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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 11, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may and donald trump discuss how to end the conflict in syria. in a telephone call last night they agreed there's now a window of opportunity to persuade russia to drop its support for syria's president assad. good morning, it's tuesday the 11th of april. also this morning: a revolutionary new treatment for stroke patients in england that could help save thousands from lifelong disablity. united airlines apologises as footage of one of its passengers being forcibly dragged off an overbooked flight sparks outrage. the prices we pay for the weekly shop, a tank of fuel or even a night out are on the rise. this morning i'm taking a closer look at the impact of inflation. in sport, the pressure mounts
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on arsene wenger as arsenal are beaten 3—0 by crystal palace in the premier league. indistinctive speech... if mumbling in television dramas really annoys you, we'll put different acting styles to the test to see which ones you find acceptable. and carol has the weather. always perfectly clear is carol with the weather. good morning. eight chilly start to the day, for some a touch of frost around but for most it will be dry with sunny spells, variable amounts of cloud, except for the north and west of scotland where there is more rain around and later we will see some gales. further details in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. lovely there this morning. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump and theresa may have discussed what they call a window of opportunity to persuade
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russia to drop its support for syria's president assad in the wake of last week's chemical attack. the prime minister and the us president spoke on the phone last night as foreign ministers from the g7 group of countries meet in italy to try to co—ordinate their response. greg dawson reports. they call it the ‘family photo' and it's a family that used to include russia before it was expelled in 2014 when the g8 became the g7. the kremlin may not be represented at this summit, but its continued support for the syrian regime dominates conversation. these foreign ministers have been working out the precise message us secretary of state rex tillerson should deliver when he heads to moscow late on tuesday. if i think about the position of vladimir putin now, you know, he's destroying the reputation of russia, by his continual association with a guy who has flagrantly poisoned his own people. ina
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in a phone call last night, theresa may and donald trump discussed breaking up the syrian regime alliance. a downing street spokesman revealed: one of the options g7 ministers are discussing is hitting russia with targeted sanctions if it refuses to buckle but president putin is used to standing up to international pressure and the chances of him abandoning his allies seem remote. greg dawson, bbc news. we'll be talking to former us assistant secretary of state pj crowley about the situation in syria at around 7:10am. thousands of stroke patients in england stand to benefit from a new programme to train more doctors in a complex procedure which could save lives
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and help reduce disability. it involves doctors catching and removing a clot which is causing the stroke, to help restore the flow of blood to the brain. here's our health correspondent jane dreaper. back on herfeet, margaret had back on her feet, margaret had a stroke just three weeks ago at the age of 50, but she's benefited from age of 50, but she's benefited from a revolutionary treatment. age of 50, but she's benefited from a revolutionary treatmentlj age of 50, but she's benefited from a revolutionary treatment. i was very, very lucky because i should have probably come out more severe, you know, i could have been paralysed and ta ken you know, i could have been paralysed and taken months and months of therapy and everything else, rehab. buti months of therapy and everything else, rehab. but i was very lucky. this is margaret's angiogram. margaret's doctors at this london hospital have led the way in trying this new procedure. it has a much higher success rate than clock busting drugs. patients can be com pletely wea k busting drugs. patients can be completely weak down one side and not have any speech and as soon as you take out the clot they can start
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talking to you sometimes and moving immediately, other times it takes several hours or by the end of the evening or the next day they can have recovered a lot of function. yes, it can have a massive impact. with from beck to meet doctors use this incredibly delicate piece of wire to fish the clot out of the patient‘s brain, although sometimes use another piece of wire, like this one, to suck it out. 8000 patients across england will benefit from this treatment every year once the programme is rolled out. not all patients will have the treatment, as some strokes are caused by a bleed rather than a clot, and it will take time to train the doctors and nurses needed to expand services. but nhs inman says it's making the investment because patients recover their health so quickly —— england. jane dreaper, bbc news. the bbc has spoken to a family friend of christopher bevington, the british man who was killed in the stockholm lorry attack last week. two swedes and one belgian also died in the attack on friday. the a1—year—old's family said
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they were devastated by the untimely and tragic death of the wonderful husband, son, father, brother and close friend to many, as maddy savage reports. chris bevington moved to stockholm for love after meeting his swedish wife in london. they raised to two young boys here in sweden but remained close to their british family and friends. as you can imagine we're all really struggling to come to terms with this horrendous loss and make sense of a world that no longer has our lovely funny mate in it, he was the most amazing father, husband, son, brother and friend to everyone that knew him and we're all obviously going to miss him, miss him terribly. you know, he loved his family, loved his friends and he also loved his music. this is where chris spent the last five years of his career, the swedish headquarters
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of the music streaming company spotify where he held a senior role. everyone we spoke to who work with him describe him as a lovely guy with a lovely family. he would run through a wall for you. —— i , iwant , i want to say that all the answers of energy we have will go to his family but also the families of those other people affected by this terrible tragedy. a tragedy that raises challenges for sweden has changed the lives of chris's loved ones for over. maddy savage, bbc news, stockholm. the american carrier, united airlines, has been heavily criticised after one of its passengers was dragged off a flight in chicago. the airline had overbooked the plane, and when no—one volunteered to leave, they selected the man and his travelling companion, at random. when he refused to get off the flight, he was dragged down the aisle by security guards as our correspondent neda tawfik reports. these are the disturbing moments
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that have now travelled around the world. several smartphones record as three police hover over a man who is being forced to exit the aircraft. the situation quickly escalates, after one officer manhandles him out of his chair. oh, my god. all three officers then drag him bloodied and injured from the cabin. no, this is wrong. oh, my god. look at what you did to him! the incident began when united airlines asked for volunteers to give up their seats for additional crew members. when none were found, they chose passengers at random, but this man refused. one passenger said he claimed to be a doctor who had patients he needed to see. good work, way to go. ten minutes later, in unexplained circumstances, the man, clearly sha ken, ru ns back on the plane. united airlines in a statement, said: that's what makes the
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world's leading airline flyer friendly. the airline has been criticised for its handling of the situation that some say clearly contrasts with its claim to fly the friendly skies. neda tawfik, bbc news, new york. an eight—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california. the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire in his estranged wife's classroom, before killing himself. a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges. more than 900 adult social care workers a day quit theirjob in england last year according
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to new figures and care providers are warning that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care. despite the government saying it will spend an extra £2 billion on social care, the uk care home association has warned that the social care system is now beginning to collapse. ministers are being accused of not having a proper plan for the future of the natural environment. an unpublished paper, obtained by the bbc, sets out a vision for clean air and water, green landscapes and a low carbon economy, but it's been repeatedly delayed and is now not expected until the summer. the government says it will develop plans in due course, but critics claim progress is too slow and the paper is devoid of policies. a project to create a full—size replica of the titanic at a theme park in china has upset relatives of victims and survivors of the 1912 disaster.
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the attraction, which will be docked permanently on a rural reservoir, has been condemned as bad taste by members of the british titanic society. but the designer says the resort will be respectful, and plans for visitors to experience a simulated iceberg crash have now been abandoned. ican i can see why you might want to abandon those plans. the film was on again last week. was it? i watched a little cheeky half an hour. it's quite long, isn't it! the landscape seen from the summit of snowdon has been named the uk's best view. this welsh mountain vista topped a survey to find the country's favourite sights. it was followed by the three sisters mountains in scotland, stonehenge and st ives bay in cornwall, with cheddar gorge rounding out the top five. this is a perfect opportunity for
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you to send in your favourite views. you can e—mail us with your favourite view at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk or get in touch with us on social media. willian facebook, twitter, virtually everything these days! we will show some of those later on —— we are on facebook. good morning. like gore meyer in north yorkshire, thrill beak. have you got a picture? unless you haven't got one i'm not interested. arsenal fans will be hoping for a better view once the dust has settled after last night's defeat to crystal palace. pretty dismal. bad performance from arsenal, not only were they beaten but defensively they looked terrible. crystal palace have beaten chelsea and arsenal in the last
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couple of weeks, not bad for them at all! there are more questions over arsene wenger‘s future as arsenal manager after they were beaten 3—0 by crystal palace in the premier league last night. they've qualified for the champions league every year for two decades but could miss out this time. former leicester city manager claudio ranieri has denied that players were behind his sacking. the italian believes it was someone else behind the scenes who pushed him out. everton‘s ross barkley is considering his options after allegedly being attacked, unprovoked, in a liverpool bar on sunday night. a complaint is yet to be made to merseyside police, who say they're are looking at cctv which appears to show barkley being punched in the face. andy murray was back in action last night after weeks out with an elbow injury. in a light—hearted charity match against roger federer, he persuaded the ball boy to play match point for him. federer won in straight sets as they raised money for education projects in southern africa. a p pa re ntly apparently the ball boy served a double fault at match point. looked
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like a decent action but didn't quite connect. with all eyes on you! quite a lot of pressure. and with no warmup. we are hoping today might be nice and sunny, so that is why carol is outside, it's always cold when we do that! good morning, carol. feel a song coming on but i won't inflict that on your ears, look at the sunrise, on the roof of broadcasting house. for many it is a chilly start, especially in england and wales where we have a touch of frost but for most of us today, there will be some cloud around, mostly dry and also we will have some sun. this morning if we start the forecast at 9am across scotland, some rain across the far north and north—west, including the northern isles. more cloud across the highlands but for southern scotland we have the sunshine. the same in northern england, maybe the odd
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shower first thing but for most it is dry and some sunshine. the sunshine prevails rather like in london, blue skies, down through the midlands, east anglia, essex, kent and all the way to the south coast. temperatures by 9am will be around nine for example in plymouth. a beautiful start in wales. it is nippy if you'rejust beautiful start in wales. it is nippy if you're just dipping out, beautiful start in wales. it is nippy if you'rejust dipping out, a touch of frost in the countryside in the valleys. in the north, a bit more cloud but it is high cloud so a fine start still and for northern ireland, a fine start as well. but againa ireland, a fine start as well. but again a chilly one with variable amounts of cloud. through the day what you will find is with the rain in scotland it will sink a bit further south, still very much in the north and north—west and later the north and north—west and later the wind will strengthen and we'll have some gales. for the rest of the uk, a dry day, some sunshine, a bit more cloud bubbling up but fairweather cloud so very nice, and why is today of between around 12 and 17 in london, way above average
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for the time of year —— highs. through the evening and overnight, the rain in scotland further north sinks south, getting into northern ireland, northern england and possibly as far as north wales. for the rest a dry night and variable amounts of cloud. tomorrow morning we start with that rain in northern england, north wales and as it continues its journey south it will wea ken continues its journey south it will wea ke n by continues its journey south it will weaken by the time much later in the day it goes to the far south and it won't be much more than a band of cloud, maybe the odd spot but nothing too heavy and leaving us with bright spells, sunshine and showers and temperatures still healthy. as we move into thursday, thursday will start dry for most, it will be chilly with some frost around first thing. then it will cloud over from the west as we see the arrival of another weather front and that will bring in some rain. temperatures again into the teens. so all in all, it's not looking too shabby at all this week. the rain in
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the north continuing to move south through the course of the night. not too shabby is great news! a high—rise behind you is not built yet but... he is only looking behind you, carol, don't worry.|j yet but... he is only looking behind you, carol, don't worry. i should put my microphone on. this is a shambles this morning. i think i may have sat on my microphone and pulled it out. the mail, they are talking about a council tax, about how many council bosses and they have tried to put a number on it, the number of bosses paid more than the prime minister soared as households are hit by a huge council tax rise. and this is quite sweet, a picture of princess charlotte who will be a bridesmaid. many of the papers this morning have pictures of the funeral
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of pc keith palmer, killed after the westminster attack last week. letter look at some of the pictures from the funeral yesterday as thousands of officers lined the streets. this is the front page of the daily mirror this morning as well. laid to rest, the thin blue line that will never be broken. they picture there of pc keith palmer. that is also front page of the daily telegraph as well. his helmet, very much a part of that service. and their main story, they are discussing the decision by donald trump to launch a cruise missile attack on syria proving that he is not in league with vladimir putin. this is according to the son of the us president. the front page of the sun. a blue lamp will shine brightly
