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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 2, 2017 8:00am-9:00am BST

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social media feeds. but for now, from me, christa larwood, and the rest of the travel show team in canterbury, it's goodbye. hello. this is breakfast, with ben thompson and katherine downes. six people are arrested for what the police describe as a brutal attack on a young asylum seeker. it happened at the 17—year—old stood at a bus stop in south london — detectives say they are treating it as a hate crime. good morning. it's sunday 2nd april. also ahead... more than 250 people die in colombia after a massive landslide — many more are still missing. a year on from the launch of a campaign to protect horses and riders on the roads, we discuss statistics that suggest the message still isn't getting through to some drivers. johanna konta wins the biggest
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tennis title by a british woman in a0 years — she beats caroline wozniacki to win the miami open. it motivates you more to keep working hard and keep enjoying. also in sport, a surprise defeat for premier league leaders chelsea. their lead is cut to seven points after a 2—1 defeat to crystal palace at stamford bridge. and tomasz has the weather. well, it promises to be a nice day—to—day. lots of sunshine on the weight it yesterday, we had to dodge a view showers but not today. good morning. first, our main story. four men and two women have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a young asylum seeker was attacked in south london. police say they're treating it as a hate crime. the 17—year—old victim suffered severe head injuries but his life is not now believed to be at risk. andy moore reports. the young man, believed to be kurdish—iranian,
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was waiting at a bus stop late on friday night with two friends when he was approached by a group of about eight people. he was attacked after telling them where he came from. we believe it's a hate crime. prior to the attack taking place, the young person was asked where they were from and when they said that they were an asylum seeker, that is when that frenzied attack took place. police say the gang chased the young man round the corner into this street, where they kicked him in the head and left him on the floor, unconscious. after that, a number of members of the public came to help him. the attack only stopped when the sound of sirens was heard. the gang made off in the direction of this nearby pub. the young man was left with a fractured skull and a blood clot on his brain. he is said to be in a serious but stable condition in hospital. his two friends escaped the attackers and received only minor injuries. the local mp said croydon had generally very good relations between people of different backgrounds.
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he called the incident an appalling crime against somebody who had come to this country to seek sanctuary. more than 250 people are now known to have died in landslides in colombia, with many more injured and missing. heavy rains on friday night caused rivers to burst their banks in the town of mocoa, flooding homes with mud. greg dawson reports. from the ground, you get a sense of the force of the mud which pushed cars through buildings and ripped trees from the ground. but it's from the air that the scale of the damage is apparent, with a stew of mud and water stretching for miles. in some areas, there is no way in or out, with roads, with roads, bridges and entire neighbourhoods swept away. this is how many spent the night, surrounded by their belongings which have now become debris. people without homes in a town without power or running water. by torchlight, rescue workers continue to look for signs of life.
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hundreds of people are still missing, many of them children. a list of their names and ages has been pinned to the walls of a family welfare unit. translation: we have lost a baby, who has gone missing, and the rest is as you can see. a little baby. we can't find him anywhere. unusually heavy rain on friday evening caused the mocoa river to burst its banks. landslides might be common in this mountainous region but residents are shocked by the scale of the damage. more than 1000 troops and police officers have been sent to the region to help with the rescue effort but authorities have warned that the death toll is likely to keep rising. a third body has been found in the aftermath of the floods that hit australia's east coast in the wake of cyclone debbie. authorities are searching for another three people who are still missing in queensland and evacuation orders remain
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in place for a number of townships in northern new south wales. but it's expected that conditions will ease over the weekend. at least 18 people have been injured after the lighting of a carnival bonfire went wrong at an event in a north—east suburb of paris. dramatic video posted on social media showed a pyre exploding seconds after a fuse was ignited, sending debris over the crowd. police said a wooden figure had been doused with petrol before being lit. the incident happened at the end of the yellow carnaval at villepinte. the chancellor is to urge indian businesses to use the expertise of the city of london in the latest attempt by ministers to build trade links outside the european union. philip hammond's trade mission to delhi and mumbai is part of an effort to build a partnership with india as it tries to forge a future as a global manufacturing powerhouse. our business correspondent joe lynam has more. depending on how britain quits the eu, the city of london is set
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to lose thousands ofjobs in the coming years, as some banks and insurers leave to remain in the single market. now, the chancellor, philip hammond, is hoping to court new customers for britain's financial services expertise. he leads a delegation of business leaders, as well as the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, to india this week, hoping that indian companies will use the city of london to fund the estimated £i.2 trillion of spending needed to modernise india's infrastructure. the government also hopes to use the trip to open new markets in india for companies like transferwise, part of britain's rapidly growing financial technology or fin—tech sector. all of this forms the backdrop for a comprehensive free trade agreement which britain hopes to sign with india once it formally leaves the eu. but that won't be easy — india has yet to sign any free trade deal with anyone and one stumbling block could be a demand by india to allow its citizens free movement to and from britain. a former government advisor
