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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 3, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a big change in the way police bail is used. a new 28—day limit has come in to force in england and wales but some officers are unhappy with the move. good morning, it's monday 3rd of april. gibraltar insists it won't be used as a bargaining chip in brexit negotiations. we're live on the rock later. the price of doing nothing. how our physical inactivity is said to be costing the nhs £1.2 billion a year. the apprenticeship levy comes into force this week designed to help more people into training, but critics say firms are unprepared and can't afford it.
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so will it work? in sport, six titles in a row for celtic. they take the scottish premiership with eight games to spare. and carol has the weather. good morning from bristol were four yea rs good morning from bristol were four years it has been rumoured someone has been going out late at night correcting bad punctuation. this morning the man who describes himself as a vigilante talks to us on breakfast. and carol has the weather. a cold start for some, some frost around and fog too but that will give way to a bright day with sunny spells. but in the west, expect some rain in northern ireland and western scotland. more details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. significant restrictions on the use of bail by police in england and wales come into force today. the amount of time a suspect released from custody can remain on bail will be limited to 28 days in most cases. the decision is in response to concerns that people were being left in limbo
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for months or even years. but police have questioned the move, as our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. famous faces who have been under police investigation, finally told they wouldn't be facing charges but only after long months on bail. they we re only after long months on bail. they were among the 5000 still on bail after a year. the government says the system needed rebalancing. well, what happened in the past is people could be put on bail with no end in sight and no check all balance, which means we have thousands of people on bailfor i2 which means we have thousands of people on bailfor 12 months or more, in fact there were examples of people on bailfor more, in fact there were examples of people on bail for several years and that's not acceptable, we need to make sure we have a proper system thatis make sure we have a proper system that is appropriate and proportionate. it's part of an overall of the system in england and wales. for those who are bailed, in most wales. for those who are bailed, in m ost pla ces wales. for those who are bailed, in most places the limit will be 28
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days. but a senior police officer will be able to grant 13—month extinction in convex cases. the police will have to seek the permission of a magistrate for anything longer that complex. —— complex. 28 days in the cycle of a police officer is not a long time to investigate a crime. you've also got to bear in mind in relation to external enquiries, what we tend to haveis external enquiries, what we tend to have is external resource, so we got the forensic science service, cps, and 28 days is not realistic for them to come back to us with the information we need to make decisions. june kelly, bbc news. we will be speaking to a criminal barrister about the changes to police bail at 7:10am. gibraltar has insisted it won't be used as a bargaining chip in any brexit deal the eu wants to reach with the uk. spain, which claims sovereignty of the british territory, culd be given a veto over decisions affecting it. but yesterday theresa may said the uk remains steadfastly committed to gibraltar. police are holding eight people
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in connection with an attack on a teenage asylum seeker on friday night. three arrests were made yesterday and the met police have now released images of three more people they wish to identify. the victim, a 17—year—old boy, is in a serious but stable condition after he was allegedly chased and beaten by 20—strong gang in croydon, south london. donald trump has said the us will solve the north korean nuclear threat under his leadership. in an interview with the financial times, the president is quoted as saying, "if china is not going to solve north korea, we will." mr trump confirmed he was referring to direct, unilateral action. the comments come ahead of a visit to the us by the chinese president this week. there's a warning that a third of adults in the uk, or 20 million people, are physically inactive and at risk
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from coronary heart disease. the british heart foundation says it's costing the health service over £1 billion a year, as breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. harriet had no warnings, no symptoms. she was climbing the stairs at home when she had a heart attack at the age ofjust 1m. it was like having the rug pulled from under your feet. i have a very young family, i had a very demanding job which i loved and really enjoyed, so then to suddenly be struck by such a traumatic incident was very difficult. i didn't make time for activity or exercise so looking i think, looking back on it now, i was fairly sedentary. harriet is not alone, research from the british heart foundation, shows the most inactive part of the uk is the northwest of england where 47% of adults do not take enough exercise. followed by northern ireland — where 46% are inactive. in wales and the northeast of england it is 42%. london and the west midlands — 40% and in scotland, 37% are too sedentary. we estimate that on average most
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of us spend 78 days of our lives each year in a sedentary position. physical activity is important but you also need to reduce the amount of time each day that you spend sitting at your computer or whatever it is you do. harriet has now changed her lifestyle, regular exercise, walking, playing with her kids, but inactivity is fast becoming one of the leading causes of premature death. graham satchell, bbc news. caring for a relative with terminal cancer takes an average of 70 hours a week in their final months, and costs the carer nearly 400 pounds according to a new study. research published in the palliative medicine journal says volunteer carers are crucial to the national health service but need more support and training to preserve their own mental and physical health. rescue teams in colombia are continuing to search through tons of mud and debris
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for anyone who might have survived the devastating mudslides in the south of the country. in the last few hours, the president has said 254 people are known to have died, 43 of them children. the total is expected to rise. the mud engulfed the town of mocoa, burying entire neighbourhoods. the political parties in northern ireland will begin fresh talks today at stormont aimed at restoring the devolved government. power sharing collapsed injanuary because of a row between sinn fein and the democratic unionists about a botched green energy scheme. last week, a deadline to form a new administration passed without agreement. some sick and disabled claimants of the out—of—work benefit employment and support allowance will now receive nearly £30 a week less. the government says bringing the benefit in line with jobseekers allowance will incentivise people to get back into work.
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0ur correspondent nikki fox has more. ulan bator wants to work. but like many others with learning difficulties, she finds it difficult to get a job —— belinda. she's getting by financially because she receives employment and support allowa nce, receives employment and support allowance, an out of work benefit for people whose ill health or disability limits their ability to work. lovely. employment and support allowa nce work. lovely. employment and support allowance is important to me because it helps for me to pay my essentials, my bills, my gas, my electric and basically to get my food in and it helps me to get out and about. those eligible for the benefit are placed in one of two groups. claimants in the support groups. claimants in the support group arejudged groups. claimants in the support group are judged as groups. claimants in the support group arejudged as being unable to work or look for work. 0thers, group arejudged as being unable to work or look forwork. others, like belinda, are placed in the work—related activity group because they've been deemed as being able to work at some point in the future.
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from today, all new claimants in this group will receive £73 a week instead of £102. existing recipients and those in the support group aren't affected by the changes so belinda won't see a reduction in the amount she receives. but like many disability charities, and mp5, she concerned cuts will be counter—productive and has campaigned against them. the theory is if you reduce benefits more people get into work but the truth is disabled people face lots of barriers to getting into work. someone on an ordinaryjobseekers allowa nce someone on an ordinaryjobseekers allowance may back in work typically in six months, for a disabled person typically it takes at least two yea rs. typically it takes at least two years. try living for two years on that really low level benefit, it's really tough. the government says new claimants placed in the affected group will receive a personal support package with practical help to re—enter the workforce when they are ready. nikki fox, bbc news. now this would be one to show
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off on your instagram or facebook feed. it might look like a picture of some dark, parallel universe but it's actually an image of swirling graphene ink and it's scooped the top prize in a prestigious science photography contest. james macleod's picture beat more than 100 entries to claim first place in two categories in this year's engineering and physical sciences research council photography competition. can you see a face? i can. tip your face a little bit to the left. quite close together eyes. if you look at it long enough! i don't know if it is smiling or not. slightly grumpy with a big nose. good morning, kat. good morning. did you see the face? i couldn't, i was squinting. morning. did you see the face? i couldn't, iwas squinting. graphene isa couldn't, iwas squinting. graphene is a wonder substance, look it up,
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it's amazing. i will read about it, i have been reading all morning about celtic winning six straight titles so i haven't been able to look up graphene think facts. but i will do! —— inc. celtic have clinched their sixth scottish premiership title in a row, after beating hearts 5—0 yesterday. they did it with eight games to spare, scott sinclair scored a hat—trick which helped put brendan rodgers' side 25 points clear of second—placed aberdeen. arsenal came from behind twice to earn a 2—2 draw at home to manchester city. it ended a run of two straight defeats for them, but leaves arsene wenger‘s side seven points outside the top four. saracens are the only british side left in rugby union's european champions cup. the reigning champions beat glasgow 38—13 to secure their place in the semi—finals, where they'll face munster. and 0xford's men win the boat race for the fourth time in five years. their women's boat lost after getting an oar stuck in the opening strokes.
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heartbreakfor heartbreak for 0xford's women, they couldn't claw that one back. that's a look at the sports headlines for now. hang around for the papers. now carol with the weather, i should look at the weather more often, it was very cold this morning? us started off with some frost. not just frost but patchy fog —— some of us. just frost but patchy fog —— some of us. yesterday in london it was very pleasant, temperatures got to 17 and we could see similar in some parts today. as we go through this week it will be mostly dry, a little bit fresher as we go through the week, chilly nights once again, some frost if you're tempted into the garden, bear that in if you're tempted into the garden, bearthat in mind, if you're tempted into the garden, bear that in mind, your tender pla nts bear that in mind, your tender plants will feel the draft. high pressure still endured but you can see a set of fronts coming in from the atlantic. —— dill in charge. —— still in charge. default we have at the moment will lift, bright skies,
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sunny spells coming through —— the fog. we could see some low cloud. through the afternoon we see the rain coming in, becoming quite in squads in western scotland whereas in eastern scotland, something drier —— in sconce. the rain pushing into northern ireland and the isle of man but for much of england we are looking at bright skies and sunny spells, highs of 16 or 17. if you're stuck under lower cloud on the coast for example, temperatures will be depressed and cloud building in south—west england and wales just ahead of the weather fronts coming in. but for most of the uk, a pleasa nt in. but for most of the uk, a pleasant and update. through the evening and overnight, ourfirst front is pushing through the south—east —— pleasant enough day. some patchy rain, maybe some low cloud around once again. a particularly cold night for most but these temperatures are indicative of what you can expect in towns and cities. we're looking at between six
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nine. tomorrow we've got the dregs of the rain in the south—east and channel islands, pushing away, leaving quite a bit of cloud behind it. the cloud thicken for drizzle and as we go further north, brighter skies, windy in the far north of scotla nd skies, windy in the far north of scotland and the north—west. —— the cloud thicken of. we could see some drizzle on the western hills. —— thick enough. we could see 8—15, not the high values we're looking at today. as we go from tuesday into wednesday, you can see the high pressure remaining across our shores, at times, windy in the north, as you can tell from the squeeze on the isobars with the weather front trotting past introducing rain at times. on wednesday, after a chilly start, some dry weather around, not wall—to—wall blue skies by any stretch, some cloud around, but again, a pleasant springlike day with highs between 8—14. that temperature dropping a couple of degrees as we go through the week,
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but the weather remaining fairly settled. thank you very much indeed, carol, see you later on! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: restrictions on the use of police bail come into force today. a new 28 day limit is introduced england and wales but some officers are unhappy with the move. a warning that more than 20 million people in the uk are physically inactive, costing the nhs around £1.2bn each year. let's look at the papers. the front page of the times, they have done an
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interview with donald trump about north korea. they are calling at exclusive. "it dott" ——" if china is not going to solve north korea, we will." a 17—year—old silence it is viciously chased by a mob while bysta nders viciously chased by a mob while bystanders do nothing. the guardian are talking to a welfare shakeup to hit children and the bereaved. lots of them have pictures. this is lydia wilkinson at her family house in the west midlands after an attack that killed her mother and brother. 0n the express, daily walk to save your life. one of our main stories this morning. 20 million lazy britons are being told to get more exercise. it's costing the nhs a lot of money.
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also trump to take on north korea also on the front of the daily telegraph. and also the italian town amateur che which was struck by an earthquake. —— amatrice. the story on the left want to talk about. booker and tesco are proposing to merge. the biggest shareholder says it will give it too much power over convenience stores. it doesn't convenience stores. it doesn't convenience stores. it doesn't convenience stores supplied by are forced to close could it would give tesco's too much power. a row is brewing in rome. they are replacing the old street lights with the new
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led ones. local council says it is good because it saves money but it isa good because it saves money but it is a bit cold, it's not very romantic. there is a great quote. look, if you are struggling to see the difference, i can only compare it to the difference, i can only compare ittoa the difference, i can only compare it to a candlelit dinner versus the frozen food isle of your local food grocery store. roma residents aren't happy. they say they love that yellow romantic glow, not the harsh white light. i share the view. a bit too stark. another shame, particularly if you are decent man who took this spectacular swallow dived into the thames but emerged with the murky depths without his winner 's medal that had just been put around his neck minutes before. what makes it even worse is that
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they were to others, james and ollie cook. james will go back with his medal and ollie will not. fizzy drinks, i have done some research and most fizzy drinks seem to kill the bugs from the river. after going in? yet. this young man, he was told he had cancer and went on a spending spree. this was 15 years ago. another good thing, he did all the jobs. he said he had to do the kitchen and bathroom. he did it all. he spent £650 on coy carp.
