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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  April 11, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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it's tuesday, it's 9 o'clock, welcome to the programme. this morning — in the 70s and 80s almost every haemophiliac patient in this country was infected with hiv and hepatis, in one of the biggest nhs scandals ever. now this programme has learnt that a new support scheme for victims and their families will leave some far worse off than others. it was something i kept to myself, i was determined i wasn't going to tell anyone because i had seen the stigma. i told a couple of close brings, that was it, i didn't tell anyone else at all. also north korea says it's ready for war and calls america reckless and outrageous are sending in naval fleet america reckless and outrageous are sending in navalfleet into korean waters. we hear from sending in navalfleet into korean waters. we hearfrom former insiders as to what they think could happen next. and how's this for customer relations? the world's leading airline, flyer friendly. screaming.
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why do airlines overbook in the ist place? we will try and find out. good morning, welcome to the programme. we are alive until 11 am, we will bring you the breaking news and developing stories and we are keen to hear from you. we will talk to former executioner who will save why he is opposed to the death penalty, that as new figures show the number of times it's used around the number of times it's used around the world is actually falling. and you may be surprised that the country for the most executions are still carried out, we will bring you the news after 10 am. if you are getting in touch, you can do so on the usual ways... just trying to tell you our
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programme has been nominated for a ba fta for programme has been nominated for a bafta for our coverage of the foot dollars abuse story back in november. the competition is very tough! —— footballers. more than 900 adult social care workers a day left theirjob in england last year. around 60% of those who quit left the adult social care profession entirely. care providers say that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care, and the uk care association claims the system is "close to collapse". the government says an extra two billion pounds is being invested in social care. carla fowler has this report. good morning. the start of the morning shift at st cecilia's nursing home in scarborough. it is a mid—sized 42—bed home and it is full. call bells ring constantly here. the residents' conditions range from dementia sufferers to stroke survivors and those needing end of life care. it is a constant battle for health care assistants to meet everyone's needs quickly. there should also be two nurses on shift today but sue gregory is on her own.
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what's the matter? i'm so dry. you're dry? right, let me put your head up. i think the hardest thing is keeping the consistency because it does have a knock—on effect. if you are having a great turnover of staff, it doesn't make for a happy home. 1.3 million people work in adult social care in england, but last year, more than 900 day left theirjobs. of those, 60% left social care completely. i'm falling! you're not falling, you're all right. i'm falling! it is high pressure, demanding and stressful work and most care workers are paid just above the minimum wage. you can't always get to everyone on time and it is quite upsetting and disheartening when you find out that people earn more just stacking shelves and you are looking after people and caring for them 2a hours a day. overnight, only two carers are on shift and tonight an agency
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nurse has had to be drafted in. the government recently committed to spending an extra £2 billion on the social care system and allowing local authorities to raise council tax bills in order to fund social care services. but with the number of 75—year—olds set to double in the next 20 years, will there be enough staff to care for those most in need? there is a 2nd social care story in the news today, our correspondent is with us now. this is a report which analysed figures from the care quality commission and they say living an u nsatisfa ctory commission and they say living an unsatisfactory care homes is a grim reality but too many people. they say a 3rd of people in the north west are inadequate or require improvement. in certain areas such as stockport and salford, 2/3 of
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people in care homes fall into that category. —— 2/3 of care homes. in manchester it is half. it doesn't quite fall into a north—south divide, kensington and chelsea also have 50% of their care homes deemed u nsatisfa ctory have 50% of their care homes deemed unsatisfactory according to the independent... 50%? unsatisfactory according to the independent... 5096? 0k. the reason behind this, what's being done?m ties into the story you've been running, they are saying a lack of funding, problems in recruiting staff as we've seen, 900 social care workers putting every single day which is quite shocking and there is inadequate support for care homes, good care homes in k—12 with the people who are in them, the families, the local community and their staff and they say if there isn't a framework to help care homes do that that is where it. 4. labour says it is the government's fault,
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they are putting pressure on local authorities in areas in the north of england and that's why they are falling down, but in the budget last month the chancellor philip hammond pledged an extra two billion pounds for social care in england. charities and local authorities say that's a stopgap, a long—term solution is needed and that is what they are calling for any forthcoming green paper. let's bring you the rest of the news. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day 5 news. theresa may and donald trump have agreed there's "a window of opportunity" to persuade russia to abandon its support for the syrian leader, bashar al—assad. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, will travel to moscow later today to meet with his russian counterpart. before that foreign ministers from the g7 group of nations will continue to meet in italy to try to agree a co—ordinated response to events in syria. an eight—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california.
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the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire in his estranged wife's classroom, before killing himself. a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges. the victims of a scandal in which the nhs used contaminated blood products to treat thousands of patients in the 70s and 80s say a new government support scheme is "shameful". under the scheme, the widow of an hiv positive haemophiliac in england could receive tens of thousands of pounds a year less than someone living in wales or scotland. the nhs infected thousands of people — many of them haemophiliacs — with hiv and hepatitis — in one of the worst scandals in the health service's history. a camp housing fifteen hundred migrants in northern france has been destroyed by a fire.
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at least ten people have been injured at the camp, near the port of dunkirk, which was home to mostly iraqi kurds. the blaze was started after a fight between residents, according to a regional official. numbers staying at the camp have grown since the closure of the much larger ‘jungle' camp near calais last year. china is believed to have executed more people in 2016 than all other nations combined, according to amnesty international — as death penalties in the world decreased overall. the number of executions around the world fell by more than a third, largely driven by fewer deaths recorded in iran and pakistan. but the group has sharply criticised china for continuing to conceal their figures. the us was removed from the top five for the first time since 2006. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. today we are discussing this pr triumph... the world's leading
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airline, flyer friendly. screaming. every thought... screaming. my my god... my god... what are you doing? no... carefully planned, coordinated and synchronised... 0h, my god, look at what you are doing to him! my god! performing together with a single united bus. you have busted his lip! my god, look at what you are doing to him! good work,
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guys, good work. that's what makes the world's leading airline, flyer friendly... i have to go home, i have to go home, i have to go home... united airlines are partially apologised, the apology has been criticised, the ceo of united airlines acknowledged to employees that the company could learn lessons from the incident. we'll talk to a pr expert about how it's possible to get it so unbelievably wrong and if that will have any long—term impact on the airline. let's get some sport. 0lly foster is with us this morning. arsenal have that horrible sinking feeling again. a couple of the players went to the fans and apologise last night. a couple of people in the office keeping a low profile! biggest league defeat of
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the season, losing 3— 0 to crystal palace, here's a couple of the goals, really good things from crystal palace at the other end of the townsend. —— the table. andros townsend, and yohan cabaye, what a performance. they also scored a late penalty, arsenalfans performance. they also scored a late penalty, arsenal fans vocal, chanting that the players are not fit to where the shirt, and crystal palace while bath—macro fans having a lot of fun. they were chanting for the manager to stay. palace now 6 points clear of relegation is, 5 wins out of 6, sam allardyce never relegated with any club, assen wenger has never finished relegated with any club, assen wenger has neverfinished outside the top four with the gunners. member some weeks ago he said he decided about his future, still keeping it to himself although he says that uncertainty about his future, his contract is up at the end of the season, isn't affecting his players. —— arsene wenger.
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end of the season, isn't affecting his players. —— arsene wengerlj end of the season, isn't affecting his players. -- arsene wenger. i am ina his players. -- arsene wenger. i am in a difficult position, the game tonight doesn't help. do you think it would have the situation but you think it would help if you came out and said what that decision is? yes, i faced that in every press conference at the moment and tonight iam not conference at the moment and tonight i am not in the mood to speak about that. when do you think you will let the fans know? at the moment, i think i paid more respect to the fa ct think i paid more respect to the fact that we had a disappointing result and focus on that, not find excuses that are not excuses, but nope what counts is how we perform on the pitch. john southall with the questions, another difficult interview for arsene wenger, 8 games left for the club to try and turn things around. those fans who are already pretty angry with the
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manager or even angrier. yes the ones at selhurst park but social media got very swearing last night, a generation of fans who have never known anything but arsenal with arsene wenger, over 20 years. ian wright helped arsene wenger win his ist trophy of the club years ago and he got some stick on social media. most pertinently he put this tweet about... a lively monday night football on 5 live, here is chris sutton and his ta ke live, here is chris sutton and his take on the gunners and he echoes that sentiment that arsene wenger has lost the dressing room. this is a manager who manage the invincible is and is managing the invisibles now. you know... there are ways to lose a football match. he's not getting the best out of the players,
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he has to go, he has to go and they have to get someone else in. could someone go have to get someone else in. could someone go in and do a betterjob? absolutely. they aren't listening. that is what usually does for managers, not fans getting angry it's when the players stop playing for the manager and that is what the owner is going to be looking at, to see if they are not listening to arsene wenger any more. we will see if his arsenal team are more visible next week, middlesbrough await next monday night. let's talk about andy murray who is back on court at least. a real worry, murray who is back on court at least. a realworry, about murray who is back on court at least. a real worry, about a murray who is back on court at least. a realworry, about a month ago people of a tournament in america, the hard court season, with a slight tear in his elbow, thought he was going to miss the start of the clay—court season but he honoured a promise to roger federer at to play in a charity match last night in z rich. all furry light—hearted, murray was losing, he lost the match in straight sets and gave the ball boy a couple of serve
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sex commission mark on match point down. perhaps a bad idea. he lost the match with a double fault but good to see him back out and get 3 a match and he might get through the monte match and he might get through the m o nte carlo match and he might get through the monte carlo masters in the clay—court season which would be great news. thank you so much. more from the sports desk throughout the morning. in the 70s and 805, thousands of haemophiliacs were treated with blood products that were contaminated. atjust one school for disabled pupils in hampshire dozens of young men were subsequently infected with hiv and hepatitis. 72 of those boys, some as young as eight—years—old, have died as a result. now the victims of the scandal and their families tell this programme a new support scheme planned by the government could leave many struggling to pay mortgages and bills. under the scheme the widow of an hiv
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positive haemophiliac in england could receive tens of thousands of pounds a year less than someone living in wales or scotland. jim reed has this exclusive report. i am one of you. i'm infected. i'm infected, 0k? haemophilia is a genetic disorder which prevents the blood from clotting. you might only need treatment during operations and things like that, or it can be severe where you have to have injections several times a week. in what is said to be the biggest medical disaster since the health service was set up, more than 1000 people with haemophilia have been infected with aids antibodies. in the 70s and 805, thousands were treated with contaminated blood products. almost every british haemophiliac
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was infected with hepatitis or hiv. many did not live long enough to be saved by modern drugs. in my school year, for example, i think i'm the only one left now. i am not the same person. i will never be the same person. i always say, and i firmly believe this, they gave him aids, they locked him up and watched him die. that's what they did. 30 years later, survivors and relatives of the dead are still fighting for answers. families are worried that a new support scheme, years in the making, could in fact leave many financially worse off. this programme has seen documents showing the government has again ruled out a public inquiry into one of the worst treatment scandals in the history of the nhs. the school is just up here on the left, just past this housing estate. left here?
