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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 23, 2017 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 1pm: jeremy corbyn refuses to confirm that labour would renew britain's trident nuclear deterrent, if it wins june's general election. voting is underway in the first round of the french presidential election — candidate francois fillon has cast his vote. a man has been killed by thieves who stole his carfrom outside his house in manchester. royal support for london marathon runners — with wins for david weir and kenya's mary keitany and daniel wanjiru. this is where the thousands of amateur runners are now crossing the finish line. so many personal milestones achieved here. so many personal milestones achieved here. also in the next hour — letting the train take the strain —
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the flying scotsmanjoins three modern trains to celebrate the past, present and future of britain's railways. and the travel show heads to china ahead of the great wall marathon next month. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. on the first weekend of the general election campaign, jeremy corbyn has announced that a labour government would introduce another four bank holidays. he said it would be a matter to be determined is when the party released its manifesto. just before we came on air, a labour party
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spokesman confirmed that the party would indeed renewed the trident nuclear deterrence. this is what jeremy corbyn told andrew marr on bbc one this morning, before that clarification. it is still an entirely unresolved question as to what you are going to do. your spokesman has said clearly that keeping trident will be in the labour manifesto. we haven't completed work on the manifesto yet. if as you would expect less than 100 hours into this election campaign. so we could be in for a shock? no, no. we are having that discussion within the party and we will produce our manifesto in may. more on that clarification from the labour party when we have more information. meanwhile, the conservative manifesto will include proposals to cap energy bills. the party says it will take action to limit the gas and electricity bills of about twenty million people on standard variable tariffs if they're returned to office. under the proposal,
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the energy regulator, ofgem, would impose a cap on the deals which are among the most expensive offered by energy firms. somehow they're getting a bad deal, and that does involve changing things in the energy markets. to be clear, what we have seen in the sunday times, which is £100 off bills for people on the standard variable tariff, that will definitely be in the manifesto? there will be lots about energy policy in the manifesto. obviously there will be more detail then, but absolutely, i think the people feel that some of the big energy companies have taken advantage of them with the tariffs. ukip says its manifesto will include a pledge to ban the full—face veils worn by some muslim women. the party leader paul nuttall will launch what he calls an "integration agenda", saying items of clothing such as the burka and niqab are a barrier to social harmony and a security risk. speaking on the andrew marr show
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this morning, ukip leader indicated that the party may not field candidates in seats in the general election where the sitting mp is a long—standing euro—sceptic. i didn't just say tory candidates, it could be people like kate hoey as well. this will not be an order which is coming down from the top of the party. i will speak to branches over the coming weeks and we will make decisions. what i don't want to see happen is good brexiteers, not fly by night brexiteers, that campaigned for years for brexit, i don't want to see them lose their seats to remainers. that clarification from the labour party on trident dropped at about three minutes to one. it looks as if they wanted to get this cleared up before it turned into a story with its own momentum, not least before its own momentum, not least before it appeared on the front pages. its own momentum, not least before
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it appeared on the front pagesm was already picking up speed because this issue is such a difficult one for the labour party. they have been divided on it. the official position has been that it is in favour of renewing trident, butjeremy corbyn, the party leader, has made no secret of the fact that he doesn't particularly wa nt of the fact that he doesn't particularly want trident to be renewed, that he thinks it shouldn't be labour policy. the labour party last year voted on this, labour mps decided that they wanted to push ahead with trident. the fact that jeremy corbyn when asked about it earlier run on the andrew marr show, that he didn't commit to it, he said the manifesto was still in the writing stages, that they haven't got around to that yet, and that he couldn't give confirmation as to whether it would be in the ma nifesto, whether it would be in the manifesto, is rarely what raised questions. now the labour party spokesperson has been in touch with us and said that it is going to be labour policy. we knew that it was labour's existing policy and the ma nifesto labour's existing policy and the manifesto was a critical point about
