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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 10, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. thousands of police officers from around the country are to attend the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in last month's westminster attack. the service will take place at southwark cathedral later today. if you could paint a picture of a perfect policemen, you would be painting a picture of pc keith palmer. —— policeman. good morning. it's monday the 10th of april. also this morning: russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its support of syria's president assad, as foreign ministers from the g7 nations meet for two days of talks. 200 years after the discovery of parkinson's. we'll hear why people living with the disease are still waiting for a cure.
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i want to apply myself more to make up i want to apply myself more to make upfor i want to apply myself more to make up for what i have lost. a train carrying british goods will leave essex this morning for a 17 point 5000 mile trip to china. in sport, sergio garcia pips justin rose to win the masters. the spaniard beats rose on a play—off hole for his maiden major title on his 74th time of asking. what a day of golf and weather. and carol has the weather. yesterday, the temperature in cambridge was 25.5. today in cambridge, more likely to be 13. temperatures are warm, but coming down today. settled but sunny spells. sunshine in northern ireland and parts of eastern england. i will have more
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details later on. thank you, carol. see you later. good morning. first, our main story. the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in the terror attack in westminster last month, will be held later today. the 48—year—old was stabbed to death by khalid masood as he stood guard outside the palace of westminster. officers from across the country will line the route to southwark cathedral, where a full police service will be held. daniel boettcher reports. yesterday, the coffin of pc keith palmer was brought to the palace of westminster, the place where he had worked, the place he was protecting when he was killed last month. and honour guard made up of parliamentary and diplomatic protection command has been watching over his coffin. pc palmer's funeral will be held at southwark cathedral this afternoon. some of his collea g u es this afternoon. some of his colleagues who worked alongside him have in giving tribute, saying he was selfless, a dedicated officer who enjoyed hisjob, and enjoyed
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working with the public. one of the kindest people you would find, very giving, very loyal, a true friend. a fantastic policeman. he came to work because he had a family to support. he was a wonderful family man. officers from across the uk are expected to travel to london to line the route from westminster to southwark cathedral. police officers will be holding a minute's silence to honour him. flags at headquarters will be lowered to half—mast. bbc news. our reporter, keith doyle, is at westminster for us this morning. good morning. what exactly will be happening today? good morning from westminster, where we expect 5000 plus officers from every police force in britain to be here along the route, taking part in pc keith palmer's funeral, which will be held
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at southwark cathedral, which is two miles away from westminster on the south bank of the thames. all night, there has been that honour guard by pc keith palmer's often, which is in the royal chapel at the houses of parliament behind me. two officers, all throughout the night, changing every hour. around one o'clock, shortly after, the coffin will be taken from that chapel, and it will go right past the spot where that officer was killed, just over two weeks ago. they will then carry on ina weeks ago. they will then carry on in a route for people who know london are long over lambeth bridge, over the south side of the river, past waterloo, over two southwark cathedral. —— to. . past waterloo, over two southwark cathedral. —— to.. —— to. he will be remembered over here with a remembrance memorial for those who
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have been lost in similar circumstances. giving us information about preparations for the funeral later today. boris johnson will meet foreign ministers from the rest of the g7 nations today as they try to present a united front, forcing russia to back down over its support for syrian president bashar al—assad. us secretary of state, rex tillerson, arrived at the summit in italy as tensions with moscow intensified. our diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports. the next two days in the tuscan walled city of luca will be dominated by a collective search for arguments to persuade vladimir putin that he must now end russia's military support for syria's president assad and help to accelerate a negotiated political transition. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, is expected to press the case for new sanctions against russia if they don't give ground. president trump's secretary of state, rex tillerson, wants to go on from here to moscow, able to confront the russians with a strong set of demands, backed by america's key allies. our priority is first the defeat of
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isis, remove them from access to the caliphate, because that's where the threat to the homeland and to so many homelands of our coalition partners is emanating from. once we can eliminate the battle against isis, conclude that, and it is going quite well, then we hope to turn our attention to achieving ceasefire agreements between the regime and opposition forces. russia and iran, president assad's key military backers, are threatening retaliation if there are any further american strikes. it's far from clear moscow's attitude has shifted significantly since either the gas attack or america's retaliatory but limited missile strike. years of effort trying to find a negotiated settlement have failed and so the task here in italy of trying to find a new way of breaking the deadlock still looks enormous. james robbins, bbc news, luca. we'll be speaking to the uk's former ambassador to moscow, sir andrew wood, just after 7am. egypt has declared a three—month state of emergency after attacks
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on two churches yesterday left at least 44 people dead. the measures allow the authorities to make arrests without warrants and search people's homes. the army will be deployed to help police protect key sites. the so—called islamic state group said it was behind both blasts. swedish police are continuing to question a man suspected of driving a hijacked lorry into a crowd of people in stockholm on friday, leaving four people dead. the 39—year—old, originally from uzbekistan, was facing deportation from sweden and had expressed support for so—called islamic state. tens of thousands gathered in the city yesterday to pay tribute to the victims, who included british father—of—two, chris bevington. the bbc has uncovered evidence that appears to implicate the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. a secret recording from 2008 obtained by panorama suggests it repeatedly pressured commercial banks to push down the rates at which they charged each other interest. here's our economics correspondent, andy verity. the libor scandal first blew up in
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2012, when the boss was forced to resign. until recently, liborwas said to be by members of staff at the biggest banks saying they would tell each other what interest rates they would need. they offered rates, liborfor they would need. they offered rates, libor for short. they basted they would need. they offered rates, liborfor short. they basted only they would need. they offered rates, libor for short. they basted only on their own genuine view of the market for borrowing and lending cash. —— based it. we uncovered a phone call on october 29, 2008, based it. we uncovered a phone call on october29, 2008, during based it. we uncovered a phone call on october 29, 2008, during the gst, when a senior banker tells the man putting in libor rates, peter johnson, to push down his libor rates below the true cost of borrowing cash because of pressure from above. we played the recording to a member
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of the treasury select committee.“ what he is saying is true, that is shocking. this tape suggest that in fa ct shocking. this tape suggest that in fact the bank of england knew about it and indeed were encouraging or even instructing it. so we need an immediate enquiry to find out exactly what is going on, given what we have just heard on this tape. the bank of england told panorama libor and other global benchmarks were not regulated in the uk or elsewhere during the period in question. andy verity, bbc news. teaching unions say pressure on school budgets in england is leading to some vocational subjects being cut. research from the nut and the atl suggests teachers in subjects outside of maths, english, science and the humanities are most at risk. the government says school funding
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is at record levels but critics say it is not keeping up with costs and warn of a £3 billion funding gap by the end of the decade. australian scientists say two—thirds of the great barrier reef has now been devastated by severe coral bleaching caused by rising water temperatures. our sydney correspondent, phil mercer, has more on this. what is happening? good morning. the great barrier reef is about the size of italy, and the damage being inflicted by this bleaching is, according to australian scientists, unprecedented. for the first time, they have recorded mass bleaching events they have recorded mass bleaching eve nts o n they have recorded mass bleaching events on the great barrier reef in consecutive years. last year they uncovered this bleaching in the northern section of the reef. this
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year it is the middle section of the great barrier reef which is being subjected to this bleaching. now, this covers an area well in excess of 900 miles, so a huge area has been affected. and the authorities and the scientists are warning the authorities in australia that if assets are not made to combat global warming, these sorts of events will occui’ warming, these sorts of events will occur far warming, these sorts of events will occurfar more warming, these sorts of events will occur far more frequently. —— efforts. ok, phil mercer, thank you very much. harry potter and the cursed child has won a record—breaking nine olivier awards, which celebrate the best in theatre. they include best actor forjamie parker, who plays the wizard, and noma dumezweni, who plays hermione grainger, won best supporting actress. the stage show has now become the most decorated production in the history of the olivier awards. i feel very lucky that i saw it last wednesday. so i just i feel very lucky that i saw it last wednesday. so ijust got in there before it won all those awards.“ is epic. it is epic because you
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watch it in two parts. you go to the matinee and there is a break in between. like a three—hour mini break in between. just amazing. the actors are brilliant. the whole thing is brilliant. you are immersed in the harry potter world. it sounds like you liked it. yeah, just a little bit. should we say other plays are available... other plays are available, but that one is good, obviously. i have been watching golf. an amazing story for sergio garcia. no longer do we have to say he is the best player who has never w011 he is the best player who has never won a major because he has done it. four times the bridesmaid. he tried so four times the bridesmaid. he tried so long and it could not happen to a nicer bloke. i went to bed at nine o'clock last night because i thought ifi o'clock last night because i thought if i stay up i would have to stay until the end. yes, good if i stay up i would have to stay untilthe end. yes, good morning. sergio garcia is the masters champion. he holed a birdie putt to win a sudden—death play—off
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against england's justin rose. an amazing final day battle between the pair, but it's the spaniard who finally becomes a major champion, after 18 years of trying. sunderland could be relegated to the championship in two weeks' time after they lost 3—0 to manchester united. the black cats had a man sent off in the first half. two goals from the premier league top scorer romelu lukaku helped everton win a dramatic game against leicester city 4—2. and paul doran—jones was the hero for wasps as his last—gasp try helped them snatch victory from northampton saints at the ricoh arena to stay top of the premiership. and that is all the sport for now. golf soon in the papers. definitely. yesterday was a lovely day for many of us. the hottest day of the year so of us. the hottest day of the year so far, with temperatures hitting 25 degrees in cambridge. soon, we will hear the forecast. first, this is how you have been enjoying the
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sunshine. gorgeous. not enough of it, though. we should have this right through until september, surely. we are going to have a picnic today. oh, and we're gonna make lots of lovely food. we were at yesterday as well. you might as well enjoy as much of it as you can. we won't have much next month. i am enjoying it as much asi next month. i am enjoying it as much as i can. next month. i am enjoying it as much asican. a next month. i am enjoying it as much as i can. a lovely day to take him out. just get some fresh air. go down to the park. i hope that it will last a little bit longer because sometimes we don't get so much of a chance to have this hot weather. the question, of course, is, is it
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going to last? well, we're not going to have the dizzy heights of those temperatures. yesterday, in cambridge, we had 25.5 c. it was the warmest day of the year so far. beautiful blue skies in cambridgeshire, and cooler in the far north—west. that cool air today will filter further south. however, having said that, for some of us we will still have temperatures above average for the time of year. so what is happening todayis time of year. so what is happening today is our southerly wind pumping in all that warm air has been replaced by more of a north—westerly, a fresh direction for us. today there will be some sunshine, fair weather cloud bubbling up at sunny intervals, instead of wall—to—wall blue skies and we will have showers across the north and west and parts of the east. this afternoon is still a beautiful day, just not as warm
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across south—west england, south wales. fair weather cloud as i mentioned developing across central parts of england, maybe the odd shower and you are more likely to catch one in parts of lincolnshire and yorkshire. as we head further north, north—west england again seeing a bit more cloud developing. some showers across the north and west, some of those wintry, actually, in the mountains of scotland. later in the day we start to import some rain. there is rain coming in across north—west scotland initially, moving across other parts of scotla nd initially, moving across other parts of scotland through the course of the night. hardly a breath of wind, and in ruralareas, under clearer skies, once again we are looking at a touch of frost. these temperatures you can see are indicative of towns and cities. so we start tomorrow on that kanepi note with some frost around. with the clear skies, some sunshine to start the day at the rain will be persisting across the north and north—west of scotland —— nicky note. further south, north and north—west of scotland —— nicky note. furthersouth, in north and north—west of scotland —— nicky note. further south, in the sunny breaks we're looking at temperatures between around about 11
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and 16 celsius, the average in london at this stage in april is about 13, so you see what i mean. we area about 13, so you see what i mean. we are a little bit above where we should be. as we move through wednesday, a weather front eventually come south but as it does so eventually come south but as it does so it will be a fairly weak affair. it is not going to produce much in the way of rain by the time it gets into the south. it move southwards through the course of the day across northern england, wales, into the midlands, staying largely dry and fine head of it. further showers across the north and the west, and that north—westerly breeze. temperatures ranging from eight in the northern isles to highs of around 13, 1a or maybe 15 in the south—east. it is more of the same during the course of thursday. again, we are looking at a lot of dry weather around. some sunny spells, that is away from the north and west of scotland, some of that at times getting into the north—west of northern ireland, and a range of nine to 1a. i will tell you what you can expect for easter in half an
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hour. look at you, you big tease! well, we will see you in half an hour, looking forward to it. are you able to tell us whether it is a thumbs up orthumbs able to tell us whether it is a thumbs up or thumbs down? well, i can give you an actual claim. i had run out of time, to be honest. sunshine and showers, mostly fine. there you go! she didn't take much teasing, then. we will have more from carol later. a quick look at the papers. the telegraph are talking about russia's threat to strike back at trump with force if there is another attack by the us and lots of papers celebrating harry potter winning a record—breaking nine olivier awards, and this is the actress who plays hermione. i sat
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through five hours of the play. russia upping the anti on syria. we will be talking about the g7 summit later on, and lots of papers have the father of two who was killed in the father of two who was killed in the stockholm attack on friday. the front page of the times, royal remembrance, the prince of wales and his sons to mark the centenary of the battle of vimy ridge, so many papers talking about sanctions on putin and what russia is saying about america. the guardian leading with chris beddington, and their main story is about refugees being sent to the poorest parts of the uk. and in g2 today, how we learned to love the fox. it keeps sending the dog around the bend. the mirror
