the memorial concert. daughter michael was the star performer from that night. —— george michael. was the star performer from that night. -- george michael. it will be good to watch, anyway. some fantastic music to celebrate. this isa fantastic music to celebrate. this is a story close to my heart. uncombable hair. yes, i never heard of it before,
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uncombable hair syndrome. it really does exist. notable examples down the bottom. some real examples. a p pa re ntly the bottom. some real examples. apparently albert einstein did have this syndrome. there is a mutation in the hair follicles apparently that makes it extremely difficult to flatten. borisjohnson, well, he does look like he may have this syndrome. it is well known that before the cameras come on him he raffles his head because that his trademark. perhaps it is laziness syndrome! suddenly everyone is looking at all of our head! nice to see you. a great variety of stories. we will be back with the headlines at 7:30am. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and katherine downes. coming up before 8:00, tomasz will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news.
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four men and two women have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a young asylum seeker was attacked in south london. the 17—year—old victim suffered severe head injuries but his life is not now believed to be at risk. police say they're treating the attack as a hate crime. more than 250 people have been killed after mudslides swept through a columbian town on friday night. 17 neighbourhoods have been destroyed, and over a 1,000 emergency workers are now involved in the rescue effort. hundreds are injured and missing, and the death toll is expected to rise. presidentjuan manuel santos has declared a state of emergency. at least 18 people have been injured after the lighting of a carnival bonfire went wrong at an event in a north—east suburb of paris. dramatic video posted on social media showed a pyre —— a third body has been found in the aftermath of the floods that hit australia's east coast in the wake of cyclone debbie. authorities are searching for another three people who are still missing in queensland
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and evacuation orders remain in place for a number townships in northern new south wales. but its expected that the conditions will ease through the weekend. the chancellor is to urge indian businesses to use the expertise of the city of london in the latest attempt by ministers to build trade links outside the european union. philip hammond's trade mission to delhi and mumbai is part of an effort to build a partnership with india as it tries to forge a future as a global manufacturing powerhouse. the organisers of the university boat races say they have no plans to postpone the event — despite the discovery of what's thought to be an unexploded second world war bomb in the thames. the device was spotted near putney bridge, close to where the race begins. a final decision on whether the races get the go—ahead will be made this morning. the women's race is due to start at 4.35 this afternoon with the men's race an hour later. from the incredible to the bazaar. the most british story you will hear all day. yellow car owners have rallied in support of a vehicle blamed for ruining tourists' photographs
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in a picturesque cotswold village. the convoy drove through bibery in solidarity with 84—year—old vauxhall corsa owner peter maddox after his car was vandalised earlier this year for spoiling the view. he said he was overwhelmed by the support. what other car was he supposed to get? to be fair, it does spoil the view. if you are after some picturesque version of... but he lives there! having a bright yellow car parked in the middle of it, it's not exactly picture postcard, but. no excuse to go and vandalised the poor man's car! i have a solution. the reason that stands out is because it is the only yellow thing. what they need is a few yellow balloons just sort of strategically placed... daffodils. it's not my
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best idea ever, you are right. stick to the sport, richard. shall we talk tennis? yes. sojohanna konta is celebrating the biggest win of her career. it's her third world tour title but easily the most significant. she beat former world number one caroline wozniacki 6—4 6—3 in the miami 0pen final. as patrick gearey reports. miami is a place for the relaxed and cool, not easy when you are in baking heat and playing one of the biggest matches of your life so far. johanna konta, british number one, with break one, in game one. in the florida sun, it takes energy to sit and watch let alone contend with the athleticism of caroline wozniacki. the first was a set of frequent breaks breaks in served but not intensity. like all the sport's best, konta peaked at the most important points. this one earned her the first set — 6—4. wozniacki is a former world number one and yet konta started this as favourite, a mark of her startling progress.
