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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 22, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and charlie stayt. the conservatives try to play down speculation that taxes will rise if they win the general election. labour accuses the government of planning a tax bombshell, while the liberal democrats say theresa may intends to hit the pockets of white van man. good morning, it's saturday the 22nd of april. also ahead: 50,000 police officers are deployed across france, as security is tightened ahead of the first round of voting in the country's presidential election. the number one is ed sheeran! the duke and duchess of cambridge as you've never heard them before, presenting the chart show while getting the message across to young people about their mental health campaign. in sport, chelsea chase the double, the premier league leaders take on their closes rivals tottenham, in the first of this weekend's fa
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cup semi—finals at wembley. and ben has the weather. good morning. we have a decent weekend in prospect. plenty of dry weather and even some sunshine, there's a big change on the way for there's a big change on the way for the start of next week. something much colder on the way. all the details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the conservatives are attempting to play down speculation that they will raise taxes if they win the general election. yesterday, the chancellor, phillip hammond, hinted that the government might abandon the pledge made at the last election not to raise income tax, national insurance or vat. labour and the liberal democrats were quick to jump on what they saw as a change of policy, warning that tax rises lie ahead. 0ur political correspondent, iain watson, reports. the american revolutionary benjamin franklin said that uncertainties
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we re franklin said that uncertainties were tax and death and commitments to push tax rates up can prove fatal to push tax rates up can prove fatal to political campaigns. 0n to push tax rates up can prove fatal to political campaigns. on a visit to political campaigns. on a visit to the united states philip hammond criticised the constraints placed on him by his party's previous pledges on tax. all chancellors would prefer to have more flexible in how they manage the economy and how they manage the economy and how they manage the economy and how they manage the overall tax burden down, than to have their hands constrained. then this happened. even some conservative supporting newspapers speculated that taxes would rise if the parties re—elected, so conservative sources we re re—elected, so conservative sources were swift to say that the chancellor's comments should be seen asa hint chancellor's comments should be seen as a hint of tax increases to come. what has been remarkable so early in the campaign has been the level of detail that emerged even before the ma nifesto detail that emerged even before the manifesto is published. we already know the reason they will recommit to the international aid target, which some room for wriggling, and she says there will be increases in the state pension. labour is committed to retain a policy of putting pensions up by a minimum of
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2.596. theresa may seems incapable of answering any questions about protection of the triple lock on the state pension. well, i give you that commitment now! labour will maintain the triple lock! at the end of this first week of campaigning, policies are emerging and political battle lines are being drawn. in around a0 minutes we'll be speaking about the so—called triple lock on state pensions, and its chances of survival after the general election. more than 50,000 troops are being deployed across france in preparation for voting in the country's presidential election after the killing of a police officer in paris. terrorism dominated the final day of campaigning after the shooting and security has been increased before polls in mainland france open on sunday. thomas fessy reports. the french prepare for an election organised under a state of emergency. armed police and gendarmes have been a common sight in the streets since the 2015 shootings in paris.
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50,000 of them have been deployed across the country. merci. the french are also used to that presence of soldiers patrolling their cities. when the campaign started, many in france believed it would be defined by terrorism and security. it turned out voters have so far been more concerned about unemployment and the economy. it remains unclear whether thursday's attack will have a last—minute impact on people's choice. we've had enough of anxiety, and things like that, with all the attacks, and so on. so just wanted to ignore it, personally. so maybe it will have an impact, but i don't know. translation: i'm not worried about sunday in particular, but i am worried, in general, for all of us. ijust don't think our politicians really have a full grasp of the problem. the most important, i think, it's economy, and economic recovery. this is the most important. more than security?