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whetherjeremy corbyn had got his way. he doesn't appear to have got his way on this one. resolutely he will argue that party policy is ultimately made by party conference. it could be in the future that the party conference will take a different position of its own. he will have to lead into the election on this whatever his own personal objections. that's how it seems. we weren't sure from what he said whether it would be in the ma nifesto. whether it would be in the manifesto. from what we have been told, that is labour policy still you would expect to find it in the ma nifesto. you would expect to find it in the manifesto. it was something the conservatives could use against the labour party, because we have already had the conservative party chairman talking about how britain would be safer under a may. that issue of defence is crucial. it is how far people think whether or not we have a leader he was in favour of the independent nuclear deterrent, there has always been a question of whether they would use it, then their finger on whether they would use it, then theirfinger on the red button. we have had people in the past like dennis eady saying he never would have done it even though he was regarded as a whole and defence. a
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tory defence minister saying he doesn't support nuclear deterrence. it was a bigger political debates, but labour it is a particular vulnerability. it is because jeremy corbyn has been the only labour leader to come out while he is labour leaders saying that he would not press the nuclear button. he said that, the conservatives certainly seized upon it and made the point that they, it is difficult to show people how you would defend the country if you have already kind of given up on one key point of defence, which would be that threat of being able to use their weapons against your opponents. jeremy corbyn has already made that clear, that he wouldn't use the nuclear deterrence. it's kind of makes having the nuclear deterrent is a moot point if he were a minister, because we know he wouldn't use it. ! thank you. more on that story on bbc news as we get it. the former prime minister tony blair has called on voters not to back general elections candidates
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who ‘back brexit at any cost‘, regardless of political party. he that brexit was a bigger issue than party allegiance in this election. speaking to radio 4's world this weekend, he said that voters need to know where candidates stand on brexit and that theresa may was pursuing an "unreasonable policy" that was driven by the right of her party the voters should at least, it's up to them what they do, and i'm not going to advocate people vote tactically, but they should know, they should vote on an informed basis on this issue. how will you vote 7 basis on this issue. how will you vote? i will vote labour, basis on this issue. how will you vote? iwill vote labour, i always have. there are many excellent labour candidates throughout the country, but that is not the point of me. the point of me is whether i am labouror not of me. the point of me is whether i am labour or not labour, even if there are conservatives lib dems, i will work with anyone to get this argument across in the country. what is that practically mean? how? for those people, lots of us from
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different political parties involved in the more pro—european movements are some of them have got very large databases of contacts and is, if you like, members, it's very important we mobilise those people in each constituency to the would—be mps, we need to know where you stand on this issue. if we don't know where he stands, we effectively are giving theresa may a blank cheque not for another negotiation but one which is for brexit at any cost, which is not in the country. tony blair on the world this weekend. later he said he felt so passionately about brexit that he is almost tempted to make a return to british politics.|j that he is almost tempted to make a return to british politics. i feel to the first time since i first came into politics, i look at the british political scene at the moment is and i actually almost feel motivated to go right back into at! really? yes,
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because i feel we are just allowing ourselves to be hijacked by what is actually quite a small group of people with a very strong ideology, he will i accept they managed to win a referendum last year, but they don't seriously, they shouldn't seriously be allowed to just take this country where they will. i agree that someone like theresa may, she is very sensible, very solid, a privately decent person, i agree with a lot of what she says, about energy costs today, most people would say fair enough, but on this issue, the biggest issue of our time, and which will have a direct impact on ourfuture, our time, and which will have a direct impact on our future, our economy, our living standards and on the younger people of this country, on this issue, she is not reasonable. she is in droves to that small group on the right. they are taking harris is taking us where they want to go. —— she is enthralled. is taking us where they want to go. -- she is enthralled. you can find
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the full interview on the bbc news website. french voters are going to the polls in the first round of the country's presidential election. 11 candidates are running for office, with the race between the top four contenders considered too close to call ahead of the vote. two candidates from this round will go through to a run—off vote next month. turnout by noon was 28.54% of the electorate — slightly up on the corresponding 2012 figure of 28.29%. karin giannone is in paris for us. good afternoon. part way through the first day. indies, will come to one of the capital's 900 or so polling stations. there are 47 million french people eligible to vote today. the security presence across the country is huge, 50,000 extra police officers, 7,000 extra army personnel. just before you came to us, we had a patrol of four army