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daniel sokol has backed a campaign calling for a law requiring medical professionals to report people unfit to drive to the dvla. the campaign started after the death of three—year—old poppy—arabella clarke, who was killed crossing the road by a pensioner who'd been warned to stop driving because of poor eyesight. earlier on the programme, daniel sokol said the authorities shouldn'tjust rely on the honesty of the patient. if the patient says, "well, of course, doctor, i. driving," and doesn't, that usually isn't followed up doesn't, that usually isn't followed up so you may have someone on the roads at the moment who is blind as a bat or may have an epileptic seizure and who could cause tremendous harm to other people. the organisers of the university boat races say they have no plans to postpone the event — despite the discovery of what's thought to be an unexploded
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second world war bomb in the thames. the device was spotted near putney bridge, close to where the race begins. a final decision on whether the races get the go—ahead will be made this morning. the women's race is due to start at 4.35 this afternoon, with the men's race an hour later. for bob dylan, it was definitely a case of better late than never when he finally received his nobel prize for literature. dylan collected the award in person, during a very private ceremony in stockholm. he was awarded the prize last year, but failed to travel to sweden to pick it up. feathers were flying in philadelphia yesterday. residents had a massive pillow fight. it's part of international pillow fight day, which saw mock battles taking place all over the world. after the down had settled, participants were encouraged to donate their pillows, which will be given to the homeless. nowhere near enough feathers for my
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liking! not enough pyjamas, either. i think you should be forced to wear pyjamas for a further fight. —— feather light. great britain'sjohanna konta is celebrating the biggest victory of her tennis career. she won the miami 0pen last night beating former world number one caroline wozniacki in straight sets. it's being described as the most significant victory by a british woman in a0 years. it's an incredible accomplishment, not just for myself but also for my team and my family back home. it's always nice to get these sorts of, i guess, moments in your career where it gets... what's the word? a bit of a pat on the back for the hard work that you're putting in and continuously putting in, and so it just motivates you more to keep working hard and, yeah, keep enjoying. late last night her coach
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andrew fitzpatrick gave us his reaction to the win. a fantastic end to a long two weeks. there are pressures and a whole host of things from the outside but, from within, you just take it day by day and match by match and it is just nice to see her push herself over the line in what is potentially her biggest win in the tournament so far. just that she's progressing really well. she's someone who is very mentally strong. she has a process that she has developed before we came under the team that is true to her and as long as she trusts in that and trusts in that process and build the day by day to talk i can tell you, it was warm
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sitting from the side. we were all struggling. i couldn't even put my elbows on the side of the court. there was a black panel that i couldn't put my hands on. jo works incredibly hard on herfitness. she understands that part of her game is to do with movement and is tennis is ata to do with movement and is tennis is at a physical sport now, especially coming up against someone like caroline, one of the best athletes out there, they worked very hard on those conditions. tomorrow morning, we are flying to charleston to turn oui’ we are flying to charleston to turn our attention to play, so it will be a relatively class transition onto the american clay courts. as far as rankings go, it's not going to change anything, really. jo is lucky that she has a strong process and a strong mental approach to what she's doing, so the exterior pressures
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that some people have with those sort of things doesn't come into effect. she's very centred around her development and it's not so much about the ranking and much unto she's playing, it's more about what she's playing, it's more about what she's trying to do and how she's trying to evolve. we just went for a nice meal. everyone with the team and a few friends and family that we re and a few friends and family that were in town. nothing to wild but just a nice celebration of her achievement and the hard work that eve ryo ne achievement and the hard work that everyone —jo achievement and the hard work that everyone — jo and the team around her and support staff, everyone — has put in and is going to continue to put in to help her continue to grow so it was a nice evening. in about half an hour we will be asking former british number one annabel croft how farjohanna konta can go. 0ur tennis correspondent said she can absolutely go all the way. you're watching
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breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... six people are arrested after what police are describing as a brutal attack on a young asylum seeker. the most successful female british tennis player in over a generation. johanna konta beats caroline wozniacki to claim the miami open title. here's tomasz with a look at this morning's weather. it is looking good out there today? it is looking good out there today? it is. much better than yesterday. yesterday, lots of showers. ramos picture from the highlands of scotland, some goode action and here is my favourite, a nice the buzzing around sunflowers. what have we got in store this afternoon? a few scattered clouds. in some areas now, it isa scattered clouds. in some areas now, it is a bit overcast, for example the north—east of england and on the south coast. the idea is that the
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clouds will break up through the morning and many of us are in for a fine day, sunny sunday. beautiful weather along the south coast. no cloud at all over the english channel, or very little. looking cloud at all over the english channel, orvery little. looking out to sea, it is beautiful clear blue skies. this is that lunchtime, lots of fine weather. just this one area around lincolnshire, east anglia, where we might catch one or two matters showers silver clouds could be just about big enough for a few spots of rain. won't last very long. most of us won't be getting that, you are in for a beautiful day in the south and the north. this evening, a beautiful end to the day, a nice sunset out there, and the weather starts to turn from the west but not too quickly. tonight is going to stay dry and there will be mist ina going to stay dry and there will be mist in a few places but tomorrow morning, we will see a weather front approaching of the atlantic, which means a bit of rain for northern ireland, western scotland and