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kitchen and bathroom. he did it all. he spent £650 on coy carpm kitchen and bathroom. he did it all. he spent £650 on coy carp. it is a lot to then have to live with them for 15 more years. remember this picture? wait for it, wait for it. that dress. sold it for children in need for £11000. —— £1100. battenberg dressing, they say. this is an‘s colours also happen to be the colours also happen to be the colours of the world ‘s best cake. all i can colours of the world ‘s best cake. allican you colours of the world ‘s best cake. all! can you are colours of the world ‘s best cake. allican...youarea colours of the world ‘s best cake. all! can you are a head colours of the world ‘s best cake. all i can you are a head of the curb, louise minchin. whoever has that dress, ahead of the curve. if you're the kind of person whose blood begins to boil when you spot
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a spelling or grammatical mistake on a sign, here's a story for you. in bristol it's been rumoured for years that there's somebody who goes out under the cover of darkness — correcting mistakes on street signs and shop fronts. breakfast'sjon kay has tracked down the mysterious individual who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". good morning. yes, he takes this really, really seriously and goes to great lengths to get it right it is one thing, you are talking about your blood boiling and seizing inside. it is another thing to take matters into their own hands. —— seething. there are three shops up there where he has changed the signs. there is one he which is a good example. gentle men's hairstylist. it did not have an apostrophe and now it does. he
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matched it in with the font and goes to great lengths to get it right. he is the banksy of bad punctuation. roaming the streets of bristol, righting wrongs. i'm a grammar vigilante. i've been doing it for quite a lot of years now. i believe it is the cause worth pursuing. working alone and in secret, he makes punctuation marks to stick on errant signs. try to match the colour of the apostrophe that is needed on the shop... he has even made a special device which he called the apostrophiser which all out into reach the highest shops. a quick demonstration on the dining room wall. what i need to do is turn the cost of pfizer are around so i can get the roly—poly end. —— the apostrophiser. by day, he is a
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highly qualified professional. 0nly a handful of his closest friends and family know what he gets up to after dark. my heart has been thumping. i have got to make sure it is technically right. he started his campaign13 years technically right. he started his campaign 13 years ago. this was the first sign he tackled. amy's nail‘s. the apostrophe, it deleted. he has left his mark throughout this city, his punctuation mark. there will be some people, maybe the owners of these shops are saying, hang on a minute, you have got permission, we haven't asked you, what you are doing is a crime, vandalism. what you think? i think it's more of a crime to have the apostrophe is wrong in the first place. i think i can do it without causing offence and just discreetly do it. there is
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one sign he has been desperate to correct for years. cambridge motor‘s. correct for years. cambridge motor's. it just correct for years. cambridge motor's. itjust makes me feel... i just think, this isjust motor's. itjust makes me feel... i just think, this is just wrong. motor's. itjust makes me feel... i just think, this isjust wrong. it's not meant to be like this. it really does need sorting out. the garage is right outside bristolposmac— curate it present but tonight, he is going for it. —— bristol ‘s high security prison. he covers the rogue'. notice anything? not really. we went to find the man who owned the garage. who has done that?|j
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find the man who owned the garage. who has done that? i thank him. it's good to find people that care about english grammar, isn't it? when you go past a sign you have corrected, you feel all it says the word you are thinking of is pride. i'm the one who has been bad, sorted it out and gotten it grammatically correct. it makes my heart swell slightly when i seek the correct apostrophe. see what i meant when i said he ta kes see what i meant when i said he takes it very seriously? he takes it very, very seriously. when you start looking and start talking to the sky, everywhere you go, you start seeing apostrophes. you will start to look at things differently. let us know this morning if you have any signs that drive you mad. any bits
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of punctuation that you don't like that infuriate you, we have had one already this morning from katherine via twitter. erra nt already this morning from katherine via twitter. errant apostrophes in there. i think it would sort out any apostrophe. he has opened up a can of worms. that's a worms without an apostrophe. i'm so glad you cleared that up. i was putting something on social media and then you start becoming convinced when you're putting something up on twitter and facebook, is that right? is that wrong? you know what? you are worrying me. he does take very seriously. the apostrophiser, presented byjon kay, is on bbc radio 4 tonight at 8pm.
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i have corrected at sign in a dressing room before. at west ham's old ground. i found dressing room before. at west ham's old ground. ifound the picture. the sign in the old dressing room and said winning, its what we're here for. there was no'. —— spostrophe. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: grabbing a coffee on the way to work? spare a thought about what happens to the take—away cup — seven million of them are thrown away in the uk every day and most end up in landfill. we'll find out about a new scheme to get us to recycle them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup.
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data seen by bbc london shows there's been a huge rise in the number of people struggling to afford a home, who've been placed in temporary accommodation outside the capital. it's gone up by more than 300% since 2012 with some families placed as far away as leeds and newcastle. many london councils are struggling to meet the soaring cost of placing them in temporary accommodation here. we are seeing that it is just a case of housing being too expensive. even people in work, people who would expect to keep a roof over their heads, are finding that through no point —— fault of their own, the market has risen around them and they can't find anywhere affordable for theirfamily. police in islington are investigating — what could be human bones found in brown paper on cloudesley square, by a member of the public. police cordoned off the road
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and say the two thigh bones aren't thought to be ancient. they've been sent to the laboratory for testing. now, if you treat yourself to a coffee in the city of london today, you'll be encouraged to recycle your cup under a new scheme that's being launched. the cups are hard to recycle using conventional methods because of their plastic lining but londoners will be able to drop them in bright yellow bins around the square mile and they'll be taken to a special recycling plant. travel now. let‘s take a look at the tube now— and there's no reported problems on any of those lines there at the moment. now in canning town— police have closed off freemasons road— they‘ re investigating a fatal stabbing yesterday afternoon. there's a lot of fog around this morning and that means no woolwich ferry — the south terminal here is looking rather quiet at the moment. and trafalgar square is closed southbound from st martins place to the strand for gas works. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. it is a foggy start of
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the day and to the week, dry weather around. some fairly decent temperatures. today, we start off with rather dense fog in places. that should be clearing fairly early on, leaving us with some long, sunny spells through much of today and are largely dry day as well. add news for hayfever sufferers, i'm afraid there is a high pollen count. a southerly breeze and temperatures reaching 18 celsius, very warm for the beginning of april. as we headed through this morning, clubs will build and there is rain on the way from the west. light, drizzly rain and temperatures are getting down to about nine celsius. it makes for a rather damp start for tomorrow. the rain works its way off to the east, leaving outbreaks behind through the afternoon but quite a lot of cloud still. temperatures up to about 15. there will be some cloudy days this week but a good deal of dry weather altogether. temperatures just above where we would expect them for this
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time of year. heading up to about 1k or 15 celsius. not quite the warm weather that we will have today but still fairly decent and as i said, a lot of dry weather around and even some sunny lot of dry weather around and even some sunny spells to look forward to. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. also this morning, from using underhand tactics on suppliers, to buy—one—get—one—free offers, are supermarkets working hard enough to improve? the woman in charge of regulating our biggest retailers will be here to answer your questions. and may we introduce you to the one and only sergeant pepper's lonely hearts club band. the famous beatles‘ album turns 50 this year. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. significant restrictions on the use of bail by police in england and wales come into force today. the amount of time a suspect released from custody can remain on bail will be limited to 28 days in most cases. according to the home office, the move will end the injustice of people left in limbo
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for months or even years. but the police federation has warned the change will be unrealistic in complex investigations. 28 days in the cycle of a police officer is not a long time to investigate a crime. you've also got to bear in mind in relation to external enquiries, what we tend to have is external resource, so we've got the forensic science service, cps, and 28 days is not realistic for them to come back to us with the information we require to make decisions. gibraltar has insisted it won't be used as a bargaining chip in any brexit deal the eu wants to reach with the uk. spain, which claims sovereignty of the british territory, could be given a veto over decisions affecting it. but yesterday theresa may said the uk remains steadfastly committed to gibraltar. police are holding eight people in connection with an attack on a teenage asylum
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seeker on friday night. three arrests were made yesterday and the met police have now released images of three more people they want to speak to. the victim, a 17—year—old boy, is in a serious but stable condition after he was allegedly chased and beaten by gang of 20 people in croydon, south london. donald trump has said the us will solve the north korean nuclear threat under his leadership. in an interview with the financial times, the president is quoted as saying, "if china is not going to solve north korea, we will." mr trump confirmed he was referring to direct, unilateral action. the comments come ahead of a visit to the us by the chinese president this week. there's a warning that a third of adults in the uk, or 20 million people, are physically inactive and at risk from coronary heart disease. the british heart foundation says it's costing the health service over £1 billion a year as breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. harriet had no warnings, no symptoms. she was climbing the stairs at home when she had a heart attack at the age ofjust 1m.
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it was like having the rug pulled from under your feet. i have a very young family, i had a very demanding job which i loved and really enjoyed, so then to suddenly be struck by such a traumatic incident was very difficult. i didn't make time for activity or exercise so i think looking back on it now, i was fairly sedentary. harriet is not alone, research from the british heart foundation, shows the most inactive part of the uk is the northwest of england where 47% of adults do not take enough exercise. followed by northern ireland — where 46% are inactive. in wales and the northeast of england it is 42%. london and the west midlands — 40% and in scotland, 37% are too sedentary. we estimate that on average most of us spend 78 days of our life each year in a sedentary position. physical activity is important but you also need to reduce the amount of time each day that
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you spend sitting at your computer or whatever it is you do. harriet has now changed her lifestyle, regular exercise, walking, playing with her kids, but inactivity is fast becoming one of the leading causes of premature death. graham satchell, bbc news. rescue teams in colombia are continuing to search through tons of mud and debris for anyone who might have survived the devastating mudslides in the south of the country. in the last few hours, the president has said 254 people are known to have died, 43 of them children. but the total is expected to rise. the mud engulfed the town of mocoa, burying entire neighbourhoods. the political parties in northern ireland will begin fresh talks today at stormont aimed at restoring the devolved government. power sharing collapsed injanuary because of a row
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between sinn fein and the democratic unionists about a botched green energy scheme. last week, a deadline to form a new administration passed without agreement. doris day has received an unusual and perhaps unwelcome surprise on her birthday, she's two years older than she thought. day always said that her date of birth was april third, 1924, making her 93 today. but her original birth certificate has been uncovered showing she was born in 1922, which makes her 95. do you think that... do you think that. .. i think lots of things. do you think that she was in her 30s when she stole a few years off her age. does it matter? i a lwa ys off her age. does it matter? i always say i'm older than i am. do you? i forget. how always say i'm older than i am. do you? iforget. how old always say i'm older than i am. do you? i forget. how old are you? she's 75! honestly, i go through yea rs she's 75! honestly, i go through years thinking i'm a year older than
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iam and years thinking i'm a year older than i am and then i think, i'm only... she's 38! it's all on wikipedia, that well—known website! she's 38! it's all on wikipedia, that well-known website! this is the most unsurprising football news of the season, eight games to spare, rangers... celtic, that would have beena rangers... celtic, that would have been a terrible mistake! they are once again the scottish premiership champions. they were head and shoulders above the rest of the competition, unbeaten domesticly, of a mockable achievement. —— a remarkable achievement. it may be only the first week of april but celtic have clinched their sixth scottish premiership title in a row after beating hearts 5—0 yesterday. so they've done it in style with eight games to spare, scott sinclair scored a hat—trick which helped put brendan rodgers' side 25 points clear of second—placed aberdeen. six titles in a row equals a record set by rangers 88 years ago. i'm very honoured and very
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privileged to manage glasgow celtic. win you support a team like this as a boy and you know the great history of the club —— when. i was happy to ta ke of the club —— when. i was happy to take on the responsibility to make the supporters dream, make them happy and hopefully we've done that this coming season and hopefully for the years to come. there were two games in the premier league. arsenal are still sixth and manchester city fourth after a 2—2 draw at the emirates stadium. city, twice took the lead through leroy sane then sergio aguero before halftime. walcott and mustafi scored for the gunners. the point means they remain seven points behind city and the champions league places. it was a game where we weren't com pletely it was a game where we weren't completely at our best on the fluency and the technical front because we were under huge pressure but we showed strong mental resources and refused to lie down against a team who is always dangerous going forward and, at the
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end of the day, we got a point that will help us. at the other end of the table, middlesbrough wasted a late chance as they shared a goalless draw with swansea at the liberty stadium. the result keeps swansea just above the relegation zone. boro are five points from safety the 163rd boat race went the way of oxford as they beat cambridge byjust over a length for their fourth victory in five years. 0xford, who were favourites entering the race on the thames, took the lead in the early stages and cambridge never quite able close the gap. 0xford now trail cambridge 82—80 overall. i think of the three races, that's probably my favourite. the harder it is the more you can savour it at the end. hats off to cambridge, they did well, but we were just better on the day and that's what it's all about. a disastrous start cost 0xford in the women's race. one of their oars got stuck handing cambridge a simple victory. the light blues won by half a minute in a course record time too. saracens will be the only
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british club in rugby union's european champions cup semi—finals. the reigning champions were far too strong for glasgow warriors. chris ashton scored two of saracens four tries as they won 38—13. they'll face munster for a place in the final. roger federer says he'll probably not play again until the french open at the end of may after winning his third title of the year. he beat rafa nadal in straight sets to lift the miami open title 24 hours after britain'sjohanna konta won the women's event. federer moves up to fourth in the world rankings but will take the next month off to rest. and this is a remarkable story. spare a thought for american golfer lexi thompson, she was leading the first women's golf major of the season by three shots with just six holes to play.