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yes, sure — for me. the champs—elysees have reopened, and are bustling again. but, on the pavement, a reminder of the attack, in which a police officer was killed and two others wounded. 0n the eve of the most unpredictable presidential election in years, thursday's shooting will have repercussions beyond the french capital. across france, people hope for a peaceful vote. thomas fessy, bbc news, paris. a sports ombudsman should be appointed to protect athletes from abuse and bullying. that's one of the recommendations of a year—long review commissioned by the government. it was led by the ii—time pa ralympic gold—medallist baroness grey—thompson, following a spate of bullying allegations against coaches, mounting concern over the treatment of injuries and the child sex abuse scandal in football. winning medals is something that i
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think everyone in the uk would support. we feel better as a nation when we are winning paramedics, football, you name it, it's a moment to celebrate. but i think over the last few years duty of care is something that has slipped away. i don't think it has been intentional oi’ don't think it has been intentional or malicious, but there are hard targets out there and we want to see british athletes do well. if we get duty of care right we can do well, if not better. us vice—president mike pence says a us naval strike group will arrive in waters near north korea in a matter of days. there had been confusion earlier this week over whether the uss carl vinson was heading into the sea of japan or not. however, in a press conference with the australian pm, mr pence said the us wanted to show north korea it had the resources to secure the region. all options are on the table. let me assure you , all options are on the table. let me assure you, the united states will continue to work closely with
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australia, our other allies in the region and with china to bring economic and diplomatic dash to bear on the regime in pyongyang until they abandon their nuclear and ballistic missile programmes. taliban gunmen have killed more than 70 troops at an afghanistan army base outside the northern city of mazar—i—sharif. a military spokesman said the insurgents were disguised in army uniforms when they attacked soldiers leaving the base's mosque on friday. the taliban said its attackers had set off an explosion, allowing suicide bombers to breach the base's defences. two men have been arrested in connection with an acid attack, which left two people blinded in one eye. 20 people were hurt in the attack at the nightclub in east london on monday. the two men in their twenties have been arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm. police are still urging another man to hand himself into police. from curries and box sets to prince george's favourite tv programme, the duke and duchess of cambridge have spoken about their family life together on radio i. the couple were promoting
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their mental health campaign on the station's chart show, as our royal correspondent peter hunt reports. please welcome to radio i the duke and duchess of cambridge. oh, my god! with a destiny to fulfil, some dj—ing in the meantime. these are royals bringing their message about mental health to a young audience, and a confession about listening habits. i have texted in, yep. under a different name? obviously, i wouldn't tell you who i was. definitely not! what are you doing texting in your car? obviously i stopped in a lay—by. i have not texted while driving, because that is illegal. the princely fan, who seeks shout—outs, and who was castigated when he missed a royal event for a skiing and clubbing trip, loves going to gigs. it's not something you can really do all the time? no, and you know, i've got in enough trouble with my dancing recently, so it's kind of best to keep away from that, to be honest. the price of such airtime, questions that wouldn't have amused victoria, like what takes their fancy for a tv supper. yeah, i'm not so good with the spicy food, though. i'm not good at spice.
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if you do a takeaway, they must never believe you when you're ordering it to the palace, right? it doesn't usually get ordered to the palace, chris. right, i see. we tend to go and pick it up, not ourselves. i've got you, got you. go for a little visit around the area. he's not going to go to chicken cottage, is he? laughter the professionals changed. the royals remained, and were set to work. the official chart with greg james and the duke and duchess of cambridge — go. he had 13 weeks at number one, with shape of you, before harry came along and spoiled his easter. sounds familiar! laughter radio bringing together briefly two national institutions, the monarchy and the chart show. so, number one is ed sheeran, shape of you. for a couple facing a life of pomp, this was pure pleasure. when i'm on holiday, would you mind stepping in? to be honest, we could probably do a betterjob. peter hunt, bbc news. for the first time since the industrial revolution, britain has gone a whole working
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day without using coal to generate electricity. national grid said the news was a "watershed moment" in attempts to phase out coal by 2025. taxes on co2 emissions and the falling cost of renewable energy have made coal plants less economical in recent years. the nasa probe cassini is about to put itself on a path that will lead to its destruction in the clouds of saturn. the craft will pass the planet's moon, titan, this morning. but this will put it on a trajectory from which it can't escape and it will be destroyed in saturn's atmosphere. launched in 1997, cassini has been in orbit around saturn for 12 years. this sunday some 30,000 people will take part in the london marathon, among them is one man believed to be the only competitor who'll combine the run with a karaoke performance. it's insane!
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graham burns from broadstairs hopes his sixth marathon will see him break £50,000 fundraising for a breast cancer charity. he is expected to sing his a0 track playlist several times around the course, including such hits as 500 miles and keep on running. so he's going to sing and broadcast and perform all the way? whether you like it or not. that's extraordinary! good luck to graham. and everyone else taking part. i had a very specific marathon running playlist. 0ne specific marathon running playlist. one is that a very appropriate for running. he mentioned 500 miles, keep on running, other ones, don't stop me now. did you have any that weren't on the list? yes, jerusalem was my rousing start
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to the race. at the beginning? yeah. but with what other suggestions. run baby run, born to run, running on empty. basically anything with a run in it. it doesn't have to have that word in it to make you feel inspired! it could be anything! let us know at hashtag bbc brea kfast. takeit brea kfast. take it easy today! let's have a quick look at some of the front pages. the daily mail newspaper, you've just seen the royal couple at radio one. they are concentrating on mortgage price wars, suggestions that mortgage companies will be slashing rates, that the phrase used here, to extremely low levels, possibly the lowest level seen in the mortgage
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market. that's one of the developments being looked at today. speculations about tax commitments in the upcoming general election on the front page of the mirror and the sun. the vat bombshell. at the moment the tories haven't ruled out raising vat and national insurance. the suspicion is that want to leave themselves some flex ability. the front page of the sun. they also suggest that tax rises could be on the way. —— flexibility. they are also looking at the threat to the triple lock, the state pension, which we will talk about later and how that might impact you if you receive the state pension. 0n the front page of the telegraph you can see the picture of the duke and a chess of cambridge —— duchess of cambridge. everybody using the phrase" unusually candid". again, ta kes phrase" unusually candid". again, takes on the front page.