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for ever. the story down the order is the punch on ross barkley over the weekend in a bar in liveable. the times, again, has quite a moving picture of a bowed head as the hearse goes past carrying the body of pc keith palmer. what would you like to start with? i have a story about car insurance. one of those things that annoys people. every time they renew. there are quite a few reasons in this report. they say here that insurance bills could soar over £1000 next year due to taxes that have come in and the compensation, you know, people claiming for whiplash. it has been argued and over whether people should be able to claim breads and they saying that the number of people claiming has been rising that has increased or at price of premiums. another thing, i don't
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know about you but i hate people who are cheating. and an article here stating that students are cheating because of the wearable technology. heeding earpieces, a quick cheeky glance at a smart watch. they say that from a freedom of information request by the guardian, they have found a 42% rise in cheating. what do found a 4296 rise in cheating. what do you do? frisk people, take their watches away from them? do you remember spies like ours, chevy chase, he has a fake broken arm with all the answers written on it? it is all the answers written on it? it is a little more advanced this year. only 42% of people have been caught, who knows how many more are getting away with it. and sergio garcia,
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saying how he would always be the runner—up and he had accepted that in the past. he said he did not have what it took to win a major. all of the papers today are reporting on this lady here as the final piece of the jigsaw puzzle that he needed. this is angela atkin and she is his fiancee. she is a good golf player herself, a reporter for the golf channel in the us. during the masters she would post inspirational quotes on post—it notes on the mirror in the bathroom and everyday would come in and there would be quotes there to read. she was this kind of complete positive presence in the house that they share. and the other missing piece of the puzzle is this pomeranian puppy who goes out on the road with them now. he has been out for the last two tours that he has won. the five life skills that renew health, wealth and
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success skills that renew health, wealth and success have been pinpointed by scientists. they are emotional stability. determination optimism. control. and conscientiousness. apparently, people who scored highly on lease for those of five categories were generally richer, we re categories were generally richer, were less depressed and had a large number of friends. only two of those in you often broke, lonely and depressed. thank you very much, everybody. we will see you later. the number of care worker suicides in england is on the rise. that's according to figures seen by bbc breakfast, which show the rate has been steadily increasing for the last 15 years. more female care workers take their own life than any other occupation, as brea kfast‘s graham satchell reports. you go home with a permanent
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headache. isil permanently stressed. jane has been a care workerfor over 30 years. she has seen dramatic changes. a rise in a number of people with chronic illnesses, a lack of time to do her work properly, i've been told i have to do them. doesn't matter if someone needs to go to the toilet. it's just rush, rush, rush. iam an permanent antidepressants and i am not ready to come off them. the pressure of herjob, a to come off them. the pressure of her job, a constant to come off them. the pressure of herjob, a constant sense of guilt that she should be doing better. it eventually meant she was unable to cope. i remember taking a tablet in front of my children and my children shouting at me not to do it. but when i think about it now i almost
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feel ashamed because i could have left my children and my family without me and i think, i suppose i was doing it to cry out for help, saying i need help. figures from the office of national statistics show a rise in the number of care workers taking their own lives. up from 66 in 2010 to 96. while there is no direct evidence of the link between someone'sjob in a mental health, the home care association says the issue needs further investigation and the union that represents care workers say the figures are worrying. these statistics tell us that it worrying. these statistics tell us thatitis worrying. these statistics tell us that it is time to start investing in the health and well—being of care workers. it is time we eroded some of the poor terms and conditions and it is time to invest in skills and training. that is why the government has to ensure we get fair funding for social care. jane says her
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current employer is compassionate understanding. but, she says, policy from the top needs to change. they need to sit up and listen. i challenge them to come on to the shopfloor for a challenge them to come on to the shopfloorfor a week to challenge them to come on to the shopfloor for a week to change their attitude. the department of health in england says it has increased funding to support groups who are at risk of suicide. but the challenges, the time pressures, the stress on ca re the time pressures, the stress on care workers remains. thank you to jane for sharing her story with us. if you are feeling emotionally distressed and would like details of organisations which offer advice and support, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline or you can call for free, at any time, to hear recorded information on 0800 066 066. it is 25 minutes past six. now, we've got a little quiz about what's coming up later on the programme.
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let's have a starter for ten shall we? the grand final of the series 46 of which long—running bbc quiz show was shown last night? university challenge? it is, annoyingly, the right answer. yes, in about an hour's time we'll be joined by the famous voice behind those university challenge questions, and a defeated semi—finalist, to ask what they believe is the secret to the programme's enduring success. did you feel nervous when you even heard that voice? it probably didn't, didn't you? i watched the final last night and now i am slightly addicted. i have, i got one question right. it is so difficult. for me, i would have to cope with the nerves as well. i felt so much pressure. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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the government has been asked to intervene, after the nhs withdrew its funding for ivf treatment in the borough of croydon. the group which commissions healthcare for the borough, said it made the decision to save money — but council leaders are appealing to health secretary, jeremy hunt to look again at the decision. guidelines recommend that women under 40 can be offered up to three free ivf cycles on the nhs, but that can be overturned locally. london's only gym aimed at helping people with disabilities and long—term illness — has been saved from closure, thanks to the trust which helps maintain london's major bridges. ability bow in east london doesn't receive money from the nhs, and had to lay off therapists. but the city of london's bridge trust has stepped in and given the gym nearly £100,000
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to continue its life changing work. the statue that was the first artwork to appear on the fourth plinth in trafalgar square — is to be unveiled again, but at a new location, on the steps of st paul's cathedral. the sculpture — ecce homo by artist mark wallinger — was on the fourth plinth 18 years ago. from this morning, it'll be outside st paul's for about six weeks — to raise awareness, by the charity amnesty, of people struggling with persecution around the world. let's have a look at the travel situation now. severe delays, stratford to richmond because of a faulty train at stratford. on the trains, london midland has delays of up to half an hour between euston and milton keynes because of overhead line problems that started yesterday. if we look at the roads, the blackwall tunnel northern approach is showing the usual delays. over in tottenham, lordship lane
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is closed by the police between bennington road and mount pleasant road. the strand underpass remains closed for maintenance works. the knock—on effect of that is extra traffic over waterloo, blackfriars and westminster bridges. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it turned out to be pleasa nt yesterday good morning. it turned out to be pleasant yesterday and we have much of the same today except it should stay dry. it will be a chilly start, however, so it is worth wrapping up when you head out this morning but there is plenty of sunshine around to warm things up. there will be varying amounts of clouds that looks like there should be breaks for bright and sunny spells. temperatures reaching 16 celsius. a westerly wind picking up later on through the night keeping the frosted bade and cloud building with close of seven or eight celsius. a
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clarity and breezy day tomorrow with a westerly wind. temperatures reaching nice temperatures. it looks settled with your shower to spice things upa settled with your shower to spice things up a bit. vanessa feltz is back on bbc radio from the 11, with more on the united airlines passenger to buckle. that is bbc radio from seven. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... footage of a passenger being dragged from an overbooked flight have provoked outrage on social media, we'll be asking why it happened in just a few minutes' time. are mumbling actors really making it harder to hear some tv dramas? we've conducted our own experiment to try to find out, we'll have the results for you before 7am.
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and the pop star nelly furtado will be here to tell us about taking a career break with a difference, from grammy—award winning musician to working in her daughter's school library. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may and donald trump have agreed there's a window of opportunity to persuade russia to abandon its support for the syrian leader bashar al—assad. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, will travel to moscow later today to meet with his russian counterpart. before that foreign ministers from the g7 group of nations will continue to meet in italy to try to agree a co—ordinated response to events in syria. if i'd think about the position of vladimir putin now, you know, he's cox of eyeing the reputation of
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russia by this continuing association with a guy who is flag ra ntly association with a guy who is flagrantly poisoned this own people —— pox of eyeing. and i think the world can see this. nhs england is to invest millions of pounds in providing a complex treatment to help save stroke patients from lifelong disability. the procedure involves the removal of a blood clot from the patient‘s brain. around 8,000 people a year will eventually benefit from the expansion of the treatment; it is currently offered to only a few hundred patients. a family friend of chris bevington, the british man killed in last week's lorry attack in stockholm, has been talking to the bbc. two swedes and one belgian also died in the attack on friday. the 41 year old's family said they were devastated by the untimely and tragic death of the wonderful husband, son, father, brother and close friend to many. as you can imagine, we're all really struggling to come to terms with this horrendous loss and make sense of a world that no longer has our lovely funny mate in it, he was the most amazing father, husband, son, brother and friend
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to everyone that knew him and we're all obviously going to miss him, miss him terribly. an eight—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california. the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire in his estranged wife's classroom, before killing himself. a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges. more than 900 adult social care workers a day quit theirjob in england last year according to new figures. care providers say that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care. despite the government saying it will spend an extra £2 billion on social care, the uk care home association claims the social care system is now beginning to collapse. an appeal is being made for more
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adults to become volunteers in the scouts to cope with the increasing popularity of the movement. the number of youngsters wanting tojoin is the highest in the history of scouting, there are 51,000 children on a waiting list to become scouts, beavers, cubs or explorers. but waiting lists can't fall unless there are more adults to volunteer as leaders to help out. we've had a massive increase in the number of adult volunteers in scouting, which is incredible, but u nfortu nately we've scouting, which is incredible, but unfortunately we've also got our longest ever waiting list for young people, we've got 51,000 young people, we've got 51,000 young people waiting tojoin people, we've got 51,000 young people waiting to join scouting so basically we obviously need even more adults to take the opportunity of volunteering to give those young people a life changing experience. last month we talked about sesame's autistic muppetjulia. last month we talked about sesame's autistic muppet julia. yesterday last month we talked about sesame's autistic muppetjulia. yesterday she made her tv debut —— sesame street's
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autistic muppet. who is this? this is ourfriend julia. autistic muppet. who is this? this is our friend julia. i'm big bird, nice to meet you. that was a clip from yesterday's episode dedicated to autism that aired in the united states. julia has been a recurring character in muppet books and online since 2015. she was created with the help of autism organisations to promote acceptance. good morning. good morning. poor old arsene wenger. i know. miserable you once again. he was trying to avoid the signs —— miserable once again. the cheering and the jeering, the fa ns the cheering and the jeering, the fans turned on him unanimously and the players, saying they aren't fit to wear the shirt. he's been in charge for 20 years and he's been offered another two—year contract at arsenal, will he take it up? we
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don't know, but a lot of pressure on him this morning to leave. that's because... arsenal were beaten 3—0 by crystal palace in the premier league last night to severely dent their chances qualifying for the champions league. they were comprehensively outplayed by palace, who had andros townsend to thank for theirfirst goal. yohan cabaye added a superb second with lu ka milvojevic‘s penalty condemning arsenal to their worst defeat of the season. it leaves them seven points off the top four, but wenger refused to address the speculation surrounding his future. i face that in every press conference at the moment and tonight i'm not in the mood to speak about that. reporter: when do you think you will be letting the fans and everybody know? i think at the moment i need to pay more respect to the fact that we had a disappointing result and focus on that and not find as well excuses that are not excuses. every manager has criticism,
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particularly a man who has dedicated this life to a football cloud for so long, we always have sympathy for each other and we are managers together and while we go head to head, we're all in the same job and we all know how difficult it can be —— club. i think he can ride it out as he has done many times and come out stronger. claudio ranieri says he doesn't think a players revolt was behind his sacking at leicester. he lost hisjob in february, nine months after leading the club to the premier league title. speaking publicly for the first time about his dismissal, he says that somebody behind the scenes may have been plotting against him. maybe could be somebody behind me. maybe could be somebody behind me. maybe people this year when we lose they push a little bit more but that's it. are you going to tell us
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who those people are, claudio?” don't want to tell. i'm a serious man, what i have to say i said face to face. sounds like he's got his theory, doesn't it! the former england and arsenal defender tony adams has been appointed head coach of spanish side granada until the end of the season. adams has been working as an advisor to the struggling club and takes over after they sacked lucas alcaraz. granada are second from bottom of la liga. everton‘s ross barkley is back in training after what his lawyers have called an unprovoked attack by a stranger on sunday night. merseyside police are examining cctv footage that appears to show barkley being punched in the face. the incident happened in a liverpool bar after the team's 4—2 win over leicester city. no report of an assault has been made to police. england women won their final home friendly before this summer's euros in the netherlands. the lionesses beat austria 3—0 in milton keynes. goals from ellen white, lucy bronze and isobel christiansen. they have another friendly injune against switzerland before the july tournament.