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no, carry on. lee is 48 years old and a severe haemophiliac. this is the first time he has ever spoken on camera. even today, some of his close family don't know he has been hiv—positive since childhood. he describes himself as one of the lucky ones. of the 1,200 british haemophiliacs infected with both hiv and hepatitis c, only 250 are still alive. i went to a normal school up to the age of 11 and then at that time the local education authority, they felt it would be better if i was sent to a boarding school for physically handicapped people — treloar college in hampshire. lee was just one of a large number of young haemophiliacs sent to treloar college in the early 805. the school had a special unit to treat the condition. 72 of those boys have now died after being given a new drug meant to improve their lives. i was called over to the haemophilia centre and told that i had been infected with hiv and they didn't know how long i would actually have left because there
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was no known cure. you were 16, 17 at the time. do you remember what your reaction was when they told you? it was kind of shock, obviously, just like somebody being told they had cancer. that's what it felt like to me. because we knew that a batch of treatment was infected, a large number of haemophiliacs at the school were all infected at the same time. in my school year, for example, i think i'm the only one left now. many in the years above and below me, also many of those have lost their lives. it is devastating for the community and particularly for that school. did you feel that you could tell other people about it at the time? no, it was something i kept to myself. i was determined that i was not going to tell anybody because i had seen the stigma. i told a couple of close friends, that was it. i kept it to myself. i didn't tell anybody else at all. lee says he doesn't blame the school or the staff
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there whatsoever. he left and went on to have a career in management. but by the late 905, he was suffering from pneumonia caused by the hiv. he needed a liver transplant and then spent months in hospital being treated for lymphoma, a blood cancer, caused by the other viruses he was exposed to. we need to know why it happened because... how did this happen to us? the more we see, the more it seems something could have been done about it. i think you need those answers to understand fully why our lives have taken the course they have. life for severe haemophiliacs like lee was never easy, but by the start of the 19705, there was hope. a new drug called factor vii! restored the ability of blood to clot. there was one major problem. britain relied on imports from america and there prisoners and drug addicts were being paid
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to donate blood to make the medicine. scientists at the national center for disease control in atlanta today released the results of a study which shows that the lifestyle of some male homosexuals has triggered an epidemic of a rare form of cancer. by 1982, concern was growing over the mysterious new disease linked to the collapse of the immune system. it's definitely transmissible. just how, i don't know. is it through blood? the effects on families like this has been devastating. haemophilia is a genetic condition. women carry the faulty gene, but it is almost always the male side that is affected. five brothers in this family were all haemophiliac. four were infected with contaminated blood, three have now died. tony was just 16 years old when his dad, barry, succumbed to aids.
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in 2010, he finally got hold of his father's old medical records. this is the first time he is making them public. through the early 19805, your father appears to be getting more and more sick. 0h, definitely. the hospital treatment became more regular. my father was constantly asking about his prognosis. we almost what that means. what's going to happen to me? he was very worried because he was dying of aids, something that he should never have been exposed to. i never knew any of this as a child. i only found this out one i was 37 years old, of what they actually did to him. he was begging for his life. the records show barry was a mild haemophiliac whose symptoms could have been managed. he might not have needed the new factor vii! drug but was prescribed it anyway. as a result, he was infected with hepatitis b, then with hiv, as early as 1980. entries in the log show doctors were aware he might
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have the virus two years before he was finally told. my dad brought me up. my parents split up when i was a baby. things started to get bad within our family group because dad was unwell. i couldn't go home, so social services were contacted and i was placed in care. i was 13 years old, i think, when i was placed in care. tony was sent to live in children's home as his father's health declined rapidly. his dad was in hospital in the summer of 1986 when tony went down to see him for the last time. he had started to lose weight by then, he was really skinny. i do remember my dad asking me for some of my ice cream and i handed it to him at which point one of the nurses intervened and said, you can't give him that. i was like, why?
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he had blisters in his mouth. they were bleeding. so obviously, i couldn't share an ice cream with my dad because they had given him aids. looking back on it now, at the time, i didn't think too much into it, but looking back over it, i was disgusted. i did have physical contact with my dad. i could give him a hug. i said goodbye. barry's death in 1986 split the family apart. tony went back into care, his twin brother, david, went to the separate care home in north london. the whole family were only reunited 26 years later. 2nd august 2010, that was the first time all our family were in the same room. that is what they did. they destroyed my dad with these viruses and then they watched his family crumble. since barry's death, two of his brothers, both infected haemophiliacs, have also died.
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vincent from an aids related illness. dave from a brain haemorrhage linked to hepatitis c. the family, like others, say a full public inquiry is long overdue. the treatment shouldn't kill you, should it? it wasn't much of a life he had. he had "aids scum" put on his car. the cafe he used to use, i went in there with him one day and everyone walked out. it was awful. awful. how important is it for you now as a family, this talk of public inquiries and getting answers about what caused this and what happened, do you need those answers as a family? is it time nowjust to move on? i can't move on. i wish i could move on. we have not had the truth. unless it is brought out and we get to the bottom of what happened, why it happened, who is going to take responsibility
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for it happening, how do we know this won't happen again? the uk has dealt with this differently from other countries. in france, a former prime minister was charged with manslaughter for his role in the scandal. here, there have been two limited investigations, but neither have the powers of a full public inquiry. families still want to know why we imported factor vii! from abroad rather than producing it ourselves and why the drug continued to be used even after it was clear there might be a risk to public health. in 2015, david cameron did something no prime minister had done before. i would like to say sorry on behalf of the government for something that should not have happened. no amount of money can ever fully make up for what did happen, but it is vital we move as soon as possible to improve the way payments are made to those affected by this blood. but even after that apology, there was still the question
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of compensation or financial support for the victims and their families. again, 30 years later, that is not something that has ever been properly resolved. bob was admitted to hospital on 17th february this year. 26 years ago, sue and bob were part of a landmark bbc documentary about hiv and aids. i'm sure nobody wanted this to happen. having said that, at least it has taught me that it can happen to anyone. there isn't a lot i can do without making myself breathless and that sort of thing. bob, a haemophiliac infected in the 805, passed awayjust after that was filmed. as a family, as a couple, as individuals, everything we had planned for just went out the window. the life i thought i would be living today is very far removed from the one i am living today. we would have retired round about the same time,
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and we would have been able to relax and enjoy ourselves a bit and enjoy the children, and he would have enjoyed his grandchildren. he never met them. sue has spent the last 25 years as a campaigner, pushing the government to explain what happened to her husband and others like him. she was unimpressed with the then—prime minister's apology in the commons. if i got david cameron here now, i would say, "what are you apologising for? what specifically are you talking about? " i don't believe he would have the faintest idea, because most of them don't. cross, angry. we have been doing this year in, year out, and there will be people listening to this programme who will say, "they have been banging on about an apology for nearly 30 years, they have got one, and they are still moaning." but an apology is only worth giving and worth taking if it is meaningful.
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one major concern is a new financial support scheme for victims and their families. the government says that since that speech in 2015 it has doubled the amount it is spending, but we have seen documents showing under new plans the worst affected will get thousands less than first promised. many could even see payments fall as more people qualify. our analysis shows the planned scheme in england and northern ireland would pay out inevitably less than in scotland and wales. the widow of an hiv—positive haemophiliac in scotland, for example, will receive more than £27,000 every year. in england, just one single one—off payment of £10,000. they are payments that people rely on to pay mortgages, rent, feed theirfamilies, and if that sounds dramatic, i don't make an apology, because it is true. this system is grossly unfair.