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the rankings are no accident. the danish woman never relented. as bodies tired, konta offered more energy—saving thunderbolts. no british woman had won this tournament before. she got there in straight sets. now up to seventh in the world, jo konta says she's benefited from playing in andy murray's shadow. you won't find much shadow in miami. it's an incredible accomplishment, notjust for myself but my team and my family back home. it's always good to get these sorts of, i guess, moments in your career. it gets, what's the word? a bit of a pat on the back for the work you put in and continuously putting in. it motivates you more to keep working hard and keep enjoying. many congratulations.
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there was a surprise defeat for premier league leaders chelsea yesterday — they went down 2—1 to crystal palace. second placed tottenham are keeping up the pressure — they won away at burnley. ben croucher has the details. commentator: 1-0 chelsea! the leaders are ahead after just four minutes! an early lead against struggling crystal palace, it looked like another saturday stroll for chelsea. in 91 first half seconds, the stroll became all the more gruelling. as first zaha and then benteke left antonio conte staring at only a fourth league loss this season. and spark some intrigue in what looked like a one—sided title race. intrugue because second—placed spurs made up ground with victory at burnley. eric dier and heung—min son scored in a 2—0 win to narrow the gap at the top of the table. it is important for us to be there. if chelsea fail and we are there fighting for the premier league.
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behind spurs are liverpool. they didn't need any help from 007, they had all the help they needed in number ten. philip continuo scored one and a hand in the other two as liverpool won the merseyside derby 3-1. with a chance to close in to the top four, jose mourinho had every reason to be cheering ahead of the match against west brom but despite having three quarters of the possession, he had to be content with an even share of the points in a goalless draw. craig shakespeare may not be the special one but he's masterminded son turned around at leicester. it helps when your players can do that. commentator: feast your eyes on that! it was a pretty pretty sight. pretty easy, boss. in a goalless draw against southampton and bournemouth, is this the worst penalty in premier league history? commentator: harry archer has
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missed it by a mile! at least you have not got far to go home, hey harry? elsewhere hull city got a crucial three points in their battle to get out of the relegation zone — they came from behind to beat west ham 2—1. and there was another defeat for bottom side sunderland — they lost 1—0 at watford. celtic will win their sixth consecutive league title if they beat hearts later today. brendan rodgers's side are 22 points ahead of their nearest rivals aberdeen in the scottish premiership. myjob was to win in the best way we possibly could. there are different ways to win. people will tell you that you can win something and it not be the same feeling but to win and get the spirit we had here throughout the whole football club, it can make it very special and also the way we have played football. so for me, to share that
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with the players and the coaching staff and everyone at the club, to make everyone a champion, would be very special. there were four games in the scottish premiership yesterday. partick thistle came from behind to beat ross county 2—1 and strengthen their position in the top six. partick now four points clear of kilmarnock who drew one all with inverness. inverness are now bottom of the table, replacing hamilton who beat stjohnstone 1—0. stjohnstone played the second half of that match with nine men after two of their team were sent off for fighting each other. rangers drew 1—1 with motherwell to get within ten points of second placed aberdeen. they beat dundee 7—0 on friday. wasps are out of european club rugby's premier competition — the champions cup. they lost 32—17 to leinster in their quarterfinal. the irish side put four tries past the premiership leaders to win — they'll play either clermont auvergne or toulon next. munster are also into the last four — they'll face either glasgow or defending champions saracens. the two remaining quarterfinal matches are later today. in the european challenge cup, bath are into the semi finals for the second time in four years. they beat brive 34—20. england winger samesa rockodoguni scored twice for bath. gloucester are also through —
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they beat cardiff blues. warrington remain bottom of super league but a late kurt gidley penalty did earn them a first point as they drew with hull fc. widnes beat leigh for their first win of the season wakefield trinity meanwhile are up to sixth in the table. they beat catalan dragons 38—18 in perpignan thanks largely to a hattrick from benjones bishop. charley hull's hopes of winning the first golf major in the women's calendar — the ana inspiration tournament — appear to be over going into today's final round in california she finished second last year, but after a round of 71. she's eight shots behind this woman — america's lexi thompson — who heads the field on 13 under par overall. she narrowly missed out on a birdie at the seventh there. world number one mark selby looks in fine form ahead —— four world records have been smashed by one woman at the prague half marathon in the czech republic. kenya's joyciline jepkosgei beat paula radcliffe's14—year—old record for 10k on the road, along with the marks for 15