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eventually some of these western fringes of the uk but the weather front will be really slow—moving, at a glacial pace for many of us across the bulk of the uk, monday promises to bea the bulk of the uk, monday promises to be a fine day. a nice, sunny start of the day and it should stay sunny and dry across eastern areas but in the west, more cloud and some rain around. here is the summary for the week ahead. we've not got much rain on the weighted up monday into tuesday, some others will get some spot but overall, a settled week and temperatures will be around ten to 14. overall, the week is looking very pleasant with lots of fine weather. good news! thanks very much, tomasz council tax, water, phone, prescriptions — just some of the services we use that went up in price yesterday. it's all because inflation is rising, reaching its highest rate in three and a half years last month. hannah maundrell is the editor of money.co.uk. hannah, you've called yesterday national price hike day. explain all. why are they all going
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up explain all. why are they all going up now? it is because a load of inflation related price hikes have kicked in but also, to add to the pain of that, energy providers are hiking prices this month, telecoms providers like bt, ee, 02 and vodafone are hiking prices, so it all comes together to put extra pressure on your wallet but the great news is that for most of these things, you can do something really simple and save yourself potentially hundreds of pounds. let's have a lot of detail about things that are going up. first, prescriptions. they going up. first, prescriptions. they 9° up going up. first, prescriptions. they 9° up by going up. first, prescriptions. they go up by 20p in england to £8.40. council tax, as well. we've had our letter through the last couple of weeks, increases of 5% 490 of households. bt is putting broadband charges by £2 on the basic broadband package. and mobile providers, to. for example, ee prices are by 2.6
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percentage up why do they all come now and would it be better for consumers if they were spread out over the year? 0r consumers if they were spread out over the year? or do you just take them as a hip now, you know you are dealing with and you can look into making savings? it is a bit confusing that everything goes up at the same time because you think, i've got to switch my energy on my mobile provider but, actually, you've only got a finite amount of time. if you ran out of time you are going to end up paying more somewhere and it makes it a bit confusing but just put somewhere and it makes it a bit confusing butjust put on our side and called your mobile provider, go online and so join energy supply. you can literally save hundreds of pounds and i think that is worth an hour set aside to drop to providers value our custom enough to actually ca re if value our custom enough to actually care if we threaten to leave? value our custom enough to actually care if we threaten to leave ?m used to work and i would ring up and say, i'm going to be reviewed up my bill and they say, ok, so you. they value you paying your bills so if you push hard enough, and you
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threaten to leave... i'm a big hagglerfor a lot of threaten to leave... i'm a big haggler for a lot of my bills so check what you would be paying with another provider. it is about that direct comparison, so if you say, this provider will give it to me £5 cheaper. and don't be afraid to walk away and not the first sign of their resista nce away and not the first sign of their resistance don't just say, away and not the first sign of their resistance don'tjust say, "fine, i'll stick with you and pay more. because you can always just go and sign up as a new customer and pay less a nyway sign up as a new customer and pay less anyway because new customer deals tend to be cheaper. so don't be afraid to stand your ground and ask what they can do for you especially the with them for a few yea rs especially the with them for a few years but it is really about seeing what you could pay elsewhere and questioning whether the amount you are paying is worth the service you are paying is worth the service you are getting. in many cases, the service will be exactly the same no matter who you pay your bill to, especially for energy, so do it as much as possible. do you think that is what put people off? you're going
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to have to fight with the person on the other end of the phone, and also it is complicated. you look your eligibility is hard to work out what you are paying for. often people think they are on a fixed energy deal, so won't be affected by the same price ex butjust because they pay the same amount every month, they are on a variable tariff, seven to present of households are, at the end up paying £100 more because of the price increases but are already paying about £300 too much for the energy supply anyway. so getting your bill and calling your provider and asking the type of tariff you an amber doing a comparison and switching, it takes ten minutes and it can be really simple. for potentially £400 back in your pocket ina year, potentially £400 back in your pocket in a year, it's worth it. £400 is worth saving. that money is better in your pocket than there's. hannah, thank you so much for coming in to talk to us about that. national price hike day sounds a bit
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depressing. that is us done for the day! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. the writer and broadcaster robert meakin is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to robert in a minute. first, let's look at the front pages. we're starting off with the sunday times. richard pearce paid for doing nothing. they say they've done an investigation into how much he is contained in the house of lords. —— rich walne paid for doing nothing to drop in the observer, nhs recruits must be given special status after brexit. says the government was under intense pressure to guarantee that eu nationals also be able to work in the nhs after brexit because there is a concern it could cause a shortage of nurses and doctors on an
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already... a system that is already under pressure. 0nto the sunday telegraph — airports and nuclear station on terror alert. security services of issued a series of alerts in the past 24 hours, they say, warning that terrorists may have developed ways of bypassing safety checks. 0n the front of the sunday mirror, the headline is talking about tom jones, his wife linda of 59 years, who died of cancer. he says that nearly pushed into breaking point. and on the front of the express by the, this is the story, according to the sunday express , the story, according to the sunday express, that britain's iconic dark blue passports are set to make a return post brexit, so instead of having those maroon passports we have at the moment, we will have the blue ones that we used to have decades ago. maroon is such a funny word! let's