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saying that parents are being asked to donate cash to schools to buy things like books and various things. i am wondering if any of you have been asked to donate money to troubled schools. and is a golf dominated? well, congratulations first of all to the guardian, the only paper to have the results of the masters on the back, because it all happens too late. some impressive printing. they must have stayed up late last night. but i really like this as well in the sun, all a little stories which you might not see on the television when the cameras following the live action. so ernie els has decided it is the last time he will play in augusta. he finished last, and he is saying it wasn't how he wanted to finish, by playing some atrocious golf. danny willett, the defending champion, did not make the cut so didn't play at the weekend, but had to stick around to hand the green
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jacket to sergio garcia, and he wa nted jacket to sergio garcia, and he wanted to play around the municipal court which is right next door, with a mate of his. —— municipal course. you know the big three, jack nicklaus, gary player and arnold palmer used to drive the first drive at augusta. golf magazine looking ahead to who will be hitting the first drive at the masters, they have gone for tiger woods, phil mickelson, who will be 56, and they think gary player will still be hitting it, a fitness fanatic. something like 1300 crunchers a day, to stay fit. so some nice masters of stories in there. there was a picture about an owl, but i will saveit picture about an owl, but i will save it for later. it is 200 years since parkinson's was discovered, and still there is no cure. some drugs can control the symptoms,
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but campaigners say progress in developing new treatments is too slow. one of the reasons, they say, is because it is less common than diseases like alzheimer's, which has six times as many people living with the condition. and today, the charity parkinson's uk is launching a new drive to raise money for more research. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to meet 22—year—old jordan, who is living with parkinson's, and takes up to 15 tablets every day. this is not the kind of face usually associated with parkinson's. the average age of onset is 60. jordan's diagnosis came when he was 16. when you first heard the diagnosis... shattered. shattered you, yes. absolutely is shattered. because he went from this... he was outgoing, loved the girls, and thinking, is he going to be the same? felt like my heart had been ripped out. in 1817,
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james parkinson called this the shaking palsy. 200 years on, there is still no cure. it is so much to deal with. it is still no cure. it is so much to dealwith. it has is still no cure. it is so much to deal with. it has been really challenging, because i have to go to university with it, i am actually applying myself more, . university with it, i am actually applying myself more,. he still managed to graduate, he is still managing to set a masters degree. managed to graduate, he is still managing to set a masters degreelj am so managing to set a masters degreelj am so proud of him. but the drugs only help so much. some drugs mask the symptoms of parkinson's, others deal with the side—effects the drugs to mark mask the symptoms of parkinson's, but they don't slow its progression, and eventually they. working. the only worked for so long, for five working. the only worked for so long, forfive or ten working. the only worked for so long, for five or ten years. parkinson's uk say it is time to change that. today they launched the we won't wait campaign. we brought jordan to london to come to
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parkinson's ho, to meet the man at the helm. have you seen what -- have you got some good news? as unfortunate, there is no good news. they only really treat the symptoms of the disease, so we are only papering over the cracks. why so little progress with this neurological condition could, when medical signs elsewhere has made great strides? the professor tells us great strides? the professor tells us the reason is simple. lack of investment. well, parkinson's is on the borderline of profitability for drug companies. you know, if they we re drug companies. you know, if they were more people affected by the disease, you would get more profit back from the sites. we have got all the tools, we have got all the knowledge, we just need the cash to drive the process forward. until a cure, alljordan can do is manage symptoms. commentary therapies help. for some it is dance, others swim,
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jordan is trying something new. very good. how does that feel? yes, feels good. how does that feel? yes, feels good. it is fine. challenging, but it is rewarding when i get it right. i it is rewarding when i get it right. , 200 years after the condition was identified, parkinson's uk say those living with the condition shouldn't have to wait any more. a cure is within reach, with the right funding. it could and should happen, they say, in jordan's lifetime. funding. it could and should happen, they say, in jordan's lifetimelj funding. it could and should happen, they say, in jordan's lifetime. i do feel close, but were not getting any investment. so we are there, but we are not there yet. i have a lot ahead of me, and i want to look forward to it. and thank you very much tojordan for talking to us. also for you today: steph is out train—spotting
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this morning. she is with a freight train which has travelled over 7,000 miles to the uk. and it is getting ready to go home, steph. good morning everyone. what a gorgeous sunshine, and this is a train for quite a long way down the stretch of track at the rail terminal at london gateway, a train which will soon be making its way to china. it is the first train which will be going from the uk to china, and it is carrying goods which have been made here. so it is everything from pharmaceuticals, soft drinks, ab products, lots of different things made here which we are selling abroad. so it gives you a really good sense of what is happening with global trade, the fa ct happening with global trade, the fact that they are now looking at delivering things via rail. it is of course a lot of things go by air but that can be more expensive than this, and also by sea. that might be cheaper than this, but it takes longer. so throughout the morning i
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am going to be here talking to the chairman of bp world, about why they are doing this, and also finding out what that what is on the train as well. it is about to head off, 7500 miles it has to do, so we will be finding out why and what they are hoping to achieve from all of this a bit later on in the programme. first let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. hello, good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. the first woman to lead london's police force will officially take up the role today. the new metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, seen here with the mayor, will be in charge of britain's biggest force, controlling a £3 billion budget. she will replace sir bernard hogan—howe. a campaign group is calling for a shorter working week to become a legal right in london. other capital cities, like amsterdam, brussels and reykjavik, are showing working fewer hours can lead to happier, healthier staff, and increased productivity. if we were to move to a three—day or
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a four day week, and enable more people to use their time to do a hobby or to get involved in their local community, or to participate in local democracy, that would mean that we would all have better mental health, they would be better gender equality, because the burden of care wouldn't automatically fallen women. —— fall on women. time for a check on the travel now. starting with the tubes. the overground is part suspended between south tottenham and barking. south west trains are experiencing major disruption at waterloo, with four platforms unavailable due to problems with the track. several long—distance services are terminating before london with others cancelled or delayed. there are extensive road closures around southwark and the city until this evening because of the funeral of pc keith palmer who was killed in the westminster attack. here you can see borough high
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street, which will be closed from 7:00am. it also means southwark street is closed, and from midday, southwark and london bridges will be closed too. and, after a glorious weekend, let's see how the weather is looking today. here is georgina burnett. good morning. well, i hope you made the most of the warm weather yesterday. we got above 25 celsius. but today, there is a cold front winds cooler air in and it will be feeling a bit more chilli. but we do have some sunshine to look good too. soa have some sunshine to look good too. so a bright start to the day. decent sunny spells this morning, but we will see that cloud building as we head into the afternoon, and maybe one or two like a very isolated showers. temperatures getting up to about 15 celsius, so a good 10 degrees below where we were yesterday, and a bit of a breeze as well. as we head through the night well. as we head through the night we are seeing some well. as we head through the night we are seeing some clear spells. mainly dry, though, there are one or two showers around, lows of about
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five or six celsius. and then tomorrow was not too dissimilar to today. so it is brighter in the morning, some sunny today. so it is brighter in the morning, some sunny spells. by the afternoon, though, we are seeing that cloud thickening, and really not much brightness later on in the day. temperatures getting up to about 16 celsius. now, from wednesday onwards we are seeing a bit more in the way of wet weather as well. it is looking fairly cloudy on wednesday and quite easy as well, with some patchy light rain later on. and for the rest of the week you can see some wet weatherjust on. and for the rest of the week you can see some wet weather just about at any point, with a lot more in the way of cloud. at those temperatures sticking around 15, 16 degrees mark. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it is back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning.
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litter and fly tipping in england costs £800 million a year to clean up. but will the threat of a £150 fine for the worst culprits make a difference? we'll ask campaigners. if you wrote a letter to your younger self, what advice would you give? we'll meet the poet who says doing just that can help you deal with the mistakes of your past. and the widow of poisoned former russian spy alexander litvinenko is here to tell us about the fight to bring his alleged kgb killers to justice. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in the terror attack in westminster last month, will be held later. the 48—year—old was stabbed to death by khalid masood as he stood guard outside the palace of westminster. officers from across the country will line the route to southwark cathedral, where a full police service will be held.
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his colleagues remember him as hardworking and dedicated. britain is pushing for new sanctions on russia if it maintains its staunch support for syrian president basher al—assad. boris johnson, the foreign secretary, will meet with other g7 leaders in italy today. he has faced criticism over his decision to pull out of talks with moscow after the chemical attack in syria last week that left more than 80 dead. egypt has declared a three—month state of emergency after attacks on two churches yesterday left at least 44 people dead. the measures allow the authorities to make arrests without warrants and search people's homes. the army will be deployed to help police protect key sites. the so—called islamic state group said it was behind both blasts. swedish police are continuing to question a man suspected of driving a hijacked lorry into a crowd of people in stockholm on friday, leaving four people dead. the 39—year—old, originally from uzbekistan, was facing deportation from sweden and had expressed support for so—called islamic state. tens of thousands gathered in the city yesterday to pay tribute to the victims, who included british father—of—two chris bevington. teaching unions say pressure on school budgets in england is leading to some vocational subjects being cut. research from the nut and the atl suggests teachers in subjects outside of maths, english, science and the humanities
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are most at risk. the government says school funding is at record levels but critics say it is not keeping up with costs. in real terms, school funding has been going down and down for a number of years. now, we are at the point where we are losing support staff and the teaching assistants in the classroom who are not supporting stu d e nts the classroom who are not supporting students who need support. we are not doing so much that is vital for these children do have a good and proper education. —— to.
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australian scientists say two—thirds of the great barrier reef has now been devastated by severe coral bleaching. it's caused by rising water temperatures and researchers say surveys show an accelerated rate of damage along the coast of queensland. mass bleaching makes the coral fragile and can kill it. the reef is home to more than 130 species of shark and 16,100 varieties of fish. thank you to all of those who are asking whether this jacquard is special. in honour of the masters. it probably is, isn't it? no, it has nothing to do with the fact that sergio garcia is wearing the most famous jacket in sport. what a fabulous story. i googled sergio garcia never winning a major and all of them said he would never win one.
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he passed his opportunity, four times runner—up. he passed his opportunity, four times runner-up. and i interviewed him a while back and he said he did not have the tools to do it. he said he was now settled and away from golf and that helped him to get on to that good mindset. he just was so calm going into the final round. absolutely brilliant. yes, that is right. after 73 failed attempts, sergio garcia has won has first major golf championship. he beat england'sjustin rose via a playoff, in what was dramatic final round at the masters. garcia is the third spaniard to win at augusta, on what was a particularly poignant day. watch out for some flash photography, as tim hague reports. some things arejust some things are just written. and sergio garcia winning a first major on the day that he is hero turned 60 was one of them. to do it on his 60th birthday and to join
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was one of them. to do it on his 60th birthday and tojoin him and my other idol in golf, my whole life, it is absolutely amazing. i felt calmness. i am so happy. and no wonder, the battle he had with justin rose was among the finest in masters history. no one else could close to them. it was simply a two horse race for the title. they were both on eight under par going to the final nine holes. the spaniard seemed to collapse, finding the trees, the rough, and even a spot in there. he needed something special on the 15, and he found it. oh, that was great. sergio garcia will have that for an eagle. and with the tree still shaking, he would get that eagle, only forjustin rose to get a birdie himself. the olympic champion never giving up. with three holes to play, they were both nine under. yet
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these ryder cup teammates and good friends kept going at it. down the 18. still level. shot into the final green. equally impressive. neither man deserved to lose, in truth. they both missed there putts, meaning a sudden death play—off. delight was fading. but sergio garcia was still shining. this putt for a first major. you have done it at last. at the 74th attempt, sergio garcia has mastered the majors, and he leaves with the green jacket. bbc news. the best pa rt with the green jacket. bbc news. the best part is they are such good friends. justin rose was the other man in the story of this final round, he came so close, but he was full of praise his playing partner. iam i am disappointed, i don't know how i feel about it. at the i am disappointed, i don't know how ifeel about it. at the moment, it happened so fast. you are losing the
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play—off, and then sudden death, and then suddenly it is all over. it is... it was a great day. it really was. sergio garcia and myself separated ourselves from the field. we went through the trees. that was the turning point for him. i am really ha p py the turning point for him. i am really happy for sergio garcia. obviously i want to wear the greenjacket, but if not me, i am glad it was him. -- greenjacket. manchester united won 3—0 at sunderland to move up to fifth in the premier league. zlatan ibrahimovic scored first, before henrikh mkhitaryan and marcus rashford followed suit. united are unbeaten in 21 league games. sunderland are bottom of the table, ten points from safety. i think the hardest thing being a manager is when you are losing, and at the moment we are losing. it is ha rd to at the moment we are losing. it is hard to take. the moment right now, it is tough. it is tough for the
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players as well because they care and they want to do well and we are not doing as good as we should be. there were five goals in the first half at goodison park as everton beat leicester 4—2. leicester conceded after 30 seconds but went ahead inside ten minutes. two goals from premier league top scorer romelu lukaku, though, helped inflict craig shakespeare's first defeat as leicester boss. three late goals gave rangers a 3—0 win over aberdeen in the scottish premiership. veteran striker kenny miller scored twice in a two minutes. aberdeen stay second to already crowned champions celtic. rangers are third. a last gasp try saw wasps snatch victory against northampton saints at the ricoh arena to stay top of the premiership. replacement prop paul doran—jones, who's on a one week loan from gloucester, scored in over time against his former club to level it at 30 points all. and an easy conversion forjimmy gopperth clinched victory byjust 32 points to 30. the extra bonus point lifts them five clear of exeter with three games left.
