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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 19, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello — this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. mps have their say — parliament will vote today on theresa may's decision to hold a snap election. the prime minister says her plans for a vote in just seven weeks would secure the backing of the british people for the brexit negotiations. the only way to guarantee certainty and stability that the years to head —— years ahead is to hold the selection and seek your support for the decisions i must take. we'll be live in westminster throughout the morning to get the latest political reaction, and we'll be hearing your views too. i'm in leicester where i'll be finding out what voters make of a second election just two years after the last one and what issues they'll be voting on. good morning. i'm at a bakery in bolton to find out what businesses think. the pound rose to its highest level
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in 10 weeks, but what do businesses —— and i'll be looking at why. good morning. it's wednesday the 19th of april. also this morning: the duke of cambridge reveals that the shock of his mother's death is still with him, twenty years on. you never get over it. it's such an unbelievably big moment in your life that it never leaves you. the dream is over for leicester city. as they're knocked out of the champions league quarter—finals by the spanish side atletico madrid. and matt has the weather. good morning. a bit more cloud around today across the uk, the old spot of drizzle in the north—west of the dry story continues as it does tomorrow, which could be a touch warmer as well. more in 15 minutes. good morning.
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first, our main story. mps are today expected to approve theresa may's plan for a snap general election on 8th june in a commons vote this afternoon. the prime minister says she's going to the polls, three years early, to unite westminster ahead of brexit, saying britain needed stability and strong leadership. opposition parties have accused mrs may of a u—turn, but say they won't vote against the election. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. it's not even 2a hours since the prime minister called for a general election but already, the party leaders are gearing up, positioning the parties and getting ready for the parties and getting ready for the campaign ahead. it was a shock announcement and a theresa may said she had only made in the last few days. i have only recently and relu cta ntly days. i have only recently and reluctantly come to this conclusion. since i became prime minister, i have said that there should be no election until 2020 but now i have concluded that the only way to
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guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold the selection and seek your support for the decisions i must take. later today, there will be a vote in parliament to bring the general election forward from its original date of may 20 20. with labour and the lib dems expected to back the plans, it's almost certain to go ahead on june the plans, it's almost certain to go ahead onjune the eighth. plans, it's almost certain to go ahead on june the eighth. we are quite clear there is an election coming and we are going to be fighting that election in order to win so that we do have a fairer, more decent society, we do have an investment — led economy. more decent society, we do have an investment - led economy. the lib dems see a chance for the party to come back from rock bottom. well, it's an opportunity for the people of this country to change the direction of this country, to decide they do not want a hard brexit, they wa nt to they do not want a hard brexit, they want to keep britain in the single market and indeed, an opportunity for us to have a decent, strong opposition in this country that we
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desperately need. this election won't just be desperately need. this election won'tjust be about what goes on here in westminster at the whole country's constitution. theresa may won't promise another boat on scottish independence but nicola sturgeon will. it's very clear that the prime minister's announcement todayis the prime minister's announcement today is all about the narrow interests of her own party, not the interests of her own party, not the interests of her own party, not the interests of the country overall. remember, despite favourable polls for the tories and a weakened opposition, the last few months and yea rs have opposition, the last few months and years have shown the politics of this era have become rather hard to predict. there is so much to talk about. we will keep you across everything. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us now from downing street, and the big question has to be iain, why now? indeed, we weren't. it caught us on
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the hop. we know the chancellor, philip hammond, the brexit secretary, david davis, were pushing for this. the prime minister met them on easter monday. she said she was reluctant to make this decision and she wants to strengthen our hand in brexit negotiations but it has not escaped the notice of advisers, the conservatives 20 points ahead of labour in the opinion polls but there is one of the consideration and we have now seen the eu's negotiating position, they've set that up. negotiations will be difficult. if theresa may must make compromises, some of their own mps are not going to be too chuffed. she can take this risk, come back to westminster and also increases her authority over not only the opposition parties but also her own mps. we will talk you were bit later. the decision to call a general election on june 8th will be viewed differently across the uk. we'll be talking to our correspondents in scotland and wales
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later, butjoining us now from belfast is our ireland correspondent chris page. chris, how is it being viewed there? well, one local satirist has suggested there should be a sign put up suggested there should be a sign put up at airports here welcoming tourists to the election capital of europe and that doesn't feel too far wide of the mark. the sixth time people in northern ireland will have gone to the polls in just under three years, the last election just last month which was a snap election to the northern ireland assembly after the devolved government collapse, and that is a crisis which is yet to be sorted out. one question is what impact this new election campaign will have on the negotiations to try to restore the devolved government? people tend to adopt more hardline positions during elections. the irish foreign minister has expressed concern the
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campaign could disrupt the peace of the current negotiations but the northern ireland secretary has said the approach to the talks will change, there is a deadline of early may and if there is no dealfor the stormont parties before then, there could be yet another election to the stormont assembly. and later on we'll be asking political analyst john cu rtice about the timing of the snap election, and what happens now. also the shadow chancellor, john mcdonald. and the brexit secretary, david davis will be here as well. and we will be talking to the snp and hearing your views. please feel free to get in touch with us. in other news this morning: prince willian has revealed the shock of his mother's death is still with him, twenty years after princess diana was killed. the duke of cambridge made the comments in a bbc documentary which follows a group of runners with mental health problems who are training to run
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the london marathon: the shop is the biggest thing and i feel 20 years later, over my mother, i have shock. people think shock cannot last that long. you never get over it. it's such an unbelievably moment in your life that it never leaves you, you just learn to deal with it. we will be speaking a little bit later to one of those runners, rhian, who will would be with us later. police have named a man they want to speak to about a suspected acid attack at an east london nightclub. arthur collins is wanted for questioning after a corrosive liquid was sprayed during an argument in the early hours of monday morning. 20 people were left injured. violence in prisons in england and wales is spiralling out of control according to the european committee for the prevention of torture. members of the committee visited doncaster prison and pentonville prison last spring as part of their inquiry. they said that official figures were under—reporting the actual
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number of incidents. the ministry ofjustice is yet to respond to the report. more than 250 potential suspects have now been identified by police investigating child sex abuse in football. the national police chiefs council — which is co—ordinating the investigation — said 560 possible victims had come forward. a hotline was set up to report abuse late last year when a number of high profile ex—footballers said they were victims of sexual abuse as youngsters. the former american president, george bush senior, is in hospital for the second time this year. his spokesman said he had a mild case of pneumonia but was in "good spirits" and was going to be fine. the 92—year—old was treated in hospital injanuary for more than two weeks for the same illness. the american philanthropist, bill gates, has praised what's been described as a record—breaking achievement in fighting neglected tropical diseases. there's been a big worldwide push to distribute tablets, to treat ten of these diseases,
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since a key meeting in london five years ago. here's our health correspondent, jane dreaper. these illnesses which sometimes kill. sleeping sickness proves fatal or not treated quickly and there are still some cases of leprosy, but the biggest damages in the disability and disfigurement these diseases cause, predominantly affecting those in some of the world's poorest countries. an international meeting will hear today that significant progress is being made in fighting neglected tropical diseases. drug companies have donated 7 billion treatments since new targets were agreed five years ago. the number of people needing medicine to prevent lymphatic filariasis, which makes limbs swell, is down from 1.4 billion to a billion. the gates foundation says these neglected illnesses are now getting the attention they need. not all of the
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goals are on track and the unrest in south sudan is making it hard to finally finish thejob south sudan is making it hard to finally finish the job of eradicating guinea worm, which is caused by drinking contaminated water. but this week's meeting is a chance to focus on progress so far while pushing for further work to beat these painful illnesses. an asteroid as big as the rock of gibraltar will hurtle past us today. this is an image of 2014j025. nasa say it will get ‘uncomfortably close' to the earth, but it won't make any impact. it's the largest asteroid to come this near the planet since 2004 but it'll still be about a million miles away. we shall be talking about that with an expert a little bit later. someone who might know that is
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actually called j0 025. there are on line telescopes you can go on and have a look. a small town in canada has become a surprise tourist spot thanks to a new visitor — an iceberg. it's nearly 50 meters tall and has become stranded in shallow water just off the newfoundland coast. the area is known as "iceberg alley" thanks to the large number that drift down from the arctic each spring. this is one of the first of the season and it doesn't look like it's going anywhere soon. that is just the most incredible sight. it towers above the houses. presumably then that one gets stuck at lots of other ones get stuck as well. do you have to wait for it to melt? probably. i've seen icebergs in real life, they are the most stunning beautiful blue colour. where were you? it was in chile. you
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have been everywhere, she has done the lot. i was studying. have been everywhere, she has done the lot. iwas studying. plenty have been everywhere, she has done the lot. i was studying. plenty to get through this morning. plus a big night of sport. we talk about brexit, last night was lexit. the dream is over but they went down with a fight. of the three previous champions league finals, they made two of them, leicester. they know what they are doing. they had a real go, 22 shots. despite scoring, they finished 1— all. they do go out of the high aggregate. it's a shame. it's been an enjoying ride. atletico opened the scoring and whilst leicester, the last british team left in the competition, did manage to pull a goal back in the second half, they were knocked out 2—1 on aggregate. the new birmingham city manager harry redknapp says the side need just four points from their remaining games to stay
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in the championship. 70 year old redknapp replaces gianfranco zola, who resigned on monday. dylan hartley is set to miss out on a place on the british and irish lions tour to new zealand. he'll be the third successive england captain to be overlooked by the lions, after steve borthwick and chris robshaw missed out in 2009 and 2013 respectively. the squad is announced at noon. and olympic gold medallist adam peaty secures his place at the world swimming championships with victory at the british championships in sheffield. the guys on stop a bullet after woods, gave his medal to a young guy in the crowd, hoping to inspire the next generation. he has got enough medals anyway. he's got a huge collection. we will see throughout the morning. the most beautiful picture. a lovely
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shot from suffolk. a bit of clout around. good morning, by the way. this is where the coldest conditions are. much of the uk once again having cloud. it is billing in northern areas in particular. clear skies to the south—east. —— spilling. it is cold. —4 in parts of east anglia. temperatures rising quickly now the sun is up. a lovely and bright start for much of england and bright start for much of england and wales. grady —— we have a weak weather front here affecting eastern scotland. the odd spot of light drizzle in the short—term. it will clear through. plenty of cloud for northern ireland and western scotland. the odd spot of drizzle in the air. predominantly dry. some rain and drizzle in
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north—west england and the far north—west england and the far north—west of wales. most will have a dry day. brightening up this afternoon in scotland. continuing with sunny spells in central, southern and eastern england. temperatures could get up to 15 degrees. cooler further temperatures could get up to 15 degrees. coolerfurther north. more cloud tonight in northern areas. a wea k cloud tonight in northern areas. a weak weather front going south across northern england and wales. drizzle here and there. very few and little in the way of significant rainfall. frost limited to parts of kent. mostly without frost. thursday, a cloudy day for england and wales. the odd spot of rain. mostly dry. rights in eastern scotla nd mostly dry. rights in eastern scotland and into the afternoon in the north of england in the east of northern ireland. some sunny spells on an overall cloudy day. tomorrow. the pennines in the north—east of scotla nd the pennines in the north—east of scotland could hit 15 degrees. working down from the north. this
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will bring rain to the north—west of scotla nd will bring rain to the north—west of scotland and later to northern ireland and the far west of england. some sunshine. temperatures only 10 degrees. the sunniest conditions on friday will be in the south. 18, 19 degrees. the cold air will be back as high pressure builds to the west of us into the weekend. temperatures dropping quite widely. most will continue with the overall dry story into the weekend. the best of sunshine will be in the west, but feeling chilly, especially by night. that is how it is looking. back to you both. banks. let's have a look at this morning's papers. theresa may is on the front of all the newspapers. the times. they are talking about a poll. there is some
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scepticism about polls. the telegraph. they have called it the bolt from the blue for may. all of the papers, massive inside pages on what it means for so many different people and part of the country as well. the sun. this will kill off labour. the election bombshell from theresa may. the express. she is saying that. front page of the daily mirror. lots of people are reminded again in the papers of how many times she said there would be no early election. this is how the daily mirror have written it. they said the lady is for u—turning. this is where you get a sense of the papers having different political leanings. really? one more. the front page of the guardian. may,
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give me my mandate. we will ask the brexit secretary about that later run. theresa may has said on numerous occasions that she will not give a sort of step—by—step plan of what they want to do with exit. but if their readers an election they had they may have to put that in the ma nifesto. had they may have to put that in the manifesto. and the financial times. they are looking at the markets and what happened over the timeline yesterday. yesterday they were talking about brighton's promotion to the premier league. some great stories. dot ervis painted her house blue a couple of years back. there she is celebrating. apparently, the way the club is run, every single person who works for the club will get a bonus of 10% on their salary. so, everyone, from order to make the
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tea to the stewards, they have a bonus in their packet. —— whoever makes the. and a family holiday to the united states. eyeing a new kitchen. do you want to hear about komodo dragons and their blood?|j can komodo dragons and their blood?” can choose. a komodo dragons and their blood?” can choose. a museum komodo dragons and their blood?” can choose. a museum of failures. i don't know. komodo dragons. a p pa re ntly don't know. komodo dragons. apparently the blood of komodo dragons, they are incredible dangerous, it sounds like harry potter, a potion from the blood of dragons can repel superbugs resista nt to dragons can repel superbugs resistant to all other treatments. they discovered this because komodo dragons fight a lot and they have a very dangerous bite right they can survive it. you have been watching lots of programmes. they can survive
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in disgusting conditions. that is why they are investigating it. not as much serious, but how do you judge a playhouse purchased from one website to another. you do it on a b i cycle. website to another. you do it on a bicycle. it is a little bit dangerous. they were stopped and asked exactly what they were doing. it is novel. i once sold a shed on a popular auction site and the person turned up to pick it up on a bike. what did you do? it did not turn out well. the scottish election, the general election two years ago, the eu referendum! how do you feel about going to the polls again? sally will tell us what people are thinking. what is the reaction in leicester?