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she was left in tears when she was approached by a rules official and told she would be punished for an infringement spotted by a television viewer in her previous round. it cost her four shots and ultimately the title which went to south korea's ryu so—yeon. she had to go into a play—off and she was so rattled by the four shot penalty in the final round that mentally she didn't have what it took to finish it off, understandably, all because someone at home was watching and said, i don't think that was right. e—mailed in... if you watch the video, she does put her ball down in a slightly different position but it's one of those things, golf is struggling to get people involved, if you look at it and you think, do i really want to be involved in that sport? the same with dustin johnson to be involved in that sport? the same with dustinjohnson at the us. 0pen same with dustinjohnson at the us. open and whether his ball was moved or not. it's so frustrating, haven't you got to go with what happens at that moment? that's the other
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argument, someone that moment? that's the other argument, someone said today a new rule in golf, you can't e—mail in 24 hours after. tiger woods said since when are the people at home the officials? if it worked like that, there would never be a decision made at all. imagine being cold when you are six holes away from winning and someone comes and says you are are six holes away from winning and someone comes and says you are being penalised for shots for something you did yesterday —— being told. poor old lexi thompson! around 30,000 people live in gibraltar but it's already entered centre—stage in negotiations over britain's exit from the european union. after its overwhelming vote to remain in the eu in last year's referendum, our correspondent tom burridge reports from the territory on the mood surrounding the brexit talks. distinct and disputed. the rock's relationship with its neighbour has a lwa ys relationship with its neighbour has always been fractious. but spain is emboldened by brexit. cue defiance
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from this very gibraltarian and british cabbie. you can close the border down, starve us economically, at the end of the day whoever remains in gibraltar, there's only one person, one gibraltarian, gibraltar will be british. that's all that counts, that's all that matters. britain's support for this british territory unflinchingly. but there is concern here about what brexit will mean —— unflinching. there is concern here about what brexit will mean -- unflinching. you have to look at our interests. 30,000 people in gibraltar, are they that important, i don't think so —— look at important is. we always manage to get by so i'm sure we will find a way —— look at importance. gibraltar‘s moneymaking machine is an success story. paul graham owns an success story. paul graham owns an investment company here —— is a success story. we need the eu
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market. i think gibraltar will be fully exposed and i think spain will have some sort of sovereignty on gibraltar because of the economic aspect. and with southern spain just over the border still struggling with low growth and high unemployment, madrid has long argued gibraltar‘s setup is unfair. gibraltar‘s setup is unfair. gibraltar in the eu has it all. it's an economic sweet spot with low taxes and access to spain just over there and the rest of europe. but there and the rest of europe. but the rock is now a bargaining chip for the european side and the wider negotiation between britain and the eu looks even more complicated. but a bad dealfor gibraltar eu looks even more complicated. but a bad deal for gibraltar and spaniards will also suffer. thousands come here for work. mercedes is hoping for the best. many, many people are working in gibraltar. also gibraltar can go out
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to enjoy our place. there needs to bea to enjoy our place. there needs to be a friendly agreement? yes, of course. gibraltar thrives on being a place apart. and with our exit from the eu, its rocky relationship with its neighbour is in british hands. tom burridge, bbc news, in gibraltar. we will be live in gibraltar a bit later. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. the weather isn't too bad today. though it is a chilly start. particularly across england and wales with temperatures widely between freezing and plus two. as we head through the course of this week, we will find it will remain fairly settled. it will be a little bit fresher than wheat —— it was over the weekend and that will lead us into some chilly nights. if you have been tempted into the garden,
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buried in mind. pressure still largely in charge. we have weather front coming in from the west. that will introduce rain. some frost and fog and most of it will lift. exception around the english channel we re exception around the english channel were at times it will laugh onshore. we will see how the band of rain through the course of the day will to advance. it will be moving across northern ireland, across the isle of man. the cloud just building all the time. moving through central parts of england and wales. a fine afternoon with sunny spells or at least dry spells. back into the south—west. as you can see, the cloud will build. if you stop under the low cloud or the fog, it will feel more like nine celsius and that will feel a bit nippy. through the evening and overnight, he comes the weather front. as it
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evening and overnight, he comes the weatherfront. as it pushes evening and overnight, he comes the weather front. as it pushes towards the east and south—east, another week one comes in hot on its heels. there will also be an other lot of cloud around tonight with fog forming. generally speaking for most, it won't be as cold and night as the one that has just gone. we are looking at between six and nine celsius. then tomorrow, we start off with the patchy rain in the south—east. it will be fairly patchy and will clear quite readily, leaving a bit of cloud behind it. againa leaving a bit of cloud behind it. again a sick enough for the odd bit of drizzle. as we move further north, some bright skies summer sunshine shine and show us. —— showers. temperatures 82 to 15. —— 8-15. showers. temperatures 82 to 15. —— 8- 15. the showers. temperatures 82 to 15. —— 8— 15. the winter dominates except for in the north. it will squeeze those isobars. it will also be weighed at times. for the rest of
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the week, it doesn't remain fairly settled with a bit more clout and a bit of drizzle. sorry about my voice. —— cloud. bit of drizzle. sorry about my voice. -- cloud. going have a cup of tea. maybe something stronger...“ it was something stronger than the next weather will be brilliant!m a lwa ys next weather will be brilliant!m always is. i can't wait until 715. the government's new apprenticeship levy comes into force this week — it's a tax on businesses to pay for training young people. but the scheme has been criticised as "unfocused" by a group of mps. ben's taking a closer look. this was announced by george osborne back in 2015, and it's to raise £2.5—billion for training. all larger businesses have to pay into a centralised fund every month and then those firms can apply for funding to train apprentices. it affects about 22,000 businesses in the uk. the levy will mean that we will be
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able to spend by 2022.5 billion on apprenticeships. notjust able to spend by 2022.5 billion on apprenticeships. not just big business but supporting small business. —— spend 2.5 billion x 20 20. one group concerned about the impact of the fund is the think tank the ippr. with me now is policy adviserjoe dromey. 0n on one hand, good news but we know that tactical skills are desperately needed but you don't think the scheme is quite right? no, it's worth saying first that we did welcome the introduction in the apprenticeship levy. recognition in the government long overdue that more needs to be done to boost employee involvement. we have some
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concerns about the exact way in which the apprenticeship levy will be implemented. particularly the emphasis on quantity over quality. it won't address the deep regional inequalities that scar our country. there was a thing that you did. is there an image issue with apprenticeships? i think this is as apprenticeships? i think this is as a result of the last labour governments. there was a strong emphasis of young people going to university which was really important and achieved some impressive results. much less attention was paid to the other end. the 50% plus that don't go to university and equipping them for with the skills they needed to succeed in the economy. it is great to have a bit more of a focus on apprenticeships. but we think that
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focusing on boosting the numbers, the government hitting their target is their main aim and it might actually devalue the apprenticeship branch. they might not necessarily be the quality. some focus on raising the money but also it would make the north—south divide bigger, you believe. how does it work? the levy only affects employers with £3 million of more. on average, there is higher pay in the south. the levy will raise more money in london and the south—east and we believe will stimulate training them all. arguably, it is needed there less because levels of qualification, productivity and indeed pay, are higher in london and the south—east. we think more needs to be done to boost skills and quality and pay in the rest of the country and that's why we are calling for a skills levy
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where some of the money will be devolved to local areas to invest in local training. so difficult to get it right, isn't it? more from me after seven. fans have bought it in their millions, musicians the world over have talked about its lasting influence and it's been voted the most important album of all time by rolling stone magazine. sergeant pepper's lonely hearts club band was recorded by the beatles 50—years ago and all this week on breakfast we're taking a fresh listen to the album widely considered a ‘musical masterpiece'. 0ur arts editor will gompertz has been to abbey road studios where it was recorded. #we # we hope you enjoy the show. # we hope you enjoy the showm # we hope you enjoy the show. it was the time of sergeant pepper. according to the guys, what we should do, make this record now
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under another persona. we will be this other band. it will free us. the idea was we could bring anything we wa nted the idea was we could bring anything we wanted because now, there was no lead on what we could do. it was 1967, the beatles had stopped touring and wanted to make a record unlike any other. paul mccartney's idea of a concept album was inspired. sergeant pepper was recorded at the now legendary abbey road studios in london. the so—called fifth beatle was looking after the sound with a little help from his friends. upstairs here is wet george martin will be twiddling all the knobs with any town centre was in charge of the technical side of music and hopefully if we go here, we will be there —— he will be there. hello, can. nice to meet you. this is where it all happened? this
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is number two this is where it all happened? this is numbertwo in this is where it all happened? this is number two in abbey road. it is when charge of pepper was made. it is amazing that you can come up in 50 yea rs is amazing that you can come up in 50 years after we made it. downstairs and they are in the studio is whether boys were. absolutely. could you give me a quick tour? absolutely. this is where the beatles made all of their recordings. 190 here at abbey road. usually the setup was only here. drums were over here. the vocals we re drums were over here. the vocals were normally placed here and the guitaramps were normally placed here and the guitar amps here. 0bviously things like pianos, we moved around. without this machine, sergeant pepper could not have been made. through this tape machine that i invented artificial double tracking. what is artificial double tracking? well, we want to double trap a voice. laying down twice. yes, you put the second was on top of the first and it makes a completely different sound. it was matched by
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the beatles's appetite a variety. indian classical and even tried chas included on the album. —— trad jazz. the key is how you mix all of those styles because sometimes, you know, curry for breakfast doesn't work but if you put something in there that makes it more anglicised, it kind of works. for me, that's what the beatles did. they found a way of mixing all of those amazing world elements into an element that is predominantly their own from daytime but that flavours. —— their tongue. everybody has their own favourite track on sergeant pepper. for me it is this song, a day in the life. still resonating among fans, dans...
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#he still resonating among fans, dans... # he blew his mind out in a car. # he blew his mind out in a car. #he # he blew his mind out in a car. # he didn't notice that hit the lights had changed. the crowd of people stopped instead... so many amazing stats. the original lyrics we re amazing stats. the original lyrics were would you throw tomatoes at me. it quite brilliantly refused. he changed it because people would fling tomatoes at him. we will be discussing the legacy of sergeant pepper's lonely hearts club band with music journalist paul gambaccini, just before nine this morning. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. data seen by bbc london shows there's been a huge rise
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in the number of people struggling to afford a home, who've been placed in temporary accommodation outside the capital. it's gone up by more than 300% since 2012 with some families placed as far away as leeds and newcastle. many london councils are struggling to meet the soaring cost of placing them in temporary accommodation here. recently what we are seeing is it is just a case of housing being too expensive. even people in work, people who would expect to keep a roof over their heads, are finding that through no fault of their own, the market has risen around them the landlord has put the rent up and they can't find anywhere affordable for theirfamily. police in islington are investigating — what could be human bones found in brown paper on cloudesley square, by a member of the public. police cordoned off the road and say the two thigh bones aren't thought to be ancient.