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0verspending more generally. it's about foreign aid, the commitment from theresa may, and the lack of commitment. exactly what the tax situation will be when they finally come up with a manifesto. we've got a few weeks to wait for that, at the hint is that they won't commit to raising taxes again. you've been hearing from representatives of all of the parties this week and we will hear from you keep this morning. this is on the times. a different story, talking about future trade deals between britain and the us. they say donald trump will put the eu ahead of britain in the trade queue when it comes to doing deals with the us. they say it's a victory for angela merkel and a victory as well for brussels. and a picture of the queen, it was her 91st birthday yesterday. we will have a few review of the papers later this morning. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the conservatives are trying to play
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down speculation they are considering tax increases if they win june's general election. 50,000 troops will be deployed across france in preparation for voting in the country's presidential election, after the killing of a police officer in paris. here is ben with a look at this morning's weather. the weather is rather important this weekend. i think it is rather good for the marathon. yes, good morning to both of you. it should be a fairly cool start in the mostly dry day ahead. we will have the full forecast in a moment but today's getting off to a decent start as well. not as decent as this everywhere, what a gorgeous sunrise from one of our weather watchers. a bit more cloud around generally but mostly dry weekend with some spells of sunshine. high pressure still with us but we have this weather front, a fly on the ointment
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bringing more in the way of cloud and the odd spot of rain southwards. that weather front gets stuck across northern ireland, so a fairly cloudy start across many southern areas of england and wales, but here the cloud should rake up. we will see some decent sunshine by the afternoon. a few showers perhaps across eastern england, heavy showers across northern scotland. if you are out and about at apm, some of the brightest weather in the channel islands, up into wales, some temperatures in the midteens, maybe 17 in places. you could catch the odd light shower across east anglia and the south—east but you will be unlike if do. most places dry, northern england dry with sunny spells, always a lot of clout for northern ireland. southern scotland in decent shape but north of the central belt there will be some showers. it will be breezy, and chile in the northern isles, just four degrees in lerwick. showers will continue in northern scotland, they will tend to die away where they will tend to die away where they have developed elsewhere. a largely dry night. some clearer spells, the odd mr patch, and towns
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and cities four to eight degrees in the countryside, not too far away from freezing. the chilly start to the marathon but as we go through the marathon but as we go through the day those temperatures will lift up the day those temperatures will lift up into the teens. we will see some spells of sunshine developing and it will be mostly a fine dry day for much of england and wales. for northern ireland in scotland more in the way of cloud, some outbreaks of rain, and some heavy rain developing late in the day across the north of scotland. and that is the first sign of quite a big change in our weather. we have a weather front developing, that will bring some wet and windy weather but then we turn oui’ and windy weather but then we turn our eyes to this cold front sinking its way southwards into the start of next week, bringing so much, much colder weather to all of us. i hope you have not lost that winter coat just yet. thank you very much, sound advice. time now to take a look at the latest cinema releases in this week's film review, with simon mccoy and jason solomons. hello, and welcome to
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the film review on bbc news. to take us through the cinema releases this week is jason solomons. what do we have this week? the glamour of old—school hollywood is the backdrop for a love story between a starlet and her chauffeur under the watchful eye of reclusive billionaire howard hughes in warren beatty‘s rules don't apply. we have the sands of time, which reveal voices from a hidden mirror in the form of gertrude bell's letters from baghdad, as read out by tilda swinton in letters from baghdad. and wartime london's rubble provides the setting for gemma arterton and bill nighy in their finest, as they struggle to produce wartime propaganda movies. we begin with rules don't apply.
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warren beatty, he hasn't had the best of years! with that oscars fiasco. it has been 16 years since he wrote and directed... this was meant to be his big return. as he gets older is he getting better? this is a vanity project that he wrote, directed, starred in... it's interesting, he began at the end of old hollywood with his film bonnie and clyde. it brought indie cinema into the fore, destroying the old studios, a success in 1967. this is old hollywood where he started out in as an actor. you can imagine him coming into town like the star lily collins does here. it's good on the details of how a boss like howard hughes ran the studios. everybody is waiting on him. starlets, showbiz and businessmen. even presidents wait on the wealth of howard hughes for their green light. it shows how he used to keep starlets in various places, the big mansions he kept them in,
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they were secretive, they had rules that applied to them. but not to warren beatty‘s howard hughes... i decided when i won a talent contest that maybe i would give it a go in hollywood. lam frank. two weeks in los angeles, you are working for howard hughes? i'm having high hopes. $400 a week on top of this? i hope howard hughes doesn't expect to meet you in a hotel room... i would like to thank you for my acting classes, ballet classes and the chance to become a star. what the hell is she doing here? you said you wanted that girl? yes, marilyn monroe! she is a baptist nun... sex is bad because it could lead to dancing. i am a square.
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movie actresses are supposed to be sexy, and they're the rules in this town? without carly simon here, some people suggest that warren beatty could be talking about himself in some of this? you think this film is about you... he has been a figure in hollywood, and him playing howard hughes recently, played by leonardo dicaprio in martin scorsese's the aviator, he is a strange and shadowy figure that warren beatty plays himself. like indiana jones, with a pilot jacket. i think warren beatty becomes obsessed with the mania that howard hughes himself was overtaken by and the film becomes oppressive and more oppressive. you think it will be light and fluffy and full of ‘50s jazz numbers, but it isn't. the romance between lily collins and alden ehrenreich, it is overshadowed by his ego in his own film, a howard hughes thing to do. i see where he was going but it is like oscars night — chaos awaits those fingertips!