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soldiers walking past with machine guns, right behind us. that is the way things are working today. there are patrolled by police and military around the polling stations across france. 66,000 polling stations to keep secure because of the atmosphere, because of thursday night's attack on the shamsi lycee and because of the ongoing state of emergency. “— and because of the ongoing state of emergency. —— on the sean scillies april. whether that attack, whether the state of emergency will put people off coming out to vote. there isa people off coming out to vote. there is a very normal atmospheric despite the intermittent security presence. there is a really normal atmosphere, people walking past enjoying a normal sunday. children playing football around us, walking their dogs. all along, there is also this fear that this security presences there, but there are determined voters turning up all the time. lots of people have told us they're going to vote, nay. one woman a particular wa nted to vote, nay. one woman a particular wanted to be first on the line.|j wanted to be first on the line.|j wanted to be first on the line.|j wanted to be here, the first one to
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come to vote, and as a woman, we are 5296 come to vote, and as a woman, we are 52% of women voting in paris. i wanted to show that there is no problem of security, and we are in paris. it is a nice weather, we are ina nice paris. it is a nice weather, we are in a nice parks and it is very quiet and calm. it is a balance, to come here to vote and we must do it. certainly some voters determines to be here, to cast their votes, to participate in the first round of this residential election. turnout is obviously going to be a huge issue. there are to 30% of french undecided if they're going to vote at all or who they will vote for. when the rate is as tight as this, not turnout could affect the result significantly. emmanuel macron is from the centre, marine le pen from the far right is, was rusty on from the far right is, was rusty on from the centre—right and jean—luc melenchon form before right. they are the four with a realistic chance of making it through to the second
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round. the challenge of trying to predict the outcome are many. i have spoken to one pollster. he is also involved in trying to come up with this result as soon as the polls close tonight. give branson idea of who that is might be. it is always challenging because pollsters are supposed to kind of project, which is not actually what we do. we just monitor the opinion and see how it changes from one moment to the other. of course, if you have in mind the fact that this election was very specific, very particular, with the huge amount of hesitation between voters, challenges knowing exactly if they would turn out or not, that was a bit trickier than it used to be, probably. because of this factor of the undecideds or people that may not turn up at all, how do you factor in that parts of the whole political landscape when you try to come up with the numbers? we don'tjust come out you try to come up with the numbers? we don't just come out with a you try to come up with the numbers? we don'tjust come out with a number of what is going to be the result,
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we have more numbers than that. usually journalists we have more numbers than that. usuallyjournalists sometimes just focus on the horse race. we don't do that, we have many tools to try to assess what... if people are going to turnout. we use social media to try to see if something is happening not exactly in the same kind of opinion. so we have many tools that we use all the time to try to monitor. it is still a tricky work, but we have more tools than we used to have, more data. l0 mightjust explain the process of this result predicted that my predicted results, not an exit poll that should appear at apm when the votes close. -- when the voting closes. how do you get the voting closes. how do you get the data and how different is this year? and it different this year, that we have its pacific french syste m that we have its pacific french system where we have the opportunity to be in polling stations because they close at different moments in time. they used to close at 6pm, 7pm
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and apm, so that means our interviewers had their not interviewing people but being in the polling stations, attending, —— attending the counting of the ballots. we used to have to hours before 8pm. we only have one hour at this time, so it means that we will have less data, we will have to be quicker, but we hope to be able to say what's going to be the result at 8pm. we are usually quite accurate. that normally means to faces appearing on the champs—elysees. usually, yes. on each tv station, we have this screen with the two faces, but of course this time if it is to call, close to call, we might have three or four faces. showing just how normal life here in the centre of paris is, in amongst all that