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bob could have been sitting next to someone at clinic and both of them had treatment from the same batch, both infected on the same day, with the same viruses, and yet because his friend moved to scotland and bob stayed in england, you get this huge disparity of nearly £30,000 a year. that cannot be right. last month, the influential haemophilia society called for a full public inquiry into the scandal, joining politicians in scotland and wales. for the moment, that is something the government in westminster says is unnecessary and could delay those support payments. what makes you now still want to question it, still want those answers? the more we have found out, the more there is to question. the deeper in we get, we think, what is really behind this? what really happened? people must have seen what was going on, they must have seen that people were watching the haemophiliacs develop aids. why did nobody stop it? thank you for your comments. a
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viewer on facebook says my father died through contaminated blood products and we are still fighting forjustice. jackie products and we are still fighting for justice. jackie says products and we are still fighting forjustice. jackie says the victims of contaminated land... —— blood. later in the programme we'll speak to one politician who's calling for a public inquiry into this. still to come. a life extending breast cancer drug that is deemed too expensive in england is being made available on the nhs in scotland. we'll be getting reaction from patients and campaigners. more people were put to death
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in china last year than in the whole of the rest of the world — that's according to a new report — we'll talk to a former executioner who tells us why he no longer believes in the death penalty. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. more than 900 adult social care workers a day quit theirjob in england last year, according to new figures. of these, 60% left the profession entirely. care providers say that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care, and the uk care association claims the system is "close to collapse". the government says an extra £2 billion is being invested in social care. a309
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a 30 9 —year—old accused of killing 4 people in an attack in stock has accepted his detention. —— 39 —year—old. theresa may and donald trump have agreed there's "a window of opportunity" to persuade russia to abandon its support for the syrian leader, bashar al—assad. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, will travel to moscow later today to meet with his russian counterpart. before that foreign ministers from the g7 group of nations will continue to meet in italy to try to agree a co—ordinated response to events in syria. an eight—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california. the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire in his estranged wife's classroom, before killing himself. a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges. the victims of a scandal in which the nhs used contaminated blood products to treat thousands of patients in the 705 and 805 say a new government support scheme is "shameful".
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under the scheme, the widow of an hiv positive haemophiliac in england could receive tens of thousands of pounds a year less than someone living in wales or scotland. the nhs infected thousands of people, many of them haemophiliacs with hiv and hepatitis in one of the worst scandals in the health service's history. a camp housing 1,500 migrants in northern france has been destroyed by a fire. at least ten people have been injured at the camp, near the port of dunkirk, which was home to mostly iraqi kurds. the blaze was started after a fight between residents, according to a regional official. numbers staying at the camp have grown since the closure of the much largerjungle camp near calais last year. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10am. back to give victoria. inflation figures arejust out,
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back to give victoria. inflation figures are just out, in march, the rate was 2 points 3%, those figures in from the office of national statistics, the same as it was in february, consumer prices inflation, unchanged from the reading in february. here's some sport now with 0lly. the headline this morning, arsenal still 7 points off the top four, suffering their biggest defeat of the season, 3— 0 to crystal palace. arsene wenger says uncertainty over his future isn't affecting players but former player ian wright says he has lost the dressing room. claudio ranieri says he never lost the dressing room at leicester and speaking publicly about his sacking the 1st time he told sky sports there wasn't a revolt but someone else behind—the—scenes might have been working against him. after time—out with an elbow injury andy murray appeared on court playing
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against roger federer and says he might be fit for the start of the clay—court season in monte carlo next week. those are the headlines, i'll be back in about 30 minutes. a life extending breast cancer drug rejected as too expensive for england and wales is going to be made available for patients in scotland. the drug kadcyla can help those with incurable breast cancer, known as her—2, live a little longer, but it's really expensive — around £90,000 a year. and that means nice, the body responsible for deciding which treatments are cost effective for the nhs, has decided it should no longer be available to nhs patients in england and wales from june this year. it's an issue we investigated earlier this year. the amount of good quality time and the amount of time my family expected to have of me has been cut down. it's incredibly unfair, when you are told you have cancer at this
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young age, you think why me, why have i been singled out to get this bad luck? and to be told that a drug is taken away from you could extend your life, it's unfair... a decision by a consultancy means the drug could be available in scotla nd the drug could be available in scotland but not in england and wales. campaigned for kadcyla to be made available. alison tait is a breast cancer patient in edinburgh who has campaigned for kadcyla to be made available. janine brook is a breast cancer patient in nottingham who says kadcyla gave her years of extra quality life. in the studio fiona hazell, director of policy and engagement at the charity breast cancer now. allassani had been campaigning for this, how do you feel. really delighted for the and about the
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outcome. —— alison. we've been able to influence them to give a positive result for women in scotland and hopefully pave the way for something firmer —— similar for women hopefully pave the way for something firmer —— similarfor women in the rest of the uk. the drug is expensive, do you think this is a valid way of spending taxpayers money? i have to say yes, of course, it's like extending for myself, i think you would get a really great a nswer to think you would get a really great answer to that if you asked my daughter or my parents. it absolutely is, the women that i know who suffer from the same type of cancer that i have seen to be fairly young, they have young families, it's not so much about me but it's about my family and children and by terence and absolutely, we need to give them that quality of life for them and for me, it's notjust about myself. i am going to bring in fiona, let's look at how it's being made available in scotland but not england and wales. the scottish
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medicines consortium say and i quote... we were able to accept it on resubmission because the company offered an improved patient access scheme, a confidential discount that im proves scheme, a confidential discount that improves the cost effectiveness of a medicine. we don't know the cause but they've agreed but that is obviously key, isn't it? absolutely. it's great news for women like alison in scotland who suffer from this type of breast cancer, there aren't many options for them, we understand the company has offered significant discounts to make it happen and! significant discounts to make it happen and i think it's important to emphasise that the fmc has listened to the voices of patients and their friends that signed a petition and have listened to the clinicians that wa nt have listened to the clinicians that want to make the drug available because it's effective. —— smc. it gives women like alison many more months and in some cases years with
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their families and as alison says, their families and as alison says, the drug which is targeting the breast cancer that alison has, tends to affect younger women who have families and so this is an important drug for them and it offers limited options. the same deal that has been struck between the company and scotla nd struck between the company and scotland could be struck between the company and the nhs.” scotland could be struck between the company and the nhs. i must emphasise some of the reporting today says kadcyla is not available in england but it is, nice are currently reviewing and appraising whether it should continue to be available. the recommendation from the draft consultation is that it should be withdrawn. the current recommendation is that unless a deal can be done that is what will happen however we know that both nice and comfy working hard to come a deal, we would urge them to work hard and follow the example of the targeted
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in scotland and give women in england and wales and northern ireland the opportunity to access this drug, it's really important for women with breast cancer. jenin, good morning. i gather it's your 40th birthday today. happy birthday. thank you and this is a year that i never thought i would see. thanks to kadcyla, i am never thought i would see. thanks to kadcyla, lam here never thought i would see. thanks to kadcyla, i am here today. never thought i would see. thanks to kadcyla, lam here today. how never thought i would see. thanks to kadcyla, i am here today. how does that feel? amazing. if you asked me several years ago if i would make it to my 40th i would probably say no but the cause of the amount of drugs that i have had, i have benefited from several drugs, 1 taken off the cancer drug front and kadcyla i had an drugs trial and i was on this for over two years and the important thing for me, and many other women, is that without these drugs, you wouldn't get so long, years, and you
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wouldn't get so long, years, and you wouldn't be eligible for drugs trials. it's notjust about kadcyla giving us years or months, it's about what's next, getting there and being there for your family and friends and still surviving. it's actually living with breast cancer and not dying from it that important. you believe kadcyla has given you at least 2 1/2 years extra of your life. the average is 9 months but it's important to know there are women like you who are living for years with that. absolutely, it is. i know quite a pew people who successfully been on this drug for years, and were not talking months, we are talking years of good quality life and i have carried on working, raising my children, i'm going to see important milestones, my eldest daughter go to secondary school and timmy, i still feel well today and this is important, i'm not dying with secondary breast cancer, i'm alive, living, i have reached 40 and i am
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determined i am going to reach 45. do you think the decision in scotla nd do you think the decision in scotland will influence or the deal that's been struck in scotland will influence what could happen in england? i really hope it will. they've only got to look at people like me and other people, to see that it's worth the money, it's not just keeping people here 4 months, it's years. i don't believe you can actually put a price on this at all andl actually put a price on this at all and i really hope this will pave the way to routinely keep kadcyla on the nhs in england and wales. it has to, so nhs in england and wales. it has to, so many people can benefit from this drug and! so many people can benefit from this drug and i feel so passionately about this drug, they need to listen and know that it's not about these months and i hope i'll still be alive in 10 years time because of kadcyla and the years it's given me, to fill that gap to get me onto other drugs and the scientists are working so hard to bring out other targeted drugs that we need to be
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here to see these drugs get licensed and moving forward. nice say they would like to be able to support the routine use of kadcyla on the nhs and we are open to an approach from the company about how they can make this happen, they've been in touch with us and we are arranging a further meeting with them during the consultation period. alison, doctors i think it can't give you an exact prognosis but what does the decision in scotland mean for your future treatment? for me it gives me a great deal of hope and positive outlook for my future at the moment, lam outlook for my future at the moment, iamona outlook for my future at the moment, i am on a different treatment, when that starts to control my disease, the spread the continuation, kadcyla is potentially a drug that be offered to me. this gives me a massive amount of hope, a bit like your last speaker, it's notjust another 5 years down the line but it could be 10 years, that means i
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could be 10 years, that means i could see my daughter's zist, see her get married, the options for me are massive. it's notjust about those months, as your last speaker said it's everything else that comes along with that, the future of other treatments, the testing i could get involved in, trials, developing more and more options to help people survive with this and see it as a critical illness rather than a terminal disease. thank you alison in edinburgh,janine terminal disease. thank you alison in edinburgh, janine brooke in nottingham and fiona. thank you all. coming up, the parents of a desperately ill eight—month—old baby will find out today if he will be taken off life support or allowed to travel to america for experimental treatment. we'll speak to one mother who had to make a we'll speak to one mother who had to makea similar we'll speak to one mother who had to make a similar heartbreaking decision. north korea has warned that it is ready for war.