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they said come to leicester market, it will be open from the crack of dawn. and, do you know, they are not quite ready. but they are starting to warm up the stores. fruit and vegeta bles to warm up the stores. fruit and vegetables are over there. fantastic clothes at the other end of the market, which i will have a look at later. this is one of the oldest markets in the country. it has been on this site for 700 years. the largest outdoor market in europe. theresa may's announcement and decision yesterday shocked the political world, of course. decision yesterday shocked the politicalworld, of course. i decision yesterday shocked the political world, of course. i can tell you it caused some surprise here as well. lesson, i don't think it will make any difference, to be honest with you, because i don't thinkjeremy corbyn can get in. —— listen. why spend all that money?” corbyn can get in. —— listen. why spend all that money? i am happy with the idea. the tories have been in too long. i was not surprised, to
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be honest. ithink in too long. i was not surprised, to be honest. i think she in too long. i was not surprised, to be honest. ithink she is in too long. i was not surprised, to be honest. i think she is running away. it has given the public a chance to decide what they think, what they think about what has been happening, being a democracy. it is normal. it will be very important for the people of the uk. the nhs, definitely. i think this is the chance for people who have a different view about brexit because after the referendum, lots of people open their rise and they realised that maybe it was not a good idea. —— their eyes. that maybe it was not a good idea. -- their eyes. the nhs, definitely. and just generally looking after english people. the nhs, income, things like that. just the general things. well, i can tell you it is getting a little bit more lively here now. i
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am joined by the director of the leicester comedy festival. and dale who owns a gallery nearby and has lived hear many years. what was your reaction? i was quite surprised like most eagle. my worry is it could have the opposite effect by alienating people from the political process. we have had many elections and referendums recently and people are not ready for another one. how do you feel about it? very, very surprised. 60 days of intense, umm, well... conversation. turmoil. turmoil? all of the parties need to work more together and not against each other, which is what elections seemed to do. didn't you recently... you are planning to run a comedy election, is that right? we did that
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earlier this year as a tongue—in—cheek thing. it was an antidote to the political systems. we urge people to vote for, the. some say there is enough already in parliament but i will not comment on that. —— vote for comedy. parliament but i will not comment on that. -- vote for comedy. certainly no laughing matter and jane green is a commentator on this. this is shocking. a significant turnaround for theresa may. it is a significant turnaround from a few weeks ago when she said there would be no early general election. why she has done it is the reason a better time. she looks ahead and sees the negotiations and sees it is going to be difficult and she won't be able to deliver on everything. the lib dems, early signs they could get more support. people are seeing prices rising. will people be asking questions about the impact of brexit
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on the economy? there has not been a better time for theresa may and i don't think there will be. that is why she called it now. briefly, it also gives her a chance to bring backbenchers in the line. it is good to be really interesting to see if thatis to be really interesting to see if that is the case. the people we are talking about have never been known for particularly going back and being quiet. what is going to be fascinating is what kind of mandate though she claimed to have? what is she going to promise to the electorate and what is she going to do? can see deliver? maybe they will be quiet if she delivers. thank you. we will be at leicester market all morning. if you have any questions that you want to ask our expert, let us that you want to ask our expert, let us know and i will pass them on to jane. we are interested to know, will this be the brexit election, or
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are you concerned about other issues? nhs, social care. et cetera. let us know. we will be in touch. thank you. we are looking for your views today to see how you feel about this. are you excited, exasperated? are you like brenda from bristol? turmoil and politics, i think she said. another seven weeks of this coming your way. hold on tight, everybody. stay with us. time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. one of the stars of tv show, "the only way is essex," has appealed to her boyfriend to speak to the police after detectives said they want to question him about an acid attack at an east end nightclub. ferne mccann made the appeal after scotland yard released a cctv image of 25—year—old, arthur collins, and said he shouldn't be approached. 20 people suffered burns when acid was sprayed inside the mangle club in hackney on sunday night. two are still in
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a serious condition. parents of a ten—year—old boy from watford with a rare terminal disease are trying to raise sixty thousand pounds to help keep their son at home for longer. shay murray has pearson's syndrome, a condition shared by only 100 youngsters in the world. any infection, like a cold, could kill him. his family want to convert their garage so he can have more of his care at home rather than hospital. i would like it a lot because it would help me and so would not have to keep going up and down, up and down, all day long. his energy, his eyesight, his hearing, everything is slowly deteriorating. let's have a look at the travel situation now. and there's no 0verground between camden road and willesden junction. track—side equipment‘s been damaged, apparently. the rest of the tube lines seem to be running well. let's take a look at the roads now. and this is eltham in south—east london
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where its slow on the a2 westbound from falconwood to kidbrooke. in tolworth, there's heavy traffic on the a3 kingston bypass northbound due to roadworks. in gants hill, it's also slow on the a12 eastbound at the gants hill roundabout. and in east sheen, there's a lane closed on the a205 south circular eastbound at roehampton lane. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. another reasonably chilly start for some of us this morning with temperatures in single figures. a chill in the air. the good news is we still have the sunshine. and compared to yesterday, we have lost the chilly breeze to a certain extent. it should feel more pleasa nt certain extent. it should feel more pleasant in the sunshine. this afternoon, a maximum temperature of 16 degrees. 0vernight tonight, clear skies in the east at first. gradually, cloud will sink south. that will protect us. the temperature not dropping as low as
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it did last night with a minimum between 6— eight degrees in towns and cities. dark cloud will continue south as we head through thursday morning. 64 a time. one or two spots of rain to arrived. high pressure is still in charge on friday. not wall—to—wall. cloud again. a cold front. some rain. nothing significant. the weather stays quite quiet and settled as we head through to the weekend. perhaps a touch warmer as more mild air starts to arrive. cooler again and cloudy as we head into the weekend. and i will be back in half an hour with more from the bbc london newsroom to be now it is back to the breakfast team. newsroom. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the latest news and sport in a moment. coming up on breakfast this morning.
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as theresa may seeks approval to hold a snap general election, we'll be telling you what happens next, and what it means for the whole of the uk. also this morning, rhian lost her son and her husband within the space of a week. now she's running the london marathon to raise awareness of mental health. she'll be here to tell us how she's been helped by prince william. and an asteroid the size of gibraltar will get uncomfortably close to earth today. don't worry, it's still a million miles away, but astrophysicist tim 0'brien will be here to tell us why, the snappily titled 2014—j025 is so important to astronomers. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the prime minister's plan for a snap general election on 8thjune is set to be approved by mps this afternoon. theresa may says she's going to the polls 3 years early to help her make a success of brexit.
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0pposition parties say they won't vote against the plan. 0ur political correspondent iain watsonjoins us from downing street, and the big question has to be iain, why now? it's interesting theresa may has abandoned her commitment not to call abandoned her commitment not to call a snap election. there are two reasons. she was on a walking holiday in wales but she was being pressed. she says of course, this is to strengthen her hand in negotiations but the two reasons we are talking about, is firstly, her advisers would have noticed the conservatives are as much as 20 points ahead of the labour party and secondly, the other development that has happened in recent weeks is that the eu has said that its negotiating position. it will be tough and she
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has to make compromises. some of own mps might not like that. if the gamble pays off and she returns with an increased authority, then her authority will be strengthened. thank you very much. and over the course of the programme we'll be getting reaction from across the political parties, including the liberal democrat leader tim farron, the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell and the brexit secretary david davis. prince william has revealed the shock of his mother's death is still with him, twenty years after princess diana was killed. the duke of cambridge made the comments in a bbc documentary which follows a group of runners with mental health problems who are training to run the london marathon. the shock is the biggest thing. i still feel 20 years later, about my mother, i still have shock within me. 20 years later, people think shock cannot last that long but it does. you never get over it. it's
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such an unbelievably big moment in your life that it never leaves you, your life that it never leaves you, you just learn to deal with it. a little bit later, we will be speaking to one people running the marathon, rhian, she will be speaking to us later. police have named a man they want to speak to about a suspected acid attack at an east london nightclub. arthur collins is wanted for questioning after a corrosive liquid was sprayed during an argument in the early hours of monday morning. 20 people were left injured. more than 250 potential suspects have now been identified by police investigating child sex abuse in football. the national police chiefs council — which is co—ordinating the investigation — said 560 possible victims had come forward. a hotline was set up to report abuse late last year when a number of high profile ex—footballers said they were victims of sexual abuse as youngsters. an asteroid as big as the rock of gibraltar will hurtle past us today.
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this is an image of 2014j0—25. nasa say it will get uncomfortably close to the earth, but it won't make any impact. it's the largest asteroid to come this near the planet since 2004 but it'll still be about a a million miles away. thank you to those of you humouring me this morning and sending the new names in the astro. it should have a better name than j0 names in the astro. it should have a better name thanj0 025. astrid? astrid the asteroid? that's a good name. very inventive. it wasn't me! a big night in the champions league. we will start with leicester but cristiano ronaldo? we will see him
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ina minute. cristiano ronaldo? we will see him in a minute. 46 hat tricks. it's ridiculous. a real thriller. disappointment the leicester but they have gone farther than other clubs. the atletico madrid manager was congratulating the other players. it was a real spirited performance from leicester. already leading one nil from the first leg, the spanish side went ahead through saul niguez‘s header in the first half. but leicester fought back, jamie vardy scored in the second half to level the scores on the night. and that prompted a flurry of attacks, but they couldn't get the two additional goals needed to eliminate their opponents. as they bow out 2—1 on aggregate. they are very disappointed in there
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but ultimately, they can be proud of what they have achieved. as a football club, we can be proud of how we have conducted ourselves and how we have conducted ourselves and how we have gone about it but they should want more of this because ultimately, all players want to play at the highest level in the champions league is the highest level but we have to get back to winning in the premier league now. it's now 100 champions league gaols for cristiano ronaldo — his hat—trick against bayern munich sending the holders real madrid through to the semis. the tie had to be settled in extra time though, as it finished 6—3 on aggregate in the bernabeu. harry redknapp is back in football management. birmingham city hoping to utilise his extensive footballing experience to avoid relegation from the championship. the 70 year old replaces gianfranco zola, with the blues just three points clear of the relegation zone.