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increased security. what he was referring to is that the french are used to faces appearing on a big screen used to faces appearing on a big screen at the end of the day, as soon screen at the end of the day, as soon as screen at the end of the day, as soon as polls close, and that might be, because of the tightness of the race, some delay. it might come a little bit later. this isjust the first rounds, 11 candidates being reduced to two. we will know the a nswer to reduced to two. we will know the answer to that too by the end of this day. we will indeed. we look forward to that and hearing more from you later. and there'll be live coverage of the results of the first round of voting in the french presidential election. that's tonight at 6:30pm, in france decides here on bbc news. and there's full coverage on our website, and via the mobile app. i labour supports the renewal of
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trident afterjeremy corbyn earlier refused to say whether or not it would be in the party's manifesto. voting is under way in the first round of the french presidential election. candidates including emmanuel macron and marine le pen have already cast votes. here a man has been killed by thieves who stole his carfrom outside his house. sport now...and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here sjessica. mary keitany has broken the world marathon record for a women's only race — previously held by paula radcliffe. keitany won it in 2 hours and 17 minutes. the kenyan has three new york marathon victories to her name, and she beat ethiopian track great tirunesh dibaba by almost a minute. aly dixon was the fastest british runner. jo pavey dropped out
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of the race at around 16 miles, so she won't take part in the world championships in london this summer. kenya were victorious in the men's elite race too, dan wanjiru crossed the line first, for the biggest win of his career, beating the favourite kenny—eesa bekele. the winning time was two hours, five minutes and 48 seconds. david weir has won a record seventh london marathon. the six time paralympic champion won his first way back in 2002 and has competed in the event every year since. it came down to a sprint finish between weir and his great rival marcel hoog of switzerland but weir was able to come out on top. he moves ahead in the record books above dame tanni grey—thompson who won six london marathon titles. the women's wheelchair race was won by switzerland's manuela schar in a course record time of one hour, 39 minutes and 57 seconds. we're 15 minutes into the scottish cup old firm there are 40,000 runners out there
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to come across this finish line, and they're starting to pour through now as they complete the 26 mile course. helen glover is one of them. an olympic gold medallist in rowing and a new medal around your neck today. yes, really chuffed. it was my first ever marathon so i didn't know what to expect. everyone says the crowds are amazing and they were brilliant from start to end. you look like you have barely broken sweat!|j have barely broken sweat! i have, believe me. a lot of food, berger, doughnuts, chocolate, anything i like. you low you said that your only goal was to beach rowing partner. i'm looking around and i can't see her. i missed out there. we are used to competing together so i hope she comes through soon. we ran for i hope she comes through soon. we ranfora i hope she comes through soon. we ran for a little while to and are lost each other. we do it again?|j lost each other. we do it again?” think we would. i have enjoyed its.
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now i know what it is about, i want to train properly and see what i could do. thank you. you really get a sense down here of the emotion that people go through as they crossed the finish line. this is a real test of insurance. some people are real test of insurance. some people a re really real test of insurance. some people are really suffering when they finish, others look like they have barely broken sweat. thank you. looks like some people in a lot of pain crossing the finish line. konta, ranked two places below her rival at seventh in the world rankings, gave signs of a comeback, breaking halep and taking a 3—1 lead in the second but halep responded by taking five games in a row to win the match. celtic are still on for the domestic treble — having already wrapped up the league title and the scottish league cup and there's been an early goal. callum mcgregor with the smart finish to give celtic the lead. the winners face aberdeen in the final. the fa cup also continues today, arsenal take on manchester city in the semi—final at wembley, at 3 o'clock. with arsenal boss arsene wenger
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under pressure because of the club's poor run in the premier league — they're seventh in the table — he's well aware of the importance of doing well in this competition. the fa cup also continues today, arsenal take on manchester city in the semi—final at wembley, at 3 o'clock. with arsenal boss arsene wenger under pressure because of the club's poor run in the premier league — they're seventh in the table — he's well aware of the importance of doing well in this competition. what i expect in the semifinal is to go to the final. i played 11 semifinals in the fa cup. it is a special experience. the match is a good opportunity to show how much we are ready for a fight and want to go to the final. it is maybe our only opportunity to get a trophy. i say many times to them and they still don't believe how good they are.