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and 20 kilometres. she won the race in a record one hour four minutes and 52 seconds. it was only the fifth time she had raced the distance. incredible. she does that. smashes it by 14 seconds. who knows if she ever m oves it by 14 seconds. who knows if she ever moves up it by 14 seconds. who knows if she ever moves up to it by 14 seconds. who knows if she ever moves up to run it by 14 seconds. who knows if she ever moves up to run the marathon. we were just talking while we were watching that johanna we were just talking while we were watching thatjohanna konta match report about her startling rise up the rankings. you are two years ago she was outside the top 100 in the world ? she was outside the top 100 in the world? june 2015 she was 146 in the world. her rise to world number seven, probably with more calm, incredible. less than two years. this is when the pressure gets intense. the so—called islamic state took control of iraq's second largest city mosul 2.5 years ago, damaging priceless syrian antiquities in a
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campaign to raise elements of cultural history. now under control of the iraqi security forces, our middle east and it —— editorjeremy bowen has been to see the damage done to mosul‘s museum. these were the statues of gods, sumerian gods, and they were were great big statues with wings, feet with claws, and the faces and torsos of humans. you can see on it cuneiform. cuneiform writing is one of the earliest kind of alphabets, about 5,000 years old, and it's considered one of the greatest contributions to civilisation. and this wasn'tjust cultural vandalism, though it was that, it was an attempt to remake history, to destroy a civilisation, to destroy a memory. the things that contributed to making this part of the world special.
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inside there are large what were once, i suppose, exhibition rooms. high ceilings, pillars, it's a classic museum. now, in other buildings here, other parts of the museum here, you can see that this wasn't just an exhibition hall, it was a working museum. a place of research. and when they came here to destroy all of this, they were also trying to create something new. their caliphate. a return to the golden age of islam. but far from being that, it turned into the exercise of a brutal, vicious tyranny. you hear the noise outside? it's brought war down onto the iraqi people once again. that was our middle east editor with remarkable pictures of the complete devastation of inside the museum in
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mosul. let's look at the weather. have you fixed your graphics? yes, we restarted the graphic system. everything will be smooth as silk. famous last words. what do we have this morning? a couple of pictures from weather watcher is. quite a fresh day yesterday. a close—up of raindrops on the grass. this is my favourite one. i don't think it was from yesterday but a lovely close—up ofa from yesterday but a lovely close—up of a pea. i don't know what flowers they are, definitely not a buttercup but they look similar. maybe a pan c. anyway, today, some sunshine and a few scattered showers. —— pansie. not the case today, very different story today. won't be 100% dry. just
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an outside chance of catching a light shower around here. let's call it, maybe just about the east midlands and into lincolnshire, maybe east anglia, too. you can barely see, such tiny showers. 0verall, barely see, such tiny showers. overall, a beautiful, sunny day. a few clouds. fresh around lunchtime, temperatures 11 degrees across the northern half of the uk. they will peak at three or four in the afternoon. we could get as high as 17 in london. further north, bit fresher. 12 or 13. tonight, clear skies. a bit of mist and fog forming. some patches dotted around at in the country. a weather front moving in so on monday if some rain will push in to northern ireland, western parts of scotland. this is early in the day. the high pressure still close to england so we have
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fine weather. it could be quite cloudy for a time around the eastern coast. the rain moves in, can't miss it. trees from the west coast. even at four pm, only just it. trees from the west coast. even at four pm, onlyjust bridging. —— breeze. —— fringing. the outlook of the week ahead, pretty settled. not much rain on the way. typical temperatures will be a round 12 or 14 degrees. back to you. and you co—operate with no technical problems at all! the bfg, matilda and esio trot are just some of the children's stories clinton blake has brought to life. and if doing so he has inspired many children. now many of his works are going on show in a major exhibition. 0ur reporter went down memory lane. they conjure up the innocence of
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life and character. but the seemingly simple drawings of quentin blake covers some pretty good territory. the artist is now exhibiting here at the artworks gallery because it also holds workshops for mental patients. gallery because it also holds workshops for mental patientslj gallery because it also holds workshops for mental patients. i put ona workshops for mental patients. i put on a show for something called the nightingale project, in london, which started me off. i did some drawings for an elderly people's ward, a mental health patient‘s ward, a mental health patient‘s ward, you got it, i've done it. in the digital age his methods are low—tech, mostly just the digital age his methods are low—tech, mostlyjust pen and ink. but the lines he draws speaks volumes. ijust feel i'm doing it