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the usa, canada and mexico have confirmed that they will bid to host the 2026 world cup and if successful it will be the first time a trio of nations has hosted the tournament. it will also be the first world cup to feature 48 teams in the new expanded format that has recently been agreed. the usa staged it in 1994... brasil won that word remember when janet jackson missed the penalty during the opening ceremony? i thought it was diana ross. i thought it was janet jackson. we will have to check. andy murray was back in action last night after weeks out with an elbow injury, honouring a promise to play roger federer in a match to raise money for charity, which wasn't taken entirely seriously. facing match point at the end of the second set, murray brought on a sub and recruited one of the ball boys to play it for him. he served a double fault
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but it didn't matter. the main point of the night was to raise money to support education projects in southern africa. andy murray getting his racquet back from the ball boy. is it diana ross? it is, remember fantasy football league, she was introduced as miss diana ross. if you look carefully at the hair... i shouldn't laugh, i probably would have missed. the hair... i shouldn't laugh, i probably would have missedm the hair... i shouldn't laugh, i probably would have missed. it was a horrendous penalty. the ball was meant to split the net because it was hit with such force. there's roberto baggio and diana ross missing penalties. at least she was in good company! it's a well—known tactic used by the airline industry, so why do they overbook some flights? this is the astonishing footage that's now been seen all over the world, of a man being dragged out of a united airlines plane, because he refused to leave. passengers were offered over 600 pounds to give up their seats. but when there were no takers, some were randomly selected to leave.
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united has apologised and says it is reviewing the incident. joining us now from our london newsroom is the travel writer phoebe smith. phoebe, these pictures are being seen around the world, a passenger being physically forced off a plane, dragged off a plane, it's not what united need to seek. why does it happened? it's a tactic a few airlines use —— you see. they had their bets with people not turning up their bets with people not turning upfor their bets with people not turning up for various reasons, not turning up, and they take an educated guess about how many will turn up and sometimes they get it wrong. it's a pr disaster, isn't it? millions by the end of today will have watched this video and whatever united say they can't apologise enough because
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it is horrific footage. it is and the worst part was the first statement they made wasn't really an apology, the second one the ceo made last night wasn't really an apology, saying they were upset at united and also that they were going to review the situation. so it was really not a very good apology at all and this comes in the wake of course of the other week when there was leggingsgate, a couple of teenage girls weren't allowed to fly on board with leggings, and people are allowed on with dresses, this is a bad wave for united and this has added to it. take us through what happened, the flight was overbooked, they asked people off, something they asked people off, something they routinely do and they started offering increasing amounts of money? obviously you are entitled to compensation, there's different rules whether you're in the eu or an eu airline or in the us, it depends
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where you are, but in the us you're entitled to compensation if this happens. the odd thing is normally you would be asked before you get on the plane, it is strange they waited until people were sat down on the flight, i until people were sat down on the flight, i don't know why they didn't deny the people who weren't on that would have taken those seats. it seems such a heavy—handed approach. normally when they do this they make one of, people tend to wait because then the money increases, they might put you on another flight and upgrade you or put you up in a hotel, so it is worth holding back if you're flexible and you want to wait to see what they will offer next. them for them to suddenly switch from doing that to win this quy switch from doing that to win this guy refused to getting security, and the way security acted, the way the officers acted, i have seen... i'm not sure if it is confirmed but i have seen on us not sure if it is confirmed but i have seen on us news not sure if it is confirmed but i have seen on us news this morning that one of the officers has been suspended pending review. i guess we'll see what happens there. that's
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true, phoebe, the news came forward that one of the officers has been suspended. bagai dragged off was a doctor and he had patients to treat —— that guy. what is right? when we area —— that guy. what is right? when we are a passenger at an airport, what rights do we have, can a company like united do what they want? not what they want, they have a duty to get you to the destination you have paid for and they have a procedure where they first ask for volunteers and they do have to compensate you for it. you should always be very careful because airlines would rather give you travel vouchers to fly with them on a different route ora fly with them on a different route or a different time, but you have the right to get cash and you have the right to get cash and you have the right to get cash and you have the right in the us i think it's to get about double the f there you would have paid. it can go higher, it can vary what they will offer —— double the f there. we know some
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people are more flexible than others —— airfare. some may want to go later or be upgraded. it can happen. it doesn't happen that much and when it doesn't happen —— does happen it shouldn't happen like it did on that flight. shouldn't happen like it did on that flight. if they ask you if you want to do it, normally you can negotiate and say no thank you, i need to be on this flight. of course you can. at the end of the day it is up to their discretion. when you look on your boarding pass you can to have a class, even though it is economy there's different letters on the alphabet after so lower classes depending on the type of fair you have, how flexible it is and how much you paid, that affects where they could put you and they will go for those that paid less for the flight. for those that paid less for the flight. but of course you have the right to say you don't want to do this and try someone else burst and
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like i said, it's normally handled and people find the right people and it's all ok, this is reallyjust unprecedented. phoebe, thanks very much. have you ever been asked to volunteer yourself? i have, i nearly took it because it was too go the following day, upgraded to first class and some money back —— to go. then i realised i had a deadline but i couldn't take it, but i would have gladly took it! phoebe, thank you very much. this evening and overnight the band of rain continues to sink southwards eventually getting into northern england ireland and also southern scotland. behind it chari and he cloudy with one or two breaks in that again is where we may see a touch of frost first thing in the morning. tomorrow where we have the bra kes morning. tomorrow where we have the brakes is where we will start with the sunshine. the rain across northern england and north wales will be heavy but as it pushes it to the south will weekends and by the time it gets the south of england later in the day it will be far more than a band of cloud with the file
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more than a odd spot in it. as we had run into thursday, a chilly start again with frost around in the countryside. largely dry however it will cloud over from the waist and you will notice later in the day there will be rain coming in. during good friday that will spread down the western side of the country, and the western side of the country, and the easter forecast has dry weather with sunshine, showers on saturday in the north and east and still a cool north—westerly wind. in the north and east and still a cool north-westerly wind. what a beautiful morning it is with you. it is gorgeous. quite warned there as well. later this morning we'll find out how much the cost of living has been going up when the government releases the latest inflation figures. and it's something steph has been keeping a close eye on. this is always interesting, the cost of living and what is increasing and decreasing price. we're talking about the cost of living. statisticians regularly compare the price
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of hundreds of things that we commonly spend our money on, so everything from a loaf of bread, a pint of beer or a night out at the cinema. they'll look at how much that stuff cost last year compared to this year...and from that get a figure which gives us the average rise in the cost of living. the bank of england has a target to try and keep this inflation figure at 2%. if they think it's too high they might increase interest rates. the economic theory behind this is that if rates go up then we'll be paying more for things like mortgages. that in turn means we'll have less money to spend on other stuff. and if we're buying less then prices fall. or on the flip side, if inflation is too low then they'll cut interest rates, so our loans will be cheaper, we'll have more disposable income and therefore spend more in the shops. this graph shows you what inflation has been like over the last few years....you can see it was below 2% for a while until itjumped in february to 2.3%.
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this is mainly because food and fuel costs have gone up. and that's down to the fall in the value of the pound which is making it more expensive to import things. but have people noticed? we asked shoppers in manchester. i have noticed petrol prices going up i have noticed petrol prices going up and eade is a case of shopping around and! up and eade is a case of shopping around and ifind up and eade is a case of shopping around and i find that supermarkets have the cheapest. not that long ago it was £111 day now it is approaching £121. diesel has come down, however. i have a long commute so down, however. i have a long commute so just the amounts of money i spend every month on petrol... it makes me wa nt to every month on petrol... it makes me want to cry. lots of mention of fuel there — well, there are a couple of reasons why economists think today's figure is expected to be less of a shock the bank of england has said it
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expects inflation will keep rising and peak at 2.8% next year. this is a worry for us because if our wages do not keep up with inflation than for many people it will feel like we're getting a pay cut in what they call real terms. they have been going up at the same rate recently but economists are worried that inflation will increase faster than wages. we'll find out the official data this morning at about half nine. i heard you perfectly there. i say that because of our next piece. i am looking to this. about mumbling on the television. i am a mumble and sometimes. i do try to speak more clearly. hopefully you are hearing us loud and clear this morning, but did you know that the bbc gets more complaints about the sound quality on television programmes than bad language, inappropriate content
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or political imbalance. so what's to blame? could itjust be a case of technical trouble? or are more and more actors starting to mumble? our arts correspondent david sillito has been trying to find out. soi so i suppose you are working... mumbling. are you struggling to hear this? you're not alone. remember jamaica inn? is ita this? you're not alone. remember jamaica inn? is it a problem with technology or diction? we filmed our own little drama and out to add this acted it out in a variety of styles.