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they've been sent to the laboratory for testing. now, if you treat yourself to a coffee in the city of london today, you'll be encouraged to recycle your cup under a new scheme that's being launched. the cups are hard to recycle using conventional methods because of their plastic lining but londoners will be able to drop them in bright yellow bins around the square mile and they'll be taken to a special recycling plant. travel now. there are delays of up to 15 minutes on southern trains— between london bridge and tulse hill. now in canning town— police have closed off freemasons road— they‘ re investigating a fatal stabbing yesterday afternoon. there's a lot of fog around this morning and that means no woolwich ferry — the south terminal here is looking rather quiet at the moment. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. it is a foggy start to the day and to the week, dry weather around. also some fairly decent temperatures. today, we start off with rather dense fog in places. that should be clearing fairly early on, leaving us with some long,
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sunny spells through much of today and a largely dry day as well. bad news for hayfever sufferers, i'm afraid there is a high pollen count. a southerly breeze and temperatures reaching 18 celsius, very warm for the beginning of april. as we head through this evening, clubs will build and there is rain on the way from the west. light, drizzly rain and temperatures are getting down to about nine celsius. it makes for a rather damp start for tomorrow. the rain works its way off to the east, leaving outbreaks behind through the afternoon but quite a lot of cloud still. temperatures up to about 15. there will be some cloudy days this week but a good deal of dry weather altogether. temperatures just slightly above where we would expect them for this time of year. getting up to about 14 or 15 celsius. not quite the warm weather that we will have today but still fairly decent and as i said, a lot of dry weather around and even some sunny spells to look forward to.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a big change in the way police bail is used. a new 28—day limit has come in to force in england and wales but some officers are unhappy with the move. good morning, it's monday 3rd of april. gibraltar insists it won't be used as a bargaining chip in brexit negotiations. we're live on the rock later. the price of doing nothing. how our physical inactivity is said to be costing the nhs £1.2 billion a year. getting tough on credit card firms.
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after a year long review, the city regulator warns that more of us are racking up huge debts. but who's responsible? i'll have the details. in sport, six titles in a row for celtic. they take the scottish premiership with eight games to spare. good morning from bristol. do spelling mistakes drive you nuts? bad punctuation on signs makes your blood boil? we meet the man from this city taking the issue into his own hands, calling himself a grammar vigilante. and carol has the weather. a cold start for some, some frost around and fog too but that will give way to a bright day with sunny spells. but in the west, expect some rain in northern ireland and western scotland. more details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story.
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significant restrictions on the use of bail by police in england and wales come into force today. the amount of time a suspect released from custody can remain on bail will be limited to 28 days in most cases. the decision is in response to concerns that people were being left in limbo for months or even years. but police have questioned the move, as our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. famous faces who have been under police investigation, finally told they wouldn't be facing charges but only after long months on bail. they were among the 5,000 still on bail after a year. the government says the system needed rebalancing. well, what's happened in the past is people could be put on bail with no end in sight and no check or balance, which means we had thousands of people could be on bail for 12 months or more, in fact there were examples of people on bailfor several years and that's not acceptable, we need to make sure we have a proper system that's appropriate and proportionate.
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it's part of an overall of the bail system in england and wales. from now on, some suspects won't be subject to police bail at all. for those who are bailed, in most places the limit will be 28 days. but a senior police officer will be able to grant one 3—month extinction in complex cases. the police will have to seek the permission of a magistrate for anything longer. the police federation, which represents rank—and—file officers, is highly critical of the changes. 28 days in the cycle of a police officer is not a long time to investigate a crime. you've also got to bear in mind in relation to external enquiries, what we tend to have is external resource, so we've got the forensic science service, cps, and 28 days is not realistic for them to come back to us with the information we require to make decisions. the police federation said the old system protected complainants and victims and helped prevent further offending. june kelly, bbc news. we will be speaking to a criminal barrister about the changes to police bail injust under ten minutes. gibraltar has insisted it won't be
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used as a bargaining chip in any brexit deal the european union wants to reach with the uk. spain, which claims sovereignty of the british territory, could be given a veto over decisions affecting it. but yesterday theresa may said the uk remains steadfastly committed to gibraltar. 0ur correspondent tom burridge is there for us this morning. good morning, tom. how much more difficult does this make negotiating for theresa may do you think? good morning, dan. it gives an added dimension to that already complicated negotiation between britain and the eu. the spanish government have been quiet over the weekend about the idea that spain could have a veto or the final say about whether that brexit deal that britain might get with the eu can apply to gibraltar or not. one interview from the spanish foreign minister saying he was happy about that. what could happen is if, when
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britain gets that final dealmaker vitiated with the european union, then it's quite possible now that spain can wade in and say aspects of that deal can't apply to gibraltar. and it probably would do that on economic grounds, because in the last few years spain's grievance about gibraltar has really been economic, it hasn't really attacked the sovereignty issue because gibraltar has low taxes, the corporation tax rate is around 10% and over the border in southern spain it's around 35%. but britain and gibraltar putting on a united front. tom, thanks for that. good to talk to you. police are holding eight people in connection with an attack on a teenage asylum seeker on friday night. three arrests were made yesterday and the met police have now released images of three more people they wish to identify. the victim, a 17—year—old boy, is in a serious but stable condition after he was allegedly chased and beaten by a gang of 20 people in croydon, south london. donald trump has said the us will solve the north korean
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nuclear threat under his leadership. in an interview with the financial times, the president is quoted as saying, "if china is not going to solve north korea, we will." mr trump confirmed he was referring to direct, unilateral action. the comments come ahead of a visit to the us by the chinese president this week. there's a warning that a third of adults in the uk, or 20 million people, are physically inactive and at risk from coronary heart disease. the british heart foundation says it's costing the health service over £1 billion a year, as breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. harriet had no warnings, no symptoms. she was climbing the stairs at home when she had a heart attack at the age ofjust 44. it was like having the rug pulled from under your feet. i have a very young family, i had a very demanding job which i loved and really enjoyed, so then to suddenly be struck by such a traumatic incident was very difficult. i didn't make time for activity or exercise so i think looking back on it now,
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i was fairly sedentary. harriet is not alone, research from the british heart foundation, shows the most inactive part of the uk is the northwest of england where 47% of adults do not take enough exercise. followed by northern ireland — where 46% are inactive. in wales and the northeast of england it is 42%. london and the west midlands — 40% and in scotland, 37% are too sedentary. we estimate that on average most of us spend 78 days of our life each year in a sedentary position. physical activity is important but you also need to reduce the amount of time each day that you spend sitting at your computer or whatever it is you do. harriet has now changed her lifestyle, regular exercise, walking, playing with her kids, but inactivity is fast becoming one of the leading causes of premature death. graham satchell, bbc news. in the last a few moments the city
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regulator has announced new plans to keep our credit card bills under control. ben's here with the details. it's a pretty heavy document, we've been looking at this for about 15 months and this is the results of the findings. it is looking at persistent debt, people in debt for so persistent debt, people in debt for so long it is costing them more, they define that as the amount of money they pay back in interest and charges being more than the amount you borrowed in the first place. we know credit cards can be useful to get us through difficult periods, but at the same time many people are relying on them. the fca, the regulator, says 3.3 million people are in what's known as persistent debt and they say that's costing them to pound 50 for every £1 they have spent. proposals to try to bring that down, three main
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proposals, it will require the credit card companies to offer advice and warnings they need to pay this back quicker. —— £2 50. people who can afford it will be encouraged to do it quicker so they don't rack up to do it quicker so they don't rack up interest charges. if they can afford it but refused to do so, the proposal is they suspend the use of that card, but lastly the people they are most worried about are the people in this spiral of debt that can't afford to pay it back, in that insta nce can't afford to pay it back, in that instance it says they waive or cancel any instance it says they waive or ca ncel a ny interests instance it says they waive or cancel any interests or charges on that card. —— interest. visa proposals, there's nothing set in stone, but nonetheless the regulator is trying to get tough on the credit ca rd is trying to get tough on the credit card thirds —— credit card thirds —— these are proposals. —— firms. this is one way they say they can bring these costs down. rescue teams in colombia are continuing to search through tons of mud and debris for anyone who might have survived the devastating mudslides
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in the south of the country. in the last few hours, the president has said 254 people are known to have died, 43 of them children. the total is expected to rise. the mud engulfed the town of mocoa, burying entire neighbourhoods. caring for a relative with terminal cancer takes an average of 70 hours a week in their final months and costs the carer nearly £400 according to a new study. research published in the palliative medicine journal says volunteer carers are crucial to the national health service but need more support and training to preserve their own mental and physical health. some sick and disabled claimants of the out—of—work benefit employment and support allowance will now receive nearly £30 a week less. the government says bringing the benefit in line with jobseekers allowance will incentivise people to get back into work.
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but disability rights campaigners are worried the changes will drive more disabled people into poverty. the theory is if you reduce benefits more people get into work, but the truth is disabled people face lots of barriers to getting into work. someone on an ordinary jobseekers allowance may back in work typically in six months, for a disabled person typically it takes at least two years. try living for two years on that really low level benefit, it's really tough. now this would be one to show off on your instagram or facebook feed. it might look like a picture of some dark, parallel universe but it's actually an image of swirling graphene ink and it's scooped the top prize in a prestigious science photography contest. james macleod's picture beat more than 100 entries to claim first place in two categories in this year's engineering and physical sciences research council photography competition. it is very impressive, it is magic
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stuff, graphene. it is, 200 times stronger than steel, you can make it incredibly thin. i did a programme on it once, it's amazing, it is well worth looking into, it is like a super material. let's go back to our main story. it has been described by the home office as an end to injustice. from today, police will no longer be able to keep suspects on bail for longer than 28 days. the move follows criticism of the use of police bail in several recent investigations but some critics say the change won't be possible in complex cases. criminal barrister christoper moran joins us now. thank you very much for coming in this morning. can we get your reaction to these changes. what do you think are the positives and negativess? overall it is a welcome change and currently suspects can be kept for well over a year while on police bail, after their initial arrest, awaiting the outcome, of
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course that's also the same for complainants and victims and witnesses in cases. that's really the positive, there are cases where you can sometimes wait up to two yea rs. you can sometimes wait up to two years. the problem of course is that there are a number of cases going through the system and the police are having to investigate a number of cases and prioritise. the difficulty i think with that is if the police are having difficulty investigating their caseload then that might be an issue to do with the resource in the police rather than the amount of time people are on police bail. the police have made the point that there might be some cases where it is particularly releva nt to cases where it is particularly relevant to have a longer period because for example with cyber crime, the sheer volume of what they might have to go through could take more than 28 days. yes, especially for cyber crime, that can be incredibly complex, a number of experts sometimes have to look at a number of computers. within the system coming into force, there are
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options to be able to extend the initial 28 day period, at up to three months initially and then by applications to the magistrates court. when those cases are shown to be complex then they should be able to get the extensions. on a day—to—day basis, how would this affect your role as a criminal barrister? one thing i had to do in a recent case i was involved in, quite a serious sex case, the prosecution were asked to explain in open court why there had been such a delay. 0ne open court why there had been such a delay. one of the problems is when you have witnesses in cases, they're having to recall some horrendous events, and further back in time those events are, the harder it is to recall the finer details. it should make my job to recall the finer details. it should make myjob easier to get the best out of witnesses, but of course make the role a bit easier for them because there remembering things not so because there remembering things not so long ago and have some closure
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sooner. so long ago and have some closure sooner. they will benefit. there are always unintended consequences. will there be pressure on police to put forward information quicker than they feel happy doing so? that could be won. what we hope is in order to charge somebody, there would have to be charging standards. —— there could be one. if they don't hit those charges, the crown prosecution service would say and they would ask extensions but there is that danger. and what about there is that danger. and what about the victims? you talked about making it easy for them but perhaps one of their priorities is things going to court and people are prosecuted for the crimes. one of the more serious crimes, of course, is sex cases. historically, one of the problems is
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many people would be charged when they should have been. in those cases, the them is often thought they weren't believed. 0ne cases, the them is often thought they weren't believed. one problem with leaving people on police bail for quite some time is it leaves complainants and victims in legal limbo as to whether they are believed not so hopefully that should assist and give them some clarity earlier. thank for your time. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: restrictions on the use of police bail come into force today. a new 28 day limit is introduced england and wales — but some officers are unhappy with the move. a warning that more than 20 million people in the uk are physically inactive, costing the nhs around £1.2 billion each year. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. the blossom is out. good morning to
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both of you. yesterday, temperatures soared up to 17 in london. a beautiful weather watcher speech. today, we could see similar but as we get through the course of this week, although we will remain mostly drive, it will feel a bit fresher. we will lose a degree temperature wise day by day. at times, chilly nights. today, what we have is high pressure still dominating a large chunk of the weather across the uk but we have a cold front coming in from the west. that will inch juice some rain. it is not far away from western scotland and northern ireland at the moment. it will continue to advance east. quite a cool start this morning across england and wales. a touch of trust and fog, leading sunshine. the sunshine will be in the east because the rain will continue to push in from the west. it will continue to move from the west. it will continue to m ove a cross from the west. it will continue to move across northern ireland, leaving brighter skies and a few showers. the cloud building ahead of our band of rain across western
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parts of england through the afternoon but the bulk of england and wales, at dry day, bright spells sunny spells. we have some low cloud and fog across the english channel. at times, we might find that lapping onshore. when that happens, it will fill chilly underneath it. through the evening and underneath it, the wind pushes eastwards. there will be fog around and lots of cloud. 0ne wind pushes eastwards. there will be fog around and lots of cloud. one or two breaks but generally speaking, not as called a night as the one just gone. there will also be showers across the far north of scotla nd showers across the far north of scotland and here, too, a strong wind. tomorrow, across shetland, there could be some areas of rain. some brighter breaks across england and wales and you can see what i mean about the temperatures, just coming down by a degree or two.