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i will be interested to see what you make of this. it is very strange. tennis is often played with four people on the court, not usually three on one side of the net. this is the david cup against france. here they are. france's julien benneteau, nicolas mahut and coach yannick noah taking on dan evans in what was supposed to be a singles match in the davis cup. it was a dead rubber because great britain had already lost the tie on saturday, so the outcome didn't matter. evans was still game though. this was a real davis cup match. i don't know what they were doing. this was a real davis cup match. i don't know what they were doinglj think don't know what they were doing.” think it was a bit of fun. and the crowd is notoriously lively at that
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and they would have loved that. we will hear more about sergio garcia's when soon. don't you fear, we will talk about it soon. —— win. pc keith palmer was "dedicated to hisjob, brave and courageous" and "gave his life protecting our democracy" according to those who knew him best. he was stabbed outside the palace of westminster during last month's terror attack. later today, pc palmer will have a full police funeral at southwark cathedral. ahead of the service his friends, pc shaun cartwright and pc greg rainey have described him as a loyal, hard working officer and a devoted husband and father. bells. if you could paint a picture of the perfect policeman, you would be painting a picture of keith palmer. as a police officer, i had never come across someone who palmer. as a police officer, i had never come across someone who worked as hard as keith palmer did. he took
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hisjob really as hard as keith palmer did. he took his job really seriously. as hard as keith palmer did. he took hisjob really seriously. the reason keith palmer came to work was for his family. he was so proud to be a police officer. very professional, very organised, and, umm, he loved everything about it. his favourite was being out on the streets talking to the members of the public. you know, happily taking pictures with people. i know he was a fantastic father and a fantastic husband and, umm, he is going to be missed, so much. he is such a hard—working person. and the credit is to the police service. he is such a lovely quy- police service. he is such a lovely guy. and we are all going to certainly miss him so much. the friends of pc keith palmer remembering him. we're joined now from westminster
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by the very reverend andrew nunn, dean of southwark cathedral. that is where the funeral will take place later today. i suppose in some ways it is an honour to have this type of funeral in southwark cathedral. a real privilege for us to do this on behalf of pc keith palmer's family. and also on behalf of the metropolitan police wars and also the nation as well. to us a little bit about the service and what form will it take. —— tell. little bit about the service and what form will it take. -- tell. a familiarfuneral what form will it take. -- tell. a familiar funeral service. it is really important that despite all of the wonderful turnout of police officers from across the country, when we actually get into church, for the family, for the widow of pc keith palmer and his daughter, it is very much a service for a husband and father, as well as a colleague and father, as well as a colleague and friend, and for all of us who did not actually know pc keith palmer in person but have come to know him over these past few days. so, a funeral service like many,
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many others, but quite different as well. and have the family been very much involved in choosing the readings and being part of the service? they have been, because we wa nted service? they have been, because we wanted it to be the service they wa nted wanted it to be the service they wanted for pc keith palmer, as well as the service he needed to honour what he did for the nation. you have two choirs, a church choir, and then a police one as well. there are actually three. the cathedral choir, the metropolitan police choir, and then a consort of police officers who will sing a specific piece of music, god be my head, as the bishop of southwark commends his body to god. three will be involved. tell us, because we god. three will be involved. tell us, because we are god. three will be involved. tell us, because we are expecting many hundreds, possibly thousands, of police officer is to be part of the service, the ones to come to it, have you got special arrangements in place? huge arrangements have been put in place by the metropolitan
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police force all around south london, and lots and lots of screens have been put up so people who cannot get into the cathedral and cannot get into the cathedral and cannot get into the cathedral and cannot get into the immediate grounds can actually cherie on this occasion. and it is very clear listening to people, for example, those we heard from just now, that he was a very dedicated officer, wasn't he? that sounds to be entirely true. and his actions on the day when he was attacked, the way he did not run away from his duty, the way he did not run away, asi duty, the way he did not run away, as i might have done, but he actually approached the person who had entered into the yard, it shows what kind of police officer he was, taking his duty to a level that really stunned us all in the level of sacrifice he made on behalf of democracy, really. ok, thank you very much for talking to us about the service. thank you. thank you for being with us. half an hour ago, we we re for being with us. half an hour ago, we were promised for some easter weather. good morning. this morning we have
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got much cooler weather coming our way. look how the blue hue seeps southwards. it will continue to do so southwards. it will continue to do so is cooler a awash as a up on our shores today. having said that, it is going to be colder than it was. some of us will still have temperatures above where they should be at this stage in april. we do have quite a bit of sunshine first thing, blue skies but through the course of the day some fair weather cloud will bubble up. so we will be looking at sunny intervals rather than wall—to—wall blue skies for the afternoon. there are a few showers in the forecast in the north and western parts of the east. if you are in south—west england, south wales, you are going to hang on to
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some sunshine for the bulk of the day. temperatures down on yesterday. fair weather cloud bubbling up through the day. you might see the odd showerfrom through the day. you might see the odd shower from that, most of us will not. cambridge, having peaked at 25.5 yesterday, is more likely to be 13 today. showers in yorkshire, lincolnshire, one or two in northern ireland and simon weston scotland. some in the mountains of scotland will actually be wintry. as we head through the evening and overnight we have a weather front coming in, bringing ina have a weather front coming in, bringing in a band of rain. you can see not much in the way of wind, from the huge spacing in the isobars. so where we do have clear skies there will be some frost in the countryside. these temperatures are more indicative of what you can expect in towns and cities. so that is how we start the day tomorrow. where we have a clear skies we will start off with some sunshine. we also have the rain continuing across northern and north—western parts of scotland. later on you will notice that cloud across northern ireland, and you could see spots of rain much later in the day. for england and wales we are looking at some sunny spells, and temperatures between about 12 and 16, more or less across the board. by the time we get to
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wednesday, a weather front which has beenin wednesday, a weather front which has been in scotland and northern ireland pushes all the way down to the south—east, and it weakens as it does so. there is more the breeze on wednesday as well. so the rain moving out of scotland and northern ireland into wales and the midlands. ahead of it, staying dry but the cloud will build. behind it a mixture of right spells, sunshine and showers but in the breeze it will feel nippy. temperatures tend to 15. to give you an idea of the temperature values, the average in london at this stage it 13. so for thursday we have a chilly start, we have can clouds, some sunshine coming in and then the next batch of rain. and we have more of a westerly, south—westerly breeze. and idid westerly, south—westerly breeze. and i did promise you what is this weekend. for good friday, the rain coming into scotland and northern ireland southwards. it will be mostly in the west, very little going towards the east. temperatures down a little bit for some, but for others, still above average and the easter weekend itself it will be
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mostly dry. sunshine and showers as well, and on saturday we expect to see most of the showers. and there will also be a cool wind. so we are not getting back to the dizzy temperatures we had at the weekend just yet. thank you for telling us about easter anyway. it has travelled 7000 miles to get here, and a freight train is about to head from the uk to china, laden with goods including whiskey, car parts, soft drinks, vitamins and baby products. is that the train?“ is indeed the train. good morning everybody. you can see it goes on for quite some way. there is something like 30 containers. they have a few more to put on, you can see them to the side of me and we are in the port, london gateway in essex, and this is the main rail
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terminal and these containers are full of stuff which has been made here, which we are hoping to sell abroad to china. this train is going to head over the next 17 days through the channel tunnel, through europe, russia, and then into china. and as you mentioned, it is this train which has been bringing stuff into the country as well. if you look at the figures on it, we export something like £16 billion worth of stuff to china, and there is about £40 billion worth of stuff coming m, £40 billion worth of stuff coming in, so there is quite a big difference in terms of that export and import deficit between the two countries, but we are hoping, given what is happening with brexit and the like, that we will be doing more trade with them in the future. but it won't be long before this train, the first ever trained to go from the first ever trained to go from the uk to china, will be heading off ina the uk to china, will be heading off in a couple of hours to pause time. alex is from the china british business council. good morning to you. tell us why this is so significant. it is the first of its
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kind, really. trains have been running from europe to china quite frequently for the last few years, this is the first connection from the uk to china and opens up a new avenue for trade, as you say. obviously maritime and freight are still there, to get the train over there, british exports n. why is it better or different to going by sea orair? better or different to going by sea or air? what is the benefit of rail? it is certainly quicker, and this will appealed to advanced manufacturers who have to get the parts from machines over to china very quickly. bulk items, getting things the ship relatively cheaply but it is a great opportunity for exporters. there is a great difference in terms of what we bring in compared with what we sell to the chinese. do you see that changing? certainly, it is a huge opportunity at the moment, and the time is now. china is not in double—digit growth any more, but it is changing, becoming a more consumer driven economy and that has created
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opportunities for the uk. you have services like finance, legal, accounting, and also products as well. so china needs these things, and these are things that the uk excels at. so there are huge opportunities for big and small countries your mac companies. so in terms of the products going across them now, what otherfavourite things we make that the chinese love ? things we make that the chinese love? in terms of this particular train, we have baby products, food and drink is hugely popular at the moment, be it went up 500%, sales of beer, after the president came over two years ago and had that point. but in terms of manufacturing, british style and food and drink, pharmaceuticals, there are real range of products that china wants from the uk. and in terms of worrying about brexit is a country, in terms of what that is going to mean for trade, can you see that filling in the gap? certainly i think there are opportunities there.
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so chinese imports in 2020 are estimated to be around 3 trillion pounds, that is an imf figure. at the moment our trade is about £60 billion. as i say, there are huge opportunities for british businesses to go and export to some non—traditional markets, and that is something the government is trying to push forward. thank you very much for your time. we had better get off the track. i will be here throughout the track. i will be here throughout the morning, and we are going to be talking to the chairman of dp world, about why they have decided to do this. that is a bright sunshine. she has her own branded hardhat. lovely. that is how to rock it. if you could write a letter to your younger self, what advice would you dish out? always ta ke always take the monday after the
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baftas. that is the concept behind a new art exhibition in birmingham. brea kfast‘s holly hamilton is there for us this morning. good morning. good morning, dan. that is a good question. what would you say to your younger self? another question this morning, when was the last time you actually sat and wrote a letter, not any mala text but put pen to paper and wrote a letter? is a bit like a sorting office in here this morning. hundreds of letters, but they haven't been written to family or friends. these are to complete strangers. some with words of wisdom, some with advice, or maybe just a friendly thought. let's take a look at some of these. the glitter and effort, we have admired your courage and appreciate your willingness to let them take care of you. others are more up to it. please don't forget that even on your darkest of days, your twinkle
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is too bright to be dulled. this is all the brainchild ofjodie and, who started five years ago asking if people want a letter from her. started five years ago asking if people want a letterfrom her. now she spends her days riding thousands of letters to people. like they say, with just some words of wisdom or maybe just some advice. let's speak tojodie. where maybe just some advice. let's speak to jodie. where did maybe just some advice. let's speak tojodie. where did this all began for you? so i was in, i guess, my darkest days. i was quite depressed, and the project was like my lighthouse. this was me kind of reaching out to the world, and asking if i could help them. and in turnitis asking if i could help them. and in turn it is ending up helping me. and this is alljust coming from that moment ofjust darkest depths, and it has turned into such a bright light. and now it is a bright light not just for light. and now it is a bright light notjust for me, light. and now it is a bright light not just for me, but for thousands of people over the world. and that is really, really amazing. and it is incredible the effort people have gone into. what is it about a letter that people appreciate so much?”
