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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  April 5, 2017 5:30am-5:46am BST

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hello. this is bbc world news. i'm ben bland with the headlines. the suspected chemical weapons attack in syria was "brutal, unabashed barbarism" according to the us secretary of state. at least 58 people died. hundreds more were affected. the un is set to stage emergency talks later. north korea has fired a ballistic missile into the sea ofjapan, prompting an angry reaction from south korea and japan. the launch comes ahead of a visit by china's president xi jinping to the united states to meet president donald trump. frontrunners in the french presidential election have clashed over europe in their second tv debate. the centrist candidate, emmanuel macron, said proposals by marine le pen of the national front amounted to "economic wa rfa re" colombia's president, juan manuel santos, has told the bbc the landslide that killed more than 250 people was a direct result of climate change. 300 people are still missing in the south—western town of mocoa. right, if you want to know what is
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going on in the financial world, i can tell you that sally is here with world business report. today politicians in the european parliament get a chance to debate brexit with meps well aware they have a final say once negotiations are complete. another brick in the wall: the bidding process for the building of president trump's controversial wall along the us—mexico border has ended. we talk you through the proposals. hello and a very warm welcome to world business report. i am sally bundock. also in the programme we'll be live in mumbai for the latest on the uk finance minister's trade trip to india.
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but first, let's start with the news that it has been a week since the united kingdom finally gave the european union formal notice that it wa nts to european union formal notice that it wants to leave. and in a few hours‘ time, today, the european parliament is starting discussions on what it wants to see from the negotiations. and this matters because the parliament can veto any final agreement made between the uk and the european council. one of the big issues they'll be looking at is the size of the so—called "divorce bill". a figure in the region of $60 billion has been widely reported. at the moment the two sides are bound by trade worth about $640 billion a year. that is a pretty sizeable sum. the future of that will be discussed and the initial draft also warns the uk against starting any trade negotiations with other countries whilst it's still a member of the eu. britian‘s role as the world's biggest exporter of financial services is also picked out with a warning the uk shouldn't expect "privileged access" to the eu's internal market.
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there is also a call for "legal certainty" for companies. an estimated that some 300 thousand uk firms currently export to the eu. and two leading industry regulators are also facing the prospect of being relocated from their current london offices. they are the european banking authority and the european medicines agency. and the future of northern ireland and the irish republic are deemed of special concern. the issue of peace is highlighted. but there's also a shared land border and particularly strong trade links. with me is mary rose burke, chief executive of the dublin chambers of commerce. good morning. welcome to world business report. so how optimistic argue about this process? well, i think the initial nervousness that oui’ think the initial nervousness that our members had immediately after the recommended has abated somewhat. —— are you about. there is some relief that the process has started.
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interestingly, our members, one in five of them feel that there could be an opportunity for them in brexit. the remaining 80% are concerned about the cost to their businesses. how have your businesses, members in ireland, been affected so far? particularly food and drink and tourism and retail have seen an impact, particularly in the second half of last year. so a very real impact, they are, primarily driven by the weakness of sterling. we expect that to continue in the great british two —— gb tourist island. that is very important to you, isn't it? yes, that small to medium size businesses, to export about 40% of their goods to the uk. —— ireland.
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talk us through some of your members, who are now seeing opportunities and the impact of this shift. talk us through those. well, there might be a relocation of some institutions to dublin, perhaps in construction and in retail, and something will pick up on that. in a chamber, we have also seen more contact from members seeking help in diverse of buying both their markets and product development. so while people are still reliant on the uk, those businesses are also looking to see how to mitigate that. suddenly i heard from quite a few analysts, and also company bosses that i have spoken to since june also company bosses that i have spoken to sincejune last year, they have said that many working here that dublin is the place to relocate to or to have a european hq, as it were. have you seen a lot of activity from that point of view? we have. a lot of people make that initial assessment. there are certainly been some pressure coming
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on the office—based, but we do expect to see that accelerating, but a glen abbey processor started. thank you forjoining us this morning. we will keep a close eye on what is going on. —— but now especially now be process has started. —— the process. it's the final day of the uk finance minister visit to india, along with the governor of the bank of england and other financial sector leaders. today is all about showcasing the uk's financial services — it's the uk's biggest export. philip hammond and mark carney are in mumbai meeting indian financial tech firms and the head of india's central bank. it's hammond's first foreign trip since article 50 was triggered, starting the process to take britain out of the european union. sameer hashmi is in mumbai. lovely to see you. tell us a bit more about today's agenda. well, the
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chancellor will be attending a couple of events with the underwriters come with. he is attending an event where they will be talk about start—ups, after which they are addressing a conference that will have business leaders from the world of financial services. you we re the world of financial services. you were referring to the uk being the biggest exporter of financial services. so they want to pitch that is one big industry where the uk and india can really partner. because india, as you know, is a growing economy, that is trained to grow its digital base across the country, and the uk is trained to say that they could partner with india to meet those aspirations, particularly when it comes to digital rollout across the country. and so, this is very important groundwork that is going on, yesterday and today, in terms of any future trade deals that are hammered out. you have to be reminded that they cannot have any official trade talks, yet. that is right. both the finance minister and