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its foreign ministry has issued a statement calling america "reckless" and "outrageous" for sending a naval fleet to korean waters. it comes amid growing international concerns over the country's nuclear programme. so could the situation escalate? in a moment we'll speak to a north korean defector, and an expert on the region. but first, let's take a look at what we know about the country. no photos. no photos. we can now speak toji hyun park who is in salford. she's a north korean defector now living in the uk. she escaped in 2004. jean h lee is a global fellow at the woodrow wilson international center for scholars in america. she spent three years in the north korean capital, pyongyang, as bureau chief for the associated press, and joins us now from seoul in south korea. jean h lee, north korea says it will defend itself by powerful force of arms. what do you think that means? the arrival of the strike group to
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korean waters gives the north koreans the excuse to defend themselves. they will use this as an opportunity to test another nuclear device or perhaps test another ballistic missile. it is possible that they won't, but what they do is this rhetoric to sort of bring the people together and give them something to unite around and you know the threat of an outside force or outsider is always something that will bring people together and the north koreans will use this to their advantage. should the west take the rhetoric seriously? we do see this rhetoric seriously? we do see this rhetoric this time of year, every year, this year in particular because it's the 105th anniversary of the founder of the birth of the founder of north korea so they have additional reason to try to rally the people together. you know, one of the things that we're really
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concerned about those of us watching north korea is the pace of the development of ballistic and nuclear missiles. we haven't seen this pace under previous leaders. every time they test launch a missile or an engine they are testing and improving that technology and it gets them closer to being able to put a hydrogen nuclear bomb on a missile that's designed to strike the united states. you know, news inside north cordeeia is tightly controlled. there is one state media broadcasts propaganda, will the people of north korea were aware of these movements by the us naval fleet? aware of these movements by the us navalfleet? can aware of these movements by the us naval fleet? can you explain again? i can't hear you properly. do you think the people inside north korea will be aware that the us naval fleet has moved into the korean
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peninsula? yes, inside north korea, north korea always brain washes and america is the enemy country and the north korean government brain washes the north korean defectors. how seriously do you think we should ta ke seriously do you think we should take north korea's statement that it will defend itself by, "powerful force of arms"? when i lived within north korea, i believed that north korea is a strong country in our world and why we get nuclear wepons and the missiles, but now days i understand it is totally wrong because it is not only america and
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south korea problem, it is a world problem. jean, in terms of north korea's nuclear programme, we have seen korea's nuclear programme, we have seen obviously the testing of various weapons, but how advanced is it? north korea has made these nuclear devices small enough and in the last test they say they had standardised the militarisation of these nuclear bombs which means they may have made a number of them and they may have a number of nuclear bombs at their disposal to continue testing. so aside from the threat of proliferation, not to mention a nuclear attack i would wonder about theissue nuclear attack i would wonder about the issue of nuclear safety and security. this is a country that kicked out international inspectors yea rs kicked out international inspectors years ago so there is nobody really safeguarding this. nobody in the international world really safeguarding and make sure that this highly dangerous nuclear material is being kept safe. ijust wanted to go
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back, these nuclear weapons are something the regime wants their people to be proud of. this is a small, poor country and these nuclear weapons are command the world's attention of the it is happening right now and this is something that they can really parade to their people and tell their people to be proud of. so, at a time when they didn't have enough to eat, they have power shortages, this is something that they can ral yu this is something that they can ral yu around and so for us to understand how much of a part it plays in their propaganda and sort of instilling a sense of pride in the people and that tells us how unwilling they are going to be to give that up. you said it was brain washing. so people have no choice, but to be proud of the nuclear developments in north korea, is that right? yes. when i lived within north korea i lectured about the nuclear weapons. we learned about that and
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the government taught us why we get the government taught us why we get the nuclear weapons, but at that time, ididn't the nuclear weapons, but at that time, i didn't understand that this was, the nuclear weapons were dangerous. but now a days i learned that this one is not only south korea and america problems, so many north korean people, they still believe about that because they don't, they never heard about the outside news and because in north korea it is only one channel tv and the one newspaper and on the news it is always about the propaganda issues and they never write about why we don't use the nuclear weapons. yes, so many people they still don't know that yet. thank you very much, both of you. thank you. thank you for your comments about our first report this morning, thank you for your comments about ourfirst report this morning, the fa ct ourfirst report this morning, the fact that thousands of haemophiliacs and others actually who were
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contaminated with dirty blood when they were treated on the nhs 30 yea rs they were treated on the nhs 30 years ago are waiting forjustice. ronan says, "my family have been torn apart by this. we lost mum in november 2015. we can't move on and we do wantjustice." i will read some more in the next hour in the programme when we talk about it further. let's get the latest weather update with phil. good morning to you. a rather mixed bag of weather across the british isles. it is difficult to know what face to put on for you really. wet and windy in the north. elsewhere, it is really a decent spring day. if you can get yourself far away from the front, the weather looks like that. closer to those weather fronts, farn faring well, if you we re fronts, farn faring well, if you were further north and west again, it will be one of those days. the
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weather front not moving very fast into the middle part of the afternoon of the it is not all doom and gloom. the southern counties of england and wales faring nicely. i'm sure somewhere in the south east could be looking at 15, 16 celsius and possibly 17 celsius. not too much in the way of breeze. generally speaking, as you drift your way towards the weather fronts the cloud increases for the north of england and southern parts of scotland. even here, there will be brightness. that will be in short supply as you can imagine with the wet and windy combination dominating the scene north of the great glen and through the western isles and maybe the northern isles will buck up as the day goes on. through the evening and overnight, we will keep the area of low pressure close by to the north of scotland. notice the number of isobars the wind a feature in the north of scotland throughout the course of the night. during wednesday, that weather front has the good grace to move further south weakening all the while. gardeners if you need rain in the southern counties, this is not the feature for you. a fresher feel and brightness and sunny spells and showers. a word to the wise for
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gardeners, it could be a chilly night, wednesday night into thursday. that's the towns and cities. cooler in the countryside. thursday is a mixture again of a fairamount of dry thursday is a mixture again of a fair amount of dry weather around, but no doubt about it, again it's the north western quarter of the british isles that gets the real peppering of showers if not longer spells of rain. i've changed the day into good friday the we are moving towards the weekend. so no heatwave, but the temperatures not too bad for the time of year. and then into saturday, we've got that area of low pressure still close by to the northern parts of scotland. isobars tightly packed there. so breezy fair, the wind in from the wes and north—west and looking across the piste, it is a day of showers, if not the odd longer spell of rain with sunshine in short supply. so the easter weekend, oh dear, it doesn't start very well, does it? if you hang on in there to easter day, it is looking to be a drier,
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brighter affair across many parts of the british isles. whether we keep it going until monday, you have to wait and see. it's one of the most serious nhs scandals. haemophiliacs are suffering from hepatitis and hiv because they were treated with contaminated blood in the 705 and 805. this programme has learned that a new support scheme will leave some worse off than others. we need to know why this has happened, how did this happen? the more we see, the more we think something could have been done about it, we need those a nswe rs. china executed more people than the rest of the world put together last year — according to a human rights group — we hear from a man who used to administer the death penalty before deciding to campaign against it.
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i have been trying to take a life under very narrow circumstances so taking under very narrow circumstances so taking someone's life was not a foreign notion to me. but i do not believe in taking anyone's life under any circumstance when there are reasonable alternatives. united airlines has just gone through one pr battle over how it treats its customers. now it's facing another... all, my god! oh, my god. we'll be asking how the company can recover its reputation and speaking to a former airline boss about the rise in companies overbooking flights. time for the latest bc news. —— bbc.