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the former tottenham and west ham manager has been appointed until the end of the season. the british and irish lions squad will be announced at noon, with dylan hartley set to miss out on a place on the tour to new zealand. he'll be the third successive england captain to be overlooked by the lions, after steve borthwick and chris robshaw missed out in 2009 and 2013 respectively. the wales forward sam warburton is favourite to be named captain by head coach warren gatland. world number twojudd trump has work to do to reach the second round of the world snooker championship. he was beating fellow englishman rory mcleod 4—0 but the world number 54 — who's the oldest player left in the competition — staged quite a comeback and won the next five frames to lead 5—4. the match resumes later this morning at the crucible. and after winning his race at the british swimming championships, 0lympic chanmpion adam peaty has given his british medal away to a boy in the crowd. peaty secured his place at the 2017 world swimming championships after the british 100 metre breaststroke title in sheffield. he finished in under 58 seconds ahead of ross murdoch
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and james wilby. and he says he gave the medal away to inspire the next generation. if it was any medal, i think i'd offered to give it away because you get so many of them but for me, i don't want to sound arrogant or anything but for me, the race is what matters, the process and going to board a pest, this is qualifying. hopefully getting a medal along the way will inspire him to train harder for his career and even if it's a week already, you have inspired someone. he has got quite a collection of medals. 0lympic medals, world titles. let us get more in our main story. theresa may says it was a walk in wales with her husband that finally made up her mind to ask permission for a general election on the 8th ofjune.
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but, what happens next? just after lunchtime today, the prime minister will lead a vote in the house of commons for permission to send voters to the ballot box. she needs two—thirds of mps — that's 434 of them — to back the motion. that means she's relying on the support of at least 100 non—tory mps. if she gets that, at one minute past midnight on 3rd may, parliament will be dissolved and the official campaign period will begin. butjust to complicate things further, a day later on the 4th may, millions of people in england, wales and scotland will vote in entirely different elections to appoint councillors and new ‘metro mayors'. it is very rare to have two major elections so close together, and the result of the local elections will be like a mega—poll for the general election ahead. to discuss all of this from glasgow is political analysts professor john
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curtice. let us talk about timing. is this a canny decision by the prime minister? the straightforward reason is that the labour party's position in the opinion polls has been gradually weakening in recent weeks and months, the conservative leader has been widening and she certainly sees an opportunity as it appears to emerge from an election with a much larger majority than the majority of 12 that she has at the moment. why might you want a bigger majority? in truth because a, during the course of the brexit negotiations, she cannot necessarily assume that all of her tory mps are going to be happy with the progress of those negotiations and therefore, she might be vulnerable. it says there is an implicit acknowledgement by the prime minister that actually, there might be some divisions within her own party over the next couple of years. the second advantage to her is that the house of lords
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perhaps might have caused some difficulty but if she's got a mandate for her kind of brexit, they will feel more restrained, and it makes much greater distance between the next election which will now be in 2022 rather than 2020 on the conclusion of the brexit negotiations. 0n the current timing, it was pretty clear that the 2020 election could well be an election on whether or not theresa may had or had not done a good job in the brexit negotiations, putting more pressure on the prime minister, by having a greater space and perhaps it will be less of a pressure on the prime minister. in so far as voters might be disappointed, they have a bit more time to forget about it. just talk about that question. could she get a bigger majority and she is looking for and what does it mean
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for the labour party? the opinion polls at the moment, on average, they point to a 16— point lead for they point to a 16— point lead for the conservatives. some polls put it higher than that. a 16— point lead, you the standard assumption that the 4.5% swing from labour to conservative is implied since may 2015, that gets you to a majority of 100. you might begin to say that is not as big as i might expect with a 16- not as big as i might expect with a 16— point lead and you would be right. it would be smaller than the majority that margaret thatcher got when she got a 16 point lead in the ballot boxes. it has become more difficult to get a big majority, partly because scotland is out of frame because the snp dominates representation there. also, there are fewer marginal seats these days and with that 4.5% swing, there are only about 40 seats that the labour
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party would be likely to lose. i'm sure theresa may would be delighted with the majority of 100 but it that poll lead starts to narrow, maybe this will not be quite such a good bet. the labour party enters this election in a worse state than any previous opposition party. labour goes into the selection in a worse position than in 1983 when they entered up with just 28% of the vote and many labourmp entered up with just 28% of the vote and many labour mp will be looking forward to the next seven weeks with considerable trepidation, notjust with their own careers but also whether or notjeremy corbyn is the least able to do well enough to least able to do well enough to least perhaps close the gap a bit on the tories and ensure there isn't any meltdown in labour's boat. there will be an awful lot of pressure on the labour leader, particularly in the labour leader, particularly in the early weeks of this election campaign. are we going to hear from brenda from bristol? he is the point of view. not another one? oh, the
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god's sake, i can't honestly stand this. there is too much politics going on at the moment. why does she need to do it? just really briefly, on that point, on voter apathy, can affect things, you think? not much. if there is apathy, it might be more on the labour side because of voters who are unhappy with jeremy corbyn because of voters who are unhappy withjeremy corbyn and who cannot bring themselves to vote for anyone else. that said, if it does focus on brexit, brexit did take voters to the polls ten months ago and it might do it again. thank you. fascinating stuff from a man who knows his business inside and out. more reactions through the morning. we wa nt more reactions through the morning. we want to know whether you agree with brenda or not. the weather. another picture from bristol. an
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ongoing theme. lovely. a cracking start from bristol. high cloud. sunshine around. more cloud in the north. the odd spot of drizzle. for most, dry. conditions at the moment mean widespread temperatures down to one is fought in temperature. high cloud. —— —4. a lovely and bright start. temporary frost in the west and east of wales. more cloud. avoiding frost. more cloud in northumbria and scotland and northern ireland. this will threaten the odd spot of light rain and drizzle. most start the get dry with cloudy conditions and brighter weather developing through the day. —— day. northern ireland, cheering up —— day. northern ireland, cheering upa
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—— day. northern ireland, cheering up a touch. clouding over in parts of northern england, wales, and the north—west midlands into the afternoon. the sunniest conditions will be to the south and east of england. 15—16. temperatures, generally, in the low to mid—teens quite widely. tonight, more cloud around. not quite as cold. frost limited to the far south—east. somewhere like kent may see a touch of frost in the tomorrow morning. mostly cloudy conditions. damp. northern england and wales as well. the odd spot of drizzle. not soaking. most dry. windy in the north of scotland with a few showers. dryness in the north of scotla nd showers. dryness in the north of scotland mostly. cloudy conditions in the north. temperatures down on today. the north—east of england and scotla nd today. the north—east of england and scotland could get to 15—16 during the afternoon. a quick look at friday. another weather front working into scotland and northern ireland. 0utbrea ks of working into scotland and northern ireland. outbreaks of rain to the
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end of the day. brightening up in the afternoon. turning colder. further south, more sunshine once again. a touch warmer. 18—19. a short—lived warm spell. a cold front going south as we go through into the start of the weekend. the blue colours on the chart in the eastern flank of the high pressure system will keep things largely dry, but pushing cold air down to europe as well where things have taken a turn. that is how it is looking. back to you. thank you. see you in the next hourfor you. thank you. see you in the next hour for another update. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the prime minister's decision to call a snap election took the country by surprise yesterday. but what could it mean for businesses? steph is live at a bakery in bolton this morning to get their reaction. of course, bakeries mean hairnets. good morning. oh yes. like always. good morning. oh yes. like always. good morning. oh yes. like always. good morning. you can see these are the cakes that are being made. they make something like 70,000 of these
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every day. a sweet variety of different products. 16,000 sausage rolls every hour. 70,000 of these are made every day. you might remember i was here when there was a referendum. look at these two. you can see the piping going on. you might recognise that face. scooby doo. we were talking to them about the referendum. their boss was clear he wanted to leave the eu. we have him back. good morning, dave. here we are again. welcome back! an election! how do you feel? all i wanted to do was have a bit of stability for industry and commerce. if it does, happy days, really. are you happy that we are going through this process again of having to vote for something? when you talk about uncertainty what does that actually
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mean for you? if it gives a mandate, whoever gets in, if it gives a mandate for a solid, financial government that, going through brexit, which i voted for, it will give stability and it will give confidence and it will give a good feeling for industry to move forward , feeling for industry to move forward, yeah. how are you feeling simply voted to leave? because, obviously, as you just said, you voted to leave. how have things being for you with the business?m has actually been tougher. some of the costs of gone up, especially materials. but the overall principle of, umm, having the right to choose, is the right thing for business. even though you have to taken a bit ofa even though you have to taken a bit of a hit in the longer term, you think it will be better? everything goes up and everything goes down no matter what. i took a bit of a hit but it will come back in the near future. good to talk to you as ever. we will be here throughout the
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morning and potentially eating some of these. by all means. we have vicky price, an economist. this was quite surprised. are your thoughts on this? it is interesting. no one expected it at all, certainly no economic commentators. but the market has interpreted it in an interesting way. they seem to think that the bigger mandate, that theresa may may be getting, they think it might mean that we are moving towards a softer brexit rather than a harder brexit. because she will have more control over eurosceptics in her own party. and of course, we will have a transition period, which is what the europeans are suggesting. she will have a lot more is in being able to push that through without people turning it down to the —— ease. there will be a longer period of people living in without restrictions. the european
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court ofjustice will still be there for a while. it actually pushes us, in the transition period itself from 2019, it actually means that we get to the next election, if indeed the five—year rule remains, 2022, where we complete that period, and then the real brexit begins, if you like. it gives the room to manoeuvre. in some ways, if the market is right, it may well be better off for businesses if that is indeed achieved. and off the back of that news, the value of the pound went up. tell us about that. it means faster growth for the economy and more trade with europe continuing for a longer period. because, of course, for us, it is such an important part of the overall package, if you like. the eu is important, we at 45% of our goods to it. the smooth the transition is, rather than a cliff edge, the easier it is to fill in vacancies and job
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shortages. —— smoother. it is to fill in vacancies and job shortages. -- smoother. thank you. you will be with us for the rest of the morning. i will take you around the morning. i will take you around the bakery. it is so fascinating to see where they make things. this is the sweet section. it is my favourite. and you can see the bread coming out of the oven is. it smells gorgeous. i am fascinated! i could learn a lot from their piping skills! see you a little bit later. lam skills! see you a little bit later. i am fascinated. scooby doo! plenty of other news around as well, besides the snap election! the duke of cambridge has revealed the shock of his mother's death is still with him 20 years after she was killed in a car crash in paris. prince william was speaking in a bbc documentary which follows a group of people affected by mental health problems, who're training to run the london marathon this weekend. 0ur royal correspondent, peter hunt, reports. exercise can help with mental health
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issues. ten runners pursuing a shared goal, a marathon for their minds as much as there bodies. all of them have suffered and continue to suffer from turmoil in the inside. it can help mental health, most definitely, from a personal experience. this is one of the marathon novices. her when he rolled fund, george, died. —— her one—year—old son. and then her husband, who blame himself, took his own life. it changed me forever. ptsd has been a huge thing i have had to carry. the runners are being supported by william, kate, and harry. their heads together campaign encourages people to work together to discuss men to help. can i ask
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you a question, you are older than my children, but i am worried about them growing up. will they be ok? with a mother like you, they will be fined. don't say that. try and understand, you have more complex emotions right now. it is critical. you are explaining to them what those emotions men and what they have to do. you have to rationalise this. if you are angry or down, you can kind of rationalise it and deal with it. the shock is the biggest thing. i still feel 20 years later with my mother that i still have shock within me 20 years later. i can't last that long, you think. but it does. it is an unbelievably big moment in your life. it never leaves you. you just learn to deal with it. how was it? it was amazing! yeah. did you get to ask a question?”