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and it comes like that. then you're also very conscious of... i like scratchy needs, or things where you can feel the paper. scratchy needs, or things where you can feelthe paper. it's scratchy needs, or things where you can feel the paper. it's notjust the process of drawing that can be therapeutic, but the results too. these colourful paintings of children and aliens are designed for the children's hospital designed to convert the children in strange surroundings. these stories were made for a unit treating eating disorders. you go into that situation and think, what is their problem? what would be suitable? what would help them? of course having some pictures on the wall of a hospital humanises it and means it isn't a health factory. the paintings are on show for three months, true inspiration for illustrators everywhere. some brilliant pictures. they make roald
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dahl‘s stories, don't they? they go hand in hand. you see a picture by quentin blake, you know exactly who it is by. now it's time for the travel show. this week we look back at some of the highlights of the year so far. hello and welcome to the travel show, coming this week from the historic city of canterbury in southern england. i'm here to take a look back at some of the great stories we have clocked up already in 2017. and so far, it's been a great year. it's actually quite difficult to walk through here.
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it's so busy. i only learned to ski for the first time two weeks ago. it's definitely not recommended if you are a little bit claustrophobic. wow! now one of the things we really pride ourselves on here at the travel show is taking you off the beaten path, to find destinations you may not find in your average guidebook. we sent henry to turkey, to see a dig that's revealing fascinating insights. in the heart of nevsehir, among the modern houses and office buildings, workers made a startling find as they cleared a hillside for redevelopment. the largest underground
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city of its kind. excavations have revealed these openings dug into the side of the hill. experts estimate the caves could extend over 450,000 square metres. wow! look at all of this. ifind it quite hard to believe that there were people living on top of here, and all of this was actually hidden. so they had no idea that this was here? no. that is insane. that ceiling is rather unique, isn't it? what's all this? this is a monastery. and according to the scientists, the monastery dates back to the sixth century. you can definitely see the outline across there. this region was very important for the early christians. turkey is the single country on earth which has got the function of a bridge which is connecting two continents together. asia to europe, europe to asia.
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nearly 30 different civilisations have passed through this country. those early civilisations leave some remains. there are plans to turn sections of the cave network into an archaeological park with art galleries and boutique hotels. authorities hope to open it to the public in 2018, when visitors can see the excavations in their full glory. now where do you think is the best place in the world to meet a potential love match? well, if you are irish, it could be a little place on the west coast. # 0h, lisdoonvarna. # lisdoon, lisdoon, lisdoon, lisdoonvarna. the lisdoonvarna matchmaking festival is europe's largest singles event, attracting up to 60,000 people each year. it's been a local tradition for 160 years. the festival was originally
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designed to help find wives for lonely farmers at the end of the harvest season. for the past half—century, willie daly has been the town's matchmaker in chief, using skills passed down from his father and grandfather. the process is this. would you like to have children if all goes well? i think so, eventually, yeah. punters fill out their details and tell willie about themselves and what they would like in a partner. i have you down there as good—looking and nice. 0h! then, once the 20 euros fee is paid, willie will attempt to find them a match. joe's a little farmer. he has his own farmer. 0k. i had my doubts. i may still have doubts. but i thought i would give it a whirl, why not? we want to find the one. so far we haven't. but you know what, there
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is such a good buzz around. it's a great atmosphere. it's a fantastic community. it's brilliant. we would like to find someone with a bit of land, a nice personality, not bad looking. we're not fussy. we have to find the right match. there are no shortage of options for the ladies here. is there anybody out there? yes. ta me anseo. to finish off our look back at some of the recent best bits of the travel show, here's a selection of stories that seem to be the producer's favourites. those are the ones where presenters get pushed way out of their comfort zone and have to try something new. well, i didn't have to travel far from here in canterbury to try
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a spot of champing recently. all will be revealed in a moment. i'm and neither did addy, when he tried his hand playing a set in one of london's most famous nightclubs. we sent carmen all the way to peru and wanted her to try her hand at scissor dancing. i'm here for a spot of champing — church camping. it's available at 12 historic venues around the country. beautiful ancient sites that are rarely, if ever, used as places of mass worship any more. that's a very big hotel room. money raised from letting champers like me stay, means the crumbling buildings are spared a slow inevitable decline. somebody at the pub just told me that tonight is supposed to be the coldest night of the year. so that's good, as i head into my unheated church room for the night. i've got my... air bed.