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the main suspect in last week's stockholm lorry attack has admitted committing "a terrorist crime". four people died in the attack, and 15 were injured, when a lorry ploughed into a crowded shopping street. the lawyer for rakhmat akilov, a 39—year—old uzbek, told a court hearing in stockholm that his client ‘confesses to a terrorist crime and accepts his detention.‘ more than 900 adult social care workers a day quit theirjob in england last year, according to new figures. of these, 60% left the profession entirely. care providers say that growing staff shortages mean vulnerable people are receiving poorer levels of care, and the uk care association claims the system is "close to collapse". the government says an extra two billion pounds is being invested in social care. the uk inflation rate has remained
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sta ble the uk inflation rate has remained stable partly the uk inflation rate has remained sta ble partly tha nks the uk inflation rate has remained stable partly thanks to the fall in the pound and the brexit ford which has raised import prices. —— brexit fold. theresa may and donald trump have agreed there's "a window of opportunity" to persuade russia to abandon its support for the syrian leader, bashar al—assad. the us secretary of state, rex tillerson, will travel to moscow later today to meet with his russian counterpart. before that foreign ministers from the g7 group of nations will continue to meet in italy to try to agree a co—ordinated response to events in syria. an 8—year—old child and his teacher have been killed after a shooting at a school in california. the gunman went into the school in san bernardino yesterday and opened fire in his estranged wife's classroom, before killing himself. a second pupil is in a critical condition after being shot by the man, who police say had a criminal history, including domestic violence and weapons charges. a camp housing fifteen hundred migrants in northern france has been
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destroyed by a fire. at least 10 people have been injured at the camp, near the port of dunkirk, which was home to mostly iraqi kurds. the blaze was started after a fight between residents, according to a regional official. numbers staying at the camp have grown since the closure of the much larger ‘jungle' camp near calais last year. the victims of a scandal in which the nhs used contaminated blood products to treat patients in the 705 and 805 the government support scheme is shameful. under the scheme the widow of an hiv—positive haemophiliac in england could receive tens of thousands of pounds a year< receive tens of thousands of pounds ayear
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wa nt 36 and there is no justice and we want a full public inquiry. —— i am a victim. if you are getting in touch, you are welcome. these are the ways to get in touch, you can see them at the bottom of your screen. here is 0llie with the sport. ian wright says arsen wenger has lost the dressing room, the gunners slumping to their biggest league defeat of the season losing 3-0at league defeat of the season losing 3— 0 at crystal palace, remaining 7 points off the top four. —— arsene wenger. he still won't reveal what decision he has made about his future but says the uncertainty isn't a fact the players. future but says the uncertainty isn't a fact the playerslj future but says the uncertainty isn't a fact the players. i face that in every press conference, tonight i am not in the mood to speak about that. when do you think you will. .. speak about that. when do you think you will... i think at the moment, i
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paid more respect to the fact that it isa paid more respect to the fact that it is a disappointing result and focus on that and not find as well excuses but i am not excusing... claudio ranieri said he never lost the dressing room at leicester and the dressing room at leicester and the rumoured players revolt wasn't to blame for his sacking. speaking publicly put the 1st time about his dismissal in february the italian says someone dismissal in february the italian says someone might have been working behind—the—scenes to push him out but not the players. they delivered the premier league title just 9 months earlier. finally it was only a charity match but there was a welcome return for andy murray last night. the world number1 who missed the past month with an elbow injury was playing in z rich against roger federer, he lost the match, it was all very light—hearted, but he's announced he could be said for the start of the clay—court season which is next week in monte carlo! that is all for now. i will be back later. 6
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minutes past 10, good morning. thousands of people infected with hiv and hepatitis as a result of nhs treatment in the 19705 and 805. dozens of pupils were infected at a school in hampshire, treated with dirty blood, 72 of them have since died, theirfamilies dirty blood, 72 of them have since died, their families still seeking decades later a public inquiry into the scandal, how it happened and why. now victims tell this programme a new support scheme planned by the government could leave many struggling to pay mortgages and bills. under the scheme the widow of an hiv—positive in the philly act in england could receive tens of thousands of pounds a year less and someone thousands of pounds a year less and someone living in wales or scotland. 0ur reporterjim reid has spoken to 3 people affected by the scandal, we brought you the full film earlier but here's a short extract. just
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appear on the left... carry on. lee is 48 and a haemophiliac, a condition which means blood doesn't clot properly. this is his 1st tv interview, some of his close family don't know he's been hiv—positive since childhood. i went to a normal school at the age of 11, they thought it would be better if i was sent to boarding school for physically handicapped people. it's a college based in hampshire. he was 1ofa a college based in hampshire. he was 1 of a large number of young haemophiliacs sent here in the early 805, 72 of those boys have now died after being given a new drug meant to improve their lives. there is no suggestion the school was to blame for what happened. suggestion the school was to blame for what happenedlj suggestion the school was to blame for what happened. i was told i'd been infected with hiv and they didn't know how long i would have left because there was no known cure. you were 16, 17 at the time? do you remember your reaction? cure. you were 16, 17 at the time? do you remember your reaction7m was kind of shock, obviously, dykes
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and being told they had cancer, that's what it felt like me. at the start of the 19705 there was hope haemophiliacs, a drug called factor 8 but there was a major problem, britain on imports from america and their prisoners were paid to donate blood, this just as the hiv virus started to take hold. the effect on families like this has been devastating. haemophilia is a genetic condition, women carried the fa u lty genetic condition, women carried the faulty gene but it's almost always the male side that is affected. tony was just 14 when his dad the male side that is affected. tony wasjust 14 when his dad barry, a haemophiliac, died from aids. things started to get bad within the family group custer was unwell. i couldn't go home so social services were contacted and i was placed in care. i was 13 years old when i was placed in care, they destroyed my dad with this virus and they watched stanley
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crumble. a major concern now is a new financial support scheme for big arms and their families, new financial support scheme for big arms and theirfamilies, the government says it is doubling the amount it spending since 2015 but you've seen documents showing under new plans the worst affected will get thousands of pounds less than 1st promised, any could see payments falling. 26 years ago sue and bob we re falling. 26 years ago sue and bob were pa rt of falling. 26 years ago sue and bob were part of a landmark bbc documentary about hiv. as a family, a couple, individuals, it meant everything we planned for went out the window. sue has spent the last 25 years as a campaigner, pushing the government to explain what happened to her husband and others like him. the more we found out, the deeper in we get, we think, my god, what is really behind this? they must have seen that they were watching haemophiliacs develop aids but why didn't anyone stop it? we
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ask the department of health for an interview but they said no. we can speak to two survivors of the blood contamination scandal, mark who is talking to us from his bed and andy, both infected with hiv when treated as children for their haemophilia, and eat when he was 5, mark when he was 7. baroness meacher is here as well. calling for a public inquiry. thank you also much for talking to us. thank you also much for talking to us. mark, it you are in bed as a direct result of the effect of hiv, is that correct? yes and no, it's the haemophilia impacted by the hiv. explain to our audience what it's like 4 years, living with this? it's like 4 years, living with this? it's like you are constantly walking around with somebody pointing a loaded gun to your head under this dark cloud. because, why? because of
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the stories that were coming out of the stories that were coming out of the united states as well as here in the united states as well as here in the uk and peoples homes being attacked, you lived in constant fear. when we were told, the doctors discussed hiv with my parents, because i was too young, they basically said to them in so many words, don't tell anybody that doesn't need to know. because we can't guarantee your safety. because of the stigma surrounding hiv? yes, in the early days of the aids crisis, we are talking, broad panic, ididn't crisis, we are talking, broad panic, i didn't know if i was going to be able to go to school, my parents had to meet with the headmaster and some of the school trustees. to even allow me to continue schooling. what is the issue today for you, now? the
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issueis is the issue today for you, now? the issue is we've never been told why or how this happened. and if i could ta ke or how this happened. and if i could take 1 or how this happened. and if i could take1 moment, or how this happened. and if i could take 1 moment, i or how this happened. and if i could take1 moment, iwas or how this happened. and if i could take1 moment, i was born in 1969 but in 1958, doctor garrett alan warned about the use of mass food blood products and he turned the phrase the prison effect because they were using what he deemed as skid row donors. there are was warnings 11 years before i was born, many, warnings 11 years before i was born, any warnings 11 years before i was born, many, many years before i even came to get factor a treatment there have been deaths within haemophilia, they knew the treatment was potentially fatal because of hepatitis viruses, hepatitis b was already being flagged up by other programmes and haemophiliacs had died before again,
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i got the treatment. but they still went ahead and used it and... you need to know why? yes. we are potentially looking at now, over 2000 haemophiliacs die, almost the equivalent of 5 jumbo jets. 2000 haemophiliacs die, almost the equivalent of 5jumbo jets. if 1 jumbojet equivalent of 5jumbo jets. if 1 jumbo jet crashed today they would be an investigation of the finest detail to make sure it never happens again. but with the haemophiliac community experian much like with the contempt they have always shown for us, well, because they are all dead, they are haemophiliacs, they are expensive and i quote... we are cheaper than chimpanzees to experiment on. if! may, we have got visitors from many people affected andi visitors from many people affected and i want to read some if i may be for hearing from andy and baroness meacher. nigel posted, i have severe haemophilia v and i was infected