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think nowadays we have these little bits of real—life magic and a letter and a bit that goes into it, it is almost like a gift. so i don't know about you, but i have always kept the letters i get. not bills and stuff, but the hundreds of letters keep, because they feel so special. nowadays we don't have much of that. iam nota nowadays we don't have much of that. i am not a technophobe, i don't hate e—mail or anything but letters are so e—mail or anything but letters are so meaningful, and i couldn't see doing it any other way. and some of the sentiments here, as well, are so lovely. they really are lovely letters. and it is really nice because they go from people who are very young, to some people who are in this project to in their or 90s. it isa in this project to in their or 90s. it is a thing that kind of scale the ages. it doesn'tjust... it is not a niche market. everybody can be reminded that they are amazing and strong and can get through. even though we don't admit that sometimes, we want to know that we
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are sometimes, we want to know that we a re loved sometimes, we want to know that we are loved and we are now, and it is going to be ok. all of these letters are little reminders of that.” think that is something very important to remember on a monday morning. i have some glitter and felt tips, i might have a go myself and see what happens. thank you very and see what happens: ——— —— we will see you a little bit much. we will see you a little bit later. we will read some of your effo rts later. we will read some of your efforts later in the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. this is bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. the first woman to lead london's police force will officially take up the role today. the new metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, seen here with the mayor, will be in charge of britain's biggest force, controlling a £3 billion budget. she will replace sir bernard hogan—howe. a campaign group is calling for a shorter working week to become a legal right in london. other capital cities like amsterdam, brussels and reykjavik are showing working fewer hours can lead to happier, healthier staff,
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and increased productivity. if we were to move to a three—day or a four—day week, and enable more people to use their time to do a hobby or to get involved in their local community, or to participate in local democracy, that would mean that we would all have better mental health, there'd be better gender equality, because the burden of care wouldn't automatically fall on women. wouldn't that be nice. time for a check on the travel now. starting with the tubes. all looking good there at the moment, but south west trains are experiencing major disruption at waterloo. there is no service dorking and chessington south to waterloo, and some long—distance trains are terminating before london. there are extensive road closures around southwark and the city until this evening, because of the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was killed in the westminster attack. here, you can see borough high street, which will be closed from 7:00am. it also means southwark street
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is closed, and from midday southwark and london bridges will be closed too. we've got full details and a map of the closures on twitter. go to @bbctravelalert. and, after a glorious weekend, let's see how the weather is looking today. here is georgina burnett. good morning. well, i hope you made the most of the warm weather yesterday. we got above 25 celsius. but today, as a cold front brings some cooler air in, it is going to be feeling a bit more chilly. but we do have some sunshine to look forward to, so a bright start to the day. decent sunny spells this morning, but we will see that cloud building as we head into the afternoon, and maybe one or two very isolated showers. temperatures getting up to about 15 celsius, so a good 10 degrees below where we were yesterday, and a bit of a breeze as well. as we head through tonight, we are seeing some clear spells. mainly dry, though there are one or two showers around.
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lows of about five or six celsius. and then tomorrow is not too dissimilar to today. so it is brighter in the morning, some sunny spells. by the afternoon, though, we are seeing that cloud thickening, and really not much brightness later on in the day. temperatures getting up to about 16 celsius. now, from wednesday onwards, we are seeing a bit more in the way of wet weather, as well. it is looking fairly cloudy on wednesday, and quite breezy, as well, with some patchy, light rain later on. and for the rest of the week you can see some wet weather just about at any point, with a lot more in the way of cloud, but those temperatures sticking around 15, 16 degree mark. i will be back with all the latest in half an hour. see you soon. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. thousands of police officers from around the country are to attend the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in last month's westminster attack. the service will take place at southwark cathedral later today. if you could paint a picture of a perfect policeman,
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you would be painting a picture of pc keith palmer. good morning. it's monday the 10th of april. also this morning: russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its support of syria's president assad, as foreign ministers from the g7 nations meet for two days of talks. 200 years after the discovery of parkinson's. we'll hear why people living with the disease are still waiting for a cure. good morning, in a few hours, this trend will make its journey from here in the uk all the way over to china. it is the first train to do that, carrying lots of stuff that has been made here in the uk. so i
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will look at what it means for global trade. good morning. in sport, sergio garcia pips justin rose to win the masters. the spaniard beats rose on a play—off hole for his maiden major title on his 74th time of asking. wore on that later. and the weather. good morning. the warmest day of the year so far. 25 degrees in cambridge. today, though, it will be 13 in cambridge. for all of us, call them yesterday, but dry weather, sunny spells, and showers in the north and west of scotland, northern ireland, and parts of eastern england. more details later. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in the terror attack in westminster last month, will be held later today. the 48—year—old was stabbed to death by khalid masood as he stood guard outside the palace of westminster. officers from across the country will line the route to southwark cathedral,
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where a full police service will be held. daniel boettcher reports. yesterday, the coffin of pc keith palmer was brought to the palace of westminster, the place where he had worked, the place he had bene protecting when he was killed last month. an honour guard made up of parliamentary and diplomatic protection command has been watching over his coffin. pc palmer's funeral will be held at southwark cathedral this afternoon. some of his colleagues who worked alongside him have been paying tribute, saying he was selfless, a dedicated officer who enjoyed his job, and enjoyed working with the public. one of the kindest people you would ever find, very giving, very loyal, a true friend. a fantastic policeman. he was so down to earth and so normal. he came to work because he had a family to support. that was all he ever wanted to do, be there for his family.
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officers from across the uk are expected to travel to london to line the route from westminster to southwark cathedral. police officers will be holding a minute's silence to honour him. to honour their fallen colleague, while flags at headquarters will be lowered to half—mast. bbc news. our reporter, keith doyle, is at westminster for us this morning. good morning. run us through what will happen today. good morning from westminster where we expect 5000 plus police officers from every force in britain to be here along the route at and take part in the full police funeral which is two miles away from us. pc keith palmer's body has been kept overnight in the chapel in parliament behind me under police guard, a police honour guard. shortly after one clarkey will be
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from westminster, past the spot where he was killed two weeks ago, along the south side of the river near lambeth bridge and going over other bridges before getting to southwark cathedral. earlier in the morning there will be a ceremony at the police national memorial, that is just close by. that is to honour officers who have been killed in the line of duty. thank you very much for that. later in the programme we'll be speaking to ken marsh, chairman of the metropolitan police federation, about how the force will remember their colleague.
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boris johnson will meet foreign ministers from the rest of the g7 nations today as they try to present a united front, forcing russia to back down over its support for syrian president bashar al—assad. us secretary of state, rex tillerson, arrived at the summit in italy as tensions with moscow intensified. our diplomatic correspondent, james robbins, reports. the next two days in the tuscan walled city of luca will be dominated by a collective search for arguments to persuade vladimir putin that he must now end russia's military support for syria's president assad and help to accelerate a negotiated political transition. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, is expected to press the case for new sanctions against russia if they don't give ground. president trump's secretary of state, rex tillerson, wants to go on from here to moscow, able to confront the russians with a strong set of demands, backed by america's key allies. our priority is first the defeat of isis, remove them from access to the caliphate, because that's where the threat to the homeland and to so many homelands of our coalition partners is emanating from. once we can eliminate the battle against isis, conclude that, and it is going quite well, then we hope to turn our attention to achieving ceasefire agreements between the regime and opposition forces.
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russia and iran, president assad's key military backers, are threatening retaliation if there are any further american strikes. it's far from clear moscow's attitude has shifted significantly since either the gas attack or america's retaliatory but limited missile strike. years of effort trying to find a negotiated settlement have failed and so the task here in italy of trying to find a new way of breaking the deadlock still looks enormous. james robbins, bbc news, luca. egypt has declared a three—month state of emergency after attacks on two churches yesterday left at least 44 people dead. the measures allow the authorities to make arrests without warrants and search people's homes. the army will be deployed to help police protect key sites. the so—called islamic state group said it was behind both blasts. swedish police are continuing to question a man suspected of driving a hijacked lorry into a crowd of people in stockholm on friday, leaving four dead.
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tens of thousands gathered in the city yesterday to pay tribute to the victims, who included a british father—of—two. maddy savage is there for us this morning. good morning. tell us a little about the police investigation. people are returning to work on monday morning. it is rush—hour. people are picking up it is rush—hour. people are picking up morning coffees. people are paying respects at the scene at this department stores. apologies for the line to sweden. we will try to get that back to you for more detail later. and now for the other news. the bbc has uncovered evidence that appears to implicate the bank of england in the so—called libor scandal. a secret recording from 2008 obtained by panorama suggests it repeatedly pressured commercial banks to push down the rates at which they charged
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each other interest. some vocational subjects in england's schools are being scrapped because of budget pressures, according to teaching unions. the nut and atl, claim teachers of subjects other than maths, english, science and humanities, are most at risk. judith burns reports. one way of measuring students' performance at 16 is the english baccalaureate, or ebacc. to pass, teenagers need at least a gcse c grade in english, maths, the sciences, a language and either history or geography. it's a key measure of how a school is doing, but according to a poll carried out by two of england's biggest teaching unions, subjects not included in the ebacc are the ones being hit hardest by budget cuts. of 1,200 school staff who responded to the poll, half were from secondary schools, three quarters of those said there had been cut to teaching posts in their schools in the last year
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with non—ebacc subjects bearing the brunt. unions say the government must find more money fast. i think the children, the pupils and the children in schools are missing out because they're losing that broad and rich and depth of their educational experience, and education cuts don't hear, what children don't get as children they will never make up in the rest of their lives. so if they don't get the chance to go on a trip, if they don't get the chance to study a subject, they won't get that opportunity again. the government says school funding is at record levels, but critics say it's not keeping up with costs and warn of a £3 billion funding gap by the end of the decade. judith burns, bbc news. australian scientists say two—thirds of the great barrier reef has now been devastated by severe coral bleaching, caused by rising water temperatures. let's talk to our sydney correspondent, phil mercer, what's risk does this pose to the reef? is there a risk involved here? what
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exactly has been happening? well, the great barrier reef is arguably australia's greatest national treasure. it is roughly the size of italy. and according to scientists, it has, for the first time, endured mass bleaching in consecutive years. last yea r‘s survey revealed a mass bleaching in consecutive years. last year's survey revealed a vast northern section of the reef had been subjected to this mass bleaching. now we hear that scientists say it more surveys are showing that a middle section of the reef has suffered the same fate. now, when coral is bleached it sta rts now, when coral is bleached it starts to staff. it does not automatically die, it can recover. —— starve. but scientists are telling us that because these massive bleaching effects are happening close to each other it affects the ability of the reef to bounce back. and one more story to bring you right now.