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he will never live it down! letters from baghdad. we've all heard about lawrence of arabia but not many people have heard of gertrude bell, the queen of the desert? yes, maybe we have heard of lawrence of arabia because of that epic tribute. gertrude bell never really had hers, and this documentary is as epic as it gets. there is another film with nicole kidman, but this is a more fitting tribute through this letters that she left through her correspondence in the desert. she was the most powerful women in the british empire. at the end of world war i, the borders of arabia were being drawn. she was very much involved in that with winston churchill, riding into the desert, a redoubtable british colonial figure, intrepid explorer, part spy, part stateswoman, part antiquarian. in the arab world, she learned farsi, she understood everything. magnificently played by tilda swinton, as you would expect. what is well done in the documentary, directed by two
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women, they resurrected these letters, finding brilliant archive footage from baghdad and damascus — all of that stuff we see on the screen now. the sphinx is an apt figure as gertrude bell stares out. there's footage now from the region which is war—torn and ravaged. war was always something in that sand, but there is an elegance to it, a kind of colonial innocence in that footage which is beautiful. it really summons up a lost time. gertrude bell's voice rings out as a lost voice of the british empire. let's move on to their finest. a british film crew attempting to boost morale
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during the second world war. what's not to like? in this film, they have bill nighy and gemma arterton. they wanted to make authenticity and optimism shine out to boost morale through the war. happy news wasn't enough. stiff upper lip, chocks away for their finest, directed by denmark's lone scherfig. this goes back to the 1940s, gemma arterton making her way as a script girl, directing slop dialogue, the romantic dialogue in movies. here she is, elbowing her way and finding her voice on the set. even taking on bill nighy, who plays a washed—up actor, ambrose hillyard. an example, a mention of the clever code. i may say that would be the first clever thing that she's done
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in herlife! laughter. just a dash of humour and further along... excuse me... certainly. no, no... it's the caption at the end is going to be "he's not listening but the enemy might be". it's a joke for women who never think that their husbands pay attention. if you start answering, the caption would make sense. i wrote it. the scenario? i will be in my dressing room, if anyone needs me... gemma arterton revealed on the one show recently that she used alexjones's accent as a model for that? there is a presenting gig for her if the oscars are not forthcoming! i did not know that was alexjones — very good! she is very good in it, gemma arterton, the rosy—cheeked script girl who becomes
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the force of the movie. it is about female voices coming in while the war was on and gaining some power. people saying, when the war was finished, that the women would not go back into their little boxes after this taste of freedom. it is about that, but the film is good at wartime tailoring and capturing that rubble of london. it is funny, witty and elegant, as you would expect from people like bill nighy, but the spectre of death is never far away. a bomb drop away. the rubble of london. there is a mix of romance and the making of a movie, like rules don't apply earlier. there is that madness of making movies which hangs this together. it's interesting — movies provide shape and structure, and an ending where life at that time was full of mess and never did. that is why people loved movies back then. 30 million people per week went to the movies. it was the revival for the british people, after a demise beforehand? it would be great if this can get an audience of 30 million in the opening weekend. i don't think it will, but this film is witty, charming and elegantly done.
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a very good performance from gemma arterton, and neatly tied up by the director, lone scherfig, with a good amount of skill. people might think it is a women's picture, but it has depth and elegance, and i love the wartime tailoring in the costumes. i may get one, a decent coat! the best out is get out. it is a horror film? yes, it is out at most cinemas, it isn't a horror film in a scary way, but it's very edgy. there is this depth going on, like in the stepford wives. a black guy goes to a white neighbourhood to meet the parents, the parents of his girlfriend... they do not know that her daughter's boyfriend is black? and then they find out, then we realise that maybe they do? it isn't a scary horror film with scary bits going on. it could be a great date movie. it is a really edgy bit of us comedy. it made me laugh a lot, get out. there is the british
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actor daniel kaluuya there who is brilliant in it and allison williams, who was in girls, thatjust finished on television this week. if you are missing it, there is one of them in get out. and the best dvd, the lady from shanghai. orson welles... and rita hayworth, his wife at the time. she was a famous redhead. in this famous film, he cut her hair and turned her blonde! the studio were up in arms. they wanted her as a redhead. it's a bit of a mess, this movie, and the final sequence is a hall of mirrors — you don't know who is shooting at who. there's this scene
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which was later spoofed. i love this film. it is a puzzle but it has all of the classic things you need from this kind of film. orson welles does one of the worst irish accents. he plays michael o'hara. nevertheless, it has a great atmosphere and shows that orson welles was a fantastic film—maker but ultimately flawed. that is what you want from your orson welles films. and that is what you want from jason solomons. that's all for this week. thank you for watching. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and rachel burden. coming up before 7am, ben will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the conservatives are attempting
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to play down speculation that they will raise taxes if they win the general election. yesterday, the chancellor, phillip hammond, hinted that the government might abandon the pledge made at the last election not to raise income tax, national insurance or vat. labour and the liberal democrats were quick to jump on what they saw as a change of policy, warning that tax rises lie ahead. 50,000 police officers are being deployed across france ahead of the first round of the country's presidential election. terrorism and security went to the top of the agenda on the final day of campaigning yesterday after a policeman was shot dead by a suspected islamist militant on the champs—elysees. polls on the french mainland open tomorrow. a sports ombudsman should be appointed to protect athletes from abuse and bullying. that's one of the recommendations of a year—long review commissioned by the government. it was led by the 11—time pa ralympic gold—medallist baroness grey—thompson following a spate of bullying
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allegations against coaches, mounting concern over the treatment of injuries, and the child sex abuse scandal in football. winning medals is something that i think everyone in the uk would support. we feel better as a nation when we are winning olympics, paralympics, football, you name it, it's a moment to celebrate. but i think over the last few years duty of care is something that has slipped away. i don't think it has been intentional or malicious, it's just there are hard targets out there and we want to see british athletes do well. if we get duty of care right we can do as well, if not better. us vice—president mike pence says a us naval strike group will arrive in waters near north korea in a matter of days. there had been confusion earlier this week over whether the uss carl vinson was heading into the sea of japan or not. however, in a press conference with the australian prime minister, mr pence said the us wanted to show north korea it had the resources to secure the region.