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sol acted it out in a variety of styles. so i suppose you were working. kind of. i so i suppose you were working. kind of. lam so i suppose you were working. kind of. i am doing a load of unpaid work. keen to do unpaid work, sort of. three options, beautiful clear diction. this is mumby. and finally what happens if you change the sound effects, the level of noise around them? how about music? we then played the results at a science media museum in bradford. did you understand any of that? just odd bits. the clearest diction was in the list. —— left. bits. the clearest diction was in the list. -- left. -- lift. there
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we re the list. -- left. -- lift. there were only around three words that we re were only around three words that were not quite clear and i am 85 in may. i have been clearing out my ears. that music level is higher than i would like it. and watching all of this was simon clark, a professional sound recordist. his conclusion, the biggest thing here is diction. i would say that yes there is too much mumbling. i come across it an awful lot on sets. all ican do across it an awful lot on sets. all i can do is go up to the director and say i am not really sure what that person said and i am reading it from a script at the same time i am recording it for naturalism is a wonderful thing but if you want reality, going stand on a pavement this is not reality. so, proof is needed that hearing varies
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dramatically and while this may seem a more realistic way of speaking... mumbling. sort of. i am doing a little unpaid work. it is this that. millions hitting the off button. that is what we will remember for today that it is all about diction. ithink... i today that it is all about diction. i think... i am glad that it proves it is not age. i always thought it was the television that they do not make sound for television as good as it used to be. good point. time now for the news, travel and weather wherever you can hear us. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the government has been asked to intervene, after the nhs withdrew its funding for ivf treatment in the borough of croydon. the group which commissions healthcare for the borough, said it made the decision to save money — but council leaders are appealing to health secretary,
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jeremy hunt to look again at the decision. guidelines recommend that women under 40 can be offered up to three free ivf cycles on the nhs, but that can be overturned locally. london's only gym aimed at helping people with disabilities and long—term illness — has been saved from closure, thanks to the trust which helps maintain london's major bridges. ability bow in dast london doesn't receive money from the nhs, —— ability bow in east london doesn't receive money from the nhs, and had to lay off therapists. but the city of london's bridge trust has stepped in and given the gym nearly £100,000 to continue its life changing work. the statue that was the first artwork to appear on the fourth plinth in trafalgar square — is to be unveiled again, but at a new location, on the steps of st paul's cathedral. the sculpture — ecce homo by artist mark wallinger — was on the fourth plinth 18 years ago. from this morning, it'll be outside st paul's for about six weeks — to raise awareness, by the charity amnesty,
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of people struggling with persecution around the world. let's have a look at the travel situation now. severe delays, stratford to richmond because of a faulty train at stratford. on the trains, london midland has delays of up to half an hour between euston and milton keynes because of overhead line problems that started yesterday. if we look at the roads, the blackwall tunnel northern approach is showing the usual delays. bow road is queueing into town because of waterworks. the traffic is ata because of waterworks. the traffic is at a complete standstill. over in tottenham, lordship lane is closed by the police between bennington road and mount pleasant road. the strand underpass remains closed for maintenance works. the knock—on effect of that is extra traffic over waterloo, blackfriars and westminster bridges.
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a look now at the weather forecast. good morning. it turned out to be pleasant yesterday and we have much of the same today except it should stay dry. it will be a chilly start, however, so it is worth wrapping up when you head out this morning but there is plenty of sunshine around to warm things up. there will be varying amounts of clouds that looks like there should be breaks for bright and sunny spells. temperatures reaching 16 celsius. a westerly wind picking up later on through the night keeping the frost at bay and cloud building with temperatures of seven or eight celsius. a clarity and breezy day tomorrow with a westerly wind. temperatures reaching 16 with the odd bright spell. save a wind over easter, it looks settled with a few showers to spice things up a bit. vanessa feltz is back on bbc radio from 7, she will have live reports from the
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gym that was saved from closure. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may and donald trump discuss how to end the conflict in syria. in a telephone call last night they agreed there's now a window of opportunity to persuade russia to drop its support for syria's president assad. good morning, it's tuesday the 11th of april. also this morning: a revolutionary new treatment for stroke patients in england that could help save thousands from lifelong disablity. united airlines apologises as footage of one of its passengers being forcibly dragged off an overbooked flight sparks outrage. sticking with your broadband provider could be costing you hundreds. one report out this morning says
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customer loyalty sees bills shoot up by 40%. in sport, the pressure mounts on arsene wenger as arsenal are beaten 3—0 by crystal palace in the premier league. as another group of students is crowned champions of university challenge, we'll have your starter for ten as we discuss the appeal of a great british television institution. and carol has the weather. good morning from the roof of new broadcasting house in london where it isa broadcasting house in london where it is a chilly start for many this morning with a touch of frost in the countryside, but for most it will be dry with sunny spells, the exception of that in the north and north—west of that in the north and north—west of scotla nd of that in the north and north—west of scotland where we have rain and strengthening winds. more in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump and theresa may have discussed what they call a window of opportunity to persuade
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russia to drop its support for syria's president assad in the wake of last week's chemical attack. the prime minister and the us president spoke on the phone last night as foreign ministers from the g7 group of countries meet in italy to try to co—ordinate their response. greg dawson reports. they call it the ‘family photo' and it's a family that used to include russia before it was expelled in 2014 when the g8 became the g7. the kremlin may not be represented at this summit, but its continued support for the syrian regime dominates conversation. these foreign ministers have been working out the precise message us secretary of state rex tillerson should deliver when he heads to moscow later today. if i think about the position of vladimir putin now, you know, he's toxifying the reputation of russia, by his continual association with a guy who has flagrantly poisoned his own people. secretary tillerson‘s visit comes after russia threatened to retaliate
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with force if the us repeats last week's tomahawk strikes on a us airbase. in a phone call last night, theresa may and donald trump discussed breaking up the syrian—russia alliance. a downing street spokesman revealed: one of the options g7 ministers are discussing is hitting russia with targeted sanctions if it refuses to buckle, but president putin is used to standing up to international pressure and the chances of him abandoning his ally seem remote. greg dawson, bbc news. we'll be talking to former us assistant secretary of state pj crowley about the situation in syria in a few minutes. thousands of stroke patients in england stand to benefit from a new programme to train more doctors in a complex procedure which could save lives and help reduce disability.
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it involves doctors catching and removing a clot which is causing the stroke, to help restore the flow of blood to the brain. here's our health correspondent jane dreaper. back on herfeet, margaret had a stroke just three weeks ago at the age of 50, but she's benefited from a revolutionary treatment. i was very, very lucky because i should have probably came out more severe, you know, i could have been paralysed and taken months and months of therapy and everything else, rehab. but i was very lucky. doctor: this is margaret's angiogram. .. margaret's doctors at this london hospital have led the way in trying this new procedure. it's called thrombectomy and has a much higher success rate than conventional treatment using clot—busting drugs. patients can be completely weak down one side and not have any speech and as soon as you take out the clot they can start talking
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to you sometimes and moving immediately, other times it takes several hours or by the end of the evening or the next day they can have recovered a lot of function. so, yes, it can have a massive impact. with thrombectomy doctors use this incredibly delicate piece of wire to fish the clot out of the patient‘s brain, or they sometimes use another piece of wire, like this one, to suck it out. 8,000 patients across england will benefit from this treatment every year once the programme is rolled out. not all patients will have the treatment, as some strokes are caused by a bleed rather than a clot, and it will take time to train the doctors and nurses needed to expand services. but nhs england says it's making the investment because patients recover their health so quickly. jane dreaper, bbc news. an eight—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california. the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire in his estranged wife's classroom, before killing himself.
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a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges. iam i am told that they were estranged. this is information that could potentially change. i'm told their marriage was relatively short, they'd only been married for a few months, and they'd been separated for the last month or month and a half. there's nobody in the investigation that has said they saw this coming. the american carrier, united airlines, has been heavily criticised after one of its passengers was dragged off a flight in chicago. the airline had overbooked the plane, and when no—one volunteered to leave, they selected the man and his travelling companion, at random. when he refused to get off the flight, he was dragged down the aisle by security guards as our correspondent neda tawfik reports. these are the disturbing moments that have now travelled
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around the world. several smartphones record as three police hover over a man who is being forced to exit the aircraft. the situation quickly escalates after one officer manhandles him out of his chair. oh, my god. all three officers then drag him bloodied and injured from the cabin. no, this is wrong. oh, my god. look at what you did to him! the incident began when united airlines asked for volunteers to give up their seats for additional crew members. when none were found, they chose passengers at random, but this man refused. one passenger said he claimed to be a doctor who had patients he needed to see. good work, way to go. ten minutes later, in unexplained circumstances, the man, clearly sha ken, ru ns back on the plane. united airlines in a statement,
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said: that's what makes the world's leading airline flyer friendly. the airline has been criticised for its handling of the situation that some say clearly contrasts with its claim to fly the friendly skies. neda tawfik, bbc news, new york. the bbc has spoken to a family friend of christopher bevington, the british man who was killed in the stockholm lorry attack last week. two swedes and one belgian also died in the attack on friday. the 41—year—old's family said they were devastated by the untimely and tragic death of the wonderful husband, son, father, brother and close friend to many. as you can imagine, we're all really struggling to come to terms
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with this horrendous loss and make sense of a world that no longer has our lovely funny mate in it, he was the most amazing father, husband, son, brother and friend to everyone that knew him and we're all obviously going to miss him, miss him terribly. more than 900 adult social care workers a day quit theirjob in england last year according to new figures and care providers are warning that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care. despite the government saying it will spend an extra £2 billion on social care, the uk care home association has warned that the social care system is now beginning to collapse. ministers have been accused of not having a proper plan for the future of the natural environment. publication of the official 25—year strategy for nature has been repeatedly delayed and is not now expected until the summer. a copy, obtained by the bbc, sets out a vision for clean air and water, green landscapes, urban parks and a low carbon economy. but critics complain
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it's devoid of policies, as roger harrabin reports. english woodland in its springtime glory. the report aspires for everyone to be able to enjoy nature. it admits to serious problems with the countryside, like soil loss and the degrading of peatlands. european farm policies have driven away birds, it says. our waters and the air we breathe need to be cleaner, the report says. environmentalists welcome its vision, but say policies are virtually absent from the document. it's lightweight, in fact it has no weight at all and that's disappointing given how long we've been waiting for it and how long we still may have to wait for the government actually tells us how it will achieve its noble ambition to have the environment in a better state for the next generation. ta ke forests. the document says that by far
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the best place to plant new woodlands is near cities where people can enjoy them. eight times better than planting them in the countryside, for instance. so what is the policy recommendation to ministers? absolutely nothing. the government says it will develop policies in due course. its critics say it should have done that already. roger harrabin, bbc news. ed sheeran has reached a deal to end a £16 million lawsuit over his hit song, photograph after it was likened to former x factor winner matt cardle's song amazing. the songwriters behind amazing accused ed sheeran and his writing partner for note—for—note copying and taking credit for their work.
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the case has now been dismissed after a us judge said an agreement had been reached between the two parties. details of the settlement haven't been revealed. the landscape seen from the summit of snowdon has been named the uk's best view. this welsh mountain vista topped a survey to find the country's favourite sights. it was followed by the three sisters mountains in scotland, stonehenge and st ives bay in cornwall, with cheddar gorge rounding out the top five. and we've already had lots of your favourite views this morning. leslie mitchell sent us this view of the tay valley near perthshire. apparently the tower in the distance was built in 1829. this is the view from stanage edge, vincent watson sent us this picture, over looking hope valley in the peak district.