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did. he was so honest. he just said straight up they will be ok. because they have a great mother? yeah. first, prince harry, and now prince william. two royal brothers who provided an insight into the detrimental impact of their morning. —— mourning. detrimental impact of their morning. -- mourning. i hate seeing people in emotional or mental torment. it is really sad. it takes you down a very, very different path in life. the point of the campaign, with the marathon, is we want to reduce the fichman. people talk about mental health as if it is perfectly normal. —— reduce the stigma. health as if it is perfectly normal. -- reduce the stigma. the runners will face physical and mental challenges when they compete in the marathon. and in the next hour,
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we'll be speaking to rhian and the presenter of the programme, nick knowles. mind 0ver marathon begins tomorrow on bbc one. and now for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. see you on the other side. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. one of the stars of tv show, "the only way is essex," has appealed to her boyfriend to speak to the police after detectives said they want to question him about an acid attack at an east end nightclub. ferne mccann made the appeal after scotland yard released a cctv image of 25—year—old, arthur collins, and said he shouldn't be approached. 20 people suffered burns when acid was sprayed inside the mangle club in hackney on sunday night. parents of a ten—year—old boy from watford with a rare terminal disease are trying to raise sixty thousand pounds to help keep their son at home for longer. shay murray has pearson's syndrome, a condition shared by only 100
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youngsters in the world. any infection, like a cold, could kill him. his family want to convert their garage so he can have more of his care at home rather than hospital. i would like it a lot because it would help me and so would not have to keep going up and down, up and down, all day long. his energy, his eyesight, his hearing, everything is slowly deteriorating. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the district line has minor delays between upminster and barking. there's also no 0verground between camden road and gospel 0ak, and minor delays on other parts of the line. also, you can't actually get into holborn tube station at the momentm although you can still exit and change trains there. they're having problems with the electrical supply. and there's no 0verground
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between camden road and willesden junction. track—side equipment‘s been damaged, apparently. the rest of the tube lines seem to be running well. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's another reasonably chilly start for some of us this morning with temperatures in single figures celcius. so, a bit of a chill in the air. but the good news is we still have the sunshine. and compared to yesterday, we have lost the chilly breeze to a certain extent. it should feel more pleasant in the sunshine. this afternoon, a maximum temperature of 15 celcius. 0vernight tonight, clear skies in the east at first. but gradually, cloud will sink south. and that will protect us. so, the temperature not dropping quite as low as it did last night with a minimum between 6—8 degrees in towns and cities. that cloud will continue south as we head through thursday morning. thick for a time. one or two spots of rain to arrive.
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high pressure is still in charge on friday. not wall—to—wall. cloud again. a cold front. some rain. nothing significant. the weather stays quite quiet and settled as we head through to the weekend. so, perhaps a touch warmer as more mild air starts to arrive. cooler again and cloudy as we head into the weekend. and i will be back in half an hour with more from the bbc newsroom. now it is back to the breakfast team. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. mps have their say — parliament will vote today on theresa may's decision to hold a snap election. the prime minister says her plans for a vote in just seven weeks would mean she could negotiate on brexit with the backing of the british people. the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold this selection and seek your support
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for the decisions i must take. we'll be live in westminster throughout the morning to get the latest political reaction, and we'll be hearing your views too. good morning. i'm in leicester where i'll be finding out what voters make of a second election just two years after the last one and what issues they'll be voting on. the pound rose to its highest level in 10 weeks, but what do businesses make of the snap election? i'm at a bakery in bolton to find out. good morning. it's wednesday the 19th of april. also this morning: the duke of cambridge reveals that the shock of his mother's death is still with him, twenty years on.
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you never get over it. it's such an unbelievably big moment in your life that it never leaves you. the dream is over for leicester city. as they're knocked out of the champions league quarter—finals by the spanish side atletico madrid. and matt has the weather. england and wales waking up to a frosty start. the dry weather story continues. there are a few exceptions and i will tell you where they are. the full forecast in the next 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the prime minister's plan for a snap general election in just 7 weeks is expected to be approved by mps today. theresa may says she's going to the polls 3 years early to help her make a success of brexit. 0pposition parties have accused mrs may of a u—turn, but say they won't vote against the election. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. it's not even 24 hours since the prime minister called for a general election but already,
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the party leaders are gearing up, positioning the parties and getting ready for the campaign ahead. it was a shock announcement and a decision theresa may said she had only made in the last few days. i have only recently and reluctantly come to this conclusion. since i became prime minister, i have said that there should be no election until 2020 but now i have concluded that the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold this election and seek your support for the decisions i must take. later today, there will be a vote in parliament to bring the general election forward from its original date of may 2020. with labour and the lib dems expected to back the plans, it's almost certain to go ahead onjune the 8th. we are quite clear there is an election coming
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and we are going to be fighting that election in order to win so that we do have a fairer, more decent society, we do have an investment—led economy. the lib dems see a chance for the party to come back from rock bottom. well, it's an opportunity for the people of this country to change the direction of this country, to decide they do not want a hard brexit, they want to keep britain in the single market and indeed, an opportunity for us to have a decent, strong opposition in this country that we desperately need. this election won'tjust be about what goes on here in westminster but the whole country's constitution. theresa may won't promise another vote on scottish independence but nicola sturgeon will. it's very clear that the prime minister's announcement today one, all about the narrow interests of her own party, not the interests of the country overall. remember, despite favourable polls
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for the tories and a weakened opposition, the last few months and years have shown the politics of this era have become rather hard to predict. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us now from downing street, and the big question has to be iain, why now? she said she made her mind up on a welsh walking holiday. she wants to strengthen her hand in brexit negotiations but it would not have escaped the notice of her advisers. 0pinion polls putting the conservatives as much as 20 points a hand of the labour party. other
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things that have changed is that the eu has set out its negotiating position. they are suggesting they might have to be an exact bill. if the prime minister as to make some compromises during that process, that might upset some of her own mps and of the gamble pays off, she could return to westminster with an increased majority. they thank you very much indeed. we will be with you grab the morning. we will also speak to the leader of the liberal democrats. we will also speak to david davis as well. we will be talking to all the political parties. john mcdonald as well. the decision to call a general election on june 8th will be viewed differently across the uk. we'll be talking to our correspondents in northern ireland and wales in a moment, butjoining us now from holyrood is our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. how's the timing being viewed there? good morning. ithink
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good morning. i think the question here in scotland will be one of whether its independence or the union. that issue is likely to dominate the general election campaign in scotland and theresa may tips hat to that issue with an article in this morning ‘s scotsman newspaper where she argues that a vote for the scottish conservatives will send a strong message of opposition to what she calls the snp's divisive plans for a second independence vote. her party ‘s challenge is to up the number of mps in scotland, currently at one. the snp have 56 and they say a strong showing of them will reinforce their cause for a second independence referendum. what about northern ireland? referendum. what about northern ireland ? chris referendum. what about northern ireland? chris pages in belfast. 0ne local satirist has suggested there should be assigned in airports welcoming tourists to the election capital of europe. this will be the
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sixth time voters have gone to the polls in just over three years in the last election was just last month. it was a snap election to the stormont assembly. that crisis has not been fixed yet. negotiations will resume today after the easter break between the parties to try to restore the power—sharing government. what will another potentially very divisive election campaign give all parties appetite to compromise? most think not very much. the irish government has expressed concern agreement might be less likely because of the general election campaign which is now upcoming but the northern ireland secretary and the westminster cabinet minister says the government's approach to the talks will not change. if there isn't a deal, the government will have to ta ke deal, the government will have to take over running northern ireland itself from westminster, suspend devolution or call yet another election to the assembly. that is
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the view from northern ireland. that is now hit from daniel davies in cardiff. they are calling this the made in wales election because it is while on holiday in snowdonia that theresa may made up her mind. what effect will wales have on the result? there are 40 seats in wales. the tories did not have any of those seats but now they are into double figures and hope to go further again. the most marginal seat in the uk is in wales, dowler, and the local tory mp said he was not nervous. he was looking forward to another election on june eight nervous. he was looking forward to another election onjune eight and thatis another election onjune eight and that is because his party knows that there are more and more labour— held seats which could be vulnerable if they continue to slide in the polls. if the snp do well in scotland and the situation remains uncertain, the seats available in wales, they become even more important as she tries to build a majority.
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prince william has revealed the shock of his mother's death is still with him, twenty years after princess diana was killed. the duke of cambridge made the comments in a bbc documentary which follows a group of runners with mental health problems — they are training to run the london marathon. the shock is the biggest thing. i still feel 20 years later, about my mother, i still have shock within me. 20 years later, people think shock cannot last that long but it does. you never get over it. it's such an unbelievably big moment in your life that it never leaves you, you just learn to deal with it. police have named a man they want to speak to about a suspected acid will be speaking to one of those taking part in the programme. nick knowles will be here and one of those who is running the marathon, rhian, will be here in about ten
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minutes' time. police have named a man they want to speak to about a suspected acid attack at an east london nightclub. arthur collins is wanted for questioning after a corrosive liquid was sprayed during an argument in the early hours of monday morning. 20 people were left injured. the american philanthropist, bill gates, has praised what he called record—breaking achievements in fighting neglected tropical diseases. the worldwide campaign to control or eliminate 10 diseases by 2020 was launched 5 years ago, with drug companies donating seven billion treatments. he says these conditions are now getting the attention they need: a small town in canada has become a surprise tourist spot thanks to a new visitor — an iceberg. it's nearly 50 meters tall and has become stranded in shallow water just off the newfoundland coast. the area is known as "iceberg alley" thanks to the large number that drift down from the arctic each spring. this is one of the first of the season — and it doesn't look like it's going anywhere soon.
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and when you remember how much of thatis and when you remember how much of that is below the surface. of course. 9096? i can't remember. never use the fact unless you know the fa ct. use the fact unless you know the fact. it is 12 minutes past seven. with the scottish independence referendum in 2014 and a general election two years ago, and the eu referendum last year, how do you feel about going to the polls again? sally is out and about testing the waters investor market to find out what people are thinking. a rather large statue as well. good morning. look at that everybody. that is john henry, the fifth duke of rutland, who has been up there for a couple of hundreds of years. i wonder what he would think? if the political world was shocked by the announcement, the people of
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leicester were quite surprised as well. i don't think it's going to make any difference. jeremy corbyn is never going to get in, simple as that. why spend all of them millions of pounds? we have had the tories too long. in a way, i wasn't surprised, to be honest. i think she is running away. it's giving the public a chance to decide what they think of what's been happening and being a democracy, it is fair enough. this election is going to be very important for the people of the uk. the nhs, definitely. ithink this is the chance for people who have a different view about the brexit because after the referendum, lots of people open their eyes and they realised, maybe it wasn't a
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good idea. the nhs definitely, and looking after english people for a change. the nhs, income, things like that. just the general things that crop up every time. i am joined in leicester market by dale and jeff. we heard from the people we were listening to, everybody was surprised by theresa may's announcement. leicester voted to remain in europejust by the skin of their teeth, 51%. will this be the brexit election? brexit election? it could be. what are the issues that concern you? the issues that concern me are that we just seemed to be in such turmoil in the country and we really need all the politicians
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pulling together and working together. playing to their strengths and guiding us through. itjust seems confusing. you run a comedy festival here. i don't know whether this is going to be a rich source of jokes for you or not because some of theissues jokes for you or not because some of the issues that sarah is facing a really serious. yell 0bama there is a lot of humour to be had. i think you are right. nhs, help, those things. i hope they can out of the next few weeks. hold that thought. you are our expert. we were talking about the issues that matter to people like education and the nhs.