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with hepatitis c when i was 14, i'm 52 and! with hepatitis c when i was 14, i'm 52 and i want to know who allowed me to be infected by contaminated blood, i want to know by the government says there is no need for a public inquiry, i need to know the truth. ross and says... i have a severe bleeding disorder and i was infected with hepatitis c multiple times as a child, i was 19, now i'm 43 but my life has been devastated by the treatment. i have health issues that i cannot overcome and mentally i've been traumatised time and time again, notjust by the virus itself but by the lack of respect shown by the government over the years. when will this disaster be properly investigated ? the years. when will this disaster be properly investigated? andy on facebook, i am 1 of the original haemophiliacs infected with hiv and hepatitis c and i can't even begin to explain how it grew and my life, having aids in 1984 pretty well finished any possibility of a normal life. andy, you contracted hepatitis
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cand hiv life. andy, you contracted hepatitis c and hiv after receiving contaminated blood for haemophilia. through an intravenous injection administered at home. what has it been like living with both those conditions for all this time? shane you were conditions for all this time? shane you we re a conditions for all this time? shane you were a boy? indeed, ist of all because of the nature of haemophilia and the way that treatment was pulled it would have been several injections over a period of time and i would have been exposed to both of the viruses, each time i had a treatment. 3 or 4 times a week. so it could have been my mother that gave that to me and you can imagine how that might make a parent feel or it could have been myself when i was at the age of 5, i was trained to give myself intravenous injections so give myself intravenous injections soi give myself intravenous injections so i may have infected myself multiple times. i didn't find out about my internet until i was 13, my parents told me, they didn't find out until 2 or 3 years after the
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doctors knew i was infected. that information was kept from them. but during the time i didn't know, i was visiting the children's hospital in birmingham. and a lot of other people, haemophiliacs, were coming alongside me and! by people, haemophiliacs, were coming alongside me and 1 by 1, they were not coming any more. and i found out that was because! by not coming any more. and i found out that was because 1 by 1, they were dying. and they were dying of aids. and we are talking children from 3 until 16. all of them dying of aids. we heard mark say he wants to know how and why this happened. what do you know about why it happened? we know that the united states was using blood plasma that came from skid row donors. people who would
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have lied and were in need of money and would have lied on their forms to say they were clean of these infections and risky practises. we know that plasma was anonymised when the united states found this was going on. it was routed through canada and exported across the world, notjust to canada and exported across the world, not just to the canada and exported across the world, notjust to the uk, but canada and exported across the world, not just to the uk, but all around the world. and that's why there are so many, this scandal is a worldwide scandal. it was coming from those donors, despite warnings as mark has already said, decades previously and in the run—up to these infections. despite those warnings, it was continued to be used and for whatever reason, people we re used and for whatever reason, people were not told the true risks of it. if it is a worldwide scandal, which it is, why are people not shouting about this? i think it's because in
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some countries it has been shouted about. i think in your report there, it was shown that one of the ex—prime ministers in france was held up on a count of manslaughter because of it. injapan there was an inquiry and leaders forced it apologise to haemophiliacs there. but in this country, it has been swe pt but in this country, it has been swept under the carpet over and over again and because we're dying, at a rate at the moment of something like one a month, as opposed to in a large group all at one time, it can be brushed aside. it's not seen as the massive, massive scandal that it actually is. baroness what would you like theresa may's government to do? it is essential at this point, i think, that she asks for a public inquiry. it has never happened overall these yea rs, it has never happened overall these years, while these people have been dying, month by month, and people have been so badly recognise come
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penced. they have never been compensated and the sort of money that they receive leaves them at the poverty level and the new scheme that the government is now bringing in reduces people's income, people with hiv for example, they have been receiving £19,000 to £25,000 a year depending on the family size and they're going down now to £155 un, can you imagine what that means to people who are very sick, who have had a lifetime of misery and ill—health? then to be told, sorry, we're going to reduce your income. in scotland people will be receiving £37,000 a year. how is it this country, well off, rich country, can be so cruel to some very sick people who are only sick because of errors made by the nhs and government? the department of health says this was an unprecedented tragedy. we're continuing to work closely with those affected to make sure the right support is in police for them. we have more than doubled our annual
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spend on payments to people affected since 2015. committing an additional £125 million as well as providing an annual payment to all infected individuals. we are consulting on new measures? that assessment of money doesn't take account at all as i understand of it the mac far land trust moneys. we have to look at what is happening to the individuals. people are going to be very, very much worse off, not a bit worse off, 0k, they may get some discretionary payments on top of the £15,500, for example, but we know what happens when governments have discretionary payments and the budget is tight. the fact is those discretionary payments don't come through. the government have cancelled the promise of additional money from 2018. just cancelled it. what are they going to do about the discretionary payments? we have got to have in my view, a public inquiry that gets underneath what exactly
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happened, how could doctors continue feeding this contaminated blood into sick people when they already knew that people were becoming extremely ill with hiv and hepatitis c, a p pa re ntly ill with hiv and hepatitis c, apparently because of the blood they had been given and so on and then it goes on from there, governments not being completely honest about what happened and giving guidance saying it is ok, this is risk—free and so on. the saga has continued. yes, for decades. trisha on facebook says, "i lost my dad in 1998 through going contaminated with hoich and help tie sis c. he was only 55. he found out his infected status through a letter. a disgraceful way to be informed. there does need to be a public inquiry. "stacey says, "my husband is a co infected and was
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told at the age of 18, that he would die. he's 47 now and each year he is suffering." abbey says, "i find it totally disgusting. so many people's lives have been destroyed by this mistake by the nhs. an organisation we're supposed to rely on and we haven't had a public inquiry 30 yea rs haven't had a public inquiry 30 years later." we will see what happens and continue to report on this. thank you very much. thank you, mark, thank you for coming on the programme. you're welcome. still to come, a report from amnesty says the number of executions around the world is falling. we'll be speaking to someone who administered the death penalty before turning into a campaigner against it. the parents of a very sick baby boy will find out later today whether a judge has decided if the child's life support machine will be switched off. eight—month—old charlie gard suffers from an extremely rare muscle wasting condition and severe brain damage. his family want to take him to a hospital in america and have raised more than £1.2 million to cover the costs.
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but doctors say further treatment is not in his best interest. the fact that they can't reach agreement is why the case is being heard in the high court. a judge will announce his decision at 2pm this afternoon. we spoke to charlie gard's mum and dad last month. he can do slight movements. he can move his mouth and his hands and his fingers and eyes. he can't open them fully, but he can still open his eyes and see us and he responds to us. we don't feel he's in pain at all. we wouldn't say he's suffering, you know. he's obviously not got the same life of another seven—month—old baby, but you know we deserve, what we're asking for is something that can make him betterment if we were going to court to either end care or to leave him how he is, you know, we
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know that's not a life for the long—term, but it's having something out there which can, you know, improve him and give him a better quality of life and hopefully make him better is the reason why we're still sitting here fighting now. halfs that like when you found out there was a really big fundamental difference of opinion, chris? well, it's difficult. we feel like we've been fighting for a long time. it seems like we've been fighting since the day we found out charlie was ill, you know. but at the end of the day, we just want him to ill, you know. but at the end of the day, wejust want him to be begin the chance because you're never going to find treatments or cures for these things. if you never try anything, you know. these aren't, what we're asking to give him are not poisons, they are naturally occurring compounds that me and you can produce and unfortunately, he is deficient in them and he can't produce them himself. so you know, there is no real known side—effects to these medications. so i kind of
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think the whole time has been why not try? we can talk now to niki cunningham whose son harry was born in 2012. he was starved of oxygen and was left severely brain damaged. she had to make a decision to turn her son's life support machine off after just 26 hours. we can also talk to emma nottingham. she is a member of the institute of medical ethics‘ research committee and is a lecturer in child law at the university of winchester. nikki, tell us a bill bit about your baby boy harry and the condition he was in? so, harry had a very normal pregnancy. everything was fine up until the point of delivery. whilst i was labouring, he suffered quite a heavy bleed and at the time they thought that was my blood. things sort of delayed and when he was
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born, by caesarean section he was really grey and lifeless and had been starved of oxygen for so long that basically his brain had started to shutdown and along with a number of his organs as well. so he was taken off to the neo—natal unit to try and try any kind of treatment that was available to see if there was anything they could do to reverse the sort of brain damage that had happened. how did you reach the decision to switch his life support off? well, so, in the 26 hours that he was alive, the doctors had tried so many different things. they had been calling up different universities, speaking to other specialists in this field and when they realise that had actually everything wa they we re that had actually everything wa they were trying was not improving his condition at all, and all of the tests were coming back and showing that actually instead of seeing improvements things were declining, it sort of became apparent that
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there wasn‘t going to be any sort of life expectancy for harry and that if he was to carry on living then he would literally just if he was to carry on living then he would literallyjust being sustained as he was and you know he was unable to, he had cerebral palsy, he was blind, he was deaf, he was never going to be able to eat or swallow his own fluids. he was never going to be able to breathe by himself. the prognosis was very grim and when my husband and i spoke about what we should do for harry, we both agreed that if the doctors came to us and said you know, "it‘s time to start make ago decision about what you wa nt to make ago decision about what you want to do" then we would know that was the time to start doing the right thing and the most loving and caring thing for harry and not for us. we wanted for him to be co mforta ble us. we wanted for him to be comfortable and to feel love at all times and to be in control of his passing rather than have him die on the equipment away from his parents.