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sleeping bag. so i'vejust got into bed. and it's quite comfy, actually. i feel quite cosy, given how cold it is. i can see my breath. i am going to try to go to sleep now. it is quite cold, notably quite cold. i think there's a jolly good reason that champing is only done during the summer. deciding to come champing at the dead of winter was a really terrible idea. you've got your volume controls here. you've got your highs, mides and lows. your bass knob. this is the big bass knob. give it some sibilance. straighten it out. with the technology today, it gives you much more flexibility to take risks and do things that you couldn't do in the old days with vinyl.
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so could you put a classic opera track with some hip—hop? yes. beethoven wrote most of his music in 120 bpm. so he was one of the first house djs. beethoven knew what he was talking about! he dropped beats. he did. and a lot of his stuff was dance music speed. all right, let's do this then. 0k. one, two, three, four. two, two, three, four. three, two, three... four, two, three, four. bingo! i'm now time to see if all that training has worked. it's the moment of truth. i'll tell you what i will say, it's very loud in here. now fortunately, it's still early, so the pressure is off a little bit.
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and i'm getting the hang of things. by the end of the night i've got the house rocking. the origin of the peruvian scissor dance is shrouded in mystery. but many believe the tradition began in the highlands of the andes as an act of worship to the mountain gods. now its importance in peru's history has been recognised by unesco. and it's backbreaking moves would put many break dancers to shame. first, i've got to get to grips with the scissors. the aim is to hit the handles together in time to the music. the blunt blades aren't connected, so holding them in position is really tricky.
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there is no way i'm going to be able to do this, and coordinate my feet. and it's not just mastering the scissors. this is the one that makes your knees bleed. learning the dance moves takes some serious commitment. after a few minutes, i'm exhausted. i can't even imagine how hard it would be to do these moves up in the andes, where the thin air makes everything so much harder. these guys are true athletes. that was hard work! carmen there, trying a spot of scissor dancing. and as they say, folks, don't try that one at home. well, that's all we've got time from this week's show. coming up next week... henry is hitting the canals
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of bangkok to find out what's being done to clean up the city's waterways. so much polystyrene, old teddy bears, mattresses. have a look at that. so dojoin us then if you can. in the meantime, don't forget you can keep up with us while we're out on the road in real—time, by signing up to our social media feeds. but for now, from me, christa larwood, and the rest of the travel show team in canterbury, it's goodbye. hello. this is breakfast, with ben thompson and katherine downes. six people are arrested for what the police describe as a brutal attack on a young asylum seeker. it happened at the 17—year—old stood at a bus stop in south london — detectives say they are treating it as a hate crime. good morning.
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it's sunday 2nd april. also ahead... more than 250 people die in colombia after a massive landslide — many more are still missing. a year on from the launch of a campaign to protect horses and riders on the roads, we discuss statistics that suggest the message still isn't getting through to some drivers.

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