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we were there last year for brea kfast. sophie turner sent us this view of the river tamar in cornwall. and this is from robin goodwin, taken at mawddach estuary in mid wales. it's interesting, isn't it, water features quite a lot. i want to look at that picture again, what was that lady holding up? was it a phone, i don't know. we will check that out later for you. as we've been hearing, theresa may and donald trump have agreed there's a window of opportunity to persuade russia to abandon its support for the syrian leader bashar al—assad. so how long might that window be open and what would be the next step when it closes? let's discuss this in more detail with pj crowley, who was assistant us secretary of state under president obama. hejoins us from our he joins us from our washington newsroom. thanks very much. agree about this window of opportunity? -- do you agree? i
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would say i'm sceptical. it would be clear that after the six years of the civil war in syria, not only russia but iran will do whatever it ta kes to russia but iran will do whatever it takes to see the syrian government and assad remain in power and so far their strategy has been successful. so then what should be happening, how could they, do you think, persuade russia that perhaps their policy is wrong, what can the us do? i think the idea that ministers are discussing additional sanctions against russia has some benefit. but putin has shown over several years that he's willing to pay a fairly significant price to not only keep russian access to syrian bases and through that projection into the region, but also he sees in assad the only current leader in syria that in russia's mind can govern the
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country and prevent a political vacuum that can only benefit extremists. we have heard, and you just mentioned it yourself, this talk of sanctions. what type of sanctions might make any difference? i'm not sure that sanctions will make a difference. we've seen this also in the context of ukraine, that russia has paid a significant price but it sees that it's natural two national interests exceed that price. this is a very difficult situation. —— national interests. as the ministers tried to come to a common position for secretary to listen to discuss with russian officials later this week, the challenge has not been the lack of a common position, the west has been unified in wanting to seek the departure of assad for a number of yea rs. departure of assad for a number of years. the means to accomplish that objective without resulting in military force. sadly in syria you don't yet have a path forward towards a viable political
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negotiation that would end this civil war and resolve the status of bashar al—assad. civil war and resolve the status of bashar al-assad. we've seen us airstrikes over the weekend and we know now that russia says if that happens again they would take action. what kind of thing do you think they mean? well, syria's a very crowded space and there has been limited co—operation between coalition authorities and russia to the conflict their respective military operations. —— not conflict. there's debate about whether that channel exists or not. but obviously if there were further action against the syrian government, that brings forces closer to russia and you have the prospect of some kind of confrontation. we know donald trump says specifically, he talked about the children being killed in the chemical attack and there's a juxtaposition between that and not letting refugees in, what do you
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make of that? sean spicer was asked about that... that's a matter of politics, that the president in his campaign, you know, promoted this idea of a muslim ban, it's not going to make the united states a safer place but he is reluctant to give up on that. as we look to what happened in syria last week, the other aspect of trump's campaign narrative was the prospect of better relations between the united states and russia. i think a variety of us officials are now openly sceptical that that is possible, the remaining holdout in the trump administration is the president himself. let's talk briefly about red lines. in 2012 the obama administration drew a red line and then criticised for not enforcing that red line in some ways, including by donald trump.
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obama did draw a red line against the use of chemical weapons in 2013. donald trump has actually acted to reinforce that line in 2017. john spry street yesterday suggested that the line has moved notjust from chemical weapons but into chlorine barrel bombs. there is no question that president trump was moved by the pictures but by the same token, as horrible as it is that a child may be killed by farren gas it is no less horrible that a child may be killed my chlorine gas. president trump was elected to fix problems in america he was not elected to fix problems in syria. the trump administration, like the
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obama administration, will defy american national interest in syria asa american national interest in syria as a defeating islamic state. thank you very much. his book about recent policy is called read line. time to catch up now with the weather. we are talking about the favourite views of the uk. snowden is number one. there is not about one bed this morning. we are soon due to some beautiful places as well, do have a favourite? so many beautiful views but my all—time favourite is where i grew up. my bedroom used to overlook the sea in my view was of two beautiful islands. on a day like todayit beautiful islands. on a day like today it would be perfect. it is a chilly start the day you just step out, especially in england and wales. a touch of frost that it will
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bea wales. a touch of frost that it will be a pleasant day. a dry one with sunshine and also some cloud. through the afternoon we will have sunny intervals. it is not wall—to—wall blue skies everywhere. across the far north and north—west scotla nd across the far north and north—west scotland we have some rain. south of that through the highlands is a bit more cloud and as we come into the southern upland so it is a brighter start. a little bit of cloud floating around. you would be lucky to see the odd cloud. as we come into the midlands, essex and kent down to the isle of wight back into blue skies and it is starting to feel a little bit worries some, a little chill in the air with the temperature rising however. a beautiful sight the day with sunshine in wales and although it is chilly there will be sunshine and a little more cloud in the north. in northern ireland, first thing there are bright breaks but the view today it should stay dry that it will be
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cloudier times. through the course of the day the rain in scotland and the final will sink a little bit further south. the wind will strengthen but for the rest of the uk except northern ireland we will see sunny uk except northern ireland we will see sunny spells. sunshine temperatures reaching about 17 degrees in london. in the south coast, 15 or 16 degrees. in the rain, about 13 or14 coast, 15 or 16 degrees. in the rain, about 13 or 14 degrees. overnight the rain comes south coming in to northern england and possibly as far as south is north—west wales. behind it will be showery and ahead, cloudy. temperatures reaching 17 in the cities, lower in rural areas. tomorrow we start with rain, the potential for heavy bursts and as it sinks into southern england later in the day it will produce a week feature of cloud around, and odd spots. behind that we return to
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bright spells, sunshine and showers. as we head into thursday, we start off on as we head into thursday, we start offona as we head into thursday, we start off on a sunny note however the cloud will tend to build from the west heralding the arrival of the next weather front which will bring in some rain. on good friday what you will find is that the rain in the north—west sinks down and as we head into the easter weekend the forecast will be mostly dry with some sunshine and whether there will be some showers, particularly on saturday in the north and east all in all, it does not look at too shabby at all. please keep sending us shabby at all. please keep sending us your pictures. she described her view so beautifully, didn't she? the rising cost of car insurance and staying online are in the business headlines this morning. it is shabby for a lot of people,
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when they get their car insurance. good morning. the cost of the average motor insurance policy is now £110 higher than was one ago according to research by comparison site. expensive repairs and changes to the rules on injury pay—outs are pushing up prices — and means drivers are paying an average of over £780 — and could pass £1000 by next year. changes to injury ruled pay—outs and taxes also push it up. experts predict it could pass £1000 by next year. and that is not the only thing rising because staying with your broadband provider could push up your annual bill by over £100. research reveals that when a deal is over bills can increase by as much as 40%. the charity is urging providers to be more transparent about prices and we will talk to
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them in about 30 minutes time so please send in any questions you may have. a final story before ago, and more university students in britain cheatin more university students in britain cheat in their exams by using devices like smart watches, mobile phones and hidden year pieces and cameras. research found that cheating using wearable technology has increased 42% in the last four yous. shocking, isn't it? what is the point of cheating? unless you play a ball game with your family... 0h, play a ball game with your family... oh, well, of course. i don't think thatis oh, well, of course. i don't think that is there either. the number of care worker suicides in england is on the rise. that's according to figures seen by bbc breakfast, which show the rate has been steadily increasing for the last 15 years. more female care workers take their own life than any other occupation, as brea kfast‘s graham satchell reports. you go home with
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a permanent headache. i feel permanently stressed. jayne has been a care workerfor over 30 years. she has seen dramatic changes. a rise in a number of people with chronic illnesses, low wages, insecure contract and a lack of time to do her work properly, i've been told i have to do them. doesn't matter if someone needs to go to the toilet. it'sjust rush, rush, rush. i am on permanent antidepressants and i am not ready to come off them. the pressure of herjob, a constant sense of guilt that she should be doing better. it eventually meant she was unable to cope. i remember taking a tablet in front of my children and my children shouting at me not to do it. but when i think about it now i almost feel ashamed because i could have
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left my children and my family without me and i think, i suppose i was doing it to cry out for help, saying i need help. figures from the office of national statistics show a rise in the number of care workers taking their own lives. up from 66 in 2010 to 96. while there is no direct evidence of the link between someone's job and their mental health, the home care association says the issue needs further investigation and the union that represents care workers say the figures are worrying. these statistics tell us that it is time to start investing in the health and well—being of care workers. it is time we eroded some of the poor terms and conditions and it is time to invest in skills and training. that is why the government has to ensure we get fair funding for social care. jayne says her current employer is compassionate understanding. but, she says, policy from the top needs to change.
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they need to sit up and listen. i challenge them to come on to the shopfloor for a week to change their attitude. the department of health in england says it has increased funding to support groups who are at risk of suicide. but the challenges, the time pressures, the stress on care workers remains. thank you jane for talking to us about that. if you are feeling emotionally distressed and would like details of organisations which offer advice and support, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline or you can call for free, at any time, to hear recorded information on 0800 066 066 now, we've got a little quiz about what's coming up later on the programme. let's have a starter for ten.
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the grand final of a series of 46 of which long—running quiz show was shown on bbc two last night?|j which long—running quiz show was shown on bbc two last night? i think it is university challenge. did to out both of us? they do not do that on the actual programme. can we play the individual ones? said andrews, minchin. sheffield, walker. in a few minutes we will be joined by the voice behind the answers and defeated semifinalist to ask what they believe is the secret to the enduring success of the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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the government has been asked to intervene, after the nhs withdrew its funding for ivf treatment in the borough of croydon. the group which commissions healthcare for the borough, said it made the decision to save money — but council leaders are appealing to health secretary, jeremy hunt to look again at the decision. guidelines recommend that women under 40 can be offered up to three free ivf cycles on the nhs, but that can be overturned locally. more adult social care workers in london quit theirjob than anywhere as in england. over 10% in thejobs in the sector are vacant in london which is over double the vacancies in the north—east of england amid concerns that the system is about to colla pse concerns that the system is about to collapse the government says it is putting extra money into services. london's only gym aimed at helping people with disabilities and long—term illness — has been saved from closure, thanks to the trust which helps
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maintain london's major bridges. ability bow in east london doesn't receive money from the nhs, and had to lay off therapists. but the city of london's bridge trust has stepped in and given the gym nearly £100,000 to continue its life changing work. the statue that was the first artwork to appear on the fourth plinth in trafalgar square — is to be unveiled again, but at a new location, on the steps of st paul's cathedral. the sculpture — ecce homo by artist mark wallinger — was on the fourth plinth 18 years ago. from this morning, it'll be outside st paul's for about six weeks — to raise awareness, by the charity amnesty, of people struggling with persecution around the world. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are problems on the waterloo & city line with minor delays on the overground as well. that is because
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ofa overground as well. that is because of a faulty train at stratford. on the roads the north circular is killing. after a crash early this morning. lord chip lane is closed by police between the 810 and bennington road. good morning. it turned out to be pleasant yesterday and we have much of the same today except it should stay dry. it will be a chilly start, however, so it is worth wrapping up when you head out this morning but there is plenty of sunshine around to warm things up. there will be varying amounts of clouds that looks like there should be breaks for bright and sunny spells. temperatures reaching 16 celsius. a westerly wind picking up later on through the night keeping the frost at bay and cloud building with temperatures of seven or eight celsius. a cloudy and breezy day tomorrow with a westerly wind. temperatures reaching 16 with the odd bright spell. save a wind over easter, it looks settled with a few showers to spice things up a bit.
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that's it from us for now. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london with her breakfast show until then. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. theresa may and donald trump have agreed there's a window of opportunity to persuade russia to abandon its support for the syrian leader, bashar al—assad. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, will travel to moscow later today to meet with his russian counterpart. before that foreign ministers from the g7 group of nations will continue to meet in italy to try to agree a co—ordinated response to events in syria. putin has shown over several years he's willing to pay a fairly
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significant price to not only keep russian access to syrian bases and then through that projection into then through that projection into the region, but also he sees in assad the only currently the in syria that in russia's mind can govern the country and prevent a political vacuum that can only benefit extremists. nhs england is to invest millions of pounds in providing a complex treatment to help save stroke patients from lifelong disability. the procedure involves the removal of a blood clot from the patient‘s brain. around 8,000 people a year will eventually benefit from the expansion of the treatment; it is currently offered to only a few hundred patients. an eight—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california. the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire before killing himself. police say he was the teacher's estranged husband. a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges.
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the video of a passenger being forcibly removed from a united airlines plane has been shared across the world and led to heavy criticism. the shocking images from a flight waiting to take off from chicago to louisville show the man being violently dragged out of his chair and pulled down the aisle to the dismay of fellow travellers. the airline had overbooked the plane and selected the man and his companion at random when nobody volunteered to leave. united has apologised and said it will investigate. an appeal is being made for more adults to become volunteers in the scouts to cope with the increasing popularity of the movement. the number of youngsters wanting tojoin is the highest in the history of scouting, there are 51,000 children on a waiting list to become scouts, beavers, cubs or explorers. but waiting lists can't fall unless there are more adults to volunteer as leaders to help out.