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two men have been arrested in connection with an acid attack, which left two people blinded in one eye. 20 people were hurt in the attack at the nightclub in east london on monday. the two men in their twenties have been arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm. police are still urging another man to hand himself into police. for the first time since the industrial revolution britain has gone a whole working day without using coal to generate electricity. national grid said the news was a "watershed moment" in attempts to phase out coal by 2025. taxes on co2 emissions and the falling cost of renewable energy have made coal plants less economical in recent years. a nasa probe, flying near the planet saturn, is about to set itself on a path of destruction, as it runs out of fuel. cassini will pass the planet's moon, titan, this morning. but this will cause it to change course and head straight for saturn's atmosphere
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where it will be destroyed. it's hoped before its demise it will be able to make some last minute measurements of the planet's rings, rotation and length of day. and of course it was cassini that discovered hydrogen on the moon a round saturn, that indicated there may be the presence of life on the moon. it's done a very importantjob andi moon. it's done a very importantjob and i feel slightly sad that it will go and just... that the technical sound it will make. good, now we know. that's the noise it will make. that's the noise it will make. that sounds very high—tech. explosions in football to the day, at least we are hoping in the fa cup. it is a brilliant weekend. how exciting. very excited about chelsea against spurs. they've been scoring goals for fun at the moment, spurs, and chelsea are notoriously ha rd to spurs, and chelsea are notoriously hard to break down, so how will this turnout? a massive weekend in fa cup.
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it's notjust english teams in cup semi—final action this weekend, scottish teams are aswell. but let's with the teatime kick off at wembley, where the two best teams in the premier league, chelsea and tottenham, meet in the fa cup. for the winners, it's a place in the final and dreams of the double. we will play again in europe. great manager, great players. players that w011 manager, great players. players that won a european competition in the world cup. i think we are going to play again one of the best teams in europe. i think tottenham is a great team and they are showing for the second consecutive year to fight for the title. last season they missed. and this season they are trying again. and that match is live on bbc one and radio 5 live, kick—off at 5:15. tomorrow, it's arsenal against manchester city in the second fa cup semi—final and at hampden park.
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in scotland, go for the treble, as they take on rangers in the scottish cup semi—finals. but the action begins this lunch—time, when the holders hibernian face aberdeen. we've seen off hearts already in impressive fashion, so aberdeen, the second—best team over the last few yea rs, second—best team over the last few years, they keep improving every years, they keep improving every year under derek. they've been to the league cup final already and the semi—final. they've had a good season. semi—final. they've had a good season. but you've got 1a to the competition who can win a trophy and i'm just pleased that we are there. ijust want i just want to ijust want to go and try to win it and get into the final first and foremost to do that. we've been some good teams along the way. ross county, a tough match against partick thistle and another tough on waiting for us. but he don't get the
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finals without tough challenges. we've got another one on saturday, but looking forward to it. the england manager gareth southgate said he was "stunned" by the death of his close friend and former team—mate ugo ehiogu, describing him as a "gentleman" and a "credit to football". ehiogu passed away yesterday at the age of 44, after suffering a heart attack at tottenham's training ground, where he was the club's under—23 coach. southgate said, "he was a gentle giant away from football" but "a colossus on the pitch". there was a minute's applause for ehiogu ahead of last night's championship match between norwich and brighton. the game itself was bizarre. the brighton goalkeeper david stockdale scoring two freakish own goals, as they lost 2—0 at norwich. both times, the ball hit the woodwork before rebounding into the net off stockdale's back. isn't that unlucky? brighton have already won promotion to the premier league. so they won't be too disappointed.