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theresa may is calling this a brexit election, but how much of a risk is she taking by going to the country now? one of the risks is we expect her to do well. what happens if she doesn't and the conservatives cannot eat into those big labour majorities in the strongholds? anything that is not a landslide victory may be framed as not a success. that is a risk, she doesn't do well with seats. the other risk is she will be making a lot of promises over the next 6—7 weeks. she says she needs a mandate to get in the eu negotiations. if she gets it she will be stronger, and so on. but what happens if she doesn't get what she is promising and the eu member states turn around and make it very difficult for her supper she has gone to the country and made promises and once this mandate and if she cannot deliver, the long—term
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risks are bigger. bigger than the ones she will have on 6—7 weeks' time. the newspapers are talking about a landslide. it may not be a safe decision. at this point i would be surprised if the conservatives don't increase their majority quite handsomely. but we have a volatile electorate. we have been surveying them since 1964. over that time people have switched support much more now from election to election. there is a lot of volatility. we will have to see what happens. thank you. i started this broadcast with a favours name. later on in the programme i have another one. —— famous name. a sporting connection. i wonder if people can guess who that will be at leicester market this morning. shall we not give it away? alleviate! let's not real and
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it isa away? alleviate! let's not real and it is a buy to let people guess. —— leave it! i could not help myself. i will keep my mouth shut. thank you for watching us this morning. how are you feeling about the prospect of another vote less than a year after the eu referendum? yesterdayjon kay spoke to brenda in bristol, who is in no doubt about her opinion... not... another one! i can't stand this. there is too much politics going on at the moment. why does she need to do it? we'd like to hear your thoughts too, and the issues you'll be voting on. je suise brenda was trending yesterday. an exciting time to make a decision. tell us what you think. we would love to hear your opinion today and in the next seven weeks over breakfast. and now for the weather. iata the exact same words
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every time my alarm goes off in the morning. good morning. ——i utter. this is a weather watchers shot from staffordshire. sunshine. more cloud around than yesterday. most will be dry. where you have had clearer skies in the night it is quite chilly. i mentioned more cloud. it isa chilly. i mentioned more cloud. it is a distant part of scotland and northern ireland in the far of england. the odd part of drizzle. —— it is biggest. a pleasant day with a gentle breeze. the best of the sunshine cloud in the sky is further west. sunshine coming through nicely. also, in the far west of lancashire and cumbria and northumberland. the cloud is conditions here. especially in the
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east of scotland and the west of northern ireland. most are dry. mist and hill fog around as well. northern ireland is predominantly cloudy. it might brighten up with sunny spells later on. cloudier much of wales as well. sliding sliding into the midlands. the odd break. after the chilly start, the highest temperatures around 15—16. mostly around 11— 13. tonight. a good deal more cloud than we saw last night, especially in the south of the country. frost in east anglia and essex and parts of sussex. the cloud could thicken up ford drizzle in the midlands and wales. a great start for tomorrow. most will be dry. a cloudy day for england and wales. bright weather in england later. sunny spell to the east of scotland. a breezy day with rain in the far
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third less. breaks to the eastern 15- some rain. mainly in the hills and west. eventually into northern england. brightening up in eastern scotland. sunniest in central and southern england and wales. feeling quite warm in the sunshine. a short—lived warm spell. working three into the weekend. high pressure nearby. not much rain. this chart suggests some cold air on the weight to be that also affects part of europe. winter has returned. these are the scenes from munich yesterday. good snowfall. some snow in the alps as well. that is how it is looking. back to you. look at that! in case you just turned on your television, it is not it is in munich. thank you very much. running a marathon is a huge
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physical and mental challenge, and for a group of runners it's being used as a way of helping them cope with their own emotional difficulties. mind 0ver marathon is a new bbc documentary which follows ten people affected by mental health issues, as they train for the big race in london this weekend. mum of three, rhian, lost her baby son george in 2012. just five days later her husband took his own life. in the programme she got some advice from prince william. can aska can ask a question? i am worried about my children. will they be ok? you have to understand the emotions a lot more. you understand it more than those who have not had issues in their lives. you have to explain what these emotions mean to your children. you have to rationalise a little bit and you understand, i am
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really angry, i am kind of down. you have the relate it to them. well, rhian, who was in that clip, joins us now, as does the programme's presenter, nick knowles. congratulations on your massive undertaking. it is such a shocking story to hear. you have come a long way since the events which turned your life around. in 2012 when my son george died, and you know, it was just completely devastating on my family was just completely devastating on myfamily and was just completely devastating on my family and friends. 0bviously, five days later, my husband walked out of the house and never came home. the life i knew in the world i was living in was completely shattered. —— answer. it has been a rollercoaster. life is for living. that is what we are looking for. this programme is going to show a
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lot of people that. where are you now compared to where you were then and what has helped you over the yea rs ? and what has helped you over the years? it has been a long journey. i have had good days and bad days. when i started it, you know, the community i lived in, cardiff, friends and family, they supported me so much. i went to a charity which i put a lot effort into. and my two children, who needed me more than ever, got me through it. i am feeling a lot better. i have tried every type of market isn't to get back on that road to recovery. it really has helped me. the idea behind the programme, nick, is he ta ke behind the programme, nick, is he take ten people, including rian, on this incredible journey, and take ten people, including rian, on this incrediblejourney, and it will end when they do the marathon on this weekend. it never ends. yes. but we talk about how exercise can
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help. why have you decided to do this? exercise, nutrition, getting outside, it can help. it is a good thing. running, it turns out, is a great thing to get into the countryside. nutrition as well. you will see that in the programme. we need to worry about that as well. some of the people involved, we have a singer, she was bullied when she was younger and ostracised as a result. we have george, a police detective. he lived a completely normal life until one day she decided she wanted to walk into the sea. a hairdresser, the lovely mel, she suffers depression. claudia, intrusive thoughts. she constantly hears voices. it is something she actually said to me recently that in her teenage years she just wanted to end things to stop this noise in her
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head. when she got to speak to someone about it, she realised there we re someone about it, she realised there were medical reasons for it and she controlled at. i am keen for people to watch this. if you are coming home and wondering whether you should watch mental health or a comedy programme, watch this, because you might recognise yourself or somebody you know. you might recognise how to be around someone who has this. we saw you talked to the duke of cambridge. what was that like? it was surreal. we did not know we were going to meet them. they gave us an understanding. having them lead this helps make a difference. he was so easy to talk to. iforgot who i was difference. he was so easy to talk to. i forgot who i was talking to. we just to. i forgot who i was talking to. wejust got to. i forgot who i was talking to. we just got chatting. i asked this question. when i look back, i wonder
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ifi question. when i look back, i wonder if i should have. but it was lovely. his response was fantastic. he knows what it is like to lose somebody suddenly that you love. it was just amazing. an amazing experience. people forget that in the maelstrom of what was happening there were two young boys. for them, that was their whole world, that was their whole story. it is extraordinary that they have kind of kept themselves 0kabe right until now and then it became a dipping point. —— 0k right until now. so you are going to run this sunday? yeah. are you excited? i am excited. i don't know if i will sleep much. have you done it before? i was inspired by some charities that have done some running. but nothing like this. it is a challenge. we met when we were in london. it is a nice place. i will
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give it my best. just enjoy it. yeah. i know you were quite keen not to run because you want the focus on them. did the duke of cambridge tell you to run? he gave me orders. i have seen him in his running suit. yeah. it was important for me that i didn't run because i do want the story to be about me. it is too much when presenters get involved in the story. this is a story about ten extraordinary people that other people might recognise as themselves. talking about it is the first step. thank you, both, very much indeed. enjoyed it, and have a very good day. —— enjoy. mind 0ver marathon starts tomorrow on bbc one at 9pm and concludes the following thursday. it is well worth your time as well. let us get some news, travel, and
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weather wherever you are watching brea kfast weather wherever you are watching breakfast this morning. we will see you injust a breakfast this morning. we will see you in just a few minutes' time. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. one of the stars of tv show, "the only way is essex," has appealed to her boyfriend to speak to the police after detectives said they want to question him about an acid attack at an east end nightclub. ferne mccann made the appeal after scotland yard released a cctv image of 25—year—old, arthur collins, and said he shouldn't be approached. 20 people suffered burns when acid was sprayed inside the mangle club in hackney on sunday night. two are still in a serious condition. parents of a ten—year—old boy from watford with a rare terminal disease are trying to raise sixty thousand pounds to help keep their son at home for longer. shay murray has pearson's syndrome, a condition shared by only 100 youngsters in the world. any infection, like a cold, could kill him. his family want to convert their garage so he can have more of his care at home rather than hospital. i would like it a lot because it would help me and so would not have to keep going up and down,
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up and down, all day long. his energy, his eyesight, his hearing, everything in his body, which slowly deteriorates, and, basically, will stop working at some point. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the district line has minor delays between upminster and barking. westbound. there's also no 0verground between camden road and gospel 0ak, and minor delays on other parts of the line. also, you can't actually get into holborn tube station at the moment, although you can still exit and change trains there. they're having problems with the electrical supply. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning.
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it's another reasonably chilly start for some of us this morning with temperatures in single figures celsius. so, a bit of a chill in the air. but the good news is we still have the sunshine, and, compared to yesterday, we've lost that chilly breeze to a certain extent. so, it should feel more pleasant in the sunshine. especially this afternoon, we're looking at a maximum temperature of 15 celcius. 0vernight tonight, clear skies in the east at first. but gradually, cloud will sink south. and that will protect us. so, the temperature not dropping quite as low as it did last night with a minimum between 6—8 degrees in towns and cities. that cloud will continue south as we head through thursday morning. thick for a time. becoming quite thick for a time. one or two spots of rain to arrive. high pressure is still in charge on friday. but not wall—to—wall sunshine. we still have some cloud again.
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with this cold front, we coudl get a spot or two of rain. nothing significant. the weather stays quite quiet and settled as we head through to the weekend. so, perhaps a touch warmer as we head to friday as more mild air starts to arrive. cooler again and cloudy as we head into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the prime minister's plan for a snap general election on 8th june is set to be approved by mps this afternoon. theresa may says she's going to the polls 3 years early to help her make a success of brexit. 0pposition parties say they won't vote against the plan. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us now from downing street, and the big question has to be iain, why now? it took a lot of people by surprise,
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didn't it? yes, us included. there was a broad ——a jawdropping moment yesterday. theresa may said she made at the mind only recently. it was on at the mind only recently. it was on a walking holiday in wales last week. when the chancellor and also the brexit secretary have been pushing for that early election. she told them she was going ahead. this is to strengthen her hand for brexit negotiations but other factors were at play. her advisers behind the black door will have noticed that the conservatives are something like 20 points ahead of the labour party. in recent weeks, the eu set out its negotiating position to clear the brexit negotiations. they want an exit bill to be paid before they talk about trade. if the prime
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minister has to make compromises, some of the mps are likely to be miffed. she can return here to downing street with an increased majority with more authority over those mps. thank you very much. and over the course of the programme we'll be getting reaction from across the political parties, including the liberal democrat leader tim farron, the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell, brexit secretary david davis and the snp. prince william has revealed the shock of his mother's death is still with him, twenty years after princess diana was killed. the duke of cambridge made the comments in a bbc documentary which follows a group of runners with mental health problems who are training to run the london marathon. the shock is the biggest thing. i still feel 20 years later, about my mother, i still have shock within me. 20 years later, people think shock cannot last that long but it does. you never get over it. it's such an unbelievably big moment in your life that it never leaves you, you just learn to deal with it.
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police have named a man they want to speak to about a suspected acid attack at an east london nightclub. arthur collins is wanted for questioning after a corrosive liquid was sprayed during an argument in the early hours of monday morning. 20 people were left injured. more than 250 potential suspects have now been identified by police investigating child sex abuse in football. the national police chiefs council — which is co—ordinating the investigation — said 560 possible victims had come forward. a hotline was set up to report abuse late last year when a number of high profile ex—footballers said they were victims of sexual abuse as youngsters. an asteroid as big as the rock of gibraltar george bush senior is in hospital with pneumonia. he was treated in hospital back in january with pneumonia. he was treated in hospital back injanuary to more than two weeks with the same illness. bill gates has praised what
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he called record—breaking achievements in fighting neglected tropical diseases. the worldwide campaign to control or eliminate ten diseases by 2020 was launched five yea rs diseases by 2020 was launched five years ago with drug companies donating 7 billion treatments. he says these treatments are now getting the attention they need. an extraordinary collection of rare colour photographs ta ken during the second world war have been released, many of which are being published for the very first time. the images taken by official photographers, news agencies and even air crews reveal a unique insight into life during the war. the rarity of colour film and high cost of reproducing the pictures mean there are few colour images of the time in existence. when you see someone like that in colour, it is rather strange. matt
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will be here with a weather shortly. but first, john is here with the sport. disappointment for leicester city, they are out of the champions league. they are up against atletico madrid. they were trailing in the first leg but there were hopes they could have upset the odds and compost. madrid have reached the final in two out of the three seasons. they are a strong side. a very spirited performance but not enough. lexit means lexit. it does indeed. this was the story of the tie. the spanish side, already leading 1—nil from the first leg, went ahead through saul niguez‘s header. that left leicester needing three goals to progress. they pulled one from back in the second half through jamie vardy, to level the scores on the night. but despite a flurry of attacks, theyjust couldn't find the two extra goals needed to eliminate their opponents. as their european journey came to a spirted end.