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last month we talked about sesame street's autistic muppetjulia. yesterday she made her tv debut. hi, guys. hi, elmo. who's this? this is our friend julia. hi, julia. i'm big bird, nice to meet you. that was a clip from yesterday's episode dedicated to autism that aired in the united states. julia has been a recurring character in muppet books and online since 2015. she was created with the help of autism organisations to promote acceptance. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather for you. we will be talking university challenge as well. and mumbling on television, which i will try not to do today. make sure you enunciated
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today! and kat is here to have a look at the sport, and a miserable morning for that fella. that shows how he's feeling, despondent, maybe angry, lots of talk about arsene wenger leaving arsenal. arsenal were beaten 3—0 by crystal palace in the premier league last night to severely dent their chances qualifying for the champions league. they were comprehensively outplayed by palace, who had andros townsend to thank for theirfirst goal. yohan cabaye added a superb second with lu ka milvojevic‘s penalty condemning arsenal to their worst defeat of the season. it leaves them seven points off the top four, but wenger refused to address the speculation surrounding his future. i face that in every press conference at the moment and tonight i'm not in the mood to speak about that. reporter: when do you think you will be letting the fans and everybody know? i think at the moment i need to pay more respect to the fact that we had a disappointing result and focus on that and not find as well excuses that are not excuses. whenever a manager has some
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criticism, particularly a man who's claudio ranieri says he doesn't think a players revolt was behind his sacking at leicester. he lost hisjob in february, nine months after leading the club to the premier league title. speaking publicly for the first time about his dismissal, he says that somebody behind the scenes may have been plotting against him. maybe it could be somebody behind me. also a little problem i had the year before when we won the title. maybe people this year when we lose they push a little bit more but that's it. do you want to tell us who those people are, claudio? i don't want to tell. i'm a serious man, a loyal man, what i have to say i said face to face. everton's ross barkley is back in training after what his lawyers have called an unprovoked attack by a stranger on sunday night.
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merseyside police are examining cctv footage that appears to show barkley being punched in the face. the incident happened in a liverpool bar after the team's 4—2 win over leicester city. no report of an assault has been made to police. england women won their final home friendly before this summer's euros in the netherlands. the lionesses beat austria 3—0 in milton keynes. goals from ellen white, lucy bronze and isobel christiansen. they have another friendly injune against switzerland before the july tournament. three wins from three as they prepare for the euros, excellent staff! you watch university challenge? i do. how many do you get right? one was a guess and one was from my philosophy degree, i knew it would happen. one peugeot. then you're pleased. if you get three right then you're in dreamland! from greek history, to hungarian rivers, and from particle physics to renaissance art.
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they're all subjects that test the general knowledge of students on university challenge. and last night millions tuned in to watch balliol college oxford take on wolfson college cambridge in this year's grand final. so after 46 years, what is the secret of its success? we went to watch the final at wolfson college, with some of those closest to the action. if you don't want to know you might wa nt to if you don't want to know you might want to make applause university challenge... asking the questions, jeremy paxman. speaker of the temple and three child spirits are among the characters in which... the magic flute. correct! anyone like to buzz? the congress of vienna is correct. eric is one of a kind, he's a dynamo, a quizzing machine, so it was interesting. we both did the
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same high school quiz programme in canada but i've never seen the lights of eric. balliol college has the fantastic appeal of seeing unbelievably clever people who know enormous amounts and they're only in their early twenties. great drama, fabulous teams, compelling individual characters. it's good to be intelligent and know something. smart is sexy. justified, correct. l. ming. ming is correct. you lose five points. and that is the goal. —— gong. balliol, many congratulations to you, you are the series champions of university —— university challenge for 2016/2017. we're joined by one of the most famous voices in television, the voice of university challenge, roger tilling, and in our london
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newsroom is one of this year's defeated semi—finalists bobby seagull, who was captain of emmanuel college cambridge, and who got quite a following on social media. great to have you both on. you've been involved in the show for how many years? 20 years. i can't believe it either. . it is gaining popularity every series. it seems to be. i think university challenge is the most fiendishly difficult quiz show in britain and it is i think. but it is amazing to see bright young students with a wide spectrum of knowledge. it makes you feel great about yourself if you can
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a nswer great about yourself if you can answer one question as well.|j great about yourself if you can answer one question as well. i got one in the final last night, which i was very happy about. show off! did you always want to take part in the show? i've always had good general knowledge but until i got on the show, i would knowledge but until i got on the show, iwould be knowledge but until i got on the show, i would be honest, knowledge but until i got on the show, iwould be honest, my embarrassing admission was if my dad went embarrassing admission was if my dad we nt o nto embarrassing admission was if my dad went onto bbc two, i would think i knew nothing and i wouldn't answer may be one or two peugeot. the only way and i got on the show did i get gripped —— per show. way and i got on the show did i get gripped —— pershow. i way and i got on the show did i get gripped —— per show. iwas way and i got on the show did i get gripped -- per show. iwas like way and i got on the show did i get gripped -- per show. i was like the rest of the population, hiding and thinking i don't know anything. what have you made of the social media interaction? you were a big star on social media. it took over the world. whenever the programmes are on, the trending topics on social media are all about university challenge. absolutely. this year
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there's been a special relationship that has developed between the co ntesta nts a nd that has developed between the contestants and the fans and historically university challenge a lwa ys historically university challenge always gets a big following but because of the way the contestants deal with the public on twitter in good humour, that adds to the relationship. there is so much pressure involved, obviously for the co ntesta nts, pressure involved, obviously for the contestants, but also for you to get the name right very quickly. just a bit, most people think i record it but i am their lives and i only see the name when it is on the board and the name when it is on the board and the longer it is, the smaller the font is going to have to be. you can do some complicated names? one or two. do you practise them? i get about four or five minutes to see what they are and then walk around the studio doing it over and over again. that's true! does anyone come up again. that's true! does anyone come up to you afterwards and say you mispronounced my name? not yet.
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that's the professional in new. they probably wouldn't mind anyway!m that's the professional in new. they probably wouldn't mind anyway! it is a simple idea, but the pressure to have that instant recall is intense, isn't it? absolutely. it is one thing sitting on the comfort of your sofa and shouting out answers and maybe having half—hearted guesses but the other thing is being in the studio and you have the indomitable figure of paxman sitting a few feet away and knowing any answer you perhaps get wrong will be magnified on twitter and in the papers next day, it's a different experience having the buzzer in the studio. roger, one of the great things is, i know you know this, you get more excited as the programme goes on, because it is live you get into it and your voice changes pitch towards the end. i'm not pushing it on, i'm playing the game, getting so into it. if there's ten points towards the last 15 seconds, i'm thinking... who's going to win? what is it like
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working with jeremy, i who's going to win? what is it like working withjeremy, i know you can obviously retake it because it isn't life, but he's under a lot of pressure as well, isn't he? 29 minutes of non—stop talking he has to do, that is hard work. it is non—stop. to do, that is hard work. it is non-stop. i don't know how he does it. what is next for you? i know your good friend is back in canada now. have you spoken to him since the final? what do you have planned for the future? eric and i are good friends and i was joking that he is now a strong contender for best man ifi now a strong contender for best man if i ever get married. i think one of the fabulous things, i am a big fan of numbers and i love mathematics and for university challenge has drawn attention to people and i may potentially have a
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chance to do some work with maths. it is definitely harsh harsh. there are only a few million people watching right now. we will definitely keep that secret. the seagull is flying. love it. daniel seagull! thank you also for playing the game with us this morning. it was an easy question, however. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. the weather here is certainly glorious and the temperature is picking up. i am on the roof of new broadcasting house and you can see all the way down regent street and it is beginning to get busier. there's been a cool start to the day with some parts of england and wales starting off with a touch of frost for most of us today the forecast is largely dry. there will be cloud but equally there will be sunshine. as we go through the late morning into the
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early afternoon with the more cloud bubble up and we will have sunny intervals around. it is not wall—to—wall blue skies across the north and north—west of scotland here this morning. we do have some rain and a bit more cloud ahead of the high land of the southern at once into northern england, yes, there is some cloud around but equally it is a beautiful start. has become further south into the midlands and east anglia, essex, kent, down towards the isle of wight and over towards the isles of scilly, again actually start with frost here and there. we are looking a bit full blue skies. by nine o'clock temperature in plymouth will be nine celsius. a nippy start again for wales but a lot of sunshine, cloud in the north but it is high cloud in the north but it is high cloud so still very pleasant. for northern ireland, well, some sunshine for you this morning that you will have a rather cloudy day. stage i, however. because of the day the scotland will sink a little bit further south getting into the outer hebrides and the finals of greenman, scotla nd hebrides and the finals of greenman, scotland is well as the northern isles. he assured we will pick up
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with exposure touch and go our fourth over the rest of the uk, a fine day with bright and sunny intervals. temperatures up to 17 degrees in london, 14 in aberdeen. in the rain, 11 to 13. through this evening and overnight the rain will come south across the west of scotland, northern ireland into england, possibly into north—west wales and some of that will be happy. behind it, showers with cloud with sun breaks and a touch of frost again in the countryside. where we have the brakes, first thing, is where we will see the sunshine do we start off with some heavy bursts of raina time start off with some heavy bursts of rain a time across north—east england and wales. it will weaken all the time in the south and in the far south leader that will not be much more than a band of cloud and for others, looking at a bright spells, sunny spells and a few showers. for thursday, well, we start a chilly note. again, frost around. there will also be sunshine. through the day it will start to
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cloud over from the west, heralding the arrival of the band of rain. for good friday, that band of rain will sink down the western side of the country and as we head on into the weekend, the easter weekend, of course, will generally speaking it will be mostly dry and there will be some sunshine there will be some sat showers, however, particularly on saturday in the north and east and we hang to the cooler north—westerly wind. think how much, carol. we will see you later. broadband customers are losing out if they don't switch their broadband contract and provider after an initial deal ends. that's according to a report from citizens advice out this morning. it is not a shock to hear it that switching providers can often save you money and we do hear people talk about that with broadband. this research comes from citizens advice.