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heading on through tuesday and into wednesday, high pressure still in charge of our weather but we have to squeeze of isobars in the north of the country. here, it will be windy and with the weather front scooting across, we will also see some showers. we start off on wednesday under some clear skies. 0n showers. we start off on wednesday under some clear skies. on a cold note. a bit of cloud at times so bright rather than wall—to—wall blue skies. here is our weatherfront coming in introducing some rain or showers and temperatures 10— 14 celsius. then as we head on to thursday, again, actually start for some of us that a fairly quiet day. high pressure still in charge. there will be brighter skies, some sunny skies but in the west, particularly with any height, we are looking at some showers. the temperature in aberdeen and 14 celsius. the letter does remain settled over the next couple of days as well. —— the weather. if you're the kind of person whose blood begins to boil when you spot a spelling or grammatical mistake
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on a sign, here's a story for you. in bristol it's been rumoured for years that there's somebody who goes out under the cover of darkness — correcting mistakes on street signs and shop fronts. breakfast'sjon kay has tracked down the mysterious individual who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear that who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear that he who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear that he takes who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear that he takes this who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear that he takes this extremely who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear that he takes this extremely seriously. who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear that he takes this extremely seriously. good who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". it's very clear that he takes this extremely seriously. good morning. it's not possible to explain quite how serious he takes it. for asking me this morning if this is an april full, i can tell you it is an april full, i can tell you it is true. this man comes out at about one or2am, is true. this man comes out at about one or 2am, armed with sticky backed plastic and a special ladder and
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correct signs. here is one he has done. a gentle men's hairstylist. he corrected it because it was wrong. it now has an apostrophe and it is just one of loads of signs he has done around here. he is the banksy of bad punctuation. roaming the streets of bristol, righting wrongs. i'm a grammarvigilante. i do take it to heart, i've been doing it for quite a lot of years now. i believe it is a cause worth pursuing. working alone and in secret, he makes punctuation marks to stick on errant signs. trying to match the colour of the apostrophe that is needed on the shop... he has even made a special device which he called the apostrophiser which lets him reach the higher shops. oh, look at that, that's worked perfectly. a quick demonstration on the dining room wall.
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what i need to do now is turn the apostrophiser around so i can apply the roly—poly end. by day, he is a highly qualified professional. only a handful of his closest friends and family know what he gets up to after dark. i have felt extremely nervous, the heart has been thumping. i've got to make sure it is technically right. he started his campaign 13 years ago. this was the first sign he tackled. "amys nail‘s." apostrophe, deleted. he's left his mark throughout this area of bristol, his punctuation mark. apostrophes added, apostrophes removed. there will be some people, maybe the owners of these shops who say, hang on a minute, you have got permission, we haven't asked you to do this, what you are doing is a crime, vandalism.
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what you say to them? i would say it's more of a crime to have the apostophes wrong in the first place. i think i can do it without causing too much offence and just discreetly do it. there is one sign he has been desperate to correct for years. cambridge motor's. motors with an apostrophe s. itjust makes me feel gross... i just think, this is just wrong. it's not meant to be like this. it really does need sorting out. the garage is right outside bristol's high security prison. but tonight, he's going for it. using a purpose—built, home made trestle, he climbs up, cuts a piece of yellow sticky—backed plastic to size and covers the rogue apostrophe. notice anything? not really, no.
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we went to see the man who owned the garage for 30 years. who's done that? there is a man... yes. ..who lives around these parts, i can't tell you about him. i thank him for what he's done. you don't mind? no, i don't mind at all! it's good to see people still caring about english grammar, isn't it? when you go past a sign you have corrected, and you know that you've made... the word you are looking for is pride. pride. i'm the one who has been there and sorted it out and got it grammatically correct. it does make my heart swell slightly when i see the correct apostrophe. see what i mean when i said he takes it seriously? i know some people have been getting in touch this
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morning. get a life, you are saying. is there any point in this day and age? some of you are seeing this man as some kind of superhero. some exa m ples age? some of you are seeing this man as some kind of superhero. some examples sent age? some of you are seeing this man as some kind of superhero. some examples sent in age? some of you are seeing this man as some kind of superhero. some examples sent in this age? some of you are seeing this man as some kind of superhero. some examples sent in this morning. mother's day, at cake. mum, your the best. it should of course be you're. this one on the back of a car. dont needs an'. you start this and it is a minefield. you start seeing spelling m ista kes minefield. you start seeing spelling mistakes everywhere. keep them coming this morning. we would love to hear from you and what you think of the man who is now known as the apostrophiser. loving his work. pam says "my hero".
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correct punctuation helps us understand each other and stops me wanting to scream when i see them in the wrong place. people have seen fish and chip shops with an apostrophe in the wrong place. the apostrophiser, presented byjon kay, is on bbc radio 4 tonight at 8pm. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: grabbing a coffee on the way to work? spare a thought about what happens to the take—away cup — seven million of them are thrown away in the uk every day and most end up in landfill. we'll find out about a new scheme to get us to recycle them. good morning. you might be surprised to hear that one in 100 of these
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coffee cups ever get recycled. the vast majority of —— majority are incinerated or go to landfill. i will be reporting on this pioneering recycling scheme in london. but first, the news, travel and weather where you are having your coffee this morning. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. data seen by bbc london shows there's been a huge rise in the number of people struggling to afford a home, who've been placed in temporary accommodation outside the capital. it's gone up by more than 300% since 2012 with some families placed as far away as leeds and newcastle. many london councils are struggling to meet the soaring cost of placing them in temporary accommodation here. recently what we are seeing is it is just a case of housing being too expensive. even people in work, people who would expect to keep a roof over their heads, are finding that through no fault of their own, the landlord's put the rent up, the market has risen around them, and theyjust can't find
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anywhere affordable for theirfamily. police in islington are investigating — what could be human bones found in brown paper on cloudesley square, by a member of the public. police cordoned off the road and say the two thigh bones aren't thought to be ancient. they've been sent to the laboratory for testing. three men have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a 21—year—old man was stabbed in an off licence on canning town. police we re off licence on canning town. police were called to freemasons road at around 230 yesterday afternoon. travel now. 0n the tube— it's mostly running well— but there are minor delays on the 0verground— there's been a signal failure. there are delays of up to 15 minutes on southern trains— between london bridge and tulse hill. in canning town—we told you about the murder investigation— police have closed off freemasons road while they carry out inquiries. trafalgar square is closed southbound from st martins place
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to the strand for gas works. and the good news is the woolwich ferry is now running (cam) but it is still foggy around some roads— this is the a13 at barking. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. it is a foggy start to the day and to the week, dry weather around. also some fairly decent temperatures. today, we start off with rather dense fog in places. that should be clearing fairly early on, leaving us with some long, sunny spells through much of today and a largely dry day as well. bad news for hayfever sufferers, i'm afraid there is a high pollen count. a southerly breeze and temperatures reaching 18 celsius, very warm for the beginning of april. as we head through this evening, clouds will build and there is rain on the way from the west. light, drizzly rain and temperatures are getting down to about nine celsius. it makes for a rather damp start for tomorrow. the rain works its way off to the east, leaving outbreaks behind through the afternoon but quite
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a lot of cloud still. temperatures up to about 15. there will be some cloudy days this week but a good deal of dry weather altogether. temperatures just slightly above where we would expect them for this time of year. getting up to about 14 or 15 celsius. not quite the warm weather that we will have today but still fairly decent and as i said, a lot of dry weather around and even some sunny spells to look forward to. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. you are watching breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. significant restrictions on the use of bail by police in england and wales come into force today. the amount of time a suspect released from custody can remain on bail will be limited to 28 days in most cases. according to the home office, the move will end the injustice of people left in limbo for months or even years.
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but the police federation has warned the change will be unrealistic in complex investigations. after 28 days it's appropriate for a senior police officer to look at the case and say we need a bit more time and they can sign that of, and even complex cases where they need three months ago, a magistrate, and that's an appropriate way to go forward. gibraltar has insisted it won't be used as a bargaining chip in any brexit deal the eu wants to reach with the uk. spain, which claims sovereignty of the british territory, could be given a veto over decisions affecting it. but yesterday theresa may said the uk remains steadfastly committed to gibraltar.
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police are holding eight people in connection with an attack on a teenage asylum seeker on friday night. three arrests were made yesterday and the met police have now released images of three more people they want to speak to. the victim, a 17—year—old boy, is in a serious but stable condition after he was allegedly chased and beaten by gang of 20 people in croydon, south london. donald trump has said the us will solve the north korean nuclear threat under his leadership. in an interview with the financial times, the president is quoted as saying, "if china is not going to solve north korea, we will." mr trump confirmed he was referring to direct, unilateral action. the comments come ahead of a visit to the us by the chinese president this week. people stuck in a spiral of credit card debt could get more help under new proposals from the city regulator. in the last half hour, the financial conduct authority has said credit card firms must do more to help the 3.3 million people in persistent debt where interest payments and charges exceed the amount they borrowed. it also calls on customers to pay back debts more quickly when they can afford to do so.