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talk papers. robert is here. this is the sunday telegraph. more news about the delays to repairs at westminster. we've heard this before. it's been going on for a good old time. it is well known the place is falling apart and now it has been kicked into the long grass again, it seems. they won't make a decision on this until 2020. i don't how much time it is between making the decision moving out but it is going to be a long, long time. they have worked out where they are going to do and what they going to do. there was talk about them going to birmingham manchester. or the delay, the bigger the cost, i assume. 3.5 quid is the estimate at the moment and these things tend to go up. it isa and these things tend to go up. it is a fantastic building. you go in there and marble but behind the walls is chaos. i heard somebody say
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they went down to the basement and they went down to the basement and they said that what they saw there doesn't bear thinking about, so lots of work to be done. they are big on rodents! sunday mirror, john prescott writing in his column, talking about phone tapping and security. uses himself as an example. he's claiming that back in his wild young days as a man himself, his phone was tapped and he's got an interesting anecdote claiming that tony blair told him that the late ian paisley‘s phone was being tapped by intelligence services and, unsurprisingly, that didn't get out at the time because the northern ireland peace process was going on. it may not have helped proceedings. there was a story were talking about on breakfast about how the first person new henry viii talking about on breakfast about how the first person new henry v!!! was abdicating was a government spy because the royal family's phone was being tapped. a murky world. we have
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this ongoing debate about what is keeping us safe on the one side and what is actuallyjust eroding our rights as citizens. speaking of the royalfamily, this rights as citizens. speaking of the royal family, this story in the telegraph, wallis simpson and her affair with a mayfair car dealer to talk this has come to light because of declassified documents. as if she wasn't a controversial enough figure in history, it is suggested that when her romance began with edward viii, she was singing this mayfair car dealer. notjust any car dealer but a mayfair car dealer! the sunday telegraph have to make clear that it is an upmarket car dealer! i think he could have a little footnote in history. we've never heard of him before but i'm sure his family will before but i'm sure his family will be delighted. sorry, i'mjust reading the details! it says she is reputed to be very attractive and fond of the company of men. that is
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well documented. we are going to the mail on sunday. april fool. well documented. we are going to the mail on sunday. aprilfool. we are talking about stormzy, i believed it it says are storming here and i thought we were talking about the weather. it is about the fact that he fell four and april. with that david attenborough was going to start producing grime music. storms the is a grime rapper. it was an announcement made that it was going to bea announcement made that it was going to be a documentary and that attenborough, a very versatile man into his 90s, but you would imagine this is going to be a step too far and possibly stormzy believed it was true and possibly forgot the date and voiced his disapproval. david attenborough‘s voice and voice—over... attenborough‘s voice and
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voice-over. .. we shouldn't underestimate the man! maybe you should team up with stormzy and they could be beautiful music! i like how you have been to the papers because we just were talking about the royal family and now we're talking about music. here is a surprise, eurovision gets political. ukraine and russia — it is not surprising it is political. ukraine are hosting at this year and currently want to ban the russian co ntesta nt, currently want to ban the russian contestant, which is causing all manner of diplomatic difficulty. eurovision are saying, you can't do this and that ukraine could be banned in the subsequent year but whatever occurs, we can pretty much guarantee that neither ukraine nor russia will be voting for us. or each other! ukraine have got it this time. i don't know the last time britain hosted it. that has been the long time. it was the mid-90s with katrina and the waves. long time. it was the mid-90s with katrina and the waveslj
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long time. it was the mid-90s with katrina and the waves. i watch it forjust katrina and the waves. i watch it for just graham norton katrina and the waves. i watch it forjust graham norton seeing —— seeming funny and bitter as when i goes on. it will be interesting to see it this year because the political landscape in europe has changed somewhat, maybe. do you think some european countries might not vote for us? good to see you, robert. robert, thanks very much. coming in the next half—hour. .. his quirky illustrations often show vibrant scenes of childhood fun, but quentin blake has been telling us how his art can have a more serious side. stay with us for that and the rest of the headlines, coming up at 8:30am. good morning, you're watching brea kfast good morning, you're watching breakfast with ben thompson and katherine downes. coming up before 9am, tomasz schaferna ker will katherine downes. coming up before 9am, tomasz schafernaker will have a last look at the weather. but just before 8:30am, a look at this morning's main news. more than 250
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people have been killed after mudslides swept through a colombian town. several neighbourhoods have been destroyed and over 1000 emergency workers are now involved in the rescue effort. hundreds are injured and missing. the death toll is expected to rise. the president has declared a state of emergency. four men and two women have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after a young asylum seeker was attacked in south london. the 17—year—old victim suffered severe head injuries but his life is not believed to be at risk. police are dealing with it as a hate crime. we have talked about colombia but let's not talk about india because there is big concern about the skills being used and whether businesses in the city of an can use those skills to try and build trade links outside the european union. 0r thatis links outside the european union. 0r that is related to the over brexit. philip hammond's trade mission to delhi bite is part of an effort to build a partnership with india as it
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tries to forge a future as a global manufacturing powerhouse. sounds like something from a beano magazine! the organisers of the university boat race and say they have no plans to postpone the event despite the discovery of what is thought to be an unexploded second world war bomb in the thames. the device was spotted near putney bridge, close to near the race begins. a final decision on whether the races go ahead will be made this morning. the woman's races due to start at 4:35pm with the men's race an hour later. yellow car owners have rallied in support of verba kel yellow car owners have rallied in support of verbakel blamed for ruining tourists' photographs in a picturesque cotswold village. the convoy drove through the village in solidarity with 84—year—old vauxhall corsa owner peter maddox after his car was vandalised earlier this year for apparently spoiling the view. he said he's been overwhelmed by the support it up that's the car, the