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manchester city women face a huge test in the champions league semi—finals this afternoon as they play holders lyon at home in the first leg. this is city's first season playing in europe's top club competition whereas lyon have reached five of the last seven finals, winning three. you can watch highlights on the women's football show tomorrow evening at 11:50pm on bbc one. widnes remain bottom of the super league despite theirfirst home win of the season. they trailed st helens into the final few minutes, but a late try gave them victory by 16—14. the 2015 world snooker champion stuart bingham has been knocked out of this year's tournament by kyran wilson. wilson had the upper hand for most of the match and had a clear lead when bingham made a hash of this attempt at a pot, allowing wilson to clear up and complete a 13—10 win
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and become the first player into the quarter—finals. and five—time champion ronnie o'sullivan will resume his second round match this morning against another former winner shaun murphy with a 10—6 lead. he needsjust three more frames for victory. ellie downie has become the first british woman to win all round called a european championships. she was in second place going into the floor routine. the final discipline of four. she beat her hungarian opponent into second place. ellie downie will compete in every individual finals downie will compete in every individualfinals over downie will compete in every individual finals over that weekend. i studied the bowl differently this time. that went well, the bar went well, the dean was british a key and on the floor i try to not what anyone else and go up and focus on myself. after the second stumble pass i was like, i'm not sure if it
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is enough. but i would have been happy with second, then when the school came through i was speechless. i don't have words. she says she is speechless, but she still has load of finals to come because she is in the finals of all of the other apparatus! she is a great young talent. shias. the thing i really like about her is she is a lovely person as well. —— she is. very humble. what a talent. i am still reeling from that goalkeeper! yes, let's focus on that! two off his own head! one hit the barand came off two off his own head! one hit the bar and came off his back, the other hit the post and came off his back. unlucky? that's a tough day. let's have another look. talk us through. you have to feel sorry for him. he is probably thinking, well, in the grand scheme of things it doesn't matter too
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much, i will be a premier li player next season, but it is very u nfortu nate. next season, but it is very unfortunate. —— in the league. on the upside he will be a youtube sensation! i think they call it going viral, don't they? that's a term! the general election campaign is just a few days old and one topic is already emerging as a key battleground. the so—called triple lock on state pensions was brought in by the conservative—led coalition in 2010. theresa may has so far refused to guarantee keeping it if she wins the election, while labour has pledged to keep it until 2025. so what is the triple lock? well, it guarantees that the state pension will rise in one of three ways. either the same as average earnings, keeping the increase in pensioners' income at the same rate as those in work. or in line with the consumer price index. that's the measure of how much british households are paying for a typical basket of food, goods and services. or it simply goes up by 2.5%. the triple lock guarantees to increase the state pension
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by whichever of these three measures is highest. so how popular is the policy of looking after pensioners? they've worked through their lives and they've paid their national insurance. they've paid their taxes, soi insurance. they've paid their taxes, so i think they deserve it as much as anyone else. if you can't look after the elderly what can you do? if it can be done, stopping for them. they don't need it. a lot of them. they don't need it. a lot of them just put it straight in the bank. tom mcphail is a pensions analyst. he's in our bristol studio to help us unpick the triple lock. good morning. we will leave aside forjust a moment, we will come back to it, the motive issues and political issues. just do the maths. it is an expensive thing to carry on a pledge over. absolutely it is and this has always been a problem with it. it was introduced to raise pension income levels and it was necessary and has been achieving
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that. but the state pension costs the government about £90 billion a year, with a very big chunk public spending. the triple lock, by giving pensioners the best of each of those measures, so it will always be running ahead of the rest of the population generally, means that the cost of the state pension would inevitably keep rising and if we project forward to the middle of the century it would add about annexed to 1% of gross domestic product under the cost of the state pension. so there's an argument that it is not sustainable in the long—term, but it has been doing itsjob not sustainable in the long—term, but it has been doing its job and really it's a question of how much longer we should keep it for for finding alternative measures, now that we've raised incomes up to appropriate levels. that becomes interesting because on the one hand there are various alternatives, the idea that you don't guarantee it at all, so very soon after the election, or the idea that you keep it going for a period of time, maybe
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until 2020, or maybe beyond that. the labour party talk about until 2025. each of those has a cost issue attached. it does and this is money that could be spent elsewhere, on defence, the nhs, police. so the government has to make hard spending decisions. labour have identified that they need to woo older voters, something the conservatives have done very successfully in previous elections. jeremy corbyn's paul ratings aren't especially good with the over 65, so they've issued a number of pledges, including this triple lock pledge, specifically targeted at older voters who say they will keep it until 2025. i think there's a expectation outside the labour party and elsewhere that the labour party and elsewhere that the policy as a whole objectively has pretty much run its course. but it is now doing this election campaign less about that and more about winning hearts and minds and putting the right messages out to the right blocks of voters and