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there's a warning that a third of adults in the uk, or 20 million people, are physically inactive and at risk of heart disease. the british heart foundation says it's costing the nhs over £1 billion a year. their research also reveals women are more sedentary than men and that the north—west of england has the highest rate of inactivity. rescue teams in colombia are continuing to search through tons of mud and debris for anyone who might have survived the devastating mudslides in the south of the country. in the last few hours, the president has said 254 people are known to have died, 43 of them children. but the total is expected to rise. the mud engulfed the town of mocoa, burying entire neighbourhoods. caring for a relative with terminal cancer takes an average of 70 hours a week in their final months and costs the carer nearly £400
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according to a new study. research published in the palliative medicine journal says volunteer carers are crucial to the national health service but need more support and training to preserve their own mental and physical health. doris day has received an unusual and perhaps unwelcome surprise on her birthday, she's two years older than she thought. day always said that her date of birth was april 3 1924, making her 93 today. but her original birth certificate has been uncovered showing she was born in 1922, which makes her 95. are used to work with a bloke called darren who was 34 at least eight yea rs darren who was 34 at least eight years —— are used to. if you're watching, you know who you are! —— i
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used to. what's wrong with that? nothing. 0ur bbc breakfast teams think that doris day looks a bit like carol. -- our bbc breakfast team. ithink like carol. -- our bbc breakfast team. i think you're absolutely right. it is carol in a polka dot dress. not a dress, though, its trousers, isn't it crazy coming up on the programme, crazy coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather for you. celtic, not a surprise, they've been there for a long time but six titles on the trot? it's what everyone saw coming, winning their sixth title in a row, but the statistics are fantastic. it equals a record set by rangers in 1988, 25 points clear they were ahead of their nearest rivals, aberdeen, eight games to spare and they are champions and they could still do the domestic treble. they are still in the
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scottish cup and the league cup. and they are unbeaten. it may be only the first week of april but celtic have clinched their sixth scottish premiership title in a row after beating hearts 5—0 yesterday. so they've done it in style with eight games to spare, scott sinclair scored a hat—trick which helped put brendan rodgers' side 25 points clear of second—placed aberdeen. six titles in a row equals a record set by rangers 88 years ago. we're very honoured and very privileged to manage glasgow celtic when you support a team like this as a boy and you know the great history of the club. i was happy to take on the responsibility to make the supporters dream, make them happy and hopefully we've done that this coming season and hopefully for the years to come. there were two games in the premier league. arsenal are still sixth and manchester city fourth after a 2—2 draw at the emirates stadium. city, twice took the lead through leroy sane then sergio aguero before halftime. walcott and mustafi scored for the gunners. the point means they remain seven points behind city and the champions league places. it was a game where we're not completely at our best
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on the fluency and the technical front because we were under huge pressure, but we showed strong mental resources and refused to lie down against a team who is always dangerous going forward and, at the end of the day, we got a point that will help us. at the other end of the table, middlesbrough wasted a late chance as they shared a goalless draw with swansea at the liberty stadium. the result keeps swansea just above the relegation zone. boro are five points from safety saracens will be the only british club in rugby union's european champions cup semi—finals. the reigning champions were far too strong for glasgow warriors. chris ashton scored two of saracens' four tries as they won 38—13. they'll face munster for a place in the final. roger federer says he'll probably not play again until the french open at the end of may after winning his third title of the year. he beat rafa nadal in straight sets to lift the miami open title
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24 hours after britain'sjohanna konta won the women's event. federer moves up to fourth in the world rankings but will take the next month off to rest. spare a thought for american golfer lexi thompson, she was leading the first women's golf major of the season by three shots with just six holes to play. she was left in tears when she was approached by a rules official and told she would be punished for an infringement spotted by a television viewer in her previous round. it cost her four shots and ultimately the title which went to south korea's ryu so—yeon. the 163rd boat race went the way of oxford as they beat cambridge byjust over a length for their fourth victory in five years. 0xford, who were favourites entering the race on the thames, took the lead in the early stages and cambridge never quite able close the gap. 0xford now trail cambridge 82—80 overall. i think of my three boat races, that's probably my favourite. the harder it is the more you can
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savour it at the end. hats off to cambridge, that was a good boat, but we were just better on the day and that's what it's about. a disastrous start cost 0xford in the women's race. one of their oars got stuck handing cambridge a simple victory. the light blues won by half a minute in a course record time too. let's have a nice surprise, though. but the moment of the weekend goes to dan walker who donned a purple lycra outfit. this was the celebrity race. you won, dan. when you say i won, i was sat behind helen glover and george nash, he won 0lympic sat behind helen glover and george nash, he won olympic gold in the coxless fours in rio, helen glover has won it twice. i didn't spot any 0lympic rowers in the pink team. they had a paralympic brower, james fox, and emma spruce, who has won
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the boat race before. evenly matched. that was our cox. a p pa re ntly matched. that was our cox. apparently you have to do that at the end. mannerjo money raised for cancer research. how the end. mannerjo money raised for cancer research. how hard was it? -- money raised. it is physically demanding, obviously. one of the quys demanding, obviously. one of the guys was sick at the end. unless you are going full tilt, it isn't as physically demanding as it should beat but we had a couple of people in our boat, me included, when you're not going full tilt or quite as good as a full role, you slow the boat down so you can't physically exhausted yourself —— full roller. it was so close. two feet in the end. —— roller. it was so close. two feet in the end. -- roller. iwill take all the credit to myself! millions of us will pick up a latte or cappuccino on the way into work this morning for that caffeine kick to get our week started. but the huge number of paper cups
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we use are difficult to recycle and are causing huge levels of waste. andy moore is in central london this morning looking at an initiative to change that. that looks impressive. good morning. good morning. the humble coffee cup, you might think it's just made of paper, that's easily recyclable but that's not the case, there's a plastic layer inside that makes it difficult to recycle so millions every day i incinerated or go to landfill or to create art installations like this one —— everyday are incinerated. you can see the gherkin on the left and st paul's cathedral here. there's a new scheme in london to recycle them, dozens scheme in london to recycle them, d oze ns of scheme in london to recycle them, dozens of yellow containers will be scattered around the city for people to put in their coffee cups and with
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me is gavin ellis from the environmental charity hubub. how will it work? we have a number of these bright bins, they looked like dried coffee cups, they are on the streets for people to dispose of theircups and we streets for people to dispose of their cups and we have 35 big employees in the city —— employers in the city to help and you can also do that in your store regardless of where you bought your coffee, all the major coffee chains. are these giant yellow containers up for a few days? that's right. what has the reaction been like? really positive, the weekend is quiet around here so todayis the weekend is quiet around here so today is when we will see how people respond because it is busier during the week. millions might get a coffee later today if they're not in the city of london, what is your advice, what should they do with them? you can use reusable cups and then you don't have the issue. apart
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from that it is tricky at the moment, the issue is only relatively recent, the difficulty of recycling the cups. what we're looking to do off the back of this campaign in the city of london is extend it throughout london and elsewhere in the uk. you had a smaller scale scheme in manchester, what lessons did you learn from that one? scheme in manchester, what lessons did you learn from that one7m scheme in manchester, what lessons did you learn from that one? it was on one street, oxford road in manchester at the end of last year and we recycle 20,000 cups from that one street. it worked really well when you have managed locations where people drink coffee from disposable cups and they don't take them away, so we did trials in the hospital and university. that's why we've teamed up with 35 of the biggest employers in the city of london so when you have the concentrations of people, if you get the system in people will use it. the coffee chains, the big chains, are they doing enough? this is a good start, there's always more. our
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aim is to extend it beyond the city of london and manchester so we get good coverage nationwide so everyone has a good opportunity to recycle theircup. has a good opportunity to recycle their cup. thanks very much, gary. they're hoping to get around 500,000 of these by the end of the month, 5 million recyclable cups in these containers by the end of the year. back to you two, dan and louise. it's incredibly obvious, it looks like a it's incredibly obvious, it looks likea cup, it's incredibly obvious, it looks like a cup, that's what you do with it,. shall hands to carol —— shall we hand to carol? or is it doris day? you have to wait for this, carol. we think that looks like a dead ringer for you. think that looks like a dead ringer foryou. in my think that looks like a dead ringer for you. in my dreams. think that looks like a dead ringer foryou. in my dreams. i think that looks like a dead ringer for you. in my dreams. i wouldn't mind looking like doris day. chiles doubts of the day if you are
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just stepping out. it will still be at warm day for this time of year. —— chilly start. although it will be mostly drive, it will be fresh. we will also see some cold nights, too. watch out if you have been planting some plants this weekend in your garden. high pressure still firmly in charge but we have a weather front coming in from the west and thatis front coming in from the west and that is introducing some rain. the wind will also strengthen in the north of the country. some patchy fog that will lift but we have some fog that will lift but we have some fog across the english channel. at times that will lap onshore. when it does do that, it will suppress the temperature. meanwhile, our weather front makes progress into northern ireland and western scotland. then there is a gap before the next system there is a gap before the next syste m co m es there is a gap before the next system comes in. the parts of north—east scotland, we will hang on
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to the rain for the longest —— sunshine for the longest. the rain comes into the east. across come from —— come to a chair and lancashire, it heads down towards east anglia and kent. again, a fair bit of sunshine as there will be towards the isle of wight. temperatures getting up to 16 or 17. into the south—west, the cloud continues to build a head of the rain. the same for wales. here is our first weather front going through. the rain is turning more patchy as it heads to the south—east. a second weather front comes in and there will be a lot of cloud around tonight. there will also be fog forming an temperature wise, for five in also be fog forming an temperature wise, forfive in the north and seven or eight or perhaps nine in the south. not quite as cold as the onejust gone. the the south. not quite as cold as the one just gone. the weather front in the south—east, through the course
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of tomorrow morning, will slowly clear away. behind it, of tomorrow morning, will slowly clearaway. behind it, quite a of tomorrow morning, will slowly clear away. behind it, quite a lot of cloud that will showers. the northern england, wales, south—west england and northern ireland, a bit more sunshine but a bit more cloud across scotland. particularly those across scotland. particularly those across as shetland will be wintry. thank you, carol. were you listening? i was looking at the wrong screen, listening? i was looking at the wrong screen, carol. there you are! lovely to see you. i don't know. there's tough competition between supermarkets. they've been cutting prices to win customers. but does it mean they're squeezing farmers and suppliers too hard to keep their profits up? ben has been looking at the issue. good news for all of us. but at what
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cost to the people that supply all of that food ? our supermarket shop might have been a bit cheaper recently — as supermarkets battle it out in fierce price wars to keep customers. but — at what cost to suppliers and farmers? the woman responsible for maintaining relations between our biggest retailers, farmers and food processors is christine tacon and she's with me now. most people have a gripe with their supermarket. what does yourjob involve ? supermarket. what does yourjob involve? i make sure they all abide bya involve? i make sure they all abide by a legally binding code. i take issues from suppliers so lots of people talk to me, tell me what's going on. at the moment, i have a survey open which is vital for direct suppliers to tell me that these retails are the most compliant and these are the issues that i have and these are the issues that i have and atany and these are the issues that i have and at any one time, i work with all of the retailers on probably about five issues. at the moment, the
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biggest one people are talking to me about it forecasting so i am trying to get to the bottom of that and try to get to the bottom of that and try to get to the bottom of that and try to get the retailers to change their ways. is that supply and demand? we have seen high—profile examples of when they get it wrong. the cou rg ette when they get it wrong. the courgette crisis when our shells we re courgette crisis when our shells were empty. how are your relations with suppliers? we see prices coming down and down and certainly of late as they try to keep comp —— customers. that put a lot of pressure on farmers. the big thing about the forecasting is trying to get the orders right in the first place because that makes the supply chain more efficient. the sorts of things people are talking to me about particularly importing, because retailers can't talk to them about the consumer price, they might decide to increase the price by something like 20% and the person has all these stock and their sales we re has all these stock and their sales were halved and they don't it know was going to happen. that is one of theissues was going to happen. that is one of the issues raised in the other is
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about promotions and the retailers mustn't over orderfor about promotions and the retailers mustn't over order for promotions, buying things at cheap, and then selling to cheaply bought stuff at full price. that is another bit of the code that is legally binding. what power do you have to regulate them. you talk about the legally binding code. annabel says, look, in it advanced maths to check out the deals in supermarkets. martin says he saw products he usually buys at £3 and it was priced at £4 50 but it was on offerfor £246. £3 and it was priced at £4 50 but it was on offer for £246. a lot of confusion about what is supposedly deal. ——2 for £6. confusion about what is supposedly deal. --2 for £6. you can imagine what that has on the suppliers. getting the forecast right so that the retailers are collaborative collaboratively putting it together.
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the code is really good at making sure suppliers get paid on time, they don't get deductions, they don't get overcharged. things like consumer complaints and if they are delisted, it happens at reasonable notice. the code is about working with suppliers unfairly and i'm really pleased that over the 3.5 yea rs i have really pleased that over the 3.5 years i have been in thejob, my annual survey is saying that retailers are getting better. also the best thing about my annual survey is it gives me a leak table. which retailers are the most compliant, which ones are getting better and which is getting worse. on the whole, they are all getting better. good to see you. the regulator of the supermarkets and some of our biggest retailers. 50 years ago the beatles headed into the abbey road studios to record what would become one of the biggest and most influential albums of all time.