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harry potter and the cursed child has won a record—breaking nine olivier awards, which celebrate the best in theatre. they include best actor forjamie parker, who plays the wizard, and noma dumezweni, who plays hermione grainger, won best supporting actress. the stage show has now become the most decorated production in the history of the olivier awards. you are watching bbc breakfast. today should have been the first visit to moscow by a british foreign secretary in five years, but borisjohnson scrapped the trip after a weekend of diplomatic arguments over russian involvement in a chemical weapons attack in syria. mrjohnson deplored russia's continued defence of the assad regime, saying the uk wants to build international support for a ceasefire. russia responded by criticising his decision, saying the uk has no real influence on world events. but the us secretary of state rex tillerson will travel to moscow later in the week, saying he will discuss russia's international obligations
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on chemical weapons. sir andrew wood is a former uk ambassador to russia, hejoins us from our london newsroom. good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. first of all, your opinion of the boris johnson's opinion us. first of all, your opinion of the borisjohnson's opinion not to go ahead with his meeting with the russians. it was more or less inevitable. the timing would have been extremely difficult. it is better to get the seven together and try and get some common approach. to go intoa try and get some common approach. to go into a meeting for which you would have no expectation of any adequate russian response or indeed anything other than disagreement to achieve, so i think it is probably better. from a diplomatic point of view, borisjohnson's better. from a diplomatic point of view, boris johnson's decision better. from a diplomatic point of view, borisjohnson's decision not to go was the right one? yes. ok, rex tillerson will now go, and russia has said the uk is no longer releva nt russia has said the uk is no longer relevant in these kinds of discussions. is that the case? that
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is not the case, but that is precisely what they would say. russia is predictable. first of all, it was not the syrian forces that did something, it was some sort of rebel activity. and then, the americans arejust rebel activity. and then, the americans are just being aggressive, they are entirely innocent, and so on, that is what russia says. how do you find a way in with the russians? you say you can predict their responses? yes, there immediate response. you have to remember that first of all this is not the america are expecting, and that affects the opinionated ukrainian. there is no bargaining over that. —— opinions over the ukrainian. and be a pretty stuck over syria. what do you mean? they have no immediate options. their troops on the ground are iranian, who are not there is. they have only one candidate to back, bashar al—assad. you could talk
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about his removal, but who would replace him and how would you replace him and how would you replace his policies? you would have to consider whether there long—term policies are correct. and they are threatening with military action. how dangerous a situation are we now in? that would be dangerous. it also depends on what the americans and the west in general actually do. this was supposed to be a single action, and now we have to consider long—term actions, like military force. and what sort of military force are you talking about? surfer is most likely to be the use of cruise missiles, which are very difficult to counter, against identifiably syrian regime targets. i don't think there is any question about putting troops on the ground. and if cruise
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missiles were to be used again, would you look to what russia has said? that is a very dangerous situation, is it? it would be dangerous, yes. but these missiles fly 100 feet above the ground, they are difficult to shoot down and are being fired from ships in the mediterranean, so there is not an obvious military response unless you wa nt to obvious military response unless you want to go and think the ships, which is not very likely. so russia could respond, but what would be their military response? what are their military response? what are the possibilities? an extreme one would be to attack the ships in the mediterranean, but on the other hand, the west has far more powerful forces in the mediterranean, so that would be foolish. they could make it more difficult for planes to operate against isil, because they have already suspended the agreement the russians and americans have to say where they are, so that would be
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dangerous. thank you. it was the hottest day of the year so it was the hottest day of the year so far yesterday, and we will have more of the weather from carol in just a moment. this is how some of you have been enjoying the sunshine. lament mac we are going to have a picnic today. i am back to work next month, so i'm going to enjoy it while i can. lovely day to take him out, get some fresh air, go down to the park.
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i think the dogs were just having a rest. just enjoying the sunshine, as many of us were. what will happen in the next few days? well, it is going to cool down. the top temperature was in cambridge, 25 .5 celsius. heathrow was 25.4, but overnight we saw some cooler conditions coming in across the north—west, and as we go through the course of the day, watch the blue hue thinking southwards. it is not suddenly going to turn cold, just cooler than it was over the weekend, and for some of us that temperatures will actually be above average for this stage in april. this morning we are starting off with a lot of blue sky. through the day you will notice a bit of fair weather cloud developing. sunny intervals rather than multiple blue skies, but showers and the forecast
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as well. not all of us seeing them. a few as well. not all of us seeing them. afew in as well. not all of us seeing them. a few in northern ireland and a few in eastern england. into the afternoon across south—west england, much of wales, we hang on to the sunshine. don't forget that little bit offair sunshine. don't forget that little bit of fair weather cloud. across the midlands, down towards the isle of wight, into the london area and east anglia, parts of yorkshire and lincolnshire could see a shower or two. most of us will not and there could be the odd shower across northern ireland, northern and western scotland as well and in scotla nd western scotland as well and in scotland some of the showers on the mountain tops will be wintry. temperatures coming down compared to yesterday. as i mentioned, still healthy for april. overnight tonight, rain coming in across the north and north—west of scotland will be on an off for the next 24 hours. for the rest of the country, variable amounts of cloud, some breaks, particularly in england and wales, so in the countryside you can expect a touch of frost. that means first thing tomorrow there will also be some sunshine. in well, the rain continues in the north and north—west. it will be quite busy here through the course of the day,
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but cloud building ahead of that rainfor but cloud building ahead of that rain for england and wales. again, some sunny rain for england and wales. again, some sunny spells and highs at 217. the average in london should be 13, so the average in london should be 13, so you the average in london should be 13, so you can see the average in london should be 13, so you can see what i mean, but even in aberdeen we are looking at highs of around 12. as we head through wednesday, a weather front in scotla nd wednesday, a weather front in scotland thinks southwards, eventually getting down to the far south of england as weak affair. it is also going to be fairly breezy, coming from a chilly direction, namely the north—west. here comes the rain sliding steadily southwards, not making it by mid—afternoon to the far south of england. behind ita mid—afternoon to the far south of england. behind it a mixture of sunshine and showers. if you are in the wind it will feel a bit nippy. stornoway 10 celsius, newcastle 11, but if you are out of it, 12 to 15 will not feel too bad at all. not as lovely and warm as it was at the weekend. into thursday, we are looking again at some chilly weather where we have the brakes on the cloud first thing. you will be sunny spells, more rain coming in across
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the north—west and during good friday that southwards. mainly affecting the west of the uk and i can't go without showing you quickly what is happening at easter weekend. mostly dry, there will be some sunshine and showers, but still that cool wind, and i mean cool is in a chilly way, not as in he, that wind is cool! —— hey. chilly way, not as in he, that wind is cool! -- hey. it is the kind of joke i make, so i think it is sunny. carroll, it is not a good joke. pc keith palmer was a friend to everyone who knew him, and every single day he strived to do his best, working tirelessly in a job that he loved. they are just some of the tributes that have been paid to the 48—year—old, who was killed during the westminster terror attack last month. colleagues have been remembering their friend ahead of his funeral later today, and speaking about what they say was the ultimate sacrifice he made, by giving his life
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while serving his country. bells. if you could paint a picture of the perfect policeman, you would be painting a picture of keith palmer. as a police officer, i never come across somebody who worked as hard as keith palmer did. he took his job really seriously. the reason keith came to work was for his family, but he was so proud to be a police officer. pc palma devoted his life to the service of his country. he was a husband and a father, killed during thejob he husband and a father, killed during the job he loved. husband and a father, killed during thejob he loved. he was husband and a father, killed during the job he loved. he was every inch a hero, and his actions will never be forgotten. thinking back to the
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actions of pc palma, just full of admiration for the man. actions of pc palma, just full of admiration forthe man. i actions of pc palma, just full of admiration for the man. i think he is the one true hero who truly stands out from the day, and every day he chose to put on a uniform he was a hero. very professional, very organised, and, um... he loved everything about it. his favourite was being out on the streets, talking to the members of the public, you know, happily taking pictures with people. he would always be thinking of his wife and his family. i know he was a fantastic father and a fantastic husband and, um... he's going to be missed, so much. he was a strong, professional public
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servant, and it was a delight to meet him here again, only a few months after being elected. every single day his striped to do his best. he worked tirelessly. such a hard—working person. and what a credit he is to the police service. he's such a lovely guy, and we're all going to certainly miss him so much. we will have plenty more on that throughout the programme for you this morning. steph is train—spotting this morning. she is with a freight train that has travelled more than 7,000 miles to get to the uk, and it isjust about to head home to the far east, laden with british exports. tell us a bit more, steph. good morning, everybody. as you can
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see i am at london gateway, the main port at the terminal. there is a really significant thing happening today. this train, which goes on for quite some distance and has around 30 containers on it, will be heading off to china taking lots of products which have been made here in the uk. everything from pharmaceuticals, soft drinks, baby products, lots of products made here that the chinese wa nt to products made here that the chinese want to buy from us. and the reason why it is so significant is because this is the first time that a train has done thisjourney, this is the first time that a train has done this journey, taking the stuff there. in the past, this port would still be very busy shipping things to china, and they travel by airas things to china, and they travel by air as well, but what they are doing is looking at rail as an option as well. helen is from dp world and has been involved in all the logistics. this has been quite a significant project. tel is the background to it. yes, so obviously the trains
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depart china and come back into the uk, they have been stabled in barking, and we are responsible, the port operator, for ensuring all the containers are loaded onto the train on time. it will go to the channel tunnel, through france and belgium and then into germany. that leg of the journey is and then into germany. that leg of thejourney is going and then into germany. that leg of the journey is going to be operated by the rail operator. in germany it will be connected with an inter— railtrain, and it will be connected with an inter— rail train, and it will then go through poland, belarus, russia and kaza khsta n before through poland, belarus, russia and kazakhstan before it arrives in china. and it is significant because this is a new project, isn't it? being delivered by rail. why are you doing this? well, in terms of putting containers on the vessel, it is cheaper than going by rail, but it takes almost double the time. rail is obviously cheaper than airfreight, so it is the sort of
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middle ground between and c. airfreight, so it is the sort of middle ground between and cl airfreight, so it is the sort of middle ground between and c. a happy medium between the two. thank you very much for your time this morning. it is fascinating to see, because when you think about all the things that must be in these containers and how much we are exporting to china, something like £16 billion worth of stuff we export to china every year. if you look at that compared to what we are bringing in, it is something like £40 billion. it is a bit of a gap andi £40 billion. it is a bit of a gap and i will be talking to the chairman of dp world later in the programme about how significant this is for global trade. it is a staggering journey to take into account, as well, isn't it? we will speak to you later. i want a hard hat with my name on it. have you got one? not yet. next christmas. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. the first woman to lead london's police force will officially take up
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the role today. the new metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, seen here with the mayor, will be in charge of britain's biggest force, controlling a £3 billion budget. she will replace sir bernard hogan—howe. a campaign group is calling for a shorter working week to become a legal right in london. other capital cities like amsterdam, brussels and reykjavik are showing working fewer hours can lead to happier, healthier staff, and increased productivity. if we were to move to a three—day or a four—day week, and enable more people to use their time to do a hobby or to get involved in their local community, or to participate in local democracy, that would mean that we would all have better mental health, there'd be better gender equality, because the burden of care wouldn't automatically fall on women. sounds like a great idea. now, let's have a look at this morning's travel.
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starting with the tubes. all looking good there at the moment. but south west trains are experiencing major disruption at waterloo. there is no service dorking and chessington south to waterloo, and some long—distance trains are terminating before london. there are extensive road closures around southwark and the city until this evening, because of the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was killed in the westminster attack. here, you can see borough high street, which is due to be closed shortly. it also means southwark street is closed, and from midday, southwark and london bridges will be closed, too. we have got full details and a map of the closures on twitter. go to @bbctravelalert. so, after a glorious weekend, let's see how the weather is looking today. here is georgina burnett. good morning. well, i hope you made the most of the warm weather yesterday. we got above 25 degrees celsius. but today, as a cold front brings some cooler air in, it is going to be feeling a bit more chilly. but we do have some sunshine to look
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forward to, so a bright start to the day. decent sunny spells this morning, but we will see that cloud building as we head into the afternoon, and maybe one or two light but very isolated showers. temperatures getting up to about 15 celsius, so a good 10 degrees below where we were yesterday, and a bit of a breeze as well. as we head through tonight, we are seeing some clear spells. mainly dry, though there are one or two showers around. lows of about five or six degrees celsius. and then tomorrow is not too dissimilar to today. so it is brighter in the morning, some sunny spells. by the afternoon, though, we are seeing that cloud thickening, and really not much brightness later on in the day. temperatures getting up to about 16 degrees celsius. now, from wednesday onwards, we are seeing a bit more in the way of wet weather, as well. it is looking fairly cloudy on wednesday, and quite breezy, as well, with some patchy, light rain later on. and for the rest of the week you can see some wet weather just about at any point, with a lot more in the way of cloud, but those temperatures
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sticking around the 15, 16 degree mark. that's all for now. for now, though, here is louise and dan. we will see you soon. hello. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the main stories. the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in the terror attack in westminster last month, will be held later. the 48—year—old was stabbed to death by khalid masood as he stood guard outside the palace of westminster. officers from across the country will line the route to southwark cathedral, where a full police service will be held. his colleagues remember him as hardworking and dedicated. he is one of the kindest people you would ever find. he is one of the kindest people you would everfind. a very he is one of the kindest people you would ever find. a very true friend, a fantastic policeman. so earth and
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so a fantastic policeman. so earth and so normal. he came to work because he had a family and all he ever wanted to do was to be there for his family. britain is pushing for new sanctions on russia if it maintains its staunch support for syrian president basher al—assad. boris johnson, the foreign secretary, will meet with other g7 leaders in italy today. he has faced criticism over his decision to pull out of talks with moscow after the chemical attack in syria last week that left more than 80 dead. egypt has declared a three—month state of emergency after attacks on two churches yesterday left at least 44 people dead. the measures allow the authorities to make arrests without warrants and search people's homes. the army will be deployed to help police protect key sites. the so—called islamic state group said it was behind both blasts. swedish police are continuing to question a man suspected of driving a hijacked lorry into a crowd of people in stockholm on friday, leaving four people dead.