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they have looked at the cheapest broadband deals provided by various providers. a top five suppliers providing about 90% of uk broadband market. they found that if customers stayed with their provider after a deal ended, the research showed that prices increased by 43%. that is the equivalent of about £9 45 a month. if you factor in people often with a supplier an average of four yes, these extra cost can run into hundreds of pounds. with me now is matt from citizens advice. people aware of this? why do you think it happens? what our research shows is that people often pay hundreds of pounds more than they should for what can only be described as a penalty, really, on their loyalty. but the things we found through our research was about one third of people, did not even realise that
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this happens. a couple of reasons for that is actually a relatively new phenomenon. if you look back five or six years, the contract price only tended to go up by about one or £2 a month whereas now you say that none of £10. also, anyone who is porches broadband recently can say that it is incredibly difficult to see and understand what you will pay beyond the original contract. and you have said there should be small transparency, then from from the providers was like absolutely. a few things. we all have busy lives and it should not be this difficult to understand how much you will pay for things. one thing that would help would be if you are looking at the initial price it should show you how much you pay once it does. beyond that, i would again be very surprised if many viewers know exactly the day but the broad band contract will expire. we have little ways of dealing with it, possibly a line in your calendar but it should not be that difficult. i think we should do a lot more to
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warn people about when it is coming to an end. today people are able to ta ke to an end. today people are able to take action and save their money.” do that as well. i use a spreadsheet. when you talk about this, when you talk about switching, surely people know now that loyalty often does not pay in a company and it the onus is on the customer to change things to try and get the best deal. you would think that they would understand it but as our research shows, people stumble at the start. whatever challenges is that loyalty is such a noble attribute that it is very strange that broadband and energy that loyalty is so viciously punished. the problem is that always tends to be those who can least afford it. people on low incomes are three times more likely to another contract for ten more years. older people twice as likely. it is really the people who can least afford to obtain the most. we were discussing car insurance earlier, is another big issue. more on this story about
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me and is going up little bit later in the programme as well. we are hearing new beautifully, stephanie, this morning. we have been discussing mumbling on the television. i have been accused of that. i will not accuse you. listen to this though, listen carefully. in fa ct, to this though, listen carefully. in fact, hopefully you are hearing us loud and clear this morning but the bbc get more complaints about the sound quality on tv shows these days than bad language, inappropriate content or political imbalance. what is to blame? would be a case of technical trouble or are more and more are beginning to mumble? our a rts more are beginning to mumble? our arts correspondent has been trying to find out. so i suppose you are working... mumbling. are you struggling to hear this? you're not alone. rememberjamaica inn? is it a problem with technology or diction? we filmed our own little drama
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and out to add this acted it out in a variety of styles. so i suppose you were working. kind of. i am doing a load of unpaid work. keen to do unpaid work, sort of. three options, beautiful clear diction. this is rather more mumbly. and finally what happens if you change the sound effects, the level of noise around them? how about music? we then played the results at a science media museum in bradford. did you understand any of that? just odd bits. the clearest diction was in the lift. there were only around
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three words that were not quite clear and i am 85 in may. i have been clearing out my ears. we tried different televisions. and when it came to flatscreen versus old —style when it came to flatscreen versus old—style it was the elderly second—hand television that was the clear winner. that one. definitely that one. even with teenagers, half of them struggled. joaquin every word. emma, fewer. ——joe got every word. and watching all of this was simon clark, a professional sound recordist. his conclusion, the big issue is diction.
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i would say that yes there is too much mumbling. i come across it an awful lot on sets. all i can do is go up to the director and say i am not really sure what that person said and i am reading it from a script at the same time i am recording it. so, proof if needed that hearing varies dramatically and while this may seem a more realistic way of speaking... mumbling. sort of. i am doing a little unpaid work. it is this that will stop millions hitting the off button. i have been watching that very closely. and we will read some of your comments. we will try and make a special effort not to mumble today at all. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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the government has been asked to intervene, after the nhs withdrew its funding for ivf treatment in the borough of croydon. the group which commissions healthcare for the borough, said it made the decision to save money — but council leaders are appealing to health secretary, jeremy hunt to look again at the decision. guidelines recommend that women under 40 can be offered up to three free ivf cycles on the nhs, but that can be overturned locally. more adult social care workers in london quit theirjob than anywhere as in england. over 10% in the jobs in the sector are vacant in london which is over double the vacancies in the north—east of england amid concerns that the system is about to collapse the government says it is putting extra money into services. london's only gym aimed at helping people with disabilities and long—term illness — has been saved from closure, thanks to the trust which helps maintain london's major bridges. ability bow in east london doesn't
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receive money from the nhs, and had to lay off therapists. but the city of london's bridge trust has stepped in and given the gym nearly £100,000 to continue its life changing work. the statue that was the first artwork to appear on the fourth plinth in trafalgar square — is to be unveiled again, but at a new location, on the steps of st paul's cathedral. the sculpture — ecce homo by artist mark wallinger — was on the fourth plinth 18 years ago. from this morning, it'll be outside st paul's for about six weeks — to raise awareness, by the charity amnesty, of people struggling with persecution around the world. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are problems on the waterloo & city line with minor delays on the overground as well. on the roads the north circular is killing. on the roads the north circular is —— queueing
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after a crash early this morning. bow road is queuing. lordship lane is closed by police between the 810 and bennington road. good morning. it turned out to be pleasant yesterday and we have much of the same today except it should stay dry. it will be a chilly start, however, so it is worth wrapping up when you head out this morning but there is plenty of sunshine around to warm things up. there will be varying amounts of clouds that looks like there should be breaks for bright and sunny spells. temperatures reaching 16 celsius. a westerly wind picking up later on through the night keeping the frost at bay and cloud building with temperatures of seven or eight celsius. a cloudy and breezy day tomorrow with a westerly wind. temperatures reaching 16 with the odd bright spell. save a wind over easter, it looks settled with a few showers to spice things up a bit.
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vanessa feltz is back on bbc radio from 7, she hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. theresa may and donald trump discuss how to end the conflict in syria. in a telephone call last night they agreed there's now a "window of opportunity" to persuade russia to drop its support for syria's president assad. good morning. it's tuesday the 11th of april. also this morning: a revolutionary new treatment for stroke patients in england, that could help save thousands from lifelong disability. united airlines apologises
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as footage of one of its passengers being forcibly dragged off a flight sparks outrage. good morning. the cost of an average motor insurance policy is now £110 more expensive than it was a year ago. you'll be investigating. in sport, the pressure mounts on arsene wenger as arsenal are beaten 3—0 by crystal palace in the premier league. # i'm like a bird i only fly away... grammy award winner nelly furtado is back with herfirst album in five years, she'll be here to tell us why she wanted to spend some time out of the spotlight. and carol has the weather. good morning from the roof of the broadcasting house in london. temperature is picking up, a dry day with sunni or bright intervals, the
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exception is across the far north and north—west of scotland, there is rain and strengthening wind. more details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump and theresa may have discussed what they call a "window of opportunity" to persuade russia to drop its support for syria's president assad in the wake of last week's chemical attack. the prime minister and the us president spoke on the phone last night as foreign ministers from the g7 group of countries meet in italy, to try to coordinate their response. greg dawson reports. they call it the ‘family photo‘ and it's a family that used to include russia before it was expelled in 2014 when the g8 became the g7. the kremlin may not be represented at this summit, but its continued support for the syrian regime dominates conversation. these foreign ministers have been working out the precise message us secretary of state rex tillerson should deliver when he heads to moscow later today. if i think about the position of vladimir putin now, you know,
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he‘s toxifying the reputation of russia, by his continual association with a guy who has flagrantly poisoned his own people. secretary tillerson‘s visit comes after russia threatened to retaliate with force if the us repeats last week‘s tomahawk strikes on a syrian airbase. in a phone call last night, theresa may and donald trump discussed breaking up the syrian—russia alliance. a downing street spokesman revealed: one of the options g7 ministers are discussing is hitting russia with targeted sanctions if it refuses to buckle, but president putin is used to standing up to international pressure and the chances of him abandoning his ally seem remote. greg dawson, bbc news. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins is in the italian city
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of lucca, where g7 leaders are continuing their meetings this morning. that looks like a stunning building but there is talk of a window of opportunity. what more can you tell us? i can tell you that doris johnson‘s idea of tight, narrowly focused sanctions bringing pressure to bear on specific russian and syrian military figures, generals, who are accused of being indicated directly in attacks on civilians, that‘s not necessarily going to get an easy passage from this meeting. some countries are holding out against the idea of any sanctions being implemented before a full investigation into last week‘s alleged chemical weapons attack has been completed. —— borisjohnson. the british are not in despair,
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discussions are continuing and rex tillerson wants to go to moscow with the best possible ammunition with which to confront president putin‘s of and but the fact is he may not get quite the clear message he wa nted get quite the clear message he wanted to deliver and we‘ll have to wait and see how this pans out. if any sanctions agreed or otherwise have to be delayed or die looted, that clearly one send quite the sort of aggressive message that the united states and britain in particular wanted. james robbins, thank you. thousands of stroke patients in england stand to benefit from a new programme to train more doctors in a complex procedure which could save lives and help reduce disability. it involves doctors catching and removing a clot which is causing the stroke, to help restore the flow of blood to the brain. here‘s our health correspondent, jane dreaper. back on herfeet, margaret had a stroke just three weeks ago at the age of 50, but she‘s benefited from a revolutionary treatment. i was very, very lucky because i should have probably come out more severe,
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you know, i could have been paralysed and taken months and months of therapy and everything else, rehab. but i was very lucky. this is margaret's angiogram. margaret‘s doctors at this london hospital have led the way in trying this new procedure. it has a much higher success rate than clock busting drugs. than clot busting drugs. patients can be completely weak down one side and not have any speech and as soon as you take out the clot they can start talking to you sometimes and moving immediately, other times it takes several hours or by the end of the evening or the next day they can have recovered a lot of function. yes, it can have a massive impact. doctors use this incredibly delicate piece of wire to fish the clot out of the patient‘s brain, although sometimes use another piece of wire, like this one, to suck it out. 8000 patients across england will benefit from this treatment every year once the programme
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is rolled out. not all patients will have the treatment, as some strokes are caused by a bleed rather than a clot, and it will take time to train the doctors and nurses needed to expand services. but nhs england says it‘s making the investment because patients recover their health so quickly. jane dreaper, bbc news. an eight—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california. the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire before killing himself. police say he was the teacher‘s estranged husband. a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges. iam i am told that they were estranged, this is preliminary information so this is preliminary information so this could change, i am told that
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there marriage was relatively short, they‘ve only been married for a few months and have been separated for the last month, month and a half when this incident took place. but there‘s nobody in the investigation who has come forward to say they knew this coming a potentially knew this could happen. united airlines has been heavily criticised after one of its passengers was dragged off a flight in chicago. shocking images, which have been shared across the world, show the man being violently dragged out of his chair and forcibly pulled down the aisle to the dismay of fellow travellers. the airline had selected the man and his companion at random when nobody volunteered to give up their seat. our correspondent neda tawfik reports. these are the disturbing moments that have now travelled around the world. several smartphones record as three police hover over a man who is being forced to exit the aircraft. the situation quickly escalates after one officer manhandles him out of his chair. oh, my god. all three officers then drag him
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bloodied and injured from the cabin. no, this is wrong. oh, my god. look at what you did to him! the incident began when united airlines asked for volunteers to give up their seats for additional crew members. when none were found, they chose passengers at random, but this man refused. one passenger said he claimed to be a doctor who had patients he needed to see. good work, way to go. ten minutes later, in unexplained circumstances, the man, clearly shaken, runs back on the plane. united airlines in a statement, said: that's what makes the world's leading airline flyer friendly. the airline has been criticised for its handling of the situation that some say clearly contrasts
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with its claim to fly the friendly skies. the landscape seen from the summit of snowdon has been named the uk‘s best view. this welsh mountain vista topped a survey to find the country‘s favourite sights. it was followed by the three sisters mountains in scotland and stonehenge. i believe cheddar gorge is in the top five. thank you so much for sending in all of your views. it‘s so sending in all of your views. it‘s so early in the morning! christie sent us this... and this is carol‘s favourite