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we'll be celebrating the legacy of sergent pepper's lonely hearts club band and taking a fresh listen to some of its most famous tracks all this week on breakfast. our arts editor will gompertz has been delving into the archives to find out how the album came about. # we're sgt pepper's lonely hearts club band # we hope you will enjoy the show. it was the time of sergeant pepper. i'd written the title song. i put it to the guys that what we should do, make this record now under another persona. we'll be this other band. it will free us. the idea was we could bring anything we wanted because now, there was no lid on what we could do. it was 1967. the beatles had stopped touring
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and wanted to make a record unlike any other. # we'd love to take you home. although never fully realised, paul mccartney's idea of a concept album was inspired. sergeant pepper was recorded at the now legendary abbey road studios in london with producer george martin, the so—called fifth beatle, looking after the sound with a little help from his friends. upstairs here is where george martin would be, twiddling all the knobs, with ken townsend who was in charge of the technical side of music and hopefully if we go here, he will be there for me to meet. hello, ken. hello, nice to meet you. nice to meet you too. this is where it all happened, right? yeah, this is number two control room in abbey road. and where sgt pepper was made. it is amazing to come up here 50 years after we made it. downstairs there in the studio was where the boys were,
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is that right. absolutely. could you give me a quick tour? absolutely, yes. this is where the beatles made all of their recordings. 192 here at abbey road. usually the setup was over here. drums were over here. the vocals were normally placed here and the guitar amps here. obviously things like pianos, we moved around. without this machine, the studerj37 4—track, sergeant pepper could not have been made. it's through this tape machine that i invented artificial double tracking. what is artificial double tracking? well, we want to double track a voice. laying it down twice. yes, you put the second voice on top of the first and it makes a completely different sound. ken‘s technical innovations were matched by the beatles‘ appetite for musical variety. the sound of northern brass bands, indian classical and even trad jazz included on the album. the key is how you mix all of those styles because sometimes, you know, curry for breakfast doesn‘t work but if you put something in there that makes it more anglicised, it kind of works.
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for me, that‘s what the beatles did. they found a way of mixing all of those amazing world elements into an element that is predominantly their own from their tongue but it had flavours from all over. # i read the news today, oh, boy. everybody has their own favourite track on sergeant pepper. for me it is this song, a day in the life. recorded half a century ago but still resonating in 2017 among fans, bands... # he blew his mind out in a car. ..and these students at the london music school. # he didn‘t notice that the lights had changed. # a crowd of people stopped and stared... thank you for all the memories you
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are sharing on that. we have lots of fa cts are sharing on that. we have lots of facts about this album. when i‘m 64 was written by paul mccartney on the age of 16 on the family piano that he released it on the piano —— album 20 years later because it was his dad ‘s birthday. still to come this morning, are you a stickler for apostrophes? i still to come this morning, are you a sticklerfor apostrophes? i know still to come this morning, are you a stickler for apostrophes? i know a man who is. he goes around correcting signs in the middle of the night. this is one he has done. greengrocers called gardener‘s patch. we will meet him shortly that first, let‘s joined the patch. we will meet him shortly that first, let‘sjoined the bbc‘s news teams are around the uk. good morning, i‘m sonja jessup.
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data seen by bbc london shows there‘s been a huge rise in the number of people struggling to afford a home, who‘ve been placed in temporary accommodation outside the capital. it‘s gone up by more than 300% since 2012 with some families placed as far away as leeds and newcastle. many london councils are struggling to meet the soaring cost of placing them in temporary accommodation here. recently what we are seeing is it is just a case of housing being too expensive. even people in work, people who would expect to keep a roof over their heads, are finding that through no fault of their own, the landlord‘s put the rent up, the market has risen around them, and theyjust can‘t find anywhere affordable for theirfamily. police in islington are investigating — what could be human bones found in brown paper on cloudesley square, by a member of the public. police cordoned off the road and say the two thigh bones aren‘t thought to be ancient. they‘ve been sent to
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the laboratory for testing. three men have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a 21—year—old man was stabbed to death in an off—licence in canning town. police were called to freemasons road at around 3.30 yesterday afternoon. travel now. on the tube — it‘s all running well it seems at the moment— no reported problems on any of those lines there. there are delays of up to 15 minutes on southern trains— between london bridge and tulse hill. in canning town—we told you about the murder investigation— police have closed off freemasons road while they carry out inquiries. trafalgar square is closed southbound from st martins place to the strand for gas works. and guess what? the woolwich ferry has closed again— the fog has returned — this is the south terminal again looking very quiet. let‘s have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. it is a foggy start to the day and to the week, dry weather around. also some fairly decent temperatures. today, we start off with rather dense fog in places. that should be clearing fairly early on, leaving us with some long, sunny spells through
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much of today and a largely dry day as well. bad news for hayfever sufferers, i‘m afraid there is a high pollen count. a southerly breeze and temperatures reaching 18 celsius, very warm for the beginning of april. as we head through this evening, clouds will build and there is rain on the way from the west. light, drizzly rain and temperatures are getting down to about nine celsius. it makes for a rather damp start for tomorrow. the rain works its way off to the east through the morning, leaving outbreaks behind through the afternoon but quite a lot of cloud still. temperatures up to about 15. there will be some cloudy days this week but a good deal of dry weather altogether. temperatures just slightly above where we would expect them for this time of year. getting up to about 14 or 15 celsius. not quite the warm weather that we will have today but still fairly decent
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and as i said, a lot of dry weather around and even some sunny spells to look forward to. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a big change in the way police bail is used. a new 28—day limit has come in to force in england and wales, but some officers are unhappy with the move. good morning, it‘s monday 3rd april. also this morning, the price of doing nothing — how physical inactivity is said to be costing the nhs £1.2 billion a year. in the business, we are talking
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about getting tough on credit card firms. after a year—long review, the city regulator has outlined plans to stop more us racking up huge debts. in sport, six titles in a row. they, they take the scottish premiership with eight games to spare. —— —— celtic take. once voted the most important album of all time, we‘re celebrating sergeant pepper‘s lonely hearts club band 50 years after it was first recorded. some kind of armadillo are no bigger than an orange, but this rare one is the size of the pig. this is the giant armadillo. they‘re one of the most elusive creatures in the natural world. we‘ll meet the man who has managed to capture them on camera. and carol has the weather. amazing footage! good morning, a jelly start, there is frost around and fog, but it will give way to a dry day with sunnis bells. we also got rain across northern ireland and western
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scotland. —— sunny spells. rain pushing into western part of the mend and wales by dark. i will tell you all about it in 15 minutes. thank you, doris! he does mean carol, more of that later! significant restrictions on the use of bail by police in england and wales come into force today. the amount of time a suspect released from custody can remain on bail will be limited to 28 days in most cases. the decision is in response to concerns that people were being left in limbo for months, or even years. but police have questioned the move, as our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. famous faces who‘ve been under police investigation, finally told they wouldn‘t be facing charges, but only after long months on bail. they were among the 5000 still on bail after a year. the government says the system needed rebalancing. well, what‘s happened in the past is people that could be put on bail with no end in sight and no check or balance, which means we had thousands of people could be on bail for 12 months or more.
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in fact, there were examples of people on for several years, and that‘s just not acceptable. we‘ve got to make sure we‘ve got a proper system that is appropriate and proportionate. it‘s part of an overhaul of the bail system in england and wales. from now on, some suspects won‘t be subject to police bail at all. for those who are bailed, in most cases, the limit will be 28 days. but a senior police officer will be able to grant one three—month extension in complex cases. the police will have to seek the permission of a magistrate for anything longer. the police federation, which represents rank—and—file officers, is highly critical of the changes. 28 days, in the cycle of a police officer, is not a long time for them to investigate the crime. you‘ve also got to bear in mind, in relation to external inquiries, what we tend to have is external resource, so we have got the forensic science service, cps, and 28 days is not realistic for them to come back to us with the information we require to make decisions. the police federation said the old system protected complainants and victims and helped prevent further offending. june kelly, bbc news.
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gibraltar has insisted it won‘t be used as a bargaining chip in any brexit deal the european union wants to reach with the uk. spain, which claims sovereignty over the british territory, could be given a veto over decisions affecting it. but yesterday theresa may said the uk remains "steadfastly committed" to gibraltar. our correspondent tom burridge is at the border with spain for us this morning. feelings are running high over this, morning. good morning from an and character to kaleka lardy rock of gibraltar, let‘s show you down there, you can probably make out a flow of traffic, a lot of people walking out on southern spain into gibraltar, because thousands of people work, sorry, live over that side of the
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border and work in gibraltar. the free movement of people is guaranteed, because gibraltar and britain are members of the european single market. now, when britain comes to negotiate its brexit deal with the rest of the european union, in theory now, according to the european union, spain will have a say on whether the deal can apply to gibraltar or not. and what is possible is that spain might say that, actually, aspects of any deal can‘t apply to gibraltar, and it might do so on economic grounds, because spain has always complained that taxes are much lower on this side of the border than in southern spain. of course, britain and gibraltar putting on a united front, saying any deal for britain is 84 gibraltar, take it or leave it, that is the kind of poker game we are in. -- is is the kind of poker game we are in. --isa is the kind of poker game we are in. —— is a dealfor gibraltar. police are holding eight people in connection with an attack on a teenage asylum seeker on friday night. three arrests were made yesterday, and the met police have now released images of three more people
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they want to speak to. the victim, a 17—year—old boy, is in a serious but stable condition after he was allegedly chased and beaten by gang of 20 people in croydon, south london. donald trump has said the us will solve the north korean nuclear threat under his leadership. in an interview with the financial times, the president is quoted as saying, "if china is not going to solve north korea, we will." mr trump confirmed he was referring to direct unilateral action. the comments come ahead of a visit to the us by the chinese president this week. there‘s a warning that a third of adults in the uk, or 20 million people, are physically inactive and at risk from coronary heart disease. the british heart foundation says it‘s costing the health service over £1 billion a year, as breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. harriet had no warnings, no symptoms. she was climbing the stairs at home when she had a heart attack at the age ofjust 44. it was like having the rug
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pulled from under your feet. i have a very young family, i had a demanding job, which i loved, really enjoyed, so then to suddenly be struck by such a traumatic incident was very difficult. i didn‘t make time for activity or exercise, so i think, looking back on it now, i was fairly sedentary. harriet is not alone. research from the british heart foundation shows the most inactive part of the uk is the northwest of england, where 47% of adults do not take enough exercise, followed by northern ireland, where 46% are inactive. in wales and the northeast of england, it is 42%. london and the west midlands 40%, and in scotland 37% are too sedentary. we estimate that, on average, most of us spend 78 days of our life each year in a sedentary position. physical activity is important, but you also need to reduce the amount of time each day that you spend sitting at your computer, or whatever it is you do.
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harriet has now changed her lifestyle — regular exercise, walking, playing with her kids — but inactivity is fast becoming one of the leading causes of premature death. graham satchell, bbc news. rescue teams in colombia are continuing to search through tonnes of mud and debris for anyone who might have survived the devastating mudslides in the south of the country. in the last few hours, the president has said 254 people are known to have died, 43 of them children. but the total is expected to rise. the mud engulfed the town of mocoa, burying entire neighbourhoods. some sick and disabled claimants of the out—of—work benefit employment and support allowance will now receive nearly £30 a week less. the government says bringing the benefit in line with jobseeker‘s allowance will incentivise people to get back into work. nikki fox has more.