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village, the view, but people don't like the yellow card. he said after his yellow car was vandalised, he's going to replace it with a lime green car! that is an attitude to be applauded. i like your theory earlier because you were saying, the village needs more yellow stuff. may be one of those army camouflage cargo things. i love it. it has pink spotlight. and he lives there. villagers are made for living in, not taking photos of. johanna konta, biggest win of her career, without doubt, winning the miami open, beating the former world number one, caroline wozniacki, number one, caroline wozniacki, number seven in the world rankings, the third world tour title, easily the third world tour title, easily the most significant, beating caroline wozniacki 6—4, 6—3. voiceover: miami is a place for the
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relaxed and cool, not so easy when you are in baking heat and playing one of the bigger matches of your life so far. johanna konta, which is number one, break one, game one, in the florida sun it takes some energy to sit and watch, but alone content with the athleticism of caroline wozniacki. first was a set of frequent breaks, in server but not intensity. like all the best in the sport, anaconda peaked at the most important points, this one earned her the first set, 6—4. the former world number one, caroline wozniacki, did not start as favourite. the ranking is no accident, a mark of the progress of johanna konta. the danish woman was repaired but never relented. as body is tired, johanna konta offered more thunderbolts. no british woman had won this tournament before, she got there in straight cents, up to seven in the world, johanna konta says that she has benefited from playing
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in the shadow of andy murray. you will not find much shadow in miami. there was a surprise defeat for premier league leaders chelsea yesterday, they went down 2—1 to crystal palace. second placed tottenham are keeping up the pressure, they won away at burnley. ben croucher has the details. commentator:1-0 commentator: 1-0 chelsea, commentator: 1—0 chelsea, leaders ahead after just four commentator: 1—0 chelsea, leaders ahead afterjust four minutes. commentator: early lead against struggling crystal palace, looks like another saturday stroll for chelsea, in 91 first half seconds, that stroll became all the more gruelling, first williams aha and then christian benteke left antonio co nte then christian benteke left antonio conte staring at only a fourth league conte staring at only a fourth lea g u e loss conte staring at only a fourth league loss this season, and sparked some injury in what looked like a one—sided title race. in trade because spurs, second place, made up ground with victory at burnley, eric dier and son scoring in a 2—0 win, to narrow the gap. what is important for us is for us to be there if chelsea slip up. then we will be
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there, we are there fighting, for the premier league show. behind spurs, liverpool, they didn't need any help from 007, they had all they neededin any help from 007, they had all they needed in their number ten, philippe coutinho scored one and had a hand in the other two, liverpool winning the merseyside derby, 3—1. a chance to close in on the top four, jose mourinho had every reason to be cheery ahead of the match with west brom, but despite having three quarters of the possession, manchester united had to be content with an even share of the points and a goalless draw. craig shakespeare may not be the special one but he has masterminded turnaround at leicester city, it helps when your players can do this. commentator: space... it's it well enough...! feast your eyes on that! voiceover: jamie vardy‘s strike was a pretty strike, too, craig
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shakespeare the first british manager to win his first four games in the premier league show pretty easy, bass! a goalless draw between southampton and bournemouth, is this the worst penalty in premier league history... commentator: harry arter has missed it by a mile! voiceover: at least he has not got far to go home(!) elsewhere hull got a crucial three points in their battle to get out of the relegation zone, they came from behind to beat west ham 2—1. and there was another defeat for bottom side sunderland, they lost one nil at watford. --1-0. celtic will win their sixth consecutive league title if they beat hearts later today. brendan rodgers's side are 22 points ahead of their nearest rivals aberdeen in the scottish premiership. the job was to win it in the best way we possibly could. there is different ways to win. people will tell you that you can win something and it's not be the same feeling, but to win and foster the spirit we have through the whole football club can make it really special, and also
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the way we have played football. there were four games in the scottish premiership yesterday. partick thistle came from behind to beat ross county 2—1 and strengthen their position in the top six. partick now four points clear of kilmarnock who drew one all with inverness. inverness are now bottom of the table, replacing hamilton who beat stjohnstone 1—0. stjohnstone played the 2nd half of that match with nine men after two of their team were sent off for fighting each other. rangers drew 1—1 with motherwell shelley kerr will become the new manager of the scotland women's team. kerr twice led arsenal to fa cup success and has also managed hibs, kilmarnock and spartans. she'll take over from anna signeul who will step down after this year's european championships. wasps are out of european club rugby's premier competition, the champions cup. they lost 32—17 to leinster in their quarterfinal. the irish side put four tries past the premiership leaders to win. they'll play either clermont auvergne or toulon next. munster are also into the last four, they'll face either glasgow or defending champions saracens. the two remaining quarterfinal matches are later today. in the european challenge cup,
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bath are into the semi finals for the second time in four years. they beat brive 34—20. england winger samesa rockodoguni scored twice for bath. gloucester are also through,they beat cardiff blues. warrington remain bottom of superleague but a late kurt gidley penalty did earn them a first point as they drew with hull fc. widnes beat leigh for their first win of the season. wakefield trinity meanwhile are up to 6th in the table. they beat catalan dragons 38—18 in perpignan thanks largely to a hattrick from benjones bishop. charley hull's hopes of winning the first golf major in the women's calendar, the ana inspiration tournament, appear to be over going into today's final round in california. she finished second last year, but after a round of 71 she's eight shots behind this woman, america's lexi thompson, who heads the field on 13 under par overall.