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they are very disappointed in there but ultimately, they can be proud of what they have achieved. as a football club, we can be proud of how we have conducted ourselves and how we have gone about it but they should want more of this because ultimately, all players want to play at the highest level in the champions league, it is the highest level but we have to get back to winning in the premier league now. it's now 100 champions league goals for cristiano ronaldo — his hat trick against bayern munich sending the holders real madrid through. this was a real thriller — the tie had to be settled in extra time — 6—3 on aggregate it finished in spain. harry redknapp is back in football management as birmingham city look to utilise his extensive footballing experience to avoid relegation from the championship. the 70 year old replaces gianfranco zola, with the blues just three points clear of the relegation zone. the former tottenham and west ham manager has been appointed until the end of the season.
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the british and irish lions squad will be announced at noon, with the england captain dylan hartley set to miss out on a place on the tour to new zealand. he'll be the third successive england skipper to be overlooked by the lions, after steve borthwick and chris robshaw missed out in 2009 and 2013 respectively. the wales forward sam warburton is favourite to be named captain by head coach warren gatland. world number twojudd trump has work to do to reach the second round of the world snooker championship. he was beating fellow englishman rory mcleod 4—0 but the world number 54 — who's the oldest player left in the competition — staged quite a comeback and won the next five frames to lead 5—4. the match resumes later this morning at the crucible and after winning his race at the british swimming championships, olympic champion adam peaty gave his medal away to a boy in the crowd. peaty secured his place at the 2017 world swimming championships after the british 100 metre breaststroke title in sheffield.he finished in under 58 seconds ahead of ross murdoch and james wilby.
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and he says he gave the medal away to inspire the next generation. if it was any medal, i think i'd offer to give it away because you get so many of them but for me, i don't want to sound arrogant or anything but for me, the race is what matters, the process and going to budapest, this is qualifying. hopefully getting a medal along the way will inspire him to train harderfor his career and even if it's a week already, you have inspired someone. here is obviously keeping hold of his 0lympic here is obviously keeping hold of his olympic medal. what you do to sort go again? he clearly wants to establish himself with legendary status. that is as motivation. fascinating to see. let's go back to our main story now — mps are expected to back
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theresa may's call for a snap general election on 8thjune — in a commons vote this afternoon. 0pposition parties have accused mrs may of a u—turn, but say they won't vote against the election. the liberal democrats have set out a simple message — vote for us, prevent hard brexit. the party's leader tim farronjoins us now from westminster. good morning. seven weeks away from another general election. what would you consider to be a good result of your party seven weeks down the line? it's an opportunity for the british people to change the direction of the country. this contest begins nil — nil. we have everything to play for. in a moment, the british government are taking us towards a ha rd the british government are taking us towards a hard brexit. they are doing so because they do not have a decent effective opposition. to
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resist a hard brexit, to stay in the single market and to have put every democrat surely believes britain needs which is a strong and decent opposition. theresa may only called the selection because she looked across the despatch box, saw the selection because she looked across the despatch box, saneremy corbyn and thought it was the political equivalent of stealing candy off a baby. there should be properly fought general election.- continue or your sporting analogy, you say nil— nil. you are starting on —224 but the main opposition, labour, who have a vast amount of seats compared to yours.” labour, who have a vast amount of seats compared to yours. i can do nothing to affect the results of the last election but i can affect the next one. you can't call the labour party the main opposition as they left off together the hard brexit cliff edge with theresa may and put our country at risk without any guarantees and whether you voted to leave oramain, in
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guarantees and whether you voted to leave or amain, in two years' time, theresa may is asking in the selection now to give her a mandate to deliver any old brexit stitched up to deliver any old brexit stitched up by to deliver any old brexit stitched up by mandarin is in whitehall and bureaucrats in brussels that we have to live with for several generations. that's not democracy. if you think there is something that can be done at changing that direction, the liberal democrats offer you that opportunity. but he voted leave or amain lastjune, would be voted for, this is the moment where democracy came back to life. a 1—party state, a coronation, it will be a disaster for democracy and only the liberal democrats offer you the chance that not to happen. this is not another eu referendum. this is not another eu referendum. this is not another eu referendum. this is a general election. this is about the nhs and education and social care. it's notjust about brexit. to write. but all is said and done, people are lucky to be told its not about this, it is
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about these things. you will recall that sam goldsmith caused the by—election that he lost the liberal democrats claiming the electorate was about one thing in the electorate said no, it's about other matters. a whole range of issues need to be discussed. nhs and social ca re need to be discussed. nhs and social care crisis, a new dealfor the british people so we will have care from cradle to grave going forward. but given the government have admitted there were £100 billion a year, we won't be able to afford good schools or healthcare or social ca re good schools or healthcare or social care or strong army if we don't remain in the single market. we simply won't have the money. this will come back to brexit. you keep talking about this hard brexit and soft brexit. if theresa may wins the election, that gives her more wriggle room to negotiate a softer brexit which you were in favour of. what it does it gives her a mandate
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to do anything she likes in the next two years and impose on the british people, however they will vote, any kind of deal that we might have at the end of it all. membership of the single market is critical. nigel farage spent several years touring the united kingdom, saying britain should be more like norway and switzerland which are outside the eu and inside the single market and theresa may is asking for a blank cheque to deliver upon britain something more extreme than they have been asking for. security, power in the world and prosperity here at home, it's important we stay in the single market. giving the prime minister a blank cheque for any old brexit is the opposite of democracy and that's why a stronger position is vital and labour sitting on the end its biggest —— on this big issue means they are not a serious opposition and the fact they are not is the real reason theresa may gate into the temptation calling this. tony blair said people should vote
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to turn down brexit if it is in the national interest. do you share his idea? i have shared ideas with many people. the only option is a liberal democrat option. the snp can only gain one seat from the tories. the labour party will not make gains. they will go backwards. that leaves you with a series of lib dem gains around the country from the north to the south of the uk that gives us the south of the uk that gives us the opportunity to make sure that theresa may has the answer to the british people. that means mps of all political colours getting together to fight that kind of hard brexit that is currently on the table. is that a yes, you agree with tony blair? i have no plans to share a platform with tony blair.l
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definite denial? a platform with tony blair.‘ definite denial? it a platform with tony blair.l definite denial? it is my job to make sure the lib dems are the only pa rt make sure the lib dems are the only part way, i think we are the only pa rt part way, i think we are the only part way, i think we are the only part way, through which the conservatives could possibly lose this election. labour cannot go any further. that means a conservative coronation, the opposite of democracy. unless the lib dems can be the stronger position we can be giving the british people a chance to avoid the hard brexit and leaving the single market and have enough money to have the nhs and police force and the army. that is vital. there needs to be a contrast of propositions in the economy. in a position to brexit at any cost. the lib dems are equally clear. but labour is not clear and what they stand for. i am sure you sort
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—— saw brenda's opinion. are you concerned about voter apathy and people who are tired of voting? yes, people who are tired of voting? yes, people will be engaged, but what about the brendas of bristol?” people will be engaged, but what about the brendas of bristol? i have about the brendas of bristol? i have a lot of sympathy. my father would utterly agree with her. the reality is people are fed up of elections and referendums. it is people like me on the television all the time they get fed up with, not election. i understand. but people are not fed up i understand. but people are not fed up with democracy. people do not wa nt to up with democracy. people do not want to be told for the next couple of generations you will have to deal with and live with the consequences ofa with and live with the consequences of a hard brexit that the government thought it had a mandate to deliver without a final say at the end of it from the public. election campaigns can be wearisome for people. i understand that. i look forward to it, but i am strange. people can get
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worn out by elections. but they are an odd one out by democracy. we are proud of democracy. —— they are not worn out by democracy. we should not give theresa may a coronation. worn out by democracy. we should not give theresa may a coronationi would not put i am strange on my ma nifesto, would not put i am strange on my manifesto, if i were you. iq for the advice. not often do they admit that. —— thank you for. time for the weather. contrast over the country. this is the scene in western scotland. you can see the waters. the hills are disappearing into the low cloud to be a grey and misty start. the opposite end, essex. you can see the contrast on the satellite image. the bloodiest conditions in the north and west and
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sunniest in the south—east. —— cloudiest. the sun is warming things up. winds away from kent. high cloud across england and wales. sunshine breaking through. a great day on the way. cumbria, cloud. the odd spot of rain and drizzle in eastern scotland in the short—term. that will quickly depart. thick cloudy northern ireland will continue to break. just the chance of rain and drizzle at times. dry weather as well. drizzle, it's possible. scotland will brighten up in the afternoon before drizzle arrives later on in the west. clouding over much of england and northern wales. the midlands later on. the sunniest in the south and east. 16 is the high this afternoon. 11— 13 degrees. tonight, thick cloud in northern england and
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the irish sea. patches of rain and drizzle. most staying dry. frost tonight limited to the far south—east corner, especially in kent, essex, and parts of sussex as well. cloudy to start with in england and wales tomorrow. the odd spot of drizzle cannot be ruled out. most dry. brightening in the north and east of england through the day. a bit ofa and east of england through the day. a bit of a breeze in the north tomorrow. not as cold as recently. 15-16 in tomorrow. not as cold as recently. 15—16 in scotland and the north—east of england in the afternoon. friday, though, the brightest conditions to the south. cloud thickening in scotla nd the south. cloud thickening in scotland and northern ireland. rain in the hills in the west. by the end of the day, that could be the same in northern england. in the south with warm and, highs of 18—19. —— air, that is how it is looking. thank you. that was comprehensive weather. 7:51. good morning to you.
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the prime minister's decision to call a snap election took the country by surprise yesterday, but what could it mean for businesses? steph is live at a bakery in bolton this morning to get their reaction. she will get some bread as well. good morning. good morning. good morning, everybody. i good morning. good morning. good morning, everybody. lam good morning. good morning. good morning, everybody. i am at a bakery where the team is working hard. they are making some kind of cheesy toast. if you are getting on a flight toast. if you are getting on a flight soon, you might eat this. this is preparing for 900 people. i keep setting off alarms. alarms g0 off. there are keep setting off alarms. alarms go off. there are 900 people they are making potato cakes this morning. they are making something like 16,000 sausage rolls every hour of the it is a business we come to talk to during referendums and became last year. —— hour. their boss was
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vocal about wanting to leave the european union. here we are. we have a general election. how are you feeling? positive, really. alli wa nt feeling? positive, really. alli want to do is have a level of confidence and stability within the economy. if you have a stable economy, a stable government, with a mandate ta ken forward economy, a stable government, with a mandate taken forward through brexit and into the future, then it is going to be good for industry. so, do you feel at the moment that short—term uncertainty is upsetting you, but the long—term is optimistic? what goes up comes down and vice—versa. the economy will override it all at the end of the day anyway. it will go forward literally from one day to the next. when i last spoke to you we did vote to leave the eu. how has this has been for you since then? exceptionally good. we picked up an awful lot of clients. costs have gone up awful lot of clients. costs have gone up a awful lot of clients. costs have gone up a little bit. raw materials, for example. but what goes up is
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point to go down. prices will drop sooi'i. point to go down. prices will drop soon. look at petrol. you are feeling optimistic? lovely to see you. and we havejoshua from the cbi which represents businesses. you are looking fabulous in your beard net. tell us what you think. it was a surprise. most of our members will be feeling there will be a bit of short—term pain. seven weeks of campaigning is worth it, though. a sta ble campaigning is worth it, though. a stable government will be clear and consistent. there is optimism about the outcome. but surprise about that, that it is happening now. we heard david talking, the boss of this business, talking about uncertainty. how do you think is the feeling of role? we are determined to go on with the job. —— overall.