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that's a challenge now for the conservatives, where they will put their marker down on this issue. all of which takes us back to the voices be heard a moment ago about the emotions around this. we heard from some younger people. there is an emotive issue around this, where people think it is fair and you should treat older people and pensioners with respect. part of that comes down to the financial equation. it's a difficult thing to tell the group of people they are going to get less. absolutely it is. the interesting thing here is pension incomes on average, after housing costs, on average, i stress, are actually higher than the working population. many pensioners, people who have recently moved into retirement and have good final pensions, many continuing to work, many are doing well for themselves. so while there are still pockets of pensioner poverty, on average pensioners are doing pretty well and it is important to remember that the state pensions are being paid for
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after taxes raised by younger workers today. there's always this question of how you strike a balance across the different generations and that something next government is going to have to wrestle with. good to talk to you. thank you. here is ben with a look at this morning's weather. i wonder whether he wants to comment on this. inside the times it says never mind spring, get your winter woollies on. it talks about snow in some places and possible icy blast on the way. it is april. what do you have to say for yourself? that's right, it might be april but there is something much colder on the way. we will rewind the seasons and i hope you can remember where you left that winter coat. there is something called on the way. the weekend is looking pretty decent. that was the scene from a weather watcher in norfolk a short time ago. mostly dry weather with some spells of sunshine
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to come courtesy of this area of high pressure. however, this little cold area is a fly on the appointment, providing a lot of clout as we start the day across northern ireland and southern parts of england and wales. i think northern ireland today will stay pretty cloudy. across england and wales, the club will break up. southern scotland and pretty decent shape. northern scotland seeing some showers, some of the showers turning wintry, the first sign of what is to come. but focusing on this afternoon, the channel islands and south—east england, seeing some sunny spells. temperatures across wales could get up to the mid—to high teens in places. one ought two showers can't be ruled out in the south—east. you will be unlucky to catch one. not a bad day for northern england. southern scotland a mixture of patchy cloud and sunny spells. showers blowing in the northern scotland, some of them went three. four degrees the temperature in lerwick. as we go through the evening and overnight we will keep showers going in scotland. elsewhere, a largely dry night. a
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bit of clout around, maybe the odd mr patch and it will get cold enough for a touch of frost. towns and cities on the chilly side but in the countryside close to freezing. the london marathon on, a cool start is not a bad thing for the runners. i think things will brighten up and warm up think things will brighten up and warm up a think things will brighten up and warm up a little bit as the day goes on. a lot of dry and bright weather to come for much of england and wales. northern ireland and scotland seeing cloud and outbreaks of patchy rain. heavier rain and strong winds later in the day for northern scotland, and that is the first sign of this. a developing area of low pressure sliding across the north of scotland, and this cold front here will work its way southwards during sunday night and monday, bringing some rain with it, and behind it thatis some rain with it, and behind it that is our icy blast. are colder, overnight frost. daytimes will be very chilly as well, and yes, there could be some wintry showers, even some rain. thank you very much. don't pack away your scarf and hat
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and gloves just yet. and don't pack away your scarf and hat and glovesjust yet. and this is what it looks like outside. and glovesjust yet. and this is what it looks like outsidelj and glovesjust yet. and this is what it looks like outside. i can live with that. not quite bikini weather, knowing salford. at the bad weather, knowing salford. at the bad weather has a few more days and it is going to be like that. the news is coming up in a few moments here on breakfast. but first it is time for click. i don't know if you have noticed, but there seems to have been a lot of election talk of late. this week, click is taking a trip to paris, where this weekend, the french take to the polls in the first round of their presidential election. and curiously, from a technology point of view, the way we vote seems, if anything, to be going backwards.
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in the last election, france did allow online voting for those living overseas. but not this time. for both the presidential elections and the legislative elections, injune, it is back to pen and paper. and that's due to the fear of cyber attacks, which the french national cyber security agency says are an extremely high risk. queues of people, paper voting — surely there has to be a better way. well, we asked bbc newsbeat‘s political editor jonathan blake to have a look. ancient institutions and modern technology. the two do not always go together. as elections are held worldwide throughout 2017, that could radically reshape the political landscape, most people will cast their vote in the same way it has been done for decades, using a pencil and paper to put a cross in a box. one company is working on a way to make voting more convenient and, they say, more secure, with an app that lets you register and vote by selfie.
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it uses facial biometrics, and combines that with some sort of government document, whether it is a passport or driver's licence, to create a digital identity, which the voter is in control of. so this is a demonstration version of the app which smartmatic have developed. we will start by registering, first of all. it's asking me to take a selfie. the next stage is to add photo id. we'll go with driver's licence, because i have that handy. once the id is matched to your face, the app confirms you are registered to vote. and we are voting for rushfield borough council, which is not a real place. it's asked me to take a photo, so if i hold up the camera, the phone will take a selfie automatically. so here there is a list of candidates, the same as you would see on the ballot paper. i don't need to tell you who i'm voting for, so i won't.