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she narrowly missed out on a birdie at the 7th there. four world records have been smashed by one woman at the prague half marathon in the czech republic. kenya's joyciline jepkosgei beat paula radcliffe's 14 year old record for 10k on the road, along with the marks for 15 and 20 kilometres. she won the race in a record one hour four minutes and fifty two seconds. it was only the fifth time she had raced the distance. that is what makes it amazing, smashed it. it's arguably the best performance by a female british tennis player since virginia wade won at wimbledon 40 years ago. ast night, johanna konta continued an incredible run of form to win the miami open and become world number 7. annabel croft, what did you make of
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the performance last night? fantastic achievement, one of the biggest achievements we have seen since virginia wade winning wimbledon, but she did not even play her best tennis, a jittery match against caroline wozniacki, once she got the first set under her belt, she completely overpowered her, in every department, serving, returning was very every department, serving, returning was very aggressive, and very aggressive groundstrokes from the back of the court. two years ago she was ranked about 147 in the world, and all of us knowjust how hard she has been putting in the hard yards on the practice court, of the court with training as well, she worked with training as well, she worked with a mental coach who sadly has passed away. he put in some great foundations for the improvements she has done mentally. all the pieces of the puzzles seem to be coming together, the calibre of player she has beaten this week, venus williams, seven time grand slam champion, former world number two,
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in simona halep, and former world number one, caroline wozniacki, so amazing, amazing achievement. really in the mix with the best players in the world now, all the talk will inevitably turn to whether she can wina grand inevitably turn to whether she can win a grand slam. that means whether or not she can beat serena williams, that she have what it takes to do that? that is a very good question, not a lot of players on the tour have beaten serena williams, there isa have beaten serena williams, there is a handful of them but as everyone knows, she is one of the greatest there has ever been to play the game and she is still highly fit and motivated. to win yet more slams, because she has just overtaken steffi g raf, because she has just overtaken steffi graf, now she will chase down margaret called's record, 24 grand slams. if serena williams is in the draw, they did meet each other at the spreading open commerce arena had too much for her, ifjohanna konta carries on with these improvement levels, it would be an
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incredible match up. —— they did meet each other at the australian open, serena williams had too much for her then. looking at the bigger picture, what does this mean for women and girls tennis in the uk, that there is now a woman at seventh in the world. such a huge achievement. if you know how tough it is to break into the top 100, she has done it by degrees and inches, using a personal development wheel, she will wake up in the morning and have a look at every aspect of her life as a tennis buyer to try to improve in every single area, something british cycling have used very successfully, andy murray uses it as well. looking at the mental side of the game, the tactical side, the emotional side, the physical side, everything... the nutritional side, everything... the nutritional side, everything... the nutritional side, every aspect goes on to being a professional tennis player. she looks at every area, how can i
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improve everyday so all the pieces will add up to a better tennis buyer? i think she is also using something called the process, she worked on that with her late mental coach, where she does not live and die by results, every time she walks onto court, not just die by results, every time she walks onto court, notjust about die by results, every time she walks onto court, not just about the winning, it is about improving herself on the tennis court. seems to bea herself on the tennis court. seems to be a formula that has worked for her, a couple of years ago, 147, near she is her, a couple of years ago, 147, nearshe is up her, a couple of years ago, 147, near she is up at seven in the world. —— mentor coach. extraordinary rise in such a tough sport, mentally demanding, as well as emotional and physically demanding. i think that she really underlines what hard work can achieve for you. so much more than just hitting the ball! going into johanna konta and her rise up the rankings. thank you for speaking with us. living with a chronic health condition is difficult at the best of times, but what about when the treatment will have lasting effects? this is something 13—year—old thomas and his parents,
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matthew and adele, have faced, but they've found a unique way to embrace thomas' future that has been the talk of social media. they're with us now to tell us more. good morning. nice to see you here. thomas, tell us about your condition. the veins in the back of my leg have bled into my knee and it wears away the joint. that makes it painful for you wears away the joint. that makes it painfulfor you to do most wears away the joint. that makes it painful for you to do most things. yes. you have been dealing with this for a long time, helping tom deal with it and you are at the point where there is no other treatment available. we have spent a couple of yea rs available. we have spent a couple of years with surgeons and specialists looking at different options, we have come to the conclusion along with the surgeons now that the only option for tom to sort of get on with his life is to have the leg amputated above the knee. that is
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going to happen very soon. we are quite positive about the situation. we have seen what tom has been true for the last couple of years. since he was born, but the last two years, it has become really difficult for him to do anything. even things like... he loves being paths, cannot get ina like... he loves being paths, cannot get in a ride anymore, because his kneeis get in a ride anymore, because his knee is stuck at a 90 degrees angle, cannot bend it, and not straighten it. we are looking forward to him being able to move on with his life. you say that you are being very positive, this is a very unusual way to be going about approaching what is essentially a very life changing surgery, talk to us about how you have been marking the run—up to this operation, which will see tom lose his leg. we decided to have a party! give the leg a bit of a sendoff(!) we had a leaving do for his leg, for a lot of people this would be a doom