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we really wanted for him to, you know, have that moment of love and we we re know, have that moment of love and we were able to let him die in my arms whilst giving him a cuddle so that he was never, you know, left alone to die. that he would be, you know, with his family and surrounded with love. incredibly difficult and heartbreaking decision. let me bring emma nottingham in. charlie gard‘s pa rents emma nottingham in. charlie gard‘s pa re nts wa nt emma nottingham in. charlie gard‘s parents want to keep him alive. the doctors say it is not in his best interests to go for further treatment in the states. how on earth does a judge make this decision. that what judge earth does a judge make this decision. that whatjudge has earth does a judge make this decision. that what judge has to do a really, really difficultjob here. so what he has got to do is really try and remove himself from any of the emotive angles of the case and look at all of the circumstances that are before him. so he will look at the arguments that are being made both by the medical professionals and by charlie's parents and he will
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then have to weigh up what he thinks is in charlie's best interests which is in charlie's best interests which is really, really difficult to do because there is an element of subjectivity with that. what is in one child's best interests is not necessarily going to be the same as what would be in another child's best interests. so the judge is going to have to make that decision because the doctors and the parents have not been able to come to an agreement here. if thejudge‘s decision agreement here. if the judge‘s decision goes against charlie‘s parents wishes, could they appeal? potentially they could appeal. i think that that's probably unlikely in this situation. however, there is the potential that they could appeal the decision. charlie‘s parents have effectively pleaded with thejudge charlie‘s parents have effectively pleaded with the judge to, "give him a chance." that is, you know, we‘re all human beings, evenjudges, that‘s really ha rd
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all human beings, evenjudges, that‘s really hard when he has got to remain as objective as possible and look at the evidence. it's unbelievably difficult. as a judge he is going to have to act in a professional capacity but the unique angle of this case and the tragedy that might be inevitable, depending on his decision, is a real responsibility and the fact that it's taken out of charlie's parents hands and it's even out of the hands of the medical professionals, it's in the hands of the judge, it's a toughjob he in the hands of the judge, it's a tough job he has in the hands of the judge, it's a toughjob he has to do. nikki, who did you turn to for advice? we listened to harry‘s doctors actually because they had tried so many different things and they explained to us that harry‘s quality of life wasn‘t going to be, he wasn‘t going to live a normal life at all and we wa nted to live a normal life at all and we wanted for him surrounded with love
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and all of those things. sorry, my dog had —— my daughter hasjust come tojoin us. we dog had —— my daughter hasjust come to join us. we wanted to dog had —— my daughter hasjust come tojoin us. we wanted to make dog had —— my daughter hasjust come to join us. we wanted to make sure that harry was always going to be, have his best interests and we, the doctors, they were the ones that you best, we really did go with their opinion on that. and with july to introduce your daughter to us? this is florence, florence is our baby that came after harry, she‘s wary special, and she understands all of harry‘s story, she knows that this is important. thank you very much florence and nikki for coming on the programme. we appreciated. goodbye! emma, thank you so much. the human rights group,
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amnesty international, says there has been a sharp drop in the use of the death penalty around the world. but they estimate more people were put to death in china last year than in the whole of the rest of the world. it‘s an estimate because china classifies it as a state secret so doesn‘t release official figures. for the first time america has fallen below the top 5 list of countries which carry out the most executions but the state of arkansas is about to execute 7 people over the next 11 days before a controversial drug goes out of date at the end of this month. this next film looks at the number and methods of executions around the world — you may not want young children to watch it. earlier we spoke to frank thompson a former executioner from oregon in the united states. he told us what his job used to involve. immediately before the actual execution you have a team of personnel who goad to the execution
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room and notify the individual that it‘s time, sometimes no more than just that it said. its time. —— who go to. you escort the individual into the room, with them on the gurney and you have in most insta nces, gurney and you have in most instances, what you call a tie—down tea m instances, what you call a tie—down team that secures the individual to the gurney to make them, for all practical purposes, in mobile but you don‘t want to hurt anyone. practical purposes, in mobile but you don't want to hurt anyone. sorry to interrupt, can i ask you what a gurneyis? to interrupt, can i ask you what a gurney is? it's like a hospital bed, i guess that‘s the best i can describe. and execution gurney... a hospital bed with platforms extending on either side of the bed, but the arms can‘t rest on and be
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secured by straps, it‘s not always a gurney. for many, many years there are weren‘t gurney is but you have modern contraptions, are weren‘t gurney is but you have modern contra ptions, construction are weren‘t gurney is but you have modern contraptions, construction is now, that it‘s like a bed, and adjustable bed, the industry is still referred to often times as the gurney. once the inmate is tied down, what happens? you have a team of individuals who are in most insta nces, of individuals who are in most instances, trained to insert the intravenous into a viable vein, in many instances both veins, in the event that 1 of the things does many instances both veins, in the event that1 of the things does not work well. and the officiating warden, superintendent, after all the arrangements have been made,
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after the inmate has been secured down and after the needles having placed into the veins, a signal is given for the execution to begin. and the lethal fluids begin flowing into the person whose demise is a pa rt into the person whose demise is a part of the protocol. you have done this twice. yes. can you tell us how on each occasion the inmate to be had, reacted, in the minutes and seconds counting down to their death? it sounds sort of insensitive and cold—blooded, i guess. to describe the two that i witnessed as
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being either book. and in large parts, the experiences i had, i had two individuals who volunteered their execution and by volunteering, imean, their execution and by volunteering, i mean, these two individuals had gotten tired, weary of life on death row and they asked to be executed. so there were not a lot of the amp attentions and lashing and clawing as many people sometimes expect. these were very corporative individuals who were almostjust short of very tranquil. and the two executions i was a part of, not
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speaking of the emotion and pressures that might have been involved, they went according to plan. in both. what is your few, now, of what you did then?” supported the death penalty for many, supported the death penalty for any supported the death penalty for many, many years, in fact, supported the death penalty for many, many years, infact, i supported the death penalty for many, many years, in fact, i was asked as a part of my being qualified to take the position as superintendent, whether or not i could conduct an execution and am a product of civil rights days back in the deep south, when civil rights workers were being murdered for demonstrating to get their constitutional rights to attend public facilities or get their voting rights. and there were people in my community, these civil rights workers were murdered and there were people in my community who felt that the perpetrators against these civil rights workers deserved a just,
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social sanction. the murderers were gruesome, as a child, as a young person, 13, 14, 15, i began nurturing the idea that some fire on the continuum of justice, nurturing the idea that some fire on the continuum ofjustice, maybe the death penalty had a place. as i became older and moved into law enforcement, i accepted became older and moved into law enforcement, iaccepted it, tolerated it, realising that it had significant flaws as many other of the institutions of our country had flaws but hopefully over time it would keep working at it, we would get it right or get it to be, you know, a morejust says. so i never. . . know, a morejust says. so i never... sorry to interrupt. what was it about the fact that you witnessed two of these executions, you oversold, but contributed to you changing your view on the death penalty? it wasn't by seeing the
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executions itself that changed me. when i started, when i was in arkansas, there was an execution of a guy arkansas, there was an execution of a guy by arkansas, there was an execution of a guy by the name of ricky ray rector who was mentally, severely mentally deficient. and is internationally known about his execution. governor bill clinton came back to arkansas to oversee the execution. while he was being executed they could hear him complaining about them not being able to find his fame, witnesses could hear him moaning, they could hear him assisting them in finding the vein. this was so traumatic to 1 star person, that staff person resigned after that execution. i was a warden in arkansas when that happened, when i came to oregon which had not had an execution in 32
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yea rs, which had not had an execution in 32 years, i had this vividly in my mind, this happened in 1992. and when i was asked to conduct the 1st execution in 1996, i had this gruesome incident from arkansas in the back of my mind. and my staff, i was really concerned about my staff. and i realised, that i was training decent men and women into the act of taking the life of a human being in the name of a public policy that could not be shown to work. i had been trained to take a life under very narrow circumstances. so taking someone‘s life was not a foreign notion to me. but i do not believe in taking anyone‘s life under any circumstance when there are reasonable alternatives and the reasonable alternatives and the
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reasonable alternatives and the reasonable alternative is life without the possibility of parole. frank thompson who used to carry out, excuse me, executions in the united states. let‘s talk to our next guest. kate allen, director of amnesty international, who has released today‘s figures is with me. how do you know who is in the top 5 and it comes to executions, particularly when the country at the top, china, is so secret. china is particularly secretive and any information about the use of the death penalty in china is a state secret. but we monitor what is happening, we are entered with people within china. there is a long history of the use of the death penalty, so we are confident to say that in china we are talking about thousands of people who are executed. in 1 year? in! thousands of people who are executed. in 1 year? in 1 year. they are in the thousands, any for up to 10,000 ina are in the thousands, any for up to 10,000 in a year. and then the other four countries... what is due monitor to get the figures? there are still use paper and media
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coverage, there are organisations that we are in touch with, there is a way of monitoring and understanding some of those numbers, but to really be accurate about them, we would need the chinese authorities to stop treating this like a state secret and be open and accountable for the numbers they are executing. do you know some of the reasons behind the thousands of executions? there are over 40 different crimes that attract the death penalty, the obvious ones, but also, corruption, use of drugs, drug—related offences, a range of issues that can attract the death penalty, an extraordinary array of ways in which you can be sentenced to death. also in the top 5, iran, iraq, saudi arabia and pakistan, no longer at the united states in those top few countries. you don‘t accept
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this but what can you do to try to either reduce the numbers are persuaded country to change their mind on this issue? we have persuaded countries to change their mind, friendly started campaigning about the death penalty in the 705 there were 16 countries come today it‘s there were 16 countries come today it's 104. i there were 16 countries come today it‘s 104. i feel and we all feel at amnesty international that progress is too slow but it‘s absolutely progress and we are moving in that direction, if you take the 5 countries you mentioned, they are responsible for 90% of the executions that take place in the world and we will continue to campaign to see the end of the death penalty. it‘s good to see the united states out of those 5, there were 20 executions last year in the states but some of that is about the inability to access the lethal drugs that they used to kill people with. so there‘s been a kind of chipping away at the ways in which the death
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penalty is implemented. let me ask you finally about what is about to happen in arkansas in the united states. 0ver happen in arkansas in the united states. over a period of 11 days, 8 executions are scheduled, in order it would seem, not to waste a particular drug that will expire at the end of april. yes. executions are being organised because of the sell by date of the lethal injection that will be used. it‘s being —— and it is shocking. some people in arkansas who will be, may well be executed, were sentenced to death 20- 30 executed, were sentenced to death 20— 30 years ago, some are now severely mentally ill, paranoid schizophrenic, other issues, it‘s appalling to see this and we are campaigning hard to see whether we can stop those executions. so what you see, there have been the use of lethal injections where it has taken people two hours or more to die and
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that‘s where we have been moving to stop the use of lethal injections and why arkansas is, it seems, determined to implement these executions before that sell by date expires. thank you. next this morning, further allegations of abuse carried out by a leading barrister who ran christian summer camps in the early 19805. john smyth is accused of carrying out a series of brutal assaults on pupils from winchester college. it‘s a story first broken by channel 4 news, but now the bbc has now been told that smyth also recruited one of his victims and asked him to administer further beating to his friends. that pupil is now the head teacher of a prep school in buckinghamshire. this report from fiona lamdin contains some graphic content. i think i was probably beaten about 3,000 times, but i can only remember one stroke.