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i'll pick one at random. you are asking people to take a photo of their face, capture an image of the photo identification. how secure is that information, where does it go? the digital identity you create is unique to you, and it stays on your device, on your personal mobile phone or tablet, whatever it is you use to create it. it doesn't get stored anywhere. you are in control of it at all times, and you are in control of what pieces of information you use to create that idea, and who you share it with. but concerns about cyber security mean countries once embracing the use of technology in democracy are having second thoughts. france has suspended online voting in elections, this year, saying the risk of cyber attacks is extremely high. and in the netherlands, where the voting system has been computerised since 2008, this year they are counting votes by hand. but the country that has earned a reputation as the electronic voting capital of the world
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is sticking to its guns. estonia is almost obsessive about its digital identity. here in estonia, everyone from the age of 15 carries a government—issued photo id card. using this, and accompanying pin numbers, you can access your bank, phone company, energy firm, but also a lot of official information. you can see this man's name, address, date of birth, where he went to school, health records, everything down to what car he drives. in estonia, voting isjust another thing you can do online. download software, use your id card and pin to make a selection, and vote from the comfort of your home, or wherever is convenient. around one in three votes is now cast online, but officials admit it has not boosted turnout. the internet voter is a transformed paper voter. having a novelty, a convenient method of voting, is not enough to bring people from the "no voting" zone back to voting, or to voting, because you need other incentives. you need policy, you need a reason to vote. other countries seem reluctant
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to follow estonia's lead. they have identification cards, and the amount of information they keep in the systems, it is a very different space to what we have in the uk, where they don't have a privacy agenda, about protecting individual citizens. we believe the current paper—and—pen method is the best way forward, that actually it means that each individual‘s vote is counted equally. you know, one citizen, one vote. as technology advances, calls to digitise democracy will continue, but so will concerns about cyber security, so the pencil and paper may well always have its place. now, back to paris. and how would you feel about renting your car to a complete stranger? well, believe it or not, here, there is an app that lets you do just that.
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drivy has been operating for six years. over 40,000 car owners have chosen to list their cars on the platform, mainly in france, germany, and spain, racking up one—and—a—half million days of rentals. the app gives me a list of vehicles available in the designated area on my chosen date. and then i can swipe through pictures and details of each car. yeah, it's basically airbnb, but for your car. some kind of carbnb, i suppose. right, first impressions of the drivy office, its maximum start—up. table tennis, check. sweetshop, check. writing on the windows, check. but how has this company persuaded thousands of people to loan their cars to others? i don't know whether it is because i'm british, but i think it's a crazy idea to randomly hire my car out
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to other people. do you not think that no one will partake of this, because of the risk of damage and having your car stolen? we definitely knew from the start that it would sound like a crazy idea to lend your car, to most people. the question was, would some people agree it was a good idea, and that its efficient, and how do i protect these people who are willing to try, rather than convince the majority. do you think there is a reason why sharing services do very well here? yeah, i think that france is special, because it has the right mix of being, like, still a rich country, where the law is really enforced, where business is going well, with still a mediterranean culture. so i think it's the right balance for sharing economy to thrive. british and americans are more scared about lending their cars. i'm not really sure, i don't know, but i heard that you teach kids "stranger danger" in britain. and that is something that i absolutely don't know in france. so maybe less trust of people you don't know, and less willingness
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to share time, or things, with other people. you have been to london, then, clearly. you've described london. can you find a lost car? can you geo—locate it? with drivy open, which is our big technological focus, now, we can geo—locate cars, see where the car is going, how it is doing. you can use the accelerometer to see if there were impacts. so you can do lots with technology. and basically, the future which is coming, which is all about connected cars, and then autonomous, cars is playing huge in ourfavour, because increasingly, the amount of data you have on the car, the control over the way it's driven is going to increase until it's autonomous, and then whoever is in the car is no longer a problem, except for sandwich crumbs or stuff like that. not that red tape is always a problem here.
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one start—up, in a northern suburb of paris, has already been given permission to place three of its pods around the city. so, what on earth is agricool putting inside these second—hand shipping containers that makes them so desirable? it's a strawberry farm! you probably know that fruit sold in city supermarkets has usually been on a long journey, over several days, to get there. and that means it has to be picked before it's ripe, and isn't as sweet or nutritious as it would be if it was left on the plant. well, this is a way of keeping fruit on the plant, in cities, until the very last minute. there you go, four walls
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of strawberries bathing under led lights. here's all the water that you need, which is pumped in, and then when it's finished, it's pumped back out again. it's a closed loop system. here are your nutrients, and over here, a box of bumblebees. did you know you could order bumblebees by the box? i didn't. that's where they live, that's where they travel in and out, and that's where the pollination happens. agricool is currently experimenting with different colours of light and different mixes of nutrients in order to get the very best strawberries. well, inside each shipping container, we create a real paradise for fruits and vegetables. so best air, the c02 level, the best lights, with led lights. we can grow the equivalent of 4000 square metres in only 70 square metres. so it is like 120,000 times more productive, using 90% less water, using no pesticides, actually, and using only renewable energy. just to be clear, these shipping containers won't move, they'll be permanent
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fixtures in cities. and with a minutely controlled climate, a new batch of strawberries can be grown every 11 weeks, meaning city folk can experience the taste of country living all year round. and that's it for the short cut of click from paris. plenty more in the full—length version which is available to watch on iplayer right now, and plenty more from us on twitter throughout the week, that's @bbcclick. thanks for watching. and everyone back to mine for strawberries. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and charlie stayt.
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the conservatives try to play down speculation that taxes will rise if they win the general election. labour accuses the government of planning a tax bombshell, while the liberal democrats say theresa may intends to hit the pockets of white van man. good morning, it's saturday the 22nd of april. also ahead: 50,000 police officers are deployed across france, as security is tightened ahead of the first round of voting in the country's presidential election. the number one is ed sheeran! the duke and duchess of cambridge as you've never heard them before, presenting the chart show while getting the message

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