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the 39—year—old, originally from uzbekistan, was facing deportation from sweden and had expressed support for so—called islamic state. tens of thousands gathered in the city yesterday to pay tribute to the victims, who included british father—of—two chris bevington. teaching unions say pressure on school budgets in england is leading to some vocational subjects being cut. research from the nut and the atl suggests teachers in subjects outside of maths, english, science and the humanities are most at risk. the government says school funding is at record levels but critics say it is not keeping up with costs. australian scientists say two—thirds of the great barrier reef has now been devastated by severe coral bleaching. it's caused by rising water temperatures and researchers say surveys show an accelerated rate of damage along the coast of queensland. mass bleaching makes the coral fragile and can kill it. the reef is home to more than 130 species of shark and 16,100 varieties of fish. soon, the weather. and a preview of
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easter, which is unusual to look that far ahead. a long-distance forecast. and now for the sport, reflecting on a brilliant finish to the first golf major of the year. the masters. the victor was sergio garcia overjustin rose. already a major winner. it felt like it was his turn. two putts to win the masters and he needed only one. after 73 failed attempts, sergio garcia has won has first major golf championship. he beat england'sjustin rose via a playoff, in what was dramatic final round at the masters. garcia is the third spaniard to win at augusta, on what was a particularly poignant day. watch out for some flash photography, as tim hague reports.
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some things are just written. and sergio garcia winning a first major on the day that his hero turned 60 was one of them. to do it on his 60th birthday and tojoin him and my other idol in golf, my whole life, it is absolutely amazing. i felt calmness. i am so happy. and no wonder, the battle he had withjustin rose was among the finest in masters history. no one else could close to them. it was simply a two horse race for the title. they were both on eight under par going to the final nine holes. the spaniard seemed to collapse, finding the trees, the rough, and even a spot in there. he needed something special on the 15, and he found it. oh, that was great. sergio garcia will have that for an eagle. and with the tree still shaking,
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he would get that eagle, only forjustin rose to get a birdie himself. the olympic champion never giving up. with three holes to play, they were both nine under. yet these ryder cup teammates and good friends kept going at it. down the 18. still level. shot into the final green. equally impressive. neither man deserved to lose, in truth. they both missed there putts, meaning a sudden death play—off. delight was fading. but sergio garcia was still shining. this putt for a first major. you have done it at last. at the 74th attempt, sergio garcia has mastered the majors, and he leaves with the green jacket. bbc news. a remarkable day for sergio garcia.
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justin rose was the other man in the story of this final round, he came so close, but he was full of praise his playing partner. i am disappointed, i don't know how i feel about it. at the moment, it happened so fast. you are losing the play—off, and then sudden death, and then suddenly it is all over. it is... it was a great day. it really was. sergio garcia and myself separated ourselves from the field. we went through the trees. that was the turning point for him. i am really happy for sergio garcia. obviously i want to wear the green jacket, but if not me, i am glad it was him. manchester united have won in the premier league. zlatan ibrahimovic scored first, before henrikh mkhitaryan and marcus rashford followed suit. united are unbeaten in 21 league games. sunderland are bottom of the table, ten points from safety. i think the hardest thing being a manager is when you are losing,
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and at the moment we are losing. it is hard to take. at the moment, it is tough. it is tough for the players as well because they care and they want to do well and we are not doing as good as we should be. there were five goals in the first half at goodison park as everton beat leicester 4—2. leicester conceded after 30 seconds but went ahead inside ten minutes. two goals from premier league top scorer romelu lukaku, though, helped inflict craig shakespeare's first defeat as leicester boss. three late goals gave rangers a 3—0 win over aberdeen in the scottish premiership. veteran striker kenny miller scored twice in a two minutes. aberdeen stay second to already crowned champions celtic. rangers are third. a last gasp try saw wasps snatch victory against northampton saints at the ricoh arena to stay top of the premiership. replacement prop paul doran—jones, who's on a one week loan from gloucester, scored in over time against his former club to level it
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at 30 points all. and an easy conversion forjimmy gopperth clinched victory byjust 32 points to 30. the extra bonus point lifts them five clear of exeter with three games left. tennis is often played with four people on the court, but there's not normally three on one side of the net! have a look at this. france's julien benneteau, nicolas mahut and coach yannick noah taking on dan evans in what was supposed to be a singles match in the davis cup. it was a dead rubber because great britain had already lost the tie on saturday, so the outcome didn't matter. evans was still game though. that is excellent. exactly. everyone likes to see tennis players having fun. i expect other people are suffering like you with a lack of sleep from watching the masters.”
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feel pumped up. how much sleep did you get? 1.5 hours. if it was a general election you would expect me to stay up and watch it. i did it for the team. i am glad, because it means i do not have to do it. the line of duty. you worrying so much trouble if you say something. the cliff—hanger to destroy all cliff—hangers. cliff—hanger to destroy all cliff-hangers. enough already. no spoiler alert. don't mention anything. it's 200 years since parkinson's was discovered, and still there is no cure. some drugs can control the symptoms, but campaigners say progress in developing new treatments is too slow. one of the reasons, they say, is because it's less common than diseases like alzheimer's, which has six times as many people living with the condition. and today, the charity parkinson's uk is launching a new drive to raise money for more research. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to meet 22—year—old, jordan webb, who is living with parkinson's and takes up to 15 tablets every day.
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this is not the kind of face usually associated with parkinson's. the average age of onset is 60. jordan's diagnosis came when he was 16. when you first heard the diagnosis... shattered. shattered you, yes. absolutely shattered, because he went from this... he was outgoing, loved the girls, and thinking, is he going to be the same? felt like my heart had been ripped out. in 1817, james parkinson called this the shaking palsy. 200 years on, there is still no cure. it is so much to deal with. it has been really challenging, because i have to go to university with it. i am actually applying myself more. he still managed to graduate. he is still managing to sit a masters degree. i am so proud of him.
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but the drugs only help so much. some drugs mask the symptoms of parkinson's, others deal with the side—effects of the drugs to mask the symptoms of parkinson's. but they don't slow its progression, and eventually they will stop working. they only work for so long, forfive or ten years. parkinson's uk say it is time to change that. today they launched the we won't wait campaign. we broughtjordan to london, to come to parkinson's ho, to meet the man at the helm. have you got some good news? unfortunately, there is no good news. they only really treat the symptoms of the disease, so we are only papering over the cracks. why so little progress with this neurological condition, when medical science elsewhere has made great strides? the professor tells us the reason is simple.
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lack of investment. well, parkinson's is on the borderline of profitability for drug companies. you know, if there were more people affected by the disease, you would get more profit back from the science. we have got all the tools, we have got all the knowledge, we just need the cash to drive the process forward. until a cure, alljordan can do is manage symptoms. commentary therapies help. for some, it is dance, others swim. jordan is trying something new. very good. how does that feel? yeah, feels good. it is fine. challenging, but it is rewarding when i get it right. 200 years after the condition was identified, parkinson's uk say those living with the condition shouldn't have to wait any more. a cure is within reach, with the right funding. it could and should happen, they say, in jordan's lifetime. i do feel close, but we're not
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getting any investment. so we are there, but we are not there yet. i have a lot ahead of me, i want to look forward to. that was jordan webb talking to jayne, diagnosed with parkinson's at 16, but determined not to let it rule his life. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. already we have some weather will watch as' pictures in. lovely sunrise, and another one from kent. again, another beautiful sunrise. it is not going to be as warm as it was over the weekend. yesterday we hit 25.5 c in
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cambridge. today in cambridge it is more likely to be 13, and a cooler, fresh day for most of us. we have lost the southerly wind and replaced it with the north—westerly breeze, which is chilly. we start off with some blue skies, but fair weather cloud will build—up through the course of the afternoon and a few of us will see some showers, but most of us will not. into the afternoon across south—west england and wales there will be some sunshine. you will notice the cloud building, and it is the same from the midlands towards the isle of wight, and heading towards the south—east. again, some fair weather cloud and showers, most not seeing them but you're more likely to them across lincolnshire and yorkshire. north—west england close to the coast will hang on to some sunshine. one or two showers in the north—west of scott and the tops of the mountains will be wintry. —— scotland. we have a weather front coming in from the north—west, introducing some rain. cloud building ahead of it across scotland
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and northern ireland, but for england and wales, under clear skies, with not much of a breeze, we will see some frost in the countryside once again. generally these temperatures you can see here are indicative of towns and cities so are indicative of towns and cities so they are that little bit higher. tomorrow the rain continues across the north and west of scotland on and off through the course of the day. cloud building across northern ireland and southern scotland but for england and wales, we are looking at once again that day of sunny spells. temperatures widely in 11 to 17 degrees. 17 for london, for example, is still above average for this stage in april. the average is about 13 so although not hitting the mid—20s it is still quite doesn't. as we head on into wednesday the rain across scotland and northern ireland six south courtesy of this cold front. looking at the isobars, it is going to be a breezy day on wednesday, the wind coming from chilly, north—westerly direction. into wales and the midlands and east
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anglia, and it doesn't make it into the far south of england by 4pm, and when it does do later, it will be fairly patchy. behind it, a mixture of sunshine and showers, and temperatures tend to 15 celsius. by the time we get to thursday, it is a similar start once again. we are looking at where we have clear skies by night, sunshine by morning, and also a touch of frost. a lot of sunny spells around as well. the exception to that once again across the north and north—west of scotland, as a weather front comes in bringing rain. laterthat scotland, as a weather front comes in bringing rain. later that will get into the north—west of northern ireland. so for good friday it continues its descent southwards, taking its rain with it. not much getting into the east. fairly patchy. kind at a return to sunshine and some showers. for the easter weekend we are looking at a mostly dry weekend. there will be some sunshine and showers, especially on saturday, and we will still have that cool wind. thank you very much
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for the easter preview. we are enjoying it. see you later. it travelled over 7,000 miles to get here. now, 12 weeks after it arrived, a freight train from the far east is making its returnjourney to china, and it is taking with it some british stuff that the chinese want to buy. steph is at the departure point in essex this morning. good morning to you. good morning everyone. i have to say it is quite nippy here this morning but a really important day for uk trade. this train behind me will be the first ever train carrying cargo from the uk all the way to china on the rail network. so it is around 30 containers, which this train will be made up of. there will be loaded on throughout the morning before it zips off. it is going to take, as you say, about 17 days to get all the way over to china and is carrying lots of british made products, things like
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pharmaceuticals, soft drinks, food as well, baby product, lots of things that chinese people want to buy from us here in the uk. let's talk to the chairman of dp world. can you just tell is a bit about how significant this project is?“ can you just tell is a bit about how significant this project is? it is a very important event today, because it is the first export train of cargo leaving england for china. it is full of british made products. it is full of british made products. it is in line with the one belt one road concept of china. we are on one belt, one road, throughout the 78 terminals around the world, and the network is one of the most important routes. this is great news for us. and obviously your business is famous for having lots of ports around the world. why is it that this product has been taken by rail,
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rather than by sea or air? it is a demonstration of the facilities available here in the port. shippers would love to see different modes of transportation. we already have by air. we already have by sea, by road, and now by rail. and rail not just to europe, but across continents all the way to asia. this is very significant. and your business as well, obviously a huge global firm. business as well, obviously a huge globalfirm. how business as well, obviously a huge global firm. how important business as well, obviously a huge globalfirm. how important do business as well, obviously a huge global firm. how important do you think london is in the global trade world ? think london is in the global trade world? well, we invested a lot in the london gateway because we believe in the strength of the economy. we believe in economic activity that the sport will add. on the whole supply chain that is managed and operated by dp world, it isa managed and operated by dp world, it is a great facility. it is state—of—the—art technology, it is
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the biggest port in the uk and will play a major role. are you worried about what impact leaving the european union might have on trade here? i think short-term there might be something, but i believe long—term it will not affect anything we haven't seen. the port is growing, the business is growing, we had a good year last year, and this year we have a committed line, dedicated to using london gateway. and this announcement of the shipping line actually happened after brexit, so it shows that it has a future for us. thank you for joining us on the programme this morning. and as you were saying it is not long until this train will be heading off. it is something like £40 billion of products we send
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every year, and we import around £60 billion of products. it is big business for us. it will be interesting to see whether that grows over the next few years but more from me and my personalised hardhat, which i know dan is very jealous of, later in the programme. love that hat. bigger fines, community service and penalties for drivers throwing rubbish out of their cars are to be announced by the government today, as part of a clampdown on littering. under the plans, fines for littering in england would double from £75 to £150, drivers could receive penalty notices if rubbish is thrown from their car, and people given community service for fly—tipping would be forced to help clear up fly—tipped waste and litter. it is hoped this will help tackle the 900,000 reported cases of fly—tipping in england last year, which cost councils nearly £50 million to clean up. john read is the founder of the campaign group clean up britain. good morning to you. good morning.