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the chancellor of india have pointed out that after the brexit process is over, they will start negotiations. they are ready trained to understand theissues they are ready trained to understand the issues where these countries can work together. india has been making this point about immigration, because a lot of indians travelled to the uk every year, but now there are concerns that because of brexit and a crackdown on, all restrictions on visas, indian students might suffer. they want to hear that the number of visas for indians will not suffer. they want to see if they can partner when it comes to infrastructure, because that is one place where india needs a lot of investments in partnership, and the uk feels can play a big over there. thank you very much forjoining us sameer. we will speak to you later in the day. the deadline for contractors to bid for a chance to build the very controversial mexico border
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wall has just closed. several firms will now be chosen to build prototypes, before a final contractor is chosen. but this is one project that won't be smooth sailing for the contractor. the boss of one company, based in texas, said he has received about a dozen death threats since publicly expressing interest in bidding. other companies have asked if authorities would rush to help their workers came under attack, and if employees would be allowed to carry firearms on the job. michelle fleury has the details. donald trump's proposal to build a border war with mexico has drawn interest from hundreds of companies around the country. a us official told the bbc the finalists will be picked in the next few months, and will be asked to build a prototype wall in the san diego area. some of the ideas are unconventional. 0ne miamifirm is the ideas are unconventional. 0ne miami firm is proposing a sustainable structure built out of recycled shipping containers. but according to some media reports,
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many bigger companies are steering clear of the project, building a wall was a cornerstone of donald trump's presidential campaign. it was also one of his most controversial policies. —— steering clear of the project. building a wall. it is not yet clear who will pay for the wall. the deadline to submit bids came as news emerged that illegal crossings from mexico have fallen 67% under donald trump. that was michelle, of cores. let's sheedy markets in asia. trading better than yesterday. hong kong reopened and china reopened. many markets were closed for a bank holiday. they are all open today. the south african rand has steady today. we go to the united states. you can quickly see others' markets ended the day, they are. you can see a flat day, they are, in the us as well. i will be back shortly and we we re well. i will be back shortly and we were reviewed the other stories in the papers soon. see you then. —— we
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will review fee. —— the. theresa may has hinted that drivers facing new charges and restrictions for driving diesel cars in the uk might be compensated. motorists with older vehicles will be forced to pay up to £34 a day to drive in central london from 2019. when buying a new car, do you go diesel or petrol? it can be confusing and is possibly a bit of a gamble. a lower vehicle tax introduced by the former labour chancellor, gordon brown, has encouraged motorists who opt for diesel. it is seen as less harmful in terms of omission as that. —— emissions. it meets the current standard. there is a concern that
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diesel in its dangerous levels of nitrogen dioxide, thought to cause thousands of premature death in the uk. a pollution limits have been repeatedly exceeded in place is included birmingham, leaves, and london. coming what this is. -- leeds. in fresh proposals, the chancellor has said that all but the news cars will faced additional charge to drive in a high air—pollution so in 2019. the premier said that decisions will be taken on a polity. she added... the government has required to produce a new and quality plan later this month. —— is required. this comes this month. —— is required. this co m es after this month. —— is required. this comes after the european commission said a final warning over breaches
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of legal abolition of us in the uk. —— leak, a legal and politician. —— legal air pollution. in other news, i'm ben bland. the top stories the soui’i the suspected chemical weapons attack in syria was "brutal, unabashed barbarism , " according to the us secretary of state. at least 58 people died. hundreds more were affected. the un is set to stage emergency talks later. north korea has fired a ballistic missile into the sea ofjapan, prompting an angry reaction from south korea and japan. the launch comes ahead of a visit by china's president xi jinping to the united states to meet president donald trump. frontrunners in the french presidential election have clashed over europe in their second tv debate. the centrist candidate emmanuel macron said proposals by marine le pen of the national front amounted to "economic warfare."
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colombia's president, juan manuel santos, has told the bbc the landslide that killed more than 250 people was a direct result of climate change. 300 people are still missing in the south—western town of mocoa. now it's time for our news review. the gulf news carries this harrowing photo from idlib province in syria, where a suspected chemical attack has killed at least 58 people. it's one of the worst atrocities to take place in the country since the war began and has sparked global condemnation. the un security council is set to hold emergency talks. the arab news is following uk prime minister theresa may's visit to saudi arabia where she hopes to develop closer trading and security links. her visit has come under fire from certain quarters who have criticised saudi arabia's
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record on human rights. the boss ofjp morgan, one of the city of london's largest employers says he will move hardly anyjobs out of britain in the next two years as a result of brexit. that's in the business telegraph. the ft says women are still missing out on most seniorjobs in the finance industry. data gathered by the paper says only 25% of top executives are female. india's business standard looks at us president trump's crack down on h1b working visas which could spell severe trouble for indian computer programmers. the paper says there are plans to prohibit visas to entry

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