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it does not help business but businesses have shown since the referendum there are good at dealing with it and rolling up their sleeves and cracking on with it. the more the government can help, the of the partnership, the better the better businesses can do at providing jobs. —— the closer the partnership. businesses can do at providing jobs. -- the closer the partnership. what does this mean for brexit? theresa may has put down her principles and whoever wins the election has to stick to those. i think those that have been broadly agreed, now the challenge is to get on with it. we need the best possible deal. we saw the value of the pound rise after the value of the pound rise after the election announcement. what do you think this mean for business?” think there will be some fluctuation in the market. and, again, what
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businesses want will be stability in the exchange rate. for some businesses, it has boosted performancethe others have had costs increase. stability is the name of the game. thank you. your bike one and now look at these potato cakes. they smell gorgeous. i keep getting in the way, to be honest. and now i will leave you with that lovely view. you have to learn how to turn off the alarms as well. look at that. a screen full of peter cakes. —— potato cakes. still to come. the virgin banker. the boss of richard branson's financial firm tells us about the mental cost of making it to the top of a male—dominated industry these days. now it is time for your news,
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travel, and weather, wherever you are this morning. see you after eight o'clock. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. one of the stars of tv show, "the only way is essex," has appealed to her boyfriend to speak to the police after detectives said they want to question him about an acid attack at an east end nightclub. ferne mccann made the appeal after scotland yard released a cctv image of 25—year—old, arthur collins, and said he shouldn't be approached. 20 people suffered burns when acid was sprayed inside the mangle club in hackney on sunday night. two are still in a serious condition. parents of a ten—year—old boy from watford with a rare terminal disease are trying to raise sixty thousand pounds to help keep their son at home for longer. shay murray has pearson's syndrome, a condition shared by only 100 youngsters in the world. any infection, like a cold, could kill him. his family want to convert their garage so he can have more of his care at home rather than hospital. i would like it a lot because it would help with my energy and so i would not have to keep going up and down,
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up and down, all day long. his energy, his eyesight, his hearing, everything in his body, which slowly deteriorates, and, basically, will stop working at some point. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the district line has minor delays between earl's court and richmond and ealing broadway. there's also no 0verground between camden road and gospel oak, and minor delays on other parts of the line. also, you can't actually get into holborn tube station at the moment, although you can still exit and change trains there— they're having problems with the electrical supply. let's take a look at the roads. this is greenwich. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's another reasonably chilly start for some of us this morning, with temperatures in single figures celsius. so, a bit of a chill in the air.
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but the good news is we still have the sunshine, and, compared to yesterday, we've lost that chilly breeze to a certain extent. so, it should feel more pleasant in the sunshine, especially this afternoon, we're looking at a maximum temperature of 15 celcius. overnight tonight, clear skies in the east at first. but gradually, cloud will sink south. and that will protect us. so, the temperature's not dropping quite as low as it did last night with a minimum between 6—8 degrees in towns and cities. that cloud will continue south as we head through thursday morning, becoming quite thick for a time. one or two spots of rain to arrive. high pressure is still in charge through friday. but not wall—to—wall sunshine. we still have some cloud again. with this cold front, we could get a spot or two of rain. nothing significant. the weather stays quite quiet and settled as we head through to the weekend. so, perhaps a touch warmer as we head to friday as more mild air starts to arrive. cooler again and cloudy as we head into the weekend.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise on the breakfast sofa. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. mps have their say — parliament will vote today on theresa may's decision to hold a snap election. the prime minister says her plans for a vote in just seven weeks would mean she could negotiate on brexit with the "backing of the british people." and the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the yea rs certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold this election and secure support for the decisions i must take. we'll be live in westminster throughout the morning to get the latest political reaction, and we'll be hearing your views too. good morning, i'm in leicester where i'll be finding out what voters make of a second
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election just two years after the last one and what issues they'll be voting on. i'm at a bakery in bolton to find out. what businesses think of this news. the pound rose off the back of it, i will be looking at wire. good morning, it's wednesday 19th april. also this morning, the duke of cambridge reveals that the shock of his mother's death is still with him, 20 years on. you never get over it, it is such an unbelievably big moment in your life that it never leaves you. in sport, leicester city's european adventure is over as they're knocked out of the quarter—finals of the champions league by the spanish side, atletico madrid. and matt has the weather. good morning, the early frost is on
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its way out, sunniest to the south and the east, a bit more cloud to the north and west but the emphasis is on the dry weather, as it will be in the coming days. all of the details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. the prime minister's plan for a snap general election in just seven weeks is expected to be approved by mps today. theresa may says she's going to the polls three years early to help her make a success of brexit. opposition parties have accused mrs may of a u—turn, but say they won't vote against the election. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. it's not even 2a hours since the prime minister called for a general election but already, the party leaders are gearing up, positioning their parties and getting ready for the campaign ahead. it was a shock announcement and a decision theresa may said she had only made in the last few days. i have only recently and reluctantly come to this conclusion. since i became prime minister,
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i have said that there should be no election until 2020 but now i have concluded that the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold this election and seek your support for the decisions i must take. later today, there will be a vote in parliament to bring the general election forward from its original date of may 2020. with labour and the lib dems expected to back the plans, it's almost certain to go ahead onjune 8th. we are quite clear there is an election coming and we are going to be fighting that election in order to win so that we do have a fairer, more decent society, we do have an investment—led economy. the lib dems see a chance for the party to come back from rock bottom. well, it's an opportunity for the people of this country to change the direction of this
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country, to decide they do not want a hard brexit, they want to keep britain in the single market and indeed, an opportunity for us to have a decent, strong opposition in this country that we desperately need. this election won'tjust be about what goes on here in westminster but the whole country's constitution. theresa may won't promise another vote on scottish independence but nicola sturgeon will. it's very clear that the prime minister's announcement today is, one, all about the narrow interests of her own party, not the interests of the country overall. remember, despite favourable polls for the tories and a weakened opposition, the last few months and years have shown the politics of this era have become rather hard to predict. so much to talk about. our political correspondent iain watson joins us now from downing street,
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and the big question has to be, iain, why now? talk to us a little about the timing. it got everyone on the hop really. it did. because theresa may heard said time and again she would not call a snap election but a couple of things have changed, she was under pressure to do so from her chancellor philip hammond, from her brexit secretary david davis, who thought this would strengthen her hand in the forthcoming brexit negotiations, but two other factors must have been playing on her mind too. her advisers would have been aware that if you look at the recent opinion polls the conservatives are perhaps up to 20 points ahead of the labour party. they may have felt this is an opportunity that sibley could not be missed but also in recent weeks the eu set out its negotiating position. they don't even negotiating position. they don't eve n wa nt negotiating position. they don't even want to talk about trade deals, for example, unless britain agrees and exit bill. some of the reason may pose my own mps might have been miffed to have made that kind of
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compromise, so if she returned to the downing street with an increased majority until authority over any dissidents in her ranks will be increased, as well as her authority over is —— over opposition parties too. the decision to call a general election onjune eighth will be viewed differently across the uk. joining us now from holyrood is our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. i suppose we can say right now what the big issues in scotland are going to be. you are right. good morning to be. you are right. good morning to you, as well. the big issue here in scotland in this general election campaign will be independent, or the union. the snp are the dominant force here. they won 56th seats, all but three of the constituencies at the last general election. their big challenge will be to repeat that phenomenal success. you can see how they will be framing their arguments going forward. the snp will be
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saying they'll all about standing up for scotland, alex salmond, their former leader, says they will be opposing what he calls the hard right agenda of the conservatives they would argue that a strong showing for them would reinforce their calls for a second independence referendum. that is not an issue theresa may is shying away from either. she has written an article for the scotsman newspaper this morning saying a general election would be a vote on scottish independence, a chance to make the case for the united kingdom. there has been some speculation that the prounion parties may step aside in certain constituencies to give a stronger prounion vote. i think though that feels very unlikely at this point, it would be some short—term gain for some possible long—term pain. it is going to be fascinating the next few weeks. we will have plenty more reaction. we have spoken to tim farron, the liberal democrat leader,
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we will be speaking to the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell and brexit secretary david davies and the snp. there is of course other news. let's talk about that. prince william has revealed the shock of his mother's death is still with him, 20 years after princess diana was killed. the duke of cambridge made the comments in a bbc documentary which follows a group of runners with mental health problems — who are training to run the london marathon: the shock is the biggest thing, i still feel 20 years later i still have shot within me, people go shock, that can't last that long but it does commune of a get over it. such an unbelievably big moment in your life that it never leaves you, your life that it never leaves you, you just learn to deal with it. police have named a man they want to speak to about a suspected acid attack at an east london nightclub. arthur collins is wanted for questioning after a corrosive liquid was sprayed during an argument in the early hours of monday morning. 20 people were left injured. more than 250 potential suspects have now been identified by police investigating child sex abuse in football. the national police chiefs council — which is co—ordinating
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the investigation — said 560 possible victims had come forward. a hotline was set up to report abuse late last year when a number of high profile ex—footballers said they were victims of sexual abuse as youngsters. the former american president, george bush senior, is in hospital for the second time this year. his spokesman said he had a mild case of pneumonia but was in "good spirits" and was going to be fine. the 92—year—old was treated in hospital injanuary for more than two weeks for the same illness. the american philanthropist, bill gates, has praised what's been described as a record—breaking achievement in fighting neglected tropical diseases. there's been a big worldwide push to distribute tablets, to treat ten of these diseases, since a key meeting in london five years ago. here's our health correspondent, jane dreaper these are illnesses which sometimes kill. sleeping sickness proves fatal if not treated quickly and there are still some cases of leprosy, but the biggest damage
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is in the disability and disfigurement these diseases cause, predominantly affecting those in some of the world's poorest countries. an international meeting will hear today that significant progress is being made in fighting neglected tropical diseases. drug companies have donated 7 billion treatments since new targets were agreed five years ago. the number of people needing medicine to prevent lymphatic filariasis, which makes limbs swell, is down from 1.4 billion to a billion. the gates foundation says these neglected illnesses are now getting the attention they need. not all of the goals are on track, and the unrest in south sudan is making it hard to finally finish the job of eradicating guinea worm, which is caused by drinking contaminated water. but this week's meeting is a chance to focus on progress so far while pushing for further work to beat these painful illnesses.
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an extraordinary collection of rare colour photographs taken during the second world war have been released, many published for the first time. the images taken by official that a cruise, news agencies and even aircrew reveal a unique insight into life during the second world war. we are so used to seeing pictures like this in black—and—white. the rarity of colour film and high cost of reproducing the pictures mean there are few colour images of the time in existence. a small town in canada has become a surprise tourist spot thanks to a new visitor — an iceberg. it's nearly 50 meters tall and has become stranded in shallow water just off the newfoundland coast. the area is known as "iceberg alley", thanks to the large number that drift down from the arctic each spring. this is one of the first of the season — and it doesn't look like it's going anywhere soon.
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let's get more on our main story. mps will vote later on whether to back theresa may's calls for a general election injune. it's a move the labour leader jeremy corbyn has welcomed — a government with him as prime minister, he says, would ‘put the interests of the majority first‘. so what kind of battle will the party have on their hands? these are the results in 2015. you can see the swathes of conservative blue across england, and snp dominance in scotland. the north west of england and the midlands will likely be crucial battle grounds — there are numerous marginal seats. but labour made little headway here at the last election. jeremy corbyn says he will deliver a "society that cares for all, an economy that works for all, and a brexit that works for all". so how will labour deliver this? joining us from westminster is the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. first question, let's biglia, are you going to back these calls for a snap election today?