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is £150 enough to make a difference? we would rather have seen a larger fine, of £200 minimum, and the government recently introduced a £200 fine for people caught using mobile phones in cars. it is a step in the right direction, but let's be clear about one thing. there is only one sustainable long—term solution, and that is changing the attitudes and that is changing the attitudes and behaviour, the culture in this country of littering. you don't see it in many countries, but it is very prevalent in this country. that is the only way you will have a long—term change and a reduction of littering in this country. how do you change attitudes? we have all seen verges where you can see an entire takeaway bag, and this is fly—tipping, but individuals throw in bags out of their cars, how do you change that? it is very difficult, there is no single silver bullet which will solve the problem, if there was, it would have been
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found. but a mixture of carrot and stick, if you like. people need to feel that if you get caught speeding, you get fined, people know there is a deterrent there. if the fines are increased, that is a step in the right direction, definitely. but there has to be a real threat of being caught, and i will give you anecdotal evidence, i had meetings last week with two councils, and both councils and the midland said to me neither of them employ any waste enforcement officers. so in those councils and the midlands you have zero chance of being caught littering orff fly—tipping. —— littering orff fly—tipping. —— littering or fly—tipping. littering orff fly—tipping. —— littering orfly—tipping. the most important thing is that we have a sustained cultural, behavioural change campaign, and that is something the government is committed to. at one thing we are very concerned about is that the government is going to be announcing that later today, but there is no funding whatsoever for this campaign. so that is a worry.” funding whatsoever for this campaign. so that is a worry. i was going to ask you about how it will be enforced, but you have given a good example that. in other countries, this scheme in germany,
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reverse vending machines, where there is an extra charge, for example, a bottle of pop that you can get from a shop, and when you ta ke can get from a shop, and when you take that back the money is refunded. but that work here? we think it certainly could work, that is called a deposit returns scheme, and as you say it works on the way that people take their can of coca—cola, or whatever, back, that people take their can of coca—cola, orwhatever, back, and they get a deposit. it acts as an incentive to do the right thing. an interesting interestingly when it was introduced in 2003, recycling rates in germany improved to 98%. they are less than 50% in this country. we can catch up if we do the right thing. let's talk about fly—tipping as well. that is a real problem, lots of different people have observed. how do you tackle that? you try to go after fly—tippers, but they are not being investigated. so what is the problem? as we know, since 2010 councils have had a reduction in theirfunding councils have had a reduction in their funding across the board. they
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are semi— bankrupt, some of these councils. they don't have the resources to do the enforcement. to give you examples of two councils i met last week, they have no enforcement officers. one council was telling me they had caught someone was telling me they had caught someone fly—tipping but the only reason they caught them was because there was a water authority camera right next to where the fly—tippers we re right next to where the fly—tippers were tipping, and they got caught because of that. so it is very, very difficult. and part of it is a resource issue, there is no getting away from that. and if you want to do the reverse vending, you need to get the manufacturers on board. absolutely, but coca—cola, the largest manufacturer in the world, has done a u—turn on that in the last weeks, and after being adamantly against it, they have decided that they will be open—minded about that. so that is very, very good sign. i think they deserve credit for doing that. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm alice salfield. the first woman to lead london's police force will officially take up the role today. the new metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, seen here with the mayor, will be in charge of britain's biggest force, controlling a £3 billion budget. she will replace sir bernard hogan—howe. a campaign group is calling for a shorter working week to become a legal right in london. other capital cities like amsterdam, brussels and reykjavik are showing working fewer hours can lead to happier, healthier staff, and increased productivity. if we were to move to a three—day or a four—day week, and enable more people to use their time to do a hobby or to get involved in their local community, or to participate in local democracy, that would mean that we would all have better mental health, there'd be better gender equality, because the burden of care wouldn't automatically fall on women. now, let's have a look
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at this morning's travel. starting with the tubes, the overground has minor delays between liverpool street and cheshunt. but south west trains are experiencing major disruption at waterloo. there is no service from dorking and chessington south to waterloo, and some long—distance trains are terminating before london. at euston, there are delays of up to half an hour because of overhead line problems. there are extensive road closures around southwark and the city until this evening, because of the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was killed in the westminster attack. this is southwark street, which is currently closed. we have got full details and a map of the closures on twitter. go to @bbctravelalert. and the a10 remains closed from stoke newington common, following a stabbing yesterday. so, after a glorious weekend, let's see how the weather is looking today. here is georgina burnett. good morning. well, i hope you made the most of the warm weather yesterday. we got above 25 degrees celsius.
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but today, as a cold front brings some cooler air in, it is going to be feeling quite a bit more chilly. but we do have some sunshine to look forward to, so a bright start to the day. decent sunny spells this morning, but we will see that cloud building as we head into the afternoon, and maybe one or two light but very isolated showers. temperatures getting up to about 15 degrees celsius, so a good 10 degrees below where we were yesterday, and a bit of a breeze as well. as we head through tonight, we are seeing some clear spells. mainly dry, though there are one or two showers around. lows of about five or six degrees celsius. and then tomorrow is not too dissimilar to today. so it is brighter in the morning, some sunny spells. by the afternoon, though, we are seeing that cloud thickening, and really not much brightness later on in the day. temperatures getting up to about 16 degrees celsius. now, from wednesday onwards, we are seeing a bit more in the way of wet weather, as well. it is looking fairly cloudy on wednesday, and quite breezy, as well, with some patchy, light rain later on. and for the rest of the week you can
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see some wet weather just about at any point, with a lot more in the way of cloud, but those temperatures sticking around the 15, 16 degree mark. that's all for now. i'll be back in half an hour, but until then, there is plenty more on our website. we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. thousands of police officers from around the country are to attend the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in last month's westminster attack. the service will take place at southwark cathedral later today. if you could paint a picture perfect policeman, you would be painting a picture of keith palmer. good morning. it's monday the 10th of april.
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also this morning: russia faces the threat of fresh international sanctions for its support of syria's president assad as foreign ministers from the g7 nations meet for two days of talks. good morning. in a few hours, these trains will be heading off to china. it is the first time we will see a train travel from the uk to china carrying lots of products that have been made here, so i will be looking at what it means for global trade. good morning. in sport, sergio garcia pips justin rose to win the masters. the spaniard beats rose on a play—off hole for his maiden major title on his 74th time of asking. who killed the former russian spy alexander litvinenko? his wife marina will be here to tell us about her search for the truth more than ten years after he was poisoned in a london hotel. and carol has the weather. good morning. yesterday was the
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warmest day of the year so far, 25.5 celsius in cambridge. in cambridge today, it is more likely to be 13. the temperatures are coming down. for most it is likely to be dry with sunny intervals and a few scattered showers. i will tell you where in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. the funeral of pc keith palmer, who was murdered in the terror attack in westminster last month, will be held later today. the 48—year—old was stabbed to death by khalid masood as he stood guard outside the palace of westminster. officers from across the country will line the route to southwark cathedral, where a full police service will be held. daniel boettcher reports. yesterday, the coffin of pc keith palmer was brought to the palace of westminster, the place where he had worked, the place he had been protecting when he was killed last month. overnight, an honour guard made up of parliamentary and diplomatic protection command has been watching over his coffin
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in the chapel inside the palace. pc palmer's funeral will be held at southwark cathedral this afternoon. some of his colleagues who worked alongside him have been paying tribute, saying he was selfless, a dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed working with the public. one of the kindest people you would ever find, very giving, very loyal, a true friend. a fantastic policeman. he was so down to earth and so normal. he came to work because he had a family to support. that was all he ever wanted to do, be there for his family. officers from across the uk are expected to travel to london to line the route from westminster to southwark cathedral. police forces will be holding two minutes' silence to honour their fallen colleague, while flags at headquarters will be lowered to half—mast. keith doyle is at westminster for
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us. runners through what will be happening. we expect 5000 or more police officers from across the country to be here and a the two mile route to southwark cathedral where the funeral will take place at two o'clock this afternoon. all night, an honour guard has been in place over keith palmer's coffin in the royal chapel in the palace of westminster behind me. just after one o'clock, that will be moved from there, put into a hearse and pass there, put into a hearse and pass the very point that he was murdered just over two weeks ago in new palace ya rd just over two weeks ago in new palace yard in the shadow of big ben. it will then move along the north bank of the river, pass over lambeth bridge and move along the south bank past waterloo station, london bridge station and end up at the cathedral. also at 11 o'clock this morning there will be a service
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at the national police memorial, where pc keith palmer's they will be added to that, a memorial dedicated to officers who have been killed carrying out their duties. thank you very much. you will be able to follow that funeral service on the bbc news channel throughout the day. boris johnson will meet foreign ministers from the rest of the g7 nations today as they try to present a united front, forcing russia to back down over its support for syrian president bashar al—assad. us secretary of state, rex tillerson, arrived at the summit in italy as tensions with moscow intensified. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins is in lucca. so much riding on these talks, james. what insight do you have?‘ lot riding on these talks, that is clear. boris johnson lot riding on these talks, that is clear. borisjohnson will arrive later in the day, to join clear. borisjohnson will arrive later in the day, tojoin rex tillerson who is already here, and
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they will be hoping to produce something quite muscularfrom a meeting of the key... united states to send a message to moscow, to say that it can't go on standing shoulder to shoulder with the russians, president assad, but there is no agreement on any form of sanction, if the russians do not back away from that outright support for president assad. rex tillerson wa nts to for president assad. rex tillerson wants to go to moscow later in the week with something quite powerful out of this meeting to confront the russians with them say, you have to change your behaviour and recognise that russia's global standing is suffering even more because of not your complicity necessarily in last week's gas attack, but the fact that it happened while russian servicemen we re it happened while russian servicemen were at the base from which the chemical attack according to the americans was launched, and if you are not complicit, you must have
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been, in rex tillerson's words, incompetent or outmanoeuvred to allow it to happen to. james robbins in italy, thank you for the update. swedish police are continuing to question a man suspected of driving a hijacked lorry into a crowd of people in stockholm on friday, leaving four dead. the 39—year—old originally from uzbekistan was facing deportation from sweden and had expressed support for so—called islamic state. tens of thousands gathered to show support for those killed, including british father of two chris bevington. egypt has declared a three—month state of emergency after attacks on two churches yesterday left at least 44 people dead. the measures allow the authorities to make arrests without warrants and search people's homes. the army will be deployed to help police protect key sites. the so—called islamic state group said it was behind both blasts. the bbc has uncovered evidence that appears to implicate the bank
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of england in the so—called libor scandal. a secret recording from 2008 obtained by panorama suggests it repeatedly pressured commercial banks to push down the rates at which they charged each other interest. teaching unions say pressure on school budgets in england is leading to some vocational subjects being cut. research from the nut and the atl suggests teachers in subjects outside of maths, english, science and the humanities are most at risk. the government says school funding is at record levels but critics say it is not keeping up with costs. australian scientists say two thirds of the great barrier reef has now been devastated by severe coral bleaching, caused by rising water temperatures. let's talk to our sydney correspondent, phil mercer. good morning. good morning. coral bleaching is when algae within the coral leaves and the coral begins to
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staff. it doesn't necessarily die at that stage, but what scientists are worried about is the proximity of mass bleaching events on the great barrier reef last year and this year isn't giving it enough time to recover. last year they conducted a vast aerial survey and found a mass bleaching event in the northern section of the great barrier reef. this time around they have found the same sort of damage in the central pa rt same sort of damage in the central part of the great barrier reef. the scientists are urging the australian government to take immediate action to address climate change, because bleaching is caused by heat stress brought on by rising water temperatures, and conservationists believe that that is caused by global warming. phil believe that that is caused by globalwarming. phil mercer believe that that is caused by global warming. phil mercer speaking to us from sydney this morning. harry potter and the cursed child has won a record—breaking nine olivier awards, which celebrate the best in theatre. they include best actor forjamie parker, who plays the wizard, and noma dumezweni, who plays hermione grainger,
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won best supporting actress. the stage show has now become the most decorated production in the history of the olivier awards. you saw it last week, and it gets the louise minchin seal of approval. it is epic, you go for the matinee, you have a break and you go back in the evening. did you go for a meal in the break? you have three hours? yes, it is magical. it is ten past eight. let's return to our main story. pc keith palmer was "dedicated to hisjob, brave and courageous" and "gave his life protecting our democracy" according to those who knew him best. he was stabbed outside the palace of westminster during last month's terror attack. later today pc palmer will have a full police funeral at southwark cathedral. ahead of the service, his friends, pc shaun cartwright and pc greg rainey have described him as a loyal, hard working officer
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and a devoted husband and father. if you could paint a picture of the perfect policeman, you would be painting a picture of keith palmer. as a police officer, i never come across somebody who worked as hard as keith palmer did. he took his job really seriously. the reason keith came to work was for his family, but he was so proud to be a police officer. very professional, very organised, and he loved everything about it. his favourite was being out on the streets, talking to members of the public. happily taking pictures with people.