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view... carol told us earlier it was a view she could see from her childhood home. just stunning. thank you somewhat for all of your photos. thank you somewhat for all of your photos. and we‘d be live in this research in thetford to discover a little bit more about the future of the environment. looks like a beautiful day. new figures seen by bbc breakfast show the number of care worker suicides in england, is on the rise. the rate has been steadily increasing for the last 15 years, with more adult care workers taking their own life in 2015, than any year since 2001. brea kfast‘s graham satchell spoke to jayne, who has been a carer for more than 30 years. she says her current employer is compassionate and understanding, but she‘s experienced difficult times in her career. it's
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it‘s just rush, rush, it‘sjust rush, rush, rush, i‘m on permanent antidepressants and i‘m not ready to come off them.” challenge them to come on the shop floor for challenge them to come on the shop floorfor a to challenge them to come on the shop floor for a to change their attitude. let‘s speak to professor martin green, chief executive of care england, which represents independent care providers. the numbers are quite small but do they, as a surprise? what do you make of them. the numbers may be small but for every family, this is a tremendous tragedy and i think the fa ct a tremendous tragedy and i think the fact these numbers have steadily increased, however small they might be something we should be concerned about uncertainly the care sector, we should start investigating ways in which we can support people. i bhui -- i
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in which we can support people. i bhui —— i thought of that piece to camera shows the pressure how many ca re camera shows the pressure how many care workers camera shows the pressure how many ca re workers are camera shows the pressure how many care workers are under. you mentioned jane in the case study, she talked about the pressure from the system and she never felt able to do thejob the system and she never felt able to do the job that she wanted to do. is that something that rings true? it certainly doors and i think one of the challenges is that we have faces don‘t which commissions, anyway, and i say commissioning, local authorities are buying services in a way that don‘t help ca re services in a way that don‘t help care workers to deliver outcomes come off what they tend to do particularly in domiciliary care in say by certain amounts of time rather than understanding this is a complexjob rather than understanding this is a complex job and care workers need to be able to be with people or longer in order to meet their needs. it's a pretty grim statistic, one of those that came out of the survey, says carol working is the worst occupation force female suicide. why do you think that is? care workers are undera do you think that is? care workers are under a great deal of pressure, i don‘t think people understand the
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complexity of the work, the emotional take on it or indeed some of the physical problems. i think we should also remember that care workers will also be, particularly female co—workers, you‘re probably looking after their families, doing a range of other things which will also cause them stress so it all leads to a very stressful situation and obviously these figures show some people take their own lives as a way out of that. we've spoken on this programme before about the high suicide rate of males in occupations like construction and the construction industry has done quite a bit to address that. what is the ca re a bit to address that. what is the care industry doing and what you do be doing to address these issues we are talking about? these figures identify that we need to do more, i think one of the things that care providers are doing is making much more time for their staff and creating processes whereby staff can identify issues, but of course the challenge is that often when people
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are feeling suicidal they don‘t reach out for help, what we as a sector have got to do is do more to make sure that there are opportunities for people when they are feeling very depressed and anxious to be able to reach out to those who can help them. what's odd thing is practically a utopian about? there might be people watching this, who feel in that situation but they don‘t what to do. i think first of all people should seek support from people like the samaritans, from a range of independent bodies, they should also talk to their line managers, they should talk to their colleagues and i think one of the challengers with a lot of particularly domiciliary services delivered in people‘s own homes, sometimes workers don‘t have as much connection with their other collea g u es as much connection with their other colleagues so they don‘t have a support network that people might have another professions. i think that‘s the same sometimes in construction so i think one of the things we need to do as a sector is make more visible things like the
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samaritans and we need to incur reach people to be able to speak not only to their managers but also their colleagues and friends. there area number of their colleagues and friends. there are a number of issues that have come out of these statistics, one more that i wanted to raise in the time we have. 900 adult social care workers leave the job every day in england, these figures from last year mother is a real problem in the isn‘t there? there is a real problem around retention and recruitment and we have to realise what the root causes of that are. this is a profession which is grossly under funded and i don‘t think people realise that in some areas local authorities are commissioning residential care for example at £2.31 an hour. we have seen example at £2.31 an hour. we have seen problems in northumberland where they‘re trying to introduce restrictive contracts which need to be changed. we‘ve got the potential ofa be changed. we‘ve got the potential of a judicial review in essex because of the way the council behaved. now, what the government has done is put a significant amount of money into the care sector, but
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that hasn‘t necessarily reached the frontline and what we‘ve got to do as well, as a society, is we‘ve got to value and respect our care staff. they do an incredible job. it is an extremely difficult job they do an incredible job. it is an extremely difficultjob and we don‘t pay them enough and we don‘t give them enough expect. martin green, thank you. the department of health in england says it has increased funding to support groups who are at higher risk of suicide. if you are feeling emotionally distressed and would like details of organisations which offer advice and support, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 066 066. carol was telling us about that beautiful view when she was growing up beautiful view when she was growing up and the view behind you isn‘t
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bad. the view you‘re viewing is regent‘s street. if you have an allergy to tree pollen, the pollen levels are high. for much of the rest of england and wales and northern ireland, they‘re moderate, but for northern england and scotland, they are low. the weather today, well, it will be mostly dry. there is some cloud around in the forecast, but for many of us, we will see some lengthy spells of sunshine particularly so this morning. so after a chilly start, temperatures picking up nicely. we‘ve got rain this morning across the north and the north—west of scotland, more cloud ahead of that in the highlands, but for the rest of scotla nd highlands, but for the rest of scotland and into northern england, it isa scotland and into northern england, it is a fine start with sunshine and just a little bit of fair—weather cloud. as we come south into the midlands into east anglia, essex and kent and hampshire and the isle of wight, blue skies rather like we have in london. and then drifting all the way over towards devon and cornwall and the isles of scilly, a beautiful
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start to the day with a little bit of wispy cloud, but chilly. wales getting off to a beautiful start. again, nippy, but there has been a touch of frost in some of the valleys this morning and more cloud in the north, but it‘s high cloud so not really spoiling t for northern ireland, well you‘ve got some sunshine this morning, but for much of today, although it should stay dry, it will be cloudy at times. so the rain across scotland through the day just the rain across scotland through the dayjust sinks a little bit further south. the wind with exposure will possibly touch gale force this afternoon. but for of the uk, sunny spells or bright spells with highs between 14 to 17 celsius, in the sunshine, about 11 to 13 celsius in the cloud and the rain. through this evening and overnight, the rain in scotla nd evening and overnight, the rain in scotland moves across all of scotland, northern ireland, into north—west england and possibly as far south as north—west wales. some of it will be heavy. behind it, it will be showery. ahead of it, it will be showery. ahead of it, it will be showery. ahead of it, it will be cloudy and where we see brea ks will be cloudy and where we see breaks in the cloud in the
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countryside, we could see a touch of frost. but, of course, where we‘ve got the breaks is where we‘ll start with sunshine. tomorrow, we have the rain across north—west england and north—west wales. there is the potential for some heavy bursts coming out of that first thing, but as it sinks south into the south of england later in the day, it won‘t be much more than a band of cloud and behind it, for all of us, we‘re back into bright spells, sunshine and showers. that leads us into thursday. thursday we start off on a cold note. there will be frost around, but equally, there will be sunshine. however, it will cloud over from the west through the day, with rain showing its hand. on good friday the rain scoots down the west coast, affecting wales, north—west england, south—west england, leading us england, south—west england, leading us into the easter weekend. in brief, mostly dry. there will be sunshine. some showers, particularly in the north and the east on saturday and still that chilly north—westerly wind. so lou and dan, it is goodbye to 25 celsius for now at least! 0h,
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oh, carol. it's not her fault! no, it is never carol‘s fault. i was enjoying the temperature, shorts out! the rising cost of car insurance is what many of our viewers are talking about. good morning. the cost of the average motor insurance policy is now £110 year higher than it was last year ago — that‘s according to research by the comparison site, confused.com. it is to do with expensive repairs, tax increases and changes to the rules on injury payouts are pushing up prices and means drivers are paying an average of over £780 a year. experts predict this could pass £1,000 by next year. it‘s not the only thing going up.
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sticking with your broadband provider after an introductory deal ends could push your annual bill up by over £100. research from citizens advice reveals that when a deal is over bills go up by over 40%. the charity is urging broadband providers to be more transparent about prices — we‘ll be speaking to them in about half an hour. jd sports have had some pretty impressive results out this morning — pretax profits up over 80%. the firm made the headlines last year for working conditions in its rochdale distribution centre — reports the boss has defended as "unbalanced" this morning. the firm is well placed for growth. before i go one other story. one that‘s annoyed me. a growing number of university students in britain are cheating
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in their exams by using devices like smart watches, mobile phones and hidden earpieces and cameras. research by the guardian newspaper found that cheating using wearable technology has gone up 42% in the last four years. cheating doesn‘t pay. you shouldn‘t do it. i‘m glad you‘ve nailed your colours clear. no cheating here u nless colours clear. no cheating here unless we‘re playing monopoly. colours clear. no cheating here unless we're playing monopoly. no, not in monopoly either! we‘re a nation that prides itself on our vast array of bird—life. but, more than a quarter of the uk‘s birds are struggling to survive, with nightingales, cu rlews and puffinsjoining the "at—risk" list of threatened species in recent years. let‘sjoin our reporter, kate bradbrook, who is at a nature reserve which is monitoring the status of many birds across the country. it looks lovely there. good morning. hello. it is beautiful here. welcome
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to the british trust for orinotholgy. we have seen geese and ducks and a swan that came to say hello a couple of minutes ago and it got shy and it went again. the reason we‘re here is we‘re talking about species that in decline. so much so, they have been placed on a red list. meaning there is cause for concern. one of those is the cerlew and the nightingale that used to live here, but not anymore and also a bit further afield, the puffin. but just to find out a little a bit further afield, the puffin. butjust to find out a little bit more about this from somebody who knows more than i do is sam francs who is a researcher here. sam, which birds are we talking about? there is a range of species that have been placed on what‘s called the birds of conservation concern red list
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including the cerlew, the nightingale and also the puffin which represents many of the seabirds. why are numbers falling, do you think? there are a few reasons. the important ones are a lwa ys reasons. the important ones are always going to be habitat, climate change, for curlew always going to be habitat, climate change, for cu rlew it always going to be habitat, climate change, for curlew it is changes this agriculture land management. for the nightingale which live in woodland, it is changes to woodland management, and an increase in the number of deer in the countryside which eats down the sort of lower habitat structure which makes it poorfor breeding. it is not all bad news, is it? no,
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some have benefited. so i think that‘s really heartening that there is lessons to be learned and we can do something to turn the decline of these species around. winners and losers. it is not all bad news, of course and the situation will continue to be monitored. back to you. studio: thank you very much indeed. it is lovely to see the sunshine out and about too. thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. morning. this active weather front making its way in, for most areas, a lot of dry weather around during the course of the day and some decent spells of sunshine. especially across of southern counties of england and wales. flooding up with some fair weather cloud during the afternoon, bright skies across east anglia, across the south will see
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temperatures of between 15 and 17 degrees. southern parts of scotland dry enough, the odd spot of rain as we move closer. the eastern side of scotland, not much more than a spot of rain, you will notice the wind strengthening and the rain at its heaviest across the north and north—west of scotland. overnight, this wouldn‘t dragging towards the south but as it comes, it will fizzle away, gardeners in the south, if you are looking for rain, this will not be featured. by the middle of the afternoon, still warm enough in the south, not much in the way of rain. on thursday, a shower is largely confined to the north and west of scotland, maybe some for northern ireland, as far ahead as good friday, not a great deal changes, another weak weather front dragging some rain through the west of wales but the south—eastern quarter remains dry. into easter weekend, it starts off rather
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u nsettled weekend, it starts off rather unsettled but pressure rising, i suspect easter day itself could be dry in many parts. this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and ben thompson. toshiba‘s troubles continue — the japanese giant faces the prospect of being delisted from the tokyo stock exchange. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday 11th april. toshiba isn‘t the only japanese company which is struggling to stay afloat — later in the programme, we‘ll look at the issues facing some of the country‘s biggest names. also in the programme... the business community has been reacting to this video of a man being dragged off a united airlines flight.
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