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it was only when he hit me that i suddenly realised the full horror of it. 22 young men brainwashed and then beaten in what victims now describe as a religious cult. john smyth, a leading qc, infiltrated britain‘s oldest school, persuading teenage boys that his violent could purge them of their sins. i amjohn smyth, the director of the justice alliance. andy was only 14, a pupil at winchester college in 1975, when the grooming started. he remembers going back tojohn smyth‘s former home. in twos or threes, best friends, we would
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go out to his house, we would have a proper sunday roast, we would play silly games in the garden. the school food then was absolutely shocking, so this was like a home away from home. in some ways it was more of a home away from home, we were quite detached from our parents, they were not able to see us very often. less than two years later, he was accepting regular and violent beatings in his garden shed. sojohn smyth had every single bandage, dressing, iodine, everything that had been invented, but even though he had all that equipment, i call it paraphernalia, we were bleeding everywhere. even with these dressings on,
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wearing these adult nappies. we bled all over his house. john smyth was like a father figure to me. if you had asked me at the time, i would have said i loved him like i loved my father. he made me a godfather to one of his children. he brought me into his family in that way. why would i hit back against someone who has made me a godfather to their child? who i already think of as a father figure? and now do you think it was part of his plan? definitely. wouldn't you ? as the years went by, these schoolboys became young men. they moved on to university, but the beatings continued. now too physicalfor one man
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on his own, smyth needed to recruit a right—hand man from within the group. he asked simon doggett, one of his victims, to start beating his best friends. one of their victims didn‘t want to speak on camera but told us his story for the first time. john smyth beat me first, appallingly, with his usual force, and then simon doggett took over while he watched. i recall the brutality of his beating. far, far worse thanjohn smyth. there was no discussion, no emotion, just a fit sportsman using all his force. then it was over, the dressings were applied, we drove back to cambridge, me sitting on a rubber ring. simon came around and checked dressings, then it was over. this was going to be the new regime. the bbc has been handed nine hours of recordings left unheard for 20 years, which revealed the full extent of the abuse. on one occasion a victim was subjected to 800 lashes, which
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lasted over 12 hours. the victims were left disfigured. i cannot remember, but it went on all day. a decade after the beatings finished, three victims recorded their story. in the afternoon i was asleep, then it started again. it was dark by the time it ended. simon and he took it in turns. john smyth beat me for maybe 50 strokes, and then he would be exhausted, and at that point simon doggett beat me for i don't know how many strokes. andy remembers every last detail of the shed. it helps him to put it on paper. the strokes he gave me were probably the equivalent of three strokes ofjohn's. simon was completely brainwashed. i think even then, i sensed
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it was not my friend beating me, that it was actually john smyth beating me, using my friend to carry out his abuse. simon doggett is the headmaster of caldicott prep school in bucks. he has been in charge for nearly 20 years. he has told us he is now critically ill and is unable to respond. there is no suggestion that he has ever harmed any of his pupils. but simon doggett was not the only onejohn smyth tried to recruit. he tried to persuade me to beat other people. i told him i could not do that. he was asking lots of people to beat other people. what did he say to you? he said, "andy, this
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is talking about steps, going from 30 beatings to 50 to 100, the next step is, you need to start beating people." i had 400 non—stop. they had two canes. whenjohn got tired, he motioned for simon to come in, and simon came in without missing a beat. police tell us they are investigating, butjohn smyth is still a free man, living in south africa, and simon doggett a headmaster, now critically ill, yet to give an account of his past. you can see more on that story on the six o clock news on bbc one tonight. now when it comes to customer relations this is clearly not the way to do it. a warning, you may find images of the way this united airlines passenger was treated distressing. the world‘s leading airline. flyer
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friendly. screaming every thought... screaming 0h screaming oh my god. 0h screaming oh my god. oh my god. 0h screaming oh my god. oh my god. oh my god. 0h no! every movement. oh my god, what are you doing? no! carefully planned, co—ordinated and synchronised. oh my god, look at what you're doing to him. 0h synchronised. oh my god, look at what you're doing to him. oh my god. performing together with a single united purpose. no, this is wrong. look at what you're doing to him. 0h my god. 0h my god. oh my god. good work. way to go.
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that‘s what makes the world‘s leading airline flyer—friendly. i have to go home. i have to go home. united airlines has now apologised after that passenger was clearly hurt while being dragged screaming from his seat on a flight from chicago that had been overbooked. this passenger on the flight spoke to the bbc on the condition of anonymity. the guy that came from, i don‘t know who he was, some airport authority of some sort, was very was calm about it. wasn‘t rude. wasn‘t even forceful. i think it was almost kind he was just there to intimidate and say "look, you need to come off", but he didn‘t use force. there was another officer that came on and then another man who that you have seen in the video, the one with the hat and the jeans,
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he had a badge, but you know, it‘s probably helpful to say who you are as an authority figure before you kind ofjust start yanking people out of seats. with me now is ronke lawal. she‘s a marketing consultant and founder of ariatu pr. how bad is this? exceptionally bad, victoria. the statement from the ceo wasn‘t good enough. he apologised to the team or he seemed to make it more about united airlines than the individual concerned and what they should have done was made it about that individual, notjust the individual and the customers who we re individual and the customers who were on the flight and actually people who were just watching. we are in an age of social media and people were filming and even i watched it, even as i watch it now, it was traumatising and scary. we weren‘t sure what was happening, who was this guy? now we are finding out who he is, as we have seen with the incidents around the world, it could
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have been more serious, it was law enforcement, not necessarily united airlines staff and the officer has been placed on leave. so they have conducted, they have done their own brand reputation management, but the airline itself, i still don‘t think they have managed it well. there was an odd apology, apartial apology, mostly worrying about united airlines staff rather than the guy. what should they do now? find a way of speaking to the guy directly. there is a lot of reputation management to be done. a few weeks ago, there was the leggings ins didn‘t which is not as serious as this. and just really get that brand loyalty back. it will take a lot though because this footage is triggering. it‘s exceptionally violent. it will take a lot. i mean even reducing fares won‘t be enough. you have to build that trust, get people together and make them feel like they will be safe in the hands of united. it will make more than an
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apology and reduction in fares. what is it then? well, it will take people coming out out the ceo being direct and more open and apologetic to the consumers and the customers. thank you. 0n the programme tomorrow — an exclusive interview with pauline cafferkey — the nurse infected with ebola in sierra leone who‘ll tell us her plans for the future. hello. as you know i‘m an optimist by nature so i‘ve got a cheery sphere behind me. that will do for the weather across the southern half of the british isles. further north, there is a frontal system bringing cloud, win and rain to the north and the north—west of scotland. certainly for the north—west of scotla nd certainly for the north—west of scotland and the western isles, that
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is where it will stay for the greater part of the afternoon. further east and south, well, once you get away from the front, there is the prospect of dry, fine weather in the south. top temperature 17 celsius. 0vernight, and too late for many of you, that frontal system will quit the north—west of scotland. not just as will quit the north—west of scotland. notjust as cold a night as we have seen of late. temperatures in single figures and then we are off and running into wednesday. a band of cloud by the time we get into the southern counties of england and wales. further north, a warm enough day at ten or 11 celsius with the combination of sunny showers and thursday much the same thing. a lot of cloud. a bit of breeze and some sunshine. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11:
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the france foreign minister said there has been no agreement on sanctions against russia and syria, as us secretary of state prepares to fly to moscow. the main suspect in the lorry attack in sweden appears in court, admitting to carrying out a terrorist act. more than 900 adult social care workers a day quit their job in england last year. as revealed by new figures. a housing 1500 migrants in northern france has been destroyed by fire. also, united airlines defends itself after this passenger was dragged off one of its aircraft because of overbooking.
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