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i know he was a fantastic father, and a fantastic husband and, um... he's going to be missed, so much. such a hard—working person, and what a credit he is to the police service. he's such a lovely guy, and we're all going to certainly miss him so much. we're joined now from westminster by ken marsh, chairman of the metropolitan police federation. thank you so much for your time this morning. i was round the corner from where you were last week at the service of hope for the victims of those westminster attacks from two weeks ago. i wonder how you feel the police force is going to recover, particularly from the death of pc keith palmer? we will take every day as it comes, one day at a time, but todayis as it comes, one day at a time, but today is a very moving day for us because we rest one of our colleagues, one of our heroes, and it is very fitting the amount of people who will be turning up from around the country from the other 42
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forces, and members of the public, thousands of people will show their respect the fact that he gave his life serving his country. and tell us what exactly is going to happen to pc keith palmer's offers a number, that will be retired permanently? his warrant number will be retained by him, as a manner of respect, so that no one else will be able to use it in anyway, because it is his numberand able to use it in anyway, because it is his number and falls with him. in terms of what has happened since the attacks of two weeks ago, there has been a lot of discussion about arming of officers. i wonder whether there will be any change in that. is that something that officers are talking about at the moment? there will be no knee jerk reaction from us, because it is not what we do. we will look very carefully at the circumstances of the incident and how it took place. we have thousands of officers on the streets of london who do not mandatory carry firearms,
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and we recently had a survey where they said they don't want to do that, they want specialist officers to carry firearms, but there will be nothing very quickly happening around that. so you don't think that is something that will be a topic of discussion in the coming weeks? you feel that overwhelmingly, police officers in london feel that the way things are done currently is the best way to protect officers? as i said, ina best way to protect officers? as i said, in a recent survey, my colleagues who responded in their thousands said they wanted to see more firearms officers, but they wanted them to be specialists. they didn't want mandatory arming of colleagues on the streets. that is not what we do and not what we are about. from a public response, quite about. from a public response, quite a few people were surprised that somebody in his position wasn't armed on that day. again, you have got to understand, i'm not sure that keith palmer being armed would have made any difference whatsoever to what race. this was an absolutely
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extraordinary incident that happened, and i'm not sure that arming would have helped at all. we have got to look very carefully at what we're talking about, and if more arming is required in that area, that will take place, but across the board, i don't think will happen. you said you expect thousands of police officers to be lining the route today. we heard from some of his close colleagues already on the programme this morning, how do you think the force will remember pc palmer? well, i think he will be remembered as a hero as a top cop. he was awarded top thief taker a couple of years ago which is extraordinary and all my colleagues around the country are turning up to show their respects which is a fitting mark and clearly shows what they think of pc palmer. and there has been, if you read some of the messages on the flowers at westminster bridge and around where you are this morning, i do feel there has been a real response to
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there has been a real response to thejob there has been a real response to the job that the police and the emergency services do as well and is that understanding, isn't it, ken, the natural reaction in the situation he found himself is to run in the opposite direction, but that's not what the training says and he was protecting those who were working in the palace that day? absolutely. the interesting thing is the public are our biggest critics, but when something like this happens, they come together in an extraordinary manner as you've seen over the last couple of weeks and they really support us because they don't like seeing this happening to one of their bobbies, one of their police officers on the street. it's very clear that they support us fully and you can see by the m essa g es fully and you can see by the messages and the outpouring that's taken place, messages and the outpouring that's ta ken place, you messages and the outpouring that's taken place, you know, just how fantastic the public are towards the police and we really respect that because we serve police and we really respect that because we serve the police, we serve because we serve the police, we serve them and we're here for them and as you rightly say, we run towards it when they runaway from it and that's what we should be doing and that's what we should be doing and that's what we should be doing and that's what we will keep doing. ken, it is really good to talk to
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you this morning. that's ken marsh. if you are if westminster look at the messages. some really moving stuff written on the flowers. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. bottom look at this picture from bristolment one of our weather watchers sent it in. yet we hit 25.5 celsius, today it is more likely to be 13 celsius. it is cooler air. it's filtering down from the north. today we have got a north—westerly breeze of the many of us are starting off with beautiful sunrises and beautiful sunshine, but you will find through the day some fair—weather cloud will bubble up and one or two of us will see showers developing. you might see one in the midlands. if you do, it will be short—lived and fleeting. for south—west england
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you hang on to the sunshine through the day. not as warm as yesterday. wales, also seeing sunshine or at worst sunny intervals as the fair—weather cloud builds. for northern ireland, you could catch a shower as we go through the day. again, not everywhere. showers across northern and north western scotla nd across northern and north western scotland falling as snow on the tops of the mountains, but a lot of dry weather too. you're more likely to catch showers across yorkshire and lincolnshire and cumbria and lancashire you have got a drier picture with sunny spells and it is the same for east anglia heading down towards can?t. as we go through the evening and overnight, look at the evening and overnight, look at the huge spacing in the isobars. that tells you there is not much of a breeze. so where the cloud breaks, there will be frost, but we have got another weather front coming in across northern and north western scotland. that's introducing rain and you will have that when it sets infor and you will have that when it sets in for the next 24 hours or so on and off. so frost in the countryside. these temperatures are more representative of what's going to happen in towns and cities. where
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we have got the breaks in the cloud, of course, with the cold start is where we will see the sunshine. the rain continuing across the north and the north—west of scotland. for northern ireland and southern scotla nd northern ireland and southern scotland and northern england, more cloud will develop through the course of the day. and temperatures 12 to 17 celsius. our temperatures are still a bit above average for this stage in april. if we choose london, we would normally be about 13 celsius. we are looking at 17 celsius. so, as we go through wednesday, our weather front continues its decent. much later in the day getting into southern england as a weak affair. but as it crosses out of scotland and northern ireland and into northern england and wales, you will see some rain on it, with the cloud building ahead of itment behind it, once again, a mixture of sunshine and showers. and we're easily into double figures. for some of us mid—double figures. thursday again, a chilly start where the cloud has broken. that's where we will have the sunshine. more rain coming in across the north and the west. temperatures still roughly ten to 14 celsius. leading us into good
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friday. here is our rain continuing to move across northern england and knee wales and the south—west. very little getting into the east. there will be some. behind t once again sunshine and showers. so, for the easter weekend, we are looking at a dry picture. however, there will be some showers as well as the sunshine. most of the showers falling on saturday and we will hang on to that cool wind as well, dan and lou. in halfan and lou. in half an hour's test, we have got a little test for you. we're doing letters that you'd write to your younger self. 8.45am what would you write to your younger self?” younger self. 8.45am what would you write to your younger self? i gave up write to your younger self? i gave up swimming when i was 15 because i thought i was too musty. my letter would be to myself be proud of murder muscles. is there any muscle there? do you mind if i... be proud
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of your muscles. don't give up sport. it is like a grapefruit. impressive stuff! don't give up sport. be proud of your muscles, everyone. if you could write a letter to your younger self, what advice would you dish out? we will come to yours in a minute. mine are particularly impressive. i can do them if you want! that's the concept behind a new art exhibition in birmingham. breakfast‘s holly hamilton is there. there are lots of ideas here. hundreds of letters that are on display. some really positive interesting messages coming through and it really is an interesting concept, not just about writing a letter to yourself, but just concept, not just about writing a letter to yourself, butjust writing a letter. when was the last time you sat down with pen and paper and hand wrote a letter? look at some of these. you have been so strong. such a fighter and your friends and family have admired your courage and appreciated your willingness to let
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you take care of you. "you are unique and may maizing. so don't feel like you're not. don't wake up and be in a miserable mood." this started from jodie's idea to get people to write her letters. she was asking people if they were down to get in touch and she would write them a letter. jodie joins get in touch and she would write them a letter. jodiejoins us now. good morning. good morning. this idea is not letters written by you, but from other people, how did it start? i was in a really dark place. i've got me and came depression and anxiety and this became my lighthouse. i reached out to the world and said if you need a helping hand, write an e—mail to me and i'll hand, write an e—mail to me and i'll hand write you a lovely letter telling you how amazing you are because we just need reminding sometimes. people are so positive when they put pen to paper. what is
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it about writing a letter that makes people put messages like this that are people put messages like this that a re really people put messages like this that are really honest? it is like real life magic because we have become such a technology, it is a big thing in our lives such a technology, it is a big thing in ourlives and such a technology, it is a big thing in our lives and to actually sit down and write a letter, it is an intimate thing to do and people just kind of spill themselves out in and as you read them all, it'sjust little bits of people's stories and some of them have been through really dark times and they've just, the whole walls are full of positivity and wonderfulness and it is really nice to be around. you wrote your first grandmother to your grandmother when you were just five yea rs grandmother when you were just five years old. it is therapeutic. my mum sat us down. my nan had died and she got us to write a little letter to heaven. we posted it in the post box and letters have been a big part of my life. i always leave them around for people. it is nice to be in a
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room where i'm surrounded by them. you have received so many letters. people from around the world asking you to write back with messages of advice, or positivity. were you surprised by how many people have got in touch? i've 4,000 letters in the last four years and we have 8,000 in the in—box, everyone needs to know that we need to know we're loved and we're not on our own because the world can feel lonely and everybody needs that from people, very, very young to people that are elderly. everybody needs to know that they are not on their own in the world and itjust reaches know that they are not on their own in the world and it just reaches so many people and it is a wonderful thing to be able to do and call my little job because i get to sit and remind people how wonderful they are every day and i'm really proud of what it has become. the effort that's gone into the lettersment look at these. we've got felt tip pence and glitter and i have had a go myself! i have not had a lot of time, i will be honest. it is not
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quite up the standard of this and my personal message is always listen to your mum and don't play with glitter on live tv! thank you very much, holly. that's good advice. always listen to your mum. we've been asking what advice you'd give your younger self. thanks for all the responses. emma says she'd tell herself, "don't stick to your original plans just because it's the thing you always thought you'd do." martyn says his advice would be, "skip the whole partying stage of life because its ultimately costly. open a savings account and retire at 45." but helen takes a different view, she says "relax. none of those qualifications you are killing yourself to get will ever be worth anything to you." some great ones. patsy kensit. "you have a great passion for rock'n'roll, but that doesn't mean you have to marry the lead singer of every band you ever had a poster of on your bedroom wall." sound advice.
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emma thompson said, "don't ever, ever, ever bother going on a diet. try to avoid rubbish and never diet. you will end up the same size anyway. drop it girls. drop it now. believe me, nobody cares." trevor says, "don't work in the family business." kirsty says to herself, "don't go out with that idiot and learn italian and live in rome." mine would be to myself, "piano is not for losers." i was convinced as a young man and pay more attention in languages at school. don't mess about with your mates at the back because that would have been handy. especially in yourjob as well. lot of people are suggesting don't buy the blue suit. i'm crushed by that! i think that's really unfair. send — you know i love that suit. it is time to gets news, tral and
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weather wherever you are. hello. the weekend poll ‘s weather headlines haven't lasted, and already fresher conditions are migrating from north to south across the british isles. that is what many of us are already waking up to. a scattering of showers, and many areas will stay dry with sunny spells, but you will notice there is a scattering of showers across the east of wales, through the midlands
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and into the south—east. the greatest concentration will be found from the yorkshire area down through lincolnshire towards the wash. some of the showers across orkney could be wintry to lower levels. through the evening and overnight, more cloud and rain coming with the weather front across northern scotland, further south could be looking at a touch of frost. then we are off and running into the new day on tuesday. showers again in the north, elsewhere a dry day with a top temperature of 16 or 17. the north—westerly flows still wins in the middle of the week, and there will be rain across the top two thirds of the british isles, but
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onceit thirds of the british isles, but once it gets to the south coast, it won't be much more than a band of cloud. towards easter weekend, still north—westerly winds for the most part, quite dry, a mixture of sunny spells and showers, and still but cool north—westerly wind. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and aaron heslehurst. fighting protectionism! or so they say. foreign ministers of the world's seven largest economies arrive in italy with free trade high on the agenda. live from london, that's our top story on monday the 10th of april. today's meeting in italy comes at a crossroads for international trade. we'll ask an expert whether political upheaval signals the end for globalisation.
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also in the programme: regulators investigate barclays boss jess staley in relation to alleged misconduct in a whistle—blowing programme.

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