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and gloom situation, i think, but for us, having lived with him and seen what he has been through, this will be his last operation, this is the start of a new chapter. we thought it with something we would try to put a positive spin on and celebrate and get everybody who knows us and loves us around, to do it with us, we had a party. tell us about the party. it were well good! laughter. family and friends... we had elvis! laughter for you, it is the start of a difficult procedure, but you have been through other attempts, with the doctor, to try to solve this, there has been nothing that has worked or help you deal with it. yeah. do you share the positives? both parents saying, you will put a
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positive spin on it, do you share the positivity? yeah, yeah. what will life be like once the leg is gone, what you hope to be able to do and get back into, once you have mobility again? everything that my mates are doing, really. like that that the be able to go with them, because they are always riding bites and everything and i can't. mum and dad, you have watched this, you have been helping him deal with this condition. -- riding bike. this is the start of a new lease of life. he is into disability sport, it has been fantastic, taking him all over the country to take part in tournaments. he is really good at
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wheelchair racing. i think that is something that he will continue with, looking forward to having a go at wheelchair rugby. that is something he has not been able to do at the moment but once he has a prophetic, he will be able to do that. lots of things, everything looks bright to me. we have seen him be upset. because he can't go and do what his friends are doing. even going to the cinema, getting on a bus, he would struggle to get on a bus, he would struggle to get on a bus with them. and sol bus, he would struggle to get on a bus with them. and so i think it is great that we will be able to see him go off and achieve whatever he wants to do. we are looking forward to seeing him walk without his sticks, walk onto fate. no more pain, as well. -- walk on two feet. there is a picture somewhere, you had... a leg cake! as part of the
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leaving party. laughter great approach to what will be a new lease of life, best of luck with the surgery and hopefully we will see you on the other side. ain't cute. —— thank you. this is where we say goodbye to kat, who's going to read the news for the andrew marr show. the weather now, this selection of cloudy pictures, we need a bit of rain, and today looks like things will be a lot drier and more not completely dry everywhere, but we will get some sunshine later on. cloud is a bit thicker across the north—east, patches of cloudy masoud, by the time we get to lunchtime, it is looking absolutely
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marvellous out there. beautiful weather along the south coast, if you are heading to the promenade, looking out to sea. clear blue skies, not much cloud inland. —— patches of cloud in the south. for most of us, west and north, looking like a beautiful day. temperatures at lunchtime, lola, ten, 11, peaking at lunchtime, lola, ten, 11, peaking at three orfour at lunchtime, lola, ten, 11, peaking at three or four in the afternoon. —— lower. there could be some mist around. the weather begins to turn from early monday across the north west, weather fronts coming from early monday across the north west, weatherfronts coming in, high—pressure slipping away, weather fronts bring some cloud and eventually rain to northern ireland and western scotland, east of scotla nd and western scotland, east of scotland looking fine, notice how
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the weather front slowly moved towards the east, maybe the western fringes of wales and cornwall will get some rain, for the bulk of the uk, and the bulk of england, looking sunny on monday. quick summary, very little rain on the way, we will have it monday into tuesday, some of us will staying settled most of the week and temperatures will be about where they should be, 12 to 14 degrees. 0verall, not looking bad at all this coming week. thank you very much, enjoy the rest of your sunday. the bfg, matilda and esio trott, just some of the famous children characters that illustrator sir quentin blake brought to life. in doing so he inspired generations of children. now 100 of his works are going on show in a major exhibition. we sent our reporter cathy killick on a trip down memory lane. voiceover: they conjure up the
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innocence and exuberance of childhood, full of life and character, the seemingly simple drawings of sir quentin blake probe some pretty poignant territory, the artist is 84 now, and increasingly interested in using art to improve health, here they hold workshops for mental health patients. health, here they hold workshops for mental health patientslj health, here they hold workshops for mental health patients. i put on a show for something called the nightingale project in london, which worked in hospitals, that started me off. idid worked in hospitals, that started me off. i did some drawings for an elderly peoples ward. mental health patients ward. you have got it, i have done it. in this overwhelmingly digital age, his methods are decidedly low—tech, pen and ink, in his hands, the lines that he draws
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speak volumes. ijust his hands, the lines that he draws speak volumes. i just feel i am doing it, it comes like that, and you are very conscious, i like scratching it is, things where you can feel the marks on the paper, so you are getting that as well. not just the process of drawing that can be therapeutic, the results can be as well, these colourful paintings of children and aliens are created for a children's hospital designed to comfort children uprooted in strange surroundings. these paintings are made for a unit treating eating disorders. you go into the situation and you think, what is their problem, the people here, what would be suitable, what would help them. having pictures on the wall of a hospital at all helps people, it humanises it, it means it is not a health factory. paintings on show for three months, true inspiration for illustrators everywhere. it's a shocking statistic