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it's a lot of stress, a lot of pressure. when you handle that and you were going to win, next time it will be easier. england's tommy fleetwood carded a final round of 9 under par at the shen—jen international, to have a tie for the lead, but lost the play—off hole to austria's bernd weisberger. fleetwood made three birdies in his finalfour holes of the final round, to move to 16 under par. but weisberger — who parred his last 11 holes of his final round — managed to birdie the play—off hole, and pip fleetwood to the title. now on bbc news, it's time for the travel show i am still catching my breath. weight that is all the sport for
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now. that's all from me. a man has died after being run over by thieves who stole his car in manchester. 35—year—old michael samwell and his wife were woken during the night by a noise outside their house in chorlton, and he went out to investigate. he was found with serious injuries and died later in hospital. police believe he was run over by his own car, a black audi s3, which was taken. greater manchester police have begun a murder investigation and are appealing for witnesses. let's get more on this with our correspondent andy gill. we are getting some details now from the police and it sounds pretty grim. it is something the police
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described as tragic. importantly, they're saying that apart from peeling for witnesses, they also wa nt peeling for witnesses, they also want the criminal community and see did this to search their conscience and give themselves up. they say this incident has crossed a line. 35—year—old michael sandwell, former royal navy officer, at home in johnson, with his wifejessica, he heard a bang outside at 3am this morning. he went down to investigate, shouting heard from the back of the property. michael samwell themselves with injuries at the back of the property, taken to hospital but died of his injuries afterwards. the black audi which belonged to him which was stolen found abandoned and badly damaged a couple of miles away. in the last few minutes, greater manchester police have been speaking about the incidents. this is detective superintendentjohn chadwick. incidents. this is detective superintendent john chadwick. we know that michael was at home in a
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really nice, quiet residential area. around 3am, he was awoken by noise downstairs. he went down to see what it is, leaving his wife upstairs. we are not exactly sure what happens next, but we know that michael ends up next, but we know that michael ends up outside the back of his house with is a parking area. he was struck by his own vehicle but we don't know how many times. he suffered multiple injuries, sadly died at manchester royal infirmary and about 4am. michael's or was stolen, it is a black audi s3. than away from the scene rapidly, it would appear. it hit the curb on legal crescents in the ladybird area, which is a couple of miles away, rise to ten minutes drive. then he drove a short distance after that, really badly damaged, ultimately abandoned the car. we don't know who those people are.
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wa nt don't know who those people are. want you think about what has happened to michael in these circumstances? i think the main thing for people to realise is that this could have happens to absolutely anybody. you hear a noise downstairs and you go and see what it is. what lines of enquiry are you pursuing the moments? there are a numberof pursuing the moments? there are a number of scenes clearly cranbourne road, residential area, a lot of noise. there are people who were working out of their beds. i appeal to anyone roundabout at 3am, it is a really quiet places of anything suspicious would stand out a mile. that his police reaction to that killing in greater manchester will stop they are appealing for help. you have arrived fresh and enthusiastic to tell us what's going to be happening over the next few days. i have indeed! i'm not sure
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i'm too enthusiastic about the forecast for the next couple of days, because it is going to feel cold. we would want something a little bit warmer at this late in the season. at the moment, beautiful weather out there. not feeling the chill in the air. it wasn't enough day. nice and sunny across so many parts of the country. scattered clouds around the south and south—east. nice weather across the eastern and southern scotland as well. this lump of brain you can see spinning around doesn't look like a lots on the weather map, but this is the leading edge of something much colder heading our way will stop that will be slipping down during the course of the night across scotla nd the course of the night across scotland is an the early hours. snow across the month in this region is there, a servant of potentially. some wintry weather getting into south—eastern of scotland. a huge tub contrast tomorrow between the south and north. by tuesday, we will feel the chill in the air. temperatures not just the
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feel the chill in the air. temperatures notjust the lee—lo but it is the wind and it will feel cool if not colder the schaeffer for some of us.
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