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allan yes, despite a promising that there would not be a snap election now she has decided to go to the country we will support that because it will give us the opportunity of having an alternative government, a labour government, so yes, we will today. does that go for the majority of the party, all of the labour party? | of the party, all of the labour party? i think there will be a considerable majority that will support it. as i say, the prime minister said during not play these party political games and they would not be a snap general election, so it isa not be a snap general election, so it is a breakdown of trust but nevertheless this gives us the opportunity to debate the issues about the future of our country and we will take that opportunity. personal ratings of the prime minister and jeremy corbyn have quite a start contrast, and of course we can look at polls with different eyes of course. isjeremy corbyn the man to win the selection of you? he can. first of all, don't
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be deceived by the polls, they have not been accurate either in terms of the last election or the referendum or the trump election. people have underestimated jeremy corbyn all along. particularly when he was able to debate head—to—head with alternative candidates, he was able to have restricted decent, principled person that he is. i am hoping the prime minister changes her mind about this issue of head—to—head televised debates. she is refusing at the moment but i think that would be critically important to have in this election campaign. on that basis i think that people will see thatjeremy corbyn is the sort of new prime minister we want, someone who is honest and decent and looks after the long term interest of the country rather than these short—term party politics theresa may is engaged in now. to get the majority of one, the labour party would have to engineer a swing on the scale that tony blair did in
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1997. is that realistic? i don't believe the polls are the way they are at the moment, but as i said, people will react against this breakdown in trust by the prime minister in calling a snap election. she has taken the people of this country for granted, and there is an arrogance there that i think people will react against, and you will find that as we debate the real issues about what is happening to our economy, our public services, and yes, about our future relationship with europe, i think you'll find that the polls will narrow and that there will be a real opportunity for a labour government. and you think you can make that kind of scale that tony blair did in 1997? that could be the measure of it? yes, i think so. as i say, i think the prime minister has misjudged this, she has taken people for granted. people don't want elections when they feel there is a need for one, but now it is happening, people will say how can you trust this prime minister? this
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isa you trust this prime minister? this is a fundamental breakdown of trust. and we know this is the campaign i think that, what we have seen so far, even on the first day, pretty nasty. you have seen the front page of the daily mail calling anyone who opposes theresa may as a saboteur, andi opposes theresa may as a saboteur, and i am hoping the prime minister today will this about that and make sure that newspapers like the daily mail, who support the conservative party, don't track this general election campaign into the gutter as this seem to want to do. talking about timing, you talked about her point about calling the election now but are you happy with the time and do you think you are ready? we have been working on the basis from last november, we put the party on a general election footing so we have been working on the basis that she could call one at any time. so, yes, we are ready and we have 500,000 members geared up on the streets campaigning, many of them already out there, parliamentary
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labour atmosphere meeting was tremendous last night and people wa nt to tremendous last night and people want to get out and campaign for a labour government. once we get into the discussion of the policies, and, asi the discussion of the policies, and, as i say, hopefully a head—to—head debate between jeremy as i say, hopefully a head—to—head debate betweenjeremy corbyn and theresa may you will see there will bea theresa may you will see there will be a significant shift in public opinion over the next few weeks. what is your slogan if you are ready? that will be revealed in due course, we will announce our ma nifesto course, we will announce our manifesto and announcing our overall campaigning materials and slogans. watch this space, it will happen over the next week or so. we are out in the field already because we have the local council elections and mayoral elections taking place. in recent weeks we have announced policies which have proved to be incredibly popular. i think that might well have been a factor that theresa may took into account, that she saw that actually labour is becoming increasingly popular on the basis of the policies we are advocating, so another reason i
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think she has gone to the country. you will remember that labour lost a by—election in copeland in april as well. talk briefly about unifying the party. we have mps like tom blenkinsop saying he will not stand for election citing irreconcilable differences with party leadership. canjeremy differences with party leadership. can jeremy corbyn differences with party leadership. canjeremy corbyn reunite the party? yes, he can. tom has never supported jeremy from the beginning, and i wish him well for the future. but what we saw from the parliamentary labour party last night at our meeting was unity right the way across the party membership and our support, wanting to get out there now and elect a labour government because we need one with the nhs in crisis, school budgets being cut, and elderly people, 1 million need ca re and elderly people, 1 million need care and not getting that care, we need a labour government very fast. lam sure need a labour government very fast. i am sure you saw brenda from bristol unhappy there is another election. do you have sympathy with her in some ways? i completely understand that because she trusted the prime minister, the prime
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minister said there would be no snap general elections and she has broken that trust and i can understand brenda's frustration. my response to brenda's frustration. my response to brenda is the way to get back is to vote for a labour government. john macdonald, shadow chancellor, thank you for your time. good to hearfrom john macdonald, he mentioned theresa may, who has spoken to the bbc in the last few minutes, to bring you a snapshot of what she has said, similarto snapshot of what she has said, similar to what she said yesterday on the steps outside no 10, similar to what she said yesterday on the steps outside n010, "i get on the steps outside n010, "i get on with myjob which is put in front of me, when i became pm i thought the most important thing was stability for the uk. when it came to triggering article 58 became clear the opposition parties were intent on the process. we are going to strengthen our position in terms of negotiating with the eu's." "it is important to get through the process and ensure we get the best possible dealfor process and ensure we get the best possible deal for the whole of the uk and put it into practice." when asked to reiterate when she made the decision about the general election she said she thought about it before
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easter. every election has a risk, says the prime minister, i've taken a decision that i believe is in the interests of the uk. talking a lot about stability as she did yesterday. we will put those points to be brexit secretary david davis later on the programme for you. let's find out what is happening with the weather this wednesday morning. frosty start for some, particularly across the south and east, cambridgeshire, this was the scene a short while ago, the frost has melted, lovely blue skies overhead, contrasting with the sky colour in parts of western scotland, much more great picture, low cloud over the hills, misty start, and it is a north—west, south—east split this money, clearest conditions in the south and east, lots of sunshine and blue skies at present —— this morning. light winds so once we got rid of the initial chill it should feel nice by the afternoon. there is more cloud in western parts of wales but it will thicken through this morning, may be producing the odd spot of drizzle for the likes of
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anglesey. also the isle of man, cumbria. this morning across some parts of eastern scotland but short lived, moving eastwards, mostly dry, but misty over the hills and a grey start. was of cloud across northern ireland which could threaten the odd spot of rain on and off through the day but most will stay dry through the day, the emphasis for the vast majority is yet another dry day and it brightens up this afternoon across much of scotland whereas northern england, north west midlands and wales will turn a little cloudier. temperatures and best of the sunshine in the south—east, 15 or 16, chilly in parts of essex and kent, 12 or 13 across eastern scotland. the clear skies he will start to turn cloudy again tonight, patchy rain in the west, extensive hill fog, turning down for one or two in northern england, wales and the midlands tomorrow morning but the cloud keeps temperatures up compared with the past few nights and if we are going to see a frost it will be in kent, sussex and essex in the morning but also a bit of the morning sunshine.
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england and wales will be cloudy tomorrow, maybe the odd spot of rain and drizzle but most will stay dry, brightening up across scotland, and temperatures could hit 15 or 16 degrees in the afternoon. breezy over north—west scotland and some outbreaks of rain with that. they will be there on friday morning, this weather front pushing southwards, that rain on the hills and in the west, in northern ireland by the afternoon and northern parts of england. finishing the day with some sunshine, but a cold day in scotla nd some sunshine, but a cold day in scotland and northern ireland. temperatures in the south 14—17 but the cold front shifts as we go into the cold front shifts as we go into the weekend, high pressure still close by, lots of dry weather in the weekend but with us on the wrong side of it during the air from the north, the blue colours mean pretty cold air once again on the way but not as cold as you might get across parts of europe which is seeing a huge amount of snowfall of late. that is how it is looking, another update in half an hour. thank you, we will see you in half
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an hour. there was snow in munich. it isa an hour. there was snow in munich. it is a 23 am. clinic prince william says he still isn't over the shock of his mother's death — 20 years after she died in a car crash. prince william was speaking in a bbc documentary which follows a group of people affected by mental health problems, who're training to run the london marathon this weekend. our royal correspondent, peter hunt reports. exercise can help with mental health issues. ten runners pursuing a shared goal, a marathon for their minds as much as their bodies. all have suffered and continue to sufferfrom turmoil on the inside. it can help mental health, most definitely, from a personal experience. this is one of the marathon novices. her one—year—old son, george, died five years ago. and then her husband, who blamed himself, took his own life. my life as i knew it was over. me as
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a person changed for ever. ptsd has been a huge thing i have had to carry. the runners are being supported by william, kate, and harry. their heads together campaign encourages people to work together to discuss their mental health. can i ask you a question? you are older than my children, but i am worried about them growing up. will they be ok? with a mother like you, they will be fine. try and understand, you can understand emotions more than someone who hasn't had these issues in their lives. it is critical. you can explain to them what those emotions mean and what they have to do. you have to rationalise this. if you are angry or down, you can kind of rationalise it and deal with it. the shock is the biggest thing. i still feel 20 years later
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about my mother that i still have shock within me, 20 years later. you think, no, shock can't last that long. but it does. it is an unbelievably big moment in your life. it never leaves you. you just learn to deal with it. how was it? it was amazing! yeah. did you get to ask a question? idid. he was so honest. he just said straight up they will be fine. if they are brought up in a loving and caring environment. because they have a great mum? first, prince harry, and now prince william. two royal brothers who provided an insight into the detrimental impact of their bereavement. diana's death was one of the reasons william is passionate about this cause. from my point of view it is the emotional side. i hate seeing people in emotional or mental torment.
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it is really sad. it takes you down a very, very different path in life. the point of the campaign, with the marathon, is we want to reduce the stigma. we want people talk about mental health as if it is perfectly normal. the runners will face physical and mental challenges when they compete in the marathon. peter hunt, bbc news. good luck to them and everyone who is taking part in the london marathon. mind over marathon starts tomorrow on bbc one at 9pm. lovely to speak to rhiannon this morning. steph is at a bakery in bolton for us this morning, finding out how businesses are reacting to the prospect of a general election. pizza bases just coming pizza basesjust coming out pizza bases just coming out of the oven here this morning, sheldon cracker on, ciabattas coming out. i'm talking about how businesses feel about the general election and what is their reaction to all of
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this. they employ about 900 people here so certainly a business interested in what is going on. first, the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. for most of us the weather today will be dry with the best of the sunshine across eastern areas of england but the amount of sunshine you see will vary from place to place, because to the north—west of the uk, a weakfront place, because to the north—west of the uk, a weak front will be bringing cloudier skies. we have had skies like this across the midlands to start the day. glorious sunrise sent to us by our weather watchers showing the sun peeking through the clouds in birmingham. that is where the high cloud has got to, the same
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across central southern and really. as we go through the day the best of the sunshine will be across east anglia and the south—east of england, but it has been a really cold, damp just got down to minus four. defrost melting away, temperatures this afternoon reaching a high of 1a degrees. for wales, north—west england, cloudy weather expected. if you've spots of rain to the isle of man. perhaps also county down, the highlands and islands of scotland but away from these areas, essentially it is a dry day, and even where damp it is only a few spots of rain, nothing particularly significant. overnight, cloudy weather will filter southwards. it will not be as cold over eastern england, perhaps a bit of frosted with parts of kent and sussex, otherwise for most of us it is a frost free and relatively mild night thanks to those cloudy skies stop thursday generally a cloudy day, just about thick enough to get vinod spit of rain across northern england, wales and the midlands for a time during the morning. in the
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afternoon most places will have brightened up a touch, perhaps a few showers working into the north—west of scotland. temperatures between 11 and 1a degrees. friday, things warming upfora and 1a degrees. friday, things warming up for a time, up to 17 degrees but then the winds turn more northerly on saturday, and that will bring some cooler air our way. that is your weather. this is business live from bbc news, with ben thompson and sally bundock. let battle commence! plans for an early election in the uk look set to be approved as the prime minister seeks to strengthen her hand in the brexit negotiations. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 19th of april. the uk will go to the polls onjune eighth and brexit will be the key battle ground on the campaign trail.
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we will have the details. the chinese giant that will be

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