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but since 2010, 38 riders and 222 horses have been killed in incidents on britain's roads. last year a campaign was launched to try to get drivers to slow down in an attempt to bring the number of incidents down, but incredibly they've actually risen in the past 12 months. we went for a ride with pat shepherd from croft end equestrian centre in 0ldham to hear about some of the problems experienced by riders. we all wear high visibility and dress accordingly, hopefully to let the motorists have plenty of time to see us, but time and again now, people are coming back, horses coming back, owner saying, we had a near miss, he has caught us with his mirror. a few years ago i had an experience, with a coach, again, same type of thing, the horse did
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notjump same type of thing, the horse did not jump out into same type of thing, the horse did notjump out into the road, it was just too close. put in to get past us quickly, and caught the horse behind me. push that horse. lots of graces. could have been a million times worse than it was. fortu nately, times worse than it was. fortunately, it was not. i think that was just basically, he was in a hurry. that could have been fatal. let's discuss this more now. we're joined by laura thorogood, who's horse died following a road accident, safety campaigner claire lilly, and alan hiscox from the british horse society. let me start with you, your horse was killed in an accident, what happened and what happened afterwards ? happened and what happened afterwards? we was on a hack, going up afterwards? we was on a hack, going up the road, and i remember being struck from behind, don't remember any breaking, anybody being aware of
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anything around me. i... iwas struck from the horse, flying through the air, somersaulting, landing on my back. i blacked out, i think, because i don't remember much, apart from sitting up and summary coming over to help me. when an ambulance arrived. awful accident, and long—lasting implications as well. i still suffer from back problems, i go to the chiropractor weekly, not only that, the trauma, and everything, post traumatic stress, having to deal with it, day in, day out, being here, lucky to be alive, that is a blessing in itself. how common is this, we touched on this in the introduction, a campaign to bring down these accidents but they have gone up. we have the statistics on the website, and this past year, because people know about the website, that is why the statistics
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have gone up. because more people report them. 80% of these statistics are avoidable, drivers are travelling to fast or too close to horses or both, we are asking drivers to slow down to a maximum of 50 mph, pass wide and slow and give a car '5 length when passing and drive away slowly, if drivers are dear to these messages, then we will save lives, drivers live, horses live, bride 's lives. touching on some of the things drivers can do, the particular problem in your village, talk me through how this happens. -- then we will save the lives of drivers, horses and riders. fatalities due to the speed on impact, we need to get the speed on impact, we need to get the speed on impact, we need to get the speed limit down, this road is a recreational route, joggers, cyclists, horse riders, and it is not a safe environment for them to be in with a speed limit of 60, also, on the bend, we hope to
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achieve flashing led lights, activated by a jogger, or warning you to slow down, and encouraging people to slow down, what is around the bend, think bend, that is the kind of thing we are doing. you are not in, you have first—hand experience, drivers have sufficient awareness of what they have to do?” don't think they do, everybody seems to be ina don't think they do, everybody seems to be in a rush to get somewhere these days. it is about raising awareness of hazards on the road. if it is not horses, cyclists, pedestrians, especially in that particular area, it has built up a lot of equestrian, everyone shares the same road, the day in question, when the accident happened, wearing high visibility, to me, it does not feel like there was any excuse to why the accident happened, the fact we we re why the accident happened, the fact we were seen in hive is... raising
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the importance of that. looking at pictures of the high visibility jackets, is that enough, because clearly sometimes it does no good. trying to influence behaviour. we are working with drivers and structures association, working with mps in parliament. and the department of transport. crucially and most importantly, working with other road users as well, the motorcycle industry, with cyclists, we have the same message, drivers need to take much more care when they approach horses, and in that way, we are going to cut down on these incidents. is this a problem in the countryside or is it about visitors in the countryside? if you don't live there, you may not be accustomed of familiar with what goes on in a country lane, and... it is about educating drivers. and reaching a
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wider audience. us horsey people tend to go to horsey magazines and we see website, how do you reach a wider audience. that is through television and radio. good to speak with all of you, time is against us, but thank you for sharing your stories. thank you for your company today. dan and louise will be here from six o'clock tomorrow morning. thanks for watching, goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at nine... six people have been arrested after what's been described as a brutal attack on a 17—year—old kurdish—iranian boy in south london. the young person was asked where they were from an when they said they were from an when they said they weren't asylum seeker, that is when that frenzied attack took place. more than 250 people have been killed and many more are missing, after severe mudslides in colombia.
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johanna konta storms to victory in the miami 0pen — also in the next hour, problems in the build—up to today's boat races. a decision is expected later this morning after a suspected world war ii bomb was discovered on the banks of the thames. and we'll take a look at the morning's papers at half past. the sunday telegraph reports on airports and power stations needing to tighten defences against terrorist attacks.
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