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belinda wants to work. but like many others with learning difficulties, she finds it difficult to get a job. she‘s getting by financially because she receives employment and support allowance, an out of work benefit for people whose ill health or disability limits their ability to work. ah, lovely! employment and support allowance is important to me, because it helps for me to pay my essentials, my bills, my gas, my electric and basicallyjust get my food in, and it helps me to get out and about. those eligible for the benefit are placed in one of two groups. claimants in the support group arejudged as being unable to work or look for work. others, like belinda, are placed in the work—related activity group because they‘ve been deemed as being able to work at some point in the future. from today, all new claimants in this group will receive £73
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a week instead of £102. existing recipients and those in the support group aren‘t affected by the changes, so belinda won‘t see a reduction in the amount she receives. but like many disability charities and mp5, she‘s concerned the cuts will be counter—productive and has campaigned against them. the theory is if you reduce benefits more people get into work, but the truth is disabled people face lots of barriers to getting into work. whereas someone on an ordinary jobseekers allowance may be back in work typically in six months, for a disabled person typically it takes at least two years. try living for two years on that really low level benefit, it‘s really tough. the government says new claimants placed in the affected group will receive a personal support package with practical help to re—enter the workforce when they are ready. nikki fox, bbc news. it‘s a job with long hours, high levels of stress,
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and one which can cost more than it pays. but tens of thousands of people would not dream of turning it down. now a study has calculated the cost of caring for a relative with terminal cancer. it found that, in the final three months, the average carer spends 70 hours per week on tasks. they include shopping, cooking, personal and medical care and emotional support. they also incur average costs of £370 for the final three months of their loved one‘s life. tony bonser has experienced this first hand. he cared for his son, neil, who died of cancer at the age of 35 in 2009. he‘s here along with gunn grande, a professor in palliative care and co—author of this study. morning, both, thank you very much indeed forjoining us. tony, you have been through this experience of looking after your son, and of course it takes a toll — what for
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you was the impression that you got, what was most difficult?” you was the impression that you got, what was most difficult? i suppose, first of all, his intense independence, so for most of the time he was ill, he insisted on staying in his own flat, but the time came, that was difficult, because we had to look after him despite the fact that he was pretending that everything was ok. we were all in denial, which didn‘t help the situation. the time came when he couldn‘t manage on his own, and we brought him to our house. at that stage, it became really difficult for us, because he... you could never tell from day to day, things like his appetite, because of chemotherapy, his appetite change, what he could eat and wanted to each changed radically. he desperately needed to talk but couldn‘t really cope with the subject, so we spent a lot of time talking around it. he would say things like, do you believe in life after death? and i missed the signs, i have to say, i regret this enormously, i believe he
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was trying to talk about something more serious. he were text us and say, can i have ageing? that is the new technology, we would be sitting watching television, and because he couldn‘t move out of his bed at that stage. he would ask for a favourite book, because he absolutely loved book, because he absolutely loved book and a vinyls. we were looking after him and never quite knowing what he wanted, and that all in an atmosphere of extreme emotional tension, because we were trying to avoid the thought that he might be close to death. of course, you are looking after your son, spending an awful lot of time doing this, and from the research, an average of 70 hours a week, but some people spending more than 100 hours a week doing this. we are looking at the top 25%, they reported spending 115 hours per week, which is 16 hours per day every day. so that is all your waking hours, and of course a lot of carers also have their sleep disrupted, so it is immense, it is
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an immense undertaking. what are you asking for help for? echoes this is something that people want to do, it is their loved ones and all the rest of it. —— because. is their loved ones and all the rest of it. -- because. what carers have told us in past research is that they need help with two main things. they need help with knowing how to look after their family member, you know, having the know—how, skills and confidence to do so. so for instance, health care professionals can provide a lot of input in terms of inspiration, showing carers how to do things, knowing what to expect. the other key thing they need more help with is looking after their own health and well—being, so thatis their own health and well—being, so that is their own psychological health, physical health. but there is also issues like dealing with work, dealing with financial matters, and also making sure that
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people sometimes get a break from caring during the daytime or night—time. you talked about financial matters and that‘s something you have spoken about in the past, as well as the emotional issues and the timing and food for neil because his tastes changed as well during the treatment? yes. so you couldn't actually budget in advance and buy standard stuff in. clothing, yes his size changed. when you have cancer, your body size, body dimensions change. he was in a job where a lot of his pay was performance related and he couldn‘t perform. the company we re very and he couldn‘t perform. the company were very good and sometimes gave him bonuses he hadn‘t earned, but he to rely on us for some that. he felt the cold intensely. a lot of people with cancer felt the cold intensely. he couldn‘t afford his electricity bills and we had a dispute with the electricity company about that, when he was at our house, we had to have the heating and the electricity on flat—out. you don‘t notice it at the
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time, you just spend it because that‘s what is necessary. but at some stage, in the future, it catches up with you and you find out, you have been spending a lot of money. of course. thank you both very much indeed for talking to us. please keep your comments coming in on that. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. a lovely picture sent in from kent this morning. now, it is not foggy everywhere. for some of us, we‘re off toa everywhere. for some of us, we‘re off to a beautiful startment this week, it will be mostly dry. however, over the next few days it will feel fresher and some chilly nights. but the coming night won‘t be as cold as the one that‘s just gone. so what‘s happening is we have got high pressure dominating our weather. as you can see, it is dominating much of western europe a the moment. so if you‘re head off to
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iberia and france, there is a lot of dry weather around. low pressure bringing showers across parts of central of the mediterranean, around italy, some of those will be thundery and we‘ve got a weather front coming in from the west introducing rain across our shores of the it is already affecting parts of the it is already affecting parts of northern ireland and also western scotland. so a foggy start for some. a frosty start for some. that should lift. the exception is where we have got sea fog and low cloud across the english channel. through the day at tile that will lap on shore. but away from that, we are looking at blue skies. beautiful afternoon across london, highs of 17 celsius. don‘t forget if you are caught under the low cloud, it will feel rather chilly. a fine afternoon across the channel islands, but the cloud building across cornwall and devon. it should be dry at this stage. for somerset, gloucestershire and wales, it is dry. but it is similarly so, we will see more cloud build ahead of the rain. the rain getting in across the isle of man and pushing through northern ireland, but than
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we have got another weather front waiting in the wings and we have rain coming in from the west towards the east of scotland with showers across the northern isles, but eastern scotland, much of central and eastern england, staying fine and eastern england, staying fine and dry with sunny spells. through the evening and overnight, here comes that weather front drifting down towards the south east and taking the patchy rain with it. the second one comes in in hot pursuit, so second one comes in in hot pursuit, so it will abcloudy night. there will be fog around and as a result not as cold a night as the one that‘s just gone. but the wind will be picking up and continuing to blow in showers not just be picking up and continuing to blow in showers notjust tonight, but tomorrow and some of the showers across shetland will be wintry. at the other end of the country, our weather front pushes away taking the rain with it, but there will be more cloud left behind it with the odd shower and in between brighter skies and some sunshine, but note the temperature, we are looking at highs of 17 celsius, we are looking at temperatures dipping a little bit and it will continue to do that as we go through the week, but dan and lou, by no means, are we entering
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the next ice age! that‘s good news, carol. there is lots going on in the business world this morning. ben has got the latest. good morning. people stuck in a spiral of credit card debt could get more help under new proposals from the city regulator. the financial conduct authority has said credit card firms must do more to help the 3.3 million people in persistent debt where interest payments and charges exceed the amount they borrowed. the pound is "significantly undervalued" — that‘s the view of a group of economists. they say sterling was only weaker against the dollar at the height of the financial crisis and the imf bail out of the uk in the 19705. the pound is currently down about 15% since the vote to leave the eu injune last year. supermarkets need to get better at forecasting demand from customers to cut the amount of food wasted every year. speaking to me on this programme,
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the groceries code adjudicator says failure to plan how much it needs to orderfrom suppliers means excessive pressure on suppliers, food is being wasted unnecessarily and prices rising for customers. lloyds bank says it is to shrink hundreds of its branches, not close them, just make them smaller. that could mean boarding up the old counter sections. the new smaller branches will be staffed byjust two people, to help customers use automated machines. lloyds says it is because more of us are doing our banking on our phones and online. dan, i worry that we will not fit into the smaller branches because i don‘t know about head height! it will absqueeze. so they will be smaller, but maybe not in the head debt, the height department. we'll have to go in and check! thank you for your comments about grammarthis thank you for your comments about grammar this morning. it really does get under people‘s skin. if you‘re the kind of person whose
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blood begins to boil when you spot a spelling or grammatical mistake on a sign, here‘s a story for you. in bristol it has been rumoured for years that there‘s somebody who goes out under the cover of darkness, correcting mistakes on street signs and shop fronts. breakfast‘sjon kay has tracked down this mysterious individual who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". jon, loads of people contacting us this morning saying this has got to be an april fools‘ dayjoke which is a few days too late? yeah, i know. i thought it was a joke when i heard about it as well. surely, it can‘t be truement nobody can take punctuation this seriously, but i promise you, it is true. he goes around bristol and checks signs. this bakery belongs to herbert. now it is herbert‘s. that‘s how
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seriously he takes punctuation and this is just seriously he takes punctuation and this isjust one seriously he takes punctuation and this is just one of many! he‘s the banksy of bad punctuation. roaming the streets of bristol, righting wrongs. i‘m a grammarvigilante. i do take it to heart. i‘ve been doing it for quite a lot of years now. i do think it‘s a cause worth pursuing. working alone and in secret, he makes punctuation marks to stick on errant signs. i‘m trying to match the colour of the apostrophe that‘s needed on the shop... he has even made a special device which he called the apostrophiser which lets him reach the higher shops. oh, look at that, that‘s worked perfectly. a quick demonstration on the dining room wall. what i need to do now is turn the apostrophiser around so i can apply the roly—poly end here. by day, he‘s a highly qualified professional. only a handful of his closest friends and family know what he gets up to after dark. i have felt extremely nervous,
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the heart has been thumping. i‘ve got to make sure that it‘s technically right. he started his campaign 13 years ago. this was the first sign he tackled, amys nail‘s. apostrophe, deleted. he‘s left his mark throughout this area of bristol, his punctuation mark. apostrophes added. apostrophes removed. there will be some people, maybe the owners of these shops who say, hang on a minute, you haven‘t got permission, we haven‘t asked you to do this, what you‘re doing is a crime, vandalism. what you say to them? i‘d say it‘s more of a crime to have the apostrophes wrong in the first place. i think i can do it without causing anybody too much offence and just discreetly do it. there‘s one sign he has been desperate to correct for years — cambridge motor‘s.
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motors with an apostrophe "s". itjust makes me feel gross... i just think this is just wrong. it‘s not meant to be like this. it really does need sorting out. the garage is right outside bristol‘s high security prison. but tonight, he‘s going for it. using a purpose—built, home—made trestle, he climbs up, cuts a piece of yellow sticky—backed plastic to size and covers the rogue apostrophe. reporter: notice anything? not really, no. we went to see the man who has owned the garage for 30 years. who‘s done that? there is a man... yes. who lives around these parts, i can‘t tell you about him. i thank him for what he‘s done. you don‘t mind? no, i don‘t mind at all! no, it‘s good to see people still caring about english grammar, isn‘t it?
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when you go past a sign that you‘ve corrected, and you know that you‘ve made... the word you are looking for is pride. pride. yeah, i‘ve been the one who has been there and sorted it out and got it grammatically correct. it does make my heart swell slightly when i see the correct apostrophe. here is another one he has done. gardner‘s patch. let‘s see some of the ones that you‘ve spotted that have driven you have seen written. , "please clean after you‘re dogs."
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jeff saw, "pizza fired." there will be one man who is going to be very busy after the submissions from you. i understand his levels of irateness! thank you for the examples today. we have got so many coming in brought and bought. that was jon kay. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. a chilly start for england and wales, still some fog for eastern england, but it will lift through the morning hours, more sunshine underneath that area of high pressure. to the north—west, though, weather france will bring bands of rain into western scotland, northern ireland, together with a freshening southerly wind. —— weather fronts. a
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little sunshine creeping into northern ireland, but still some bands of rain turning heavier over western scotland. eastern scotland, very little rain, should stay dry the moray firth. that band of rain stretches across the irish sea to arrive on western coasts before the end of the day, more cloud coming into the west, quite warm in the sunshine, except when the fog is lapping onto english channel coast. through this evening and overnight, these bands of rain will move into england and wales, rain light and patchy. clear skies in the north, cooler than last night, whereas with cloud for england and wales, a good deal milder than last night, and we are not expecting the same fog problems. a little bit of rain towards east anglia and the south—east, but no great amount, cloudy across the south eastern half of the uk, more sunshine in northern england and wales, sunshine and
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showers for the north, strong to gale force winds in western scotland. temperatures two or three degrees lower than today. looking ahead to the rest of the week, high pressure building in across the southern half of the uk, light winds, some spells of sunshine, across the north some stronger winds, but for the most part fine and dry. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and alice baxter. a critical week for south africa — as its parliament considers a vote of no confidence in president zuma, we talk you through what is at stake. live from london, that‘s our focus on monday the 3rd of april. protests are expected in south africa this week, and its currency, the rand, is out of favour, afterjacob zuma fired his respected finance minister in a dramatic cabinet reshuffle, so where next for one
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of africa‘s biggest economies? we are live injohannesburg for the latest. also in the programme, it could be a third strike and out for toshiba.
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