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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 27, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. deepening tensions in north korea: the us calls for tougher sanctions until it dismantles its nuclear programme. america is piling on the pressure as all 100 us senators attend a special briefing at the white house. we'll ask the foreign secretary borisjohnson what the uk can do about north korea, just after 7am. good morning, it's thursday the 27th of april. also this morning: the pioneering eye test which could save people's sight by helping doctors to diagnose glaucoma. car insurance premiums have gone up by 10% over the past year and could rise even further, according to one leading insurer. i'll be finding out why. morning, everyone.
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in sport: still in the title race. tottenham beat crystal palace and keep the heat on leaders chelsea. a boom for books as the publishing industry has a surge in sales and a record year. and carol has the weather. a chilly start in southern areas, with a touch of frost. but here we've got early sunshine. most of the uk will be cloudy, with showers and a few sunny spells in between. more in about 15 minutes. thank you amcu bend. —— see you then. tensions are rising in north korea, as the u—5 call for more pressure to force the country to give up its nuclear weapons programmes. last night, president trump briefed all 100 members of the senate, revealing a strategy of economic sanctions and diplomacy. but washington also said they were prepared to defend themselves and their allies, as our correspondent laura bicker reports. the us is piling on the pressure. this is a military exercise just
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north of the north korean border. a message that the us is ready if diplomatic efforts fail. this is how the head of the us pacific command put it to the house in washington. all options are on the table. we want to bring kim jong—un to his senses, not to his knees. later, all 100 senators were bussed to a briefing at the white house from their commander in chief. a highly unusual move to show politicians from both sides of the aisle just how serious the situation has become. north korea is the most dangerous spot on the planet right now, and kimjong—un is a dangerous and wildly unpredictable dictator. donald trump is hoping china will use its political and economic leverage over pyongyang to persuade kim jong—un to end his nuclear programme. other options include redesignating north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism, which will allow
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the us to impose greater sanctions. meanwhile, the us show off might continues. this is a —— is a missile defence system in south korea. the current goal is apart to peace through negotiations, but the trump administration said it is prepared to defend itself and its allies if necessary. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has used his first intervention in the election campaign to mount the conservatives‘ most personal attack yet on thejeremy corbyn. in an article published in the sun newspaper, mrjohnson accused the labour leader of being a security threat to the united kingdom. labour have called his comments "crass and offensive". our political correspondent alex forsyth joins us from westminster. alex, what more has boris johnson said? borisjohnson has boris johnson has been borisjohnson has been pretty quiet in this election campaign so far, but he has now waited in in true fla m boya nt style. he but he has now waited in in true flamboyant style. he is known for
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his colourful use of language and has turned that full blast onjeremy corbyn. he has called him a martin headed —— mutton headed and says he threatens national security. he says he asks nonsensical questions in parliament, he would be calamitous in parliament and disastrous for brexit. this is the core of the conservative campaign so far. they are trying to make this about leadership to draw parallels between jeremy corbyn and theresa may because they think this will do them some savers, but labour have been highly critical of these comments. the shadow secretary says boris johnson was only allowed out of hiding if he talked delusional nonsense. she says he is looking after exit, a significant thing for this country, and these remarks could damage the chances of the uk getting a good deal with the eu —— brexit. we are one week into the campaign and it is already very personal. we'll speak to the foreign secretary, borisjohnson injust over an hour's time.
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labour will today promise to tackle the housing crisis by building a million homes, half of them council houses, if the party wins the general election. labour claims the number of affordable homes being built is at a 24—year low. the housing minister gavin barwell mp said the conservatives have recently set out a clear plan to build more affordable housing, with the number of new homes under construction up three quarters since 2010. ministers from 27 european union countries will meet today for final discussions about the eu's negotiating stance on brexit. they're set to approve the draft negotiating guidelines for the uk's divorce from the eu and discuss the next steps in the process. a simple eye test could lead to much earlier detection of a condition which causes irreversible sight loss, according to researchers from university college london. diagnosing glaucoma sooner would mean patients could start treatment before their vision deteriorates. our health correspondent jane dreaper has the details. francesca's eyesight is crucial for her work as an artist.
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glaucoma develops slowly over many years. there is no cure, but doctors in london believe this new injection will eventually help patients get diagnosed and treated much sooner. to lose one's eyesight early or later is devastating, really, especially if you have an artistic background. but this sort of gave you hope that they could monitor the condition and then, if need be, they could give you drops, which would slow it down slightly. glaucoma is more common as you get older. it affects 600,000 people in the uk. if left untreated, nerve cells in the retina die, leading to sight loss. the test uses a special fluorescent marker to highlight failings cells, potentially revolutionising treatment. we believe in glaucoma, it is ten years between a visual
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defect being identified and when the actual process starts. that ten—year delay could mean that you have delayed starting treatment at the time when it is most accessible to treatment, and when you could even prevent vision loss occurring in the first place. francesca wants to save her sight from deteriorating, and she is hopeful the new test will help many others too. 16 people have been involved in trials so far, so more research is needed. but the london team say these are promising results which could also perhaps be used to detect early signs of degenerative brain illnesses. councils in england will have to do more to tackle homelessness, under a new law introduced today. the homelessness reduction bill means local authorities now have a legal duty to help homeless people to find a place to live. the legislation has been broadly welcomed by homelessness charities, though they warn more still needs to be done to tackle rough sleeping,
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which has risen by 16% in england in the last year. patients are still struggling to get gp appointments and many surgeries are closed during core opening hours, according to mp5. a report from the public accounts committee says the government's drive to force surgeries to open longer risks duplicating services. they also warn "no credible plan" is in place to recruit more doctors. the government has pledged an extra £500 million per year in funding by 2020 to operate a seven—day service. it's been a record year for book sales, according to figures released by the publishing industry. children's books, non—fiction and academicjournals all did well, but sales of ebooks fell sharply. e—readers, tablets, smart phones. the story was that as we increasingly read on screens this would spell doom for the good old—fashioned book. would spell doom for the good old —fashioned book. but last
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would spell doom for the good old—fashioned book. but last year sales of ebooks to consumers fell by 1796. sales of ebooks to consumers fell by 17%. meanwhile, in a record yearfor the publishing industry, physical book sales rose by 8%. readers showed particular interest in non—fiction. everything from diet books to celebrity memoirs. sales of children's books rose by 16%. the bestseller of 2016 was harry potter's new book and the overwhelming majority of buyers ready —— when it on paper, not on screen. most of us have screens in front of us at work or home and people are choosing to spend time away from them. in their leisure moments they look at a book, a printed version, and equally really important when parents want to spend time with their children they want to redo them themselves or they want their children to spend time away from screens. the publishing industry is still making increasing amounts of money from online journals, digitalacademic titles and audio books, but it seems the
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printed book isn't over yet. the number of new cars built in britain reached a 17 year high last month at more than 170,000. figures from the society of motor manufacturers and traders show exports continue to drive the increase, with an average of one car exported every 20 seconds in march. now for something fluffy. 0r four fluffy things to be precise. a zoo in austria has shown off a litter of white tiger cubs to the public for the first time. falco, toto, mia and mautzi were born a month ago and weighed about a kilo each. as you can see from these pictures, they've been eating well and have grown quite a bit in just a few weeks. white tigers are very rare, so the cubs are bound to be a big hit with visitors, before they're donated to other zoos around the world in about a year's time. for a zoo, that is a fantastic thing
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to happen. absolutely. marvellous. 0ver absolutely. marvellous. over to the sport. good morning. crystal palace have already beaten some big names in the past few weeks. arsenal, liverpool, chelsea. last night it looked, before i went to bed, like they were going to cause another upset and trip spurs up. but waking up this morning there was a late goal, but i missed it because i went to bed early! tottenham are back to within four points of chelsea at the top of the premier league after a 1—0 win over crystal palace. christian erikssen with the goal that kept spurs in the title race, with five games to play. tottenham's next game is on sunday against their north london rivals arsenal, who beat leicester 1—0 last night to boost their chances of finishing in the top four. elsewhere, bottom side sunderland lost to middlesbrough. maria sharapova won herfirst competitive match since returning from a 15—month doping ban, beating italy's roberta vinci in straight sets at the stuttgart grand prix, but there's been more criticism from fellow—players for sharapova.
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eugenie bouchard described her as a "cheater". and ronnie 0'sullivan's been knocked out of the world snooker championship by ding junhui. but he says he's "over the moon" for the chinese player, who's into the semi—finals. he said he would rather lose a good match than win a bad one. there are enough! i think a win's a win. i know what he means. -- fair i know what he means. —— fairenough. i think —— fairenough. ithinki —— fairenough. i think i would still want to win. let's have a quick look at the papers. starting with the daily telegraph. the main stories about theresa may, saying she will keep britain tidy europe's human rights laws. we have heard her say that before. the picture is of her greeting jean—claude juncker outside downing street. and these tax raids at west ham.
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inside, borisjohnson and these tax raids at west ham. inside, boris johnson is and these tax raids at west ham. inside, borisjohnson is writing for the first time. a very personal attack onjeremy corbyn. we will be speaking to him later this morning. the front page of the times. quite an incredible picture released yesterday by north korea. images of what you could only describe as their military strength. marking their 85th anniversary. of course north korea recently threatened to strike the us. the mail is focusing on mps' comments about gps, suggesting people were denied appointments because gps are closing early, shutting in the afternoon. we will be talking a lot more about that later in the programme, to the head of gps who is explaining why that might happen, why they might wa nt to that might happen, why they might want to close on wednesday, which makes it more difficult for people to getan makes it more difficult for people to get an appointment. i've got a story about car production. we often look at what's
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going on in the car industry to see how the manufacturing industry is going. good morning. the times picks up going. good morning. the times picks up on the latest figures. car factories have had their best months since 2000. back at the start of the millennium. they say there is a 7% surge in car assembly output. in terms of the number of cars produced, it is something like the equivalent of 230 cars every hour of which is huge! that in the uk every hour. as for that particular month in march. if you look at the three figures for the first quarter, it is still the strongest opening since 2000. nice to hear things are going well in manufacturing. the other thing i want to talk about is you know when you've got... you are trying to get people to donate and you might send one of those e—mails out to your mates and everything? well, this is a story saying the best thing to do to raise more money is just
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best thing to do to raise more money isjust go best thing to do to raise more money is just go and ask a few. so rather than sending 100 e—mails, if you just ask for five people you will probably get more money. face—to—face? because people feel like they have to donate? yes and e—mails are fairly anonymous. you can send it out and people can ignore it. the trick is, if you go doorto ignore it. the trick is, if you go door to door, not personally, but local kids come around and perform, whatever the first person has put m, whatever the first person has put in, sponsorship... if they have put in £50, then you all have to do around the same thing, it's about the first one. maybe their mum or dad puts £100 in at the top and then you see it's their mum and dad and you see it's their mum and dad and you think, i don't need to do that much! i'm always fascinated with stories about what athletes eat, especially athletes like and anthony joshua, fighting vladimir klitschko on saturday. it's all about what he
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puts in his body to perform at the best of his ability and it is the sheer volume that fascinates me. for breakfast he has a smoothie made with yoghurt, fruit, porridge, oats and milk, something similarto sally. then a second breakfast, five eggs, a few slices of bread, smoked salmon, avocados, juice, lunch is too large chicken breasts with pasta and all sorts of things. then a recovery sha ke n and all sorts of things. then a recovery shaken with bananas. dinner, to fill its salmon, brown rice, vegetables, and supper as well —— two phillips of. then an eton mess and honey for a treat. how does he find time to fight? he drains two hours a day and the rest of it is eating. -- trains. that makes me hungry! what is it, six takes? up to
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five eggs. is that an order for me? we will go to the cafe now. see you later on. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the us says it will tighten sanctions on north korea and step up diplomatic moves aimed at pressuring the country to end its nuclear and missile programmes. scientists say they've developed an eye test which could spot the main cause of blindness a decade before symptoms appear leading to earlier treatment. fill it time to say hello properly and good morning to carol. good morning. this morning if you're outside early on under clear skies, a chilly start. in powys the temperature last night fell to —6, at the moment in benson in 0xfordshire, “i! but not everywhere has clear skies, eight bit of cloud around today producing showers, some of which will be heavy —— a bit of. especially in the afternoon. as is the way with
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showers, not all will catch one. we have had a few showers overnight, we've also had some rain moving steadily south in scotland and now in skulls in england. still further showers, some merging to give outbreaks in the far north 0scar and, brighter spells ahead of it —— ensconced —— far north of scotland. south of that under clear skies overnight, a beautiful and sunny start to the date but also a frosty one and cold one for some if you're just tapping out that to the day. the south—west doing well today in terms of dry weather and some joint —— stepping out —— to the day. sunshine in central and southern parts of wales, in the north, a little more cloud. a few showers dotted around. through the course of the day, this is the weather front thatis the day, this is the weather front that is sinking south and it is fairly wea k that is sinking south and it is fairly weak but as it does it will bring more cloud where we have the
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bright skies at the moment and there will also be some showery outbreaks of rain across wales, the midlands and east anglia. again we've got this north—westerly breeze. behind that big line of showers you can see extending through scotland it will brighten up with some sunshine but fairly cloudy in northern ireland and cloud in over across wales, south—west england hanging onto the sunshine for much of the day and the dry conditions as well. temperatures between nine and 12. through the course of this evening and overnight, this is also a weather front, you can see how it is slipping steadily south with its cloud so in eastern areas but why there will be some clear skies and hopefully we could see some grass frost cache locally we could. 4—7 overnight, temperatures higher over the —— under the cloud in the west —— locally we could. a fair bit of sunshine around. temperatures continuing just to climb that bit more. we're looking at 15 as the top
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temperature in london, 11 in stornoway. as we head into the weekend, well, saturday's looking quite dry, but as we head into sunday, look at all this coming up from the south—west, an area of low pressure with its attendant fronts and also some rain so it looks like we could see some rain coming in across the south—west during sunday, heading steadily northwards. probably not getting as far as the far north of northern england. so for the weekend in summary, how it's looking is saturday, largely dry, generally it's going to be breezy and milder but once again we're looking at that rain coming in from the south—west during sunday and pushing north—eastwards. as or next week, if it's been too cold this week, if it's been too cold this week, you'll be pleased it is warming up —— for next week. temperatures in the midst of high teens and for some it could be a bit higher. -- mid to high teens. a bid by the government to delay publishing its plans to tackle illegal air pollution
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until after the general election is being heard by the high court today. despite politicians on all sides agreeing there has to be action, ministers will argue so—called purdah rules forbid the publication of sensitive policies at this time. so let's remind ourselves what this draft legislation is about. in 2011, the government was taken to court over its failure to tackle dangerously high levels of nitrogen dioxide in some uk cities. but in november of last year, it was told its latest proposals for tackling air pollution wouldn't work fast enough. the high court ordered it to publish a new plan by last monday. but late on friday, the government said it couldn't publish its new plan because it would breach election rules. so what exactly is purdah and how might it relate to this case? let's speak to colin talbot who's a professor of government at the university of manchester. let's start with the basics, what is
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purdah it is originally a persian word which means to secluded somebody, like women hidden behind curtains. it has been adopted to apply to a period after an election has been called and before the election were civil servants and ministers can't use public resources 01’ ministers can't use public resources or do anything that affect the outcome of the election —— were civil servants. it is hoped to maintain neutrality —— —— where. a couple of things about this, you have to understand purdah rules are a government invention, they make them up every time there is a general election they are published shortly before the general election and they are their own rules, they've made up their own roles and then they said we can't publish this
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plan because of our own rules. even the rules they have published this time allow for exceptions if there is something urgent, clearly this particular issue many would argue is urgent and there's a fair degree of prop, cross—party support for publishing. -- cross-party support. interesting timing, what do you make of that? the timing issue is interesting. in the old days before we had the fixed term parliament act, before the prime minister called an election and told the queen they wanted an election, the purdah rules would come into affect, in 2015 the rules didn't come into effect until parliament dissolved, which isn't until may the third this time around. this time they've done it halfway in between the announcement they‘ re it halfway in between the announcement they're going to have a general election and the dissolution of parliament. it's rather convenient. this has ended up in court? it was already in court
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because the government had been instructed by the courts to produce a new plan and they were meant to publish in by last monday, they haven't and the excuse their giving to the courts is they can't because of the purdah rules. it will be interesting to see what the courts make of that because the purdah rules have no legal effect at all. what about other types of election, like the eu referendum? in the run—up to the u referendum it was interesting because david cameron's government tried to abolish the purdah rules for the period of the referendum —— eu referendum. they we re referendum —— eu referendum. they were forced to reinstate them and it was quite a political battle. governments tend to play fast and loose with the purdah rules to sort themselves —— suit themselves. loose with the purdah rules to sort themselves -- suit themselves. with some issues you can themselves -- suit themselves. with some issues you can argue themselves -- suit themselves. with some issues you can argue they are academic and fairly distant, this is about the air you breathe when you step out of your door this morning and tomorrow and the day after. it gives it a sense of urgency that
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possibly in other cases doesn't exist. there's a clause in their own rules were in cases of urgency they can make announcements during the election period, so there's nothing to stop them if they wanted to. professor, thank you very much for joining us. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: from flat—faced dogs to flat—eared cats, we'll find out why some vets are calling for a ban on selective breeding to create designer pets. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the conservatives have chosen zac goldsmith to fight his old seat in richmond park injune's election just months after losing to the liberal democrats. he'd triggered a by—election after leaving the conservative party in protest at the government's backing of a third heathrow runway. the lib dems say he's lost his last shred of credibility but he says he can win.
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i think the circumstances of this election are very different to the circumstances of the by—election. that was i1 of very rare opportunity caused by my resignation of the heathrow that gave people an opportunity to express their rage by the outcome of the referendum, and it was an opportunity they weren't going to miss. it's feared a tottenham football supporter who was attacked by a fellow spurs fan at their game against chelsea at the weekend may have suffered permanent damage to his eyesight. police have released an image of michael voller, which you may find upsetting. the 23—year—old, who used to work as a gardenerfor spurs, suffered a broken cheek—bone, eye—socket and skull after being punched in the face. london's victoria and albert museum says it will fund a national education programme to teach and inspire the next generation of young artists and designers. it's using its prize money from winning the museum of the year award in 2016 to pay for the programme in secondary schools. the tube is all running normally so far this morning,
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no reported problems on any of those lines there. southern and thameslink trains have delays of up to 15 minutes and some cancellations via streatham because of a signalling problem. here's how the blackwall tunnel looks, northbound traffic slow as usual from blackwall lane. in the west end, regent street is closed northbound at maddox street for works. and in bexleyheath, police have closed market place. lots of buses are being diverted. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a chilly morning with a widespread frost to start the day but the weather would be as dramatic as it was yesterday when we saw thunderclouds and hailstorms. instead today a much quieter day of weather with some sunshine around through the morning and then cloud will thicken into the afternoon, eventually we'll get some outbreaks of rain. but it's a nice morning, lots of sunshine around and then the cloud will thicken from the north as we head through the afternoon. possibly a few light showers as we end the day as well,
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this is a three—week warm front coming through but it's still going to feel cold today, top temperatures between ten and 12 but the temperatures will start to improve over the next few days. still a few light showers around this evening but a lot of dry weather too. it's going to be quite a chilly night again but not as cold as it was last night, temperatures out in them rural spots could possibly dipped low enough to get a touch of frost. tomorrow another quiet day, should be mostly dry, just a small chance of one or two showers here and there and pledge your brightness and sunshine as well. temperatures coming up over the next few days or so. saturday probably the nicest day of the bank holiday weekend, it will turn wet and windy later on on sunday and possibly monday too. i'll be back in half an hour with more news, travel and weather. you can also check out our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent.
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we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. also on breakfast this morning: it's about the flies and the butterflies and the lady bugs and the bees. 11 year old jaco sees, feels and hears the world differently to most people. after 8am, he'll be here with his dad to explain what it's like to grow up with autism. with the increasing popularity of ereaders, our bookshelves once seemed doomed to history. but is the story changing? we'll be finding out why the situation might not be quite so black and white. # i'm in heaven... # and my heartbeat...# ella fitzgerald was once crowned the first lady of song and to celebrate what would have been her 100th birthday, the soul singer mica paris has recorded an album in tribute to her inspiration. she tell us more
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about it after 8:30am. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the trump administration has revealed its strategy to mount more pressure on pyongyang through economic sanctions and diplomacy. the aim is to force the county to give up its ballistic missile and nuclear weapons programmes. as tensions continue to rise, large—scale military exercises have been held in both north and south of the peninsular. north korea is the most dangerous spot on the planet right now and kim jong—un is a dangerous and wildly unpredictable dictator. who u nfortu nately has unpredictable dictator. who unfortunately has a significant arsenal of nuclear weapons. borisjohnson has used his first intervention in the election campaign to mount the conservatives' most personal attack yet onjeremy corbyn. in an article published in the sun newspaper, the foreign secretary accused the labour leader of being a security threat to the united kingdom. labour have described his comments "crass and offensive". in a speech to dignitaries last night, mrjohnson also stressed the importance of strong leadership. leadership is so vital. clear
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leadership. from this country to help us navigate an age of uncertainty. and we in the uk government are determined to help provide that leadership. and to give people the security and the certainty that they need. because there can be no more important task for government than to keep people safe. and we must be prepared to do everything necessary to do so. we'll speak to the foreign secretary, borisjohnson injust over an hour's time. labour will today promise to tackle the housing crisis by building a million homes, half of them council houses, if the party wins the general election. labour claims the number of affordable homes being built is at a 24—year low. the housing minister gavin barwell mp said the conservatives have recently set out a clear plan to build more affordable housing, with the number of new homes under
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construction up three quarters since 2010. the liberal democrats have decided not to contest the brighton pavilion seat currently held by the only green party mp, caroline lucas. last week, ms lucas called for a so—called "progressive alliance", where parties did not put up candidates in some seats to avoid the vote against the conservatives being split. ministers from 27 european union countries will meet today for final discussions about the eu's negotiating stance on brexit. they're set to approve the draft negotiating guidelines for the uk's divorce from the eu and discuss the next steps in the process. a simple eye test could mean far earlier detection of glaucoma, the leading cause of sight loss in the uk. scientists found that injecting patients with a florescent marker enabled them to identify sick nerve cells. it means the condition could be detected before a person's eyesight begins to deteriorate. councils in england will have to do
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more to tackle homelessness, under a new law introduced today. it means local authorities now have a legal duty to help homeless people to find a place to live. the legislation has been broadly welcomed by charities, though they warn more still needs to be done to tackle rough sleeping, which has risen by 16% in england in the last year. patients are still struggling to get gp appointments and many surgeries are closed during core opening hours, according to mp5. a report from the public accounts committee says the government's drive to force surgeries to open longer risks duplicating services. they also warn "no credible plan" is in place to recruit more doctors. the government has pledged an extra £500 million per year in funding by 2020 to operate a seven—day service. the number of new cars built in britain reached a 17 year high last month at more than 170,000. figures from the society of motor manufacturers and traders show exports continue to drive the increase, with an average of one car exported
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every 20 seconds in march. a village in north yorkshire, which was put up for sale last year with a £20 million price tag, has been sold. yes, west heslerton, near malton, includes a mansion, 43 houses, a pub and 2,000 acres of farmland. it had been owned by the same family for more than 150 years but has now been sold to a property investment company. bargain! £20 million! time for the sport. totte n ha m £20 million! time for the sport. tottenham on a late dash. eight consecutive league games in a row now and that the first time they have done it since 1960! but can they catch chelsea? who knows? they certainly start a chance, although they have arsenal at the weekend.
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it is interesting. that whole race is still interesting. and don't we love it when the premier league goes down to the last few games and it could go either way? when it is somebody far out in front everybody loses interest. tottenham can still catch chelsea at the top of the premier league. christian erikssen scored the only goal of the game as spurs beat crystal palace. the gap at the top of the table now four points with five games to play. there are only five games left and we know we need to keep close to chelsea if you want to have a chance. we can cross our fingers that chelsea will lose points, but it's up to us to give ourselves the extra boost to keep ourselves up there. tottenham's next game is on sunday against their north london rivals arsenal. a robert huth own—goal gave them a 1—0 win over leicester last night, to boost their chances of finishing in the top four. i think we were focused overall, hungry to win the game and in the end we played against a team which
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was difficult to get out of position, to destabilise and we got the win we wanted. sunderland are on the brink of relegation after losing to middlesbrough. marten de roon scoring the only goal of the game. boro are still in deep trouble themselves, but sunderland could be relegated this weekend. the burnley midfielderjoey barton said he'd effectively been forced to retire early, after receiving an 18—month ban from football for breaking the fa's betting rules. he admitted the charge but plans to appeal against the length of the ban and he called on the fa to look at their own relationship with the gambling industry. referees at next summer's world cup in russia will be able to use video technology for the first time. fifa has been experimenting with the system, which uses an official to review various replays, and they say they've had nothing but positive feedback so far. maria sharapova has received her strongest criticism so far from a fellow—player. eugenie bouchard said she doesn't think a cheater in any sport should be allowed to play that sport again.
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well, sharapova won herfirst competitve match since returning from a 15—month doping ban, beating italy's roberta vinci in straight sets at the stuttgart grand prix. vinci had questioned sharapova being given a wild card for the event. it was a moment that i've obviously been looking forward to for a very long time. training quite intensively for the past few months and visualising myself going back at it and competing again. so in ways of course i was rusty, but in so many other ways i felt like i hadn't left. so maria sharapova is peru. and so is britain'sjohanna konta, who is safely into the last 16, after a three—set win over japan's naomi 0saka. english cricket is changing, in a bid to attract a new audience. there'll be a new city—based twenty20 tournament starting in three years' time, along the lines of the big—money indian premier league which currently involves a number of english players.
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the ecb voted it through, but some members are concerned about a lack of detail in the plans. let's see what the concept is going to be like. is it going to affect cou nty to be like. is it going to affect county cricket? will it be a real plus and make county cricket go stronger? time will tell. we do support it and i hope the format —— suits everyone. ronnie 0'sullivan's been knocked out of the world snooker championship by dingjunhui. 0'sullivan says he's in a happy place, even though he hasn't won a ranking tournament this season. i love what i do, so why would i not do it because i'm not winning tournaments or be unhappy because i'm not winning, when you love what you do? it's kind of all the stuff that comes with snooker is a bonus. the real love is just playing. that comes with snooker is a bonus. the real love isjust playing. if you were as good as me you would love it as well! he is such an entertainer. but he
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just has this swings and roundabouts. sometimes he hates snooker and will never play again and is retiring. now he is coming back and he loves snooker. you can tell he loves it, even when he hates it. 0k, see later. thanks very much. let's go back to our main story. the united states has revealed its strategy to increase pressure on pyongyang, through economic sanctions and diplomacy. the aim is to force an end to its nuclear and missile programmes. last night, the trump administration summoned all 100 members of the us senate to the white house for the briefing on the threat posed by north korea. cristina varriale is a research analyst for proliferation and nuclear policy at the defence think tank, rusi. good morning. how significant is it that this summit took place and it actually took pace at the white house? yes, that's incredibly significant. what we've seen recently with the trump administration is he has been putting a huge focus on north korean policy. as we know this is quite an
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unprecedented move for him to take and isn't something that usually happens. especially the court all senators to the white house. so he has been putting a lot of focus on ensuring that the north korean nuclear challenge is addressed. what is also really interesting is the message here is putting out following this briefing. we've seen him step away from 0bama's policy and all we've seen come out of this briefing so far is the administration will be increasing sanctions and pressure against north korea, for them to give up their nuclear and missile programmes. that's pretty similar to what 0bama was pushing for in the first place. what will be the reaction from north korea do think? i think in the first insta nce korea do think? i think in the first instance nothing will change to significantly. we've seen so far that the sanctions regime that was first implemented in 2006 has increased pressure on the regime and made it more difficult for them to apply some of the necessary materials for their programmes, but we haven't seen that pressure so far
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change the direction or their rationale towards being able to deliver a long—range missile and also short—range missiles at a deliverable nuclear warhead as well. what do you make of the military exercises with seen over the past few days? again, that's quite significant that we have seen north korea conducted their largest ever drill, but it's not so significant it signifies a huge focus on imminent military action. for example, the us and south korea conduct military drills throughout the year and we've seen them recently close ally of firing drill. so it can contribute to bringing military action to the forefront of strategic stability in the region and looking at how we are actually addressing these issues. it does raise tensions there. but i wouldn't necessarily say it makes military action imminent. we have also seen
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that north korea's latest military test didn't go very well. does this perhaps undermine the credibility of any of their threats? absolutely not. what we've seen from that test that did fail is it happened from a site that we are where is usually a site that we are where is usually a site for testing nuclear capabilities, or capabilities they aren't confident of yet. each time a test fails we know they learn something about that. so for example when we see their short and medium—range missiles tested, they are medium—range missiles tested, they a re often medium—range missiles tested, they are often from a different site and they are often confident of that capability and it's more about demonstrating that confidence and that ability and also for the north korean to start thinking through the operational planning and the use of those missiles, if it ever came to a military escalation. so each time we see the failure of this new missiles it is just see the failure of this new missiles it isjust a see the failure of this new missiles it is just a learning curve and see the failure of this new missiles it isjust a learning curve and i think that's something that is quite significant. we've seen president trump talking about the non—military brute and he has even said the word
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diplomacy. how would that work? it's a really interesting question because i think right now there doesn't seem to be any concrete policy or idea of how we would get to diplomacy. as i mentioned earlier, trump's pressure on north korea is similar to what 0bama pushed for an implemented. it is also in co—ordination with security council. however that hasn't actually pushed us anywhere near diplomacy in the first instance, i don't think, and it is also important to remember that that won't bring the north korean regime to the table either. a couple of the options are providing party talks with seen previously in the region, to talk about how we can stabilise the situation with north korea. i think it would be very unlikely that we'd see a complete rollback of their missile programme, back to com plete their missile programme, back to complete zero, without a change in the regime. 0r complete zero, without a change in the regime. or it could be an new format of talk that involve just the us and north korea, although i think
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that's probably highly unlikely given the us relationship with south korea and japan especially and china's stake in the game. thank you very much. that is our main story. the us says it will tighten sanctions on south korea and step up diplomatic moves as it tries to get the country to end its nuclear and missile programmes. scientists say they've developed an eye test which could spot the cause of blindness a decade before symptoms appear. let's have a look at the weather with carol. good morning. good morning. 0ur weather watchers we re good morning. 0ur weather watchers were up early this morning, beautiful pictures sent in from bedfordshire. you can see the sun rising but also some frost, also a bit of patchy mist rann for some this morning but generally it's a cloudy day than yesterday and a few showers around —— mist around. and
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some rain stoppage during the night we have had some showers, some rain moving across scotland heading south, weakening as it does into northern england. —— and some rain. that's how we'll be at 8am. northern england. —— and some rain. that's how we'll be at sam. the rain not particularly heavy, and south of that we will see brighter skies and where we have clearer skies a cold start. in northern england, our weather front is producing some cloud and patchy outbreaks. coming south into east anglia and parts of the midlands and to the south coast, the midlands and to the south coast, the isle of wight, into south—west england, under clear skies it's a cold start and for some it is a frosty one, you may have to scrape your car first frosty one, you may have to scrape your carfirst thing. frosty one, you may have to scrape yourcarfirst thing. in frosty one, you may have to scrape your car first thing. in south wales, a beautiful start to the day, clear skies, frosty conditions, showers blurting with the coastline of wales and into northern ireland, some breaks in the cloud. —— flirting. although there will be
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some brighter breaks developing in northern ireland today, they will be fairly limited, cloudy with showers on and off. meanwhile our band of rain six south as a weak feature, after the sunny start in southern england and south wales, it will cloud over with a few showers, brightening up in parts of north—east scotland. not feeling as cold in the north as yesterday but under this cloud it will still feel pretty cool if you're further south. through the evening and overnight, our weather front is continuing to slide down to the south and west. clearer skies come in behind so locally it will the frosty this coming night, temperatures in towns and cities between four and seven. -- it and cities between four and seven. —— it will be frosty. towards the west it will be cloudy, still producing a few showers, but even so some holes in the cloud. tomorrow with lighter winds and the wind is changing direction so not feeling as
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cold as it has. towards the weekend, saturday is looking fine but on sunday this area of low pressure and its fronts moving from the south—west heading north—east. windy ahead of it but not making a huge amount of progress on sunday, expected to continue moving north on bank holiday monday. 0n expected to continue moving north on bank holiday monday. on friday, a lot of cloud around, some brighter breaks, one or two showers coming in from the west, temperatures continuing to rise and as we had on towards sunday, i want to show you this quickly, this is how the rain is coming in on sunday. —— head on towards sunday. temperatures rising into next week. that is great to hear. it was cold coming into work this morning. very nippy! talking about car insurance, steph has the details. it only ever seems to go up. i know! my guest is
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laughing about that because it is fairto laughing about that because it is fair to say! let me give you the latest figures, it isn't a laughing matter, lots of us have to fork out for it. according to the body that represents insurance companies, the abi, the average car insurance premium has risen by 8% over the past year to around £460. that's the highest level since its records started in 2012. that's likely to go up a further 20% by the start of next year. one thing pushing up premiums is a planned increase in the tax that most of us pay on insurance policies. that's due to rise injune. but there are other reasons too. let's talk to amanda stretton, motoring editor at confused.com good morning. good morning. what is going on, why is it going up so much? there are a number of competing factors, some of which have been steady and they've been
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happening over time and others have come slightly out of the blue. you mentioned the insurance premium tax, that's a big one that has gone up, essentially it has doubled in two yea rs. essentially it has doubled in two years. that's going up to 12% in june. that's been a big change if you like, certainly a big contributing factor. we've then seen the changes in the discount rate. this has caught all the insurers by surprise. this is the rate that is applied to the big lump sum payments when you have a big claim for a serious injury. but nobody saw this coming and that cost, that extra cost has got to be applied to the motorist. what we're not seeing is that applied to everybody equally. we see that generally being applied to the demographics that make the big claims, but that's another contributing factor. then you got the cost of repairing cars going up.
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ca rs have the cost of repairing cars going up. cars have a lot more technology in and they are more expensive, to repair them when there's been an accident costs more. exactly, it wasn't long ago when you just needed a bit of paint and filler when you had a bump, now you have cameras, sensors and radar, now some manufacturers say it has to be done by their approved centres to maintain your warranty and that is pushing the price up. we often hear in insurance companies complaining about all of this and using that as an excuse. do you think there's enough competition in the market in terms of... they still make money, the insurance companies. most of the big insurance companies haven't made a profit over the last few years. they've been propping themselves up by releasing reserves. what we're seeing now is newer companies coming into the market, they don't have those losses to carry over, so they can offer some really significant
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savings, which is why it's more important than ever to shop around and use a price comparison website. the government has introduced legislation that's coming into force this month that says when you get your insurance renewal you must also be shown your previous year's premium so you can see how much it has gone up. once you have clicked renew five years running, it says go toa renew five years running, it says go to a price comparison website to shop around because you can get better deals. that's one of the problems, people not realising how much it has gone up by. thank you for your time, nice to see you. and the results from lloyds coming out at 7am, the results from lloyds coming out at7am, a the results from lloyds coming out at 7am, a bank we had a big stake m, at 7am, a bank we had a big stake in, that's gone down, we will see what they have to say later on. when it comes to reading, do you savour the smell and feel of leafing through printed pages or perhaps prefer the more modern concept of an e—book? new figures show that despite predictions of recent years, sales of the traditional book are at record levels. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at a bookshop in the wirral
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for us this morning. is the e—reader really going out of fashion? the figures are amazing. there's two parts of this story, one is the fightback books are making because macro one size rolls are down 17% but the other figure is the record numbers spent on physical books. hash e—book sales are down —— e—book sales are down. good morning. how are you going to cope later at school? let's not think about that for too long. let's meet sue, she owns the shop. it was a wee bit of a lea p owns the shop. it was a wee bit of a leap of faith when you bought this place 18 months ago. we did a lot of research before we bought the shop and at that stage we knew that e—books were on the decline but the
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sale of books were increasing but the recent stats... you have faith! inafew the recent stats... you have faith! in a few words, what is it about a physical book that beats an e—book? it's the smell and the feel of a book, it means when you come into a bookshop you have the chance to meet your favourite author and received a signed book from someone you like. it'sjust a signed book from someone you like. it's just a unique signed book from someone you like. it'sjust a unique selling point when you pick a book rather than an e—book —— receive. when you pick a book rather than an e-book -- receive. you know what i found fascinating, notjust the volume being sold but fiction is down. in this age of uncertainty and turmoil and change, i would have thought people wanted a bit of escapism. what's that down to?|j don't know, i was quite shocked to hear that. i know from this shop that non—fiction sells well and children's books, and that ties in with the stats. 0ur children's area is fun, moms can come in... let's go
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and meet them. are you 0k is fun, moms can come in... let's go and meet them. are you ok on the step? don't trip over. the and meet the kids. the sales of children's book are up 16%. —— let's meet the kids. you only have physical books, not an e—reader, what are you reading right now? i'm reading alex rider and it's a page turner, like the equivalent to james bond, but just ina the equivalent to james bond, but just in a children's style.|j the equivalent to james bond, but just in a children's style. i have to get my boys into that. what about you? i like the magic far away tree, lots of adventure in it and i have a tree in my garden and i think mr moon says is there. thanks for getting up slow early. lots of comments on social media this morning, michelle says she only buys hardcopies of books for cookbooks
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and everything else she buys an e—book, but nina says no way, what she likes to do is shares her book, she likes to do is shares her book, she buys loads of paperbacks and gives them to her friends. she buys loads of paperbacks and gives them to herfriends. fiona says she likes her e—book so she can read it in bed. charlie, what about you, e—reader or physical book? jane, do you know what i love, a proper bookshelf. a nice big bookshelf packed with different types of books, i love that. i've never read a book on an e—book.|j thought you were going to say never read a book! whichever means you read a book! whichever means you read something is clearly a good thing but for me it is a book every time. do you wear glasses? i do. maybe it affects you, the technology. technology, that little thing! how do you like to read? what are you reading at the moment?
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what are you reading at the moment? what did you do to get into reading in the first place? you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories using #bbcbreakfast or follow us for the latest from the programme. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: juggling a cast of characters along with cute and cuddly animals in corfu. that was the challenge faced by the man behind the second series of the durrells. screen—writer simon nye joins us after nine to tell us how he managed. of course inspired by a proper book! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the conservatives have chosen zac goldsmith to fight his old seat in richmond park injune's election just months after losing to the liberal democrats. he'd triggered a by—election after leaving the conservative party in protest at the government's backing of a third heathrow runway. the lib dems say he's lost his last shred of credibility but he says he can win.
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i think the circumstances of this election are very, very different to the circumstances of the by—election. that was a one—off, very rare opportunity caused by my resignation over heathrow, but it gave people an opportunity to express their rage about the outcome of the referendum, and it was an opportunity they weren't going to miss. it's feared a tottenham football supporter who was attacked by a fellow spurs fan at their game against chelsea at the weekend may have suffered permanent damage to his eyesight. police have released an image of michael voller, which you may find upsetting. the 23—year—old, who used to work as a gardenerfor spurs, suffered a broken cheek—bone, eye—socket and skull after being punched in the face. london's victoria and albert museum says it will fund a national education programme to teach and inspire the next generation of young artists and designers. it's using its prize money from winning the museum of the year award in 2016 to pay for the programme in secondary schools. the tube is all running normally
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so far this morning, no reported problems on any of those lines there. there are no southern trains between redhill and tonbridge this morning because of a faulty train. here's how the blackwall tunnel looks. northbound traffic slow as usual from the woolwich road flyover. in the west end, regent street is closed northbound at maddox street for works. and in bexleyheath, police have closed market place. lots of buses are being diverted. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a chilly morning with a widespread frost to start the day but the weather won't be as dramatic as it was yesterday when we saw thunderclouds and hailstorms. instead today a much quieter day of weather with some sunshine around through the morning and then cloud will thicken into the afternoon, eventually we'll get some outbreaks of rain. but it's a nice morning, there's lots of sunshine around and then the cloud will thicken from the north as we head through the afternoon.
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possibly a few light showers as we end the day as well, this is a very weak warm front coming through but it's still going to feel cold today, top temperatures only between 10—12 but the temperatures will start to improve over the next few days. still a few light showers around this evening but a lot of dry weather too. it's going to be quite a chilly night again but not as cold as it was last night. temperatures out in the more rural spots could possibly dip low enough to get a touch of frost. tomorrow another quiet day, should be mostly dry, just a small chance of one or two showers here and there and plenty of brightness and sunshine as well. temperatures coming up over the next few days or so. saturday probably the nicest day of the bank holiday weekend, it will turn wet and windy later on on sunday and possibly monday too. i'll be back in half an hour with more news, travel and weather. you can also check out our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. deepening tensions in north korea: the us calls for tougher sanctions
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until it dismantles its nuclear programme. america is piling on the pressure as all 100 us senators attend a special briefing at the white house. we'll ask the foreign secretary borisjohnson what the uk can do about north korea in just a few minutes. good morning, it's thursday the 27th of april. also this morning: the pioneering eye test which could save people's sight by helping doctors to diagnose glaucoma. it's the country's most complained about bank and in the next few minutes we'll be finding out whether that's been hitting profits. i'll have lloyds results for you shortly. in sport: still in the title race. tottenham beat crystal palace and keep the heat on leaders chelsea. a boom for books as the publishing
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industry has a surge in sales and a record year. and carol has the weather. it's a cold, dry, crisp and frosty start in southern england and southern wales, but it will cloud over, with showers developing for the rest of the uk. nonetheless, there will be some brighter breaks andi there will be some brighter breaks and i will tell you when you can expect them in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. tensions are rising in north korea, as the us call for more pressure to force the country to give up its nuclear weapons programmes. last night, president trump briefed all 100 members of the senate, revealing a strategy of economic sanctions and diplomacy. but washington also said they were prepared to defend themselves and their allies, as our correspondent laura bicker reports. the us is piling on the pressure. this is a military exercise just miles from the north korean border.
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a message for kim jong—un, that the us is ready if diplomatic efforts fail. this is how the head of the us pacific command put it to the house in washington. all options are on the table. we want to bring kim jong—un to his senses, not to his knees. later, all 100 senators were bussed to a briefing at the white house from their commander in chief. a highly unusual move to show politicians from both sides of the aisle just how serious the situation has become. north korea is the most dangerous spot on the planet right now, and kimjong—un is a dangerous and wildly unpredictable dictator. donald trump is hoping china will use its political and economic leverage over pyongyang to persuade kim jong—un to end his missile programme. other options include redesignating north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism, which will allow the us to impose greater sanctions. meanwhile, the us show
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of might continues. this is a missile defence system in south korea. the current goal is a path to peace through negotiations, but the trump administration said it is prepared to defend itself and its allies if necessary. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has used his first intervention in the election campaign to mount the conservatives' most personal attack yet on thejeremy corbyn. in an article published in the sun newspaper, mrjohnson accused the labour leader of being a security threat to the united kingdom. labour have called his comments "crass and offensive". 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth joins us from westminster. alex, what more has boris johnson said? he has been pretty quiet in this election campaign so far, but today he has waited in in full flamboyant style, with an attack onjeremy corbyn. he has called him a martin
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headed person and says he would be a threat to security. —— mutton. he says he asks meandering and nonsensical questions in parliament, and said he would be calamitous in downing street and disastrous for brexit. typical colourful language from borisjohnson, brexit. typical colourful language from boris johnson, but brexit. typical colourful language from borisjohnson, but it is more than that. conservatives i trying to make this campaign about leadership, pitting jeremy corbyn against theresa may, because they think that would do them some favours. but labour have been very critical of boris johnson's remarks labour have been very critical of borisjohnson's remarks and say he is talking delusional nonsense and he has only been allowed out of hiding to do so. they make a serious point, saying as foreign secretary with a duty and role to play in those serious brexit negotiations, these comments are crass and risk undermining the uk's chance of getting a good deal with the eu. we arejust one week getting a good deal with the eu. we are just one week into this campaign and already it is very personal.
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thank you very much. we will be talking to boris johnson thank you very much. we will be talking to borisjohnson shortly in the programme. labour will today promise to tackle the housing crisis by building a million homes, half of them council houses, if the party wins the general election. labour claims the number of affordable homes being built is at a 24—year low. the housing minister gavin barwell mp said the conservatives have recently set out a clear plan to build more affordable housing, with the number of new homes under construction up three quarters since 2010. the liberal democrats have decided not to contest the brighton pavilion seat currently held by the only green party mp, caroline lucas. last week, ms lucas called for a so—called "progressive alliance" — where parties did not put up candidates in some seats to avoid the vote against the conservatives being split. united airlines says it will offer passengers up to £7,000 as an incentive to give up their seats if flights are overbooked.
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the us airline was widely criticised after video emerged of a passenger being forcibly removed from one of its planes. a simple eye test could lead to much earlier detection of a condition which causes irreversible sight loss, according to researchers from university college london. diagnosing glaucoma sooner would mean patients could start treatment before their vision deteriorates. 0ur health correspondent jane dreaper has the details. francesca's eyesight is crucial for her work as an artist. glaucoma develops slowly over many years. there is no cure, but doctors in london believe this new injection will eventually help patients get diagnosed and treated much sooner. to lose one's eyesight early or later is devastating, really, especially if you have an artistic background. but this sort of gave you hope that they could monitor the condition and then, if need be, they could give you drops, which would slow it down slightly. glaucoma is more common as you get older.
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it affects 600,000 people in the uk. if left untreated, nerve cells in the retina die, leading to sight loss. the test uses a special fluorescent marker to highlight failings cells, potentially revolutionising treatment. we believe in glaucoma, it is ten years between a visual defect being identified and when the actual process starts. that ten—year delay could mean that you have delayed starting treatment at the time when it is most accessible to treatment, and when you could even prevent vision loss occurring in the first place. francesca wants to save her sight from deteriorating, and she is hopeful the new test will help many others too. 16 people have been involved in trials so far, so more research but the london team say these are promising results which could also perhaps be used to detect
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early signs of degenerative brain illnesses. councils in england will have to do more to tackle homelessness, under a new law introduced today. the homelessness reduction bill means local authorities now have a legal duty to help homeless people to find a place to live. the legislation has been broadly welcomed by homelessness charities, though they warn more still needs to be done to tackle rough sleeping, which has risen by 16% in england in the last year. it's been a record year for book sales, according to figures released by the publishing industry. children's books, non—fiction and academicjournals all did well, but sales of ebooks fell sharply. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones reports. e—readers, tablets, smart phones. the story was that as we increasingly read on screens this would spell doom for the good old—fashioned book. but last year sales of ebooks to consumers fell by 17%. meanwhile, in a record year for the publishing industry, physical book sales rose by 8%. readers showed particular interest in non—fiction. everything from diet books
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to celebrity memoirs. and sales of children's books rose by 16%. the bestseller of 2016 was harry potter and the cursed child, and the overwhelming majority of buyers read it on paper, not on a screen. in every aspect of our lives we have screens in front of us, whether at work or home, and people are choosing to spend time away from them. in their leisure moments they look at a book, a printed version, and equally really important when parents want to spend time with their children they want to read to them themselves or they want their children to spend time away from screens. the publishing industry is still making increasing amounts of money from online journals, digital academic titles and audio books, but it seems the epic story of the printed book isn't over yet. now for something fluffy. well, a few things a little bit
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fluffy things to be precise. a zoo in austria has shown off a litter of white tiger cubs to the public for the first time. they're so cute! their names — falco, toto, mia and mautzi. born a month ago and weighed about a kilo then. as you can see from these pictures, they've been eating well and have grown quite a bit in just a few weeks. white tigers are very rare, so the cubs are bound to be a big hit with visitors, before they're donated to other zoos around the world in about a year's time. look at those zookeepers enjoying that cuddle! i bet you can't cuddle them for very law! very true. —— very long. news in this morning from lloyds bank. figures released in the last few minutes. yes, good morning. lloyds banking group has just minutes. yes, good morning. lloyds banking group hasjust announced they have doubled their profits to £1.3 billion, so good news for them. lloyds is one of the banks that we
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have the bailout in the financial crisis. nine years ago the government spent something like £20.3 billion bailing out the bank and they got a stake in it as part of that and it has been slowly selling off its stake and making its money back. so we found out earlier in the week that the government has made back that money and a bit more as well. we've still got a bit of a state, about 2%, in it, so it has been doing well and has returned a profit. so they are doing well, but it hasn't all been plain sailing? no, lloyds, which also owns halifax and bank of scotland, has had a tough time around payment protection insurance. you remember that? a big scandal. it's been on the balance sheet of the banks for a long time now and it has cost lloyds is something like £17 billion in terms of the money they've had to set aside to compensate people. we were expecting today for it to be the first time that they didn't have to
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set aside money, but they've said it still going on. people are still claiming for it to the tune of another £350 million that they are putting aside for that, so that's still a big pressure for them. despite that they are still doing well? they are. it's a bank that is looking healthy at the moment, unlike rbs, the other bank we have the bailout, which isn't having such a good time. thank you very much and see you soon. 0ur our main stories: the us says it will tighten sanctions on north korea and step up diplomatic moves, as it tries to get the country to end its nuclear and missile programmes. scientists say they have developed an eye test which could spot the main cause of blindness a decade before any symptoms appear. let's get the weather forecast. my word for the weather is nippy. how about that? that's pretty good and accurate. a
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cold stuff was on the bus. we've had clear skies in the south. beautiful weather watcher pictures sent in. this one from grace. a bit of missed and some white cloud and sunshine. that's telling the story of today. it will be cloudier. even where we have the bright skies morning. with clear skies the cloud will build and a few showers. showers through the night and a few showers. showers through the nightand rain a few showers. showers through the night and rain coming out of scotland, a weakening feature. the tail end of that could be in the final of scotland and that's what we have at the moment. the rain isn't especially heavy. south of that we have brighter skies and sunny spells and any big stack. across northern england, cloudy, patchy rain which is fairly light in nature. in the east anglia and most of the midlands, through essex and kent and towards the south coast, we have some sunny skies and the temperature has fallen overnight. “i! in 0xfordshire. a lovely start the day
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south—west england. you hang on to the sunshine drew daylight hours and for wales we start on a sunny note, with a couple of coastal showers. it will cloud over for you. for northern ireland we have a cloudy start, with some breaks. we've also got some showers. through the day the first weather fronts in the southward and as it does so it takes the cloud, eradicating the nice sunny start we've had in the south, with the exception of the south—west. we have another weather fronts draped across scotland and northern england, bringing more showers. what clearer skies coming in behind, with some sunshine. temperatures 9— 12. in the sunshine we could get 1a, from glasgow to cumbria for example. this evening and overnight the weather front moves southwards. more cloud in the west. under clear skies in the east west. under clear skies in the east we have a touch of frost. these temperatures are towns and cities. lower than that in the countryside. where we have clear skies by night
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we start with them, to sunshine posting. towards the west there will be more cloud and splashes of rain. it won't feel as cold tomorrow. sta rt it won't feel as cold tomorrow. start pulling in more of a south—westerly wind. heading into the weekend saturday is looking fine and dandy. easy, at sunday we have the low pressure coming in from the south—west. —— breezy, but sunday. breezy generally on sunday. quick look at saturday, a lot of dry weather around. some cloud and sunny breaks, a couple of showers and quickly on sunday here is the low pressure coming in, bringing the rain, moving slowly north. but northern areas should stay dry and getting that bit milder. when is it going to get nice again? next week things settle down a bit. this rain on dank holiday monday looks like it will go northwards and it will warm up. some of us will see temperatures into the high teens and
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possibly the 20s. properly warm, nice to hear that from carol. we will be talking to the foreign secretary boris johnson we will be talking to the foreign secretary borisjohnson shortly on the programme, he hasjudged it settled into the studio, we will speak to him in a few minutes. instead we going to be talking about... flat faced dogs or cats with folded ears. pet owners are being urged to think twice before buying certain breeds, that's because of concerns over selective breeding. the british veterinary association warns irresponsible breeding to create so—called designer pets should be banned. breakfast‘s holly hamilton has been to see some of the animals concerned to find out more. from pugs to french bulldogs, britain has fallen for flat—faced breeds. we just cannot get enough of them. they're on instagram, tea tiles, and lots of merchandise.
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the breed is very popular at the moment. they are like little clowns. 0bviously, they are cute as well. but as their popularity rises, so too have concerns over health problems. highfive, high five, good boy! while many like teddy are healthy, selective breeding led to breathing issues. it seems the issue of selective breeding isn't limited to dogs. with theirfamous breeding isn't limited to dogs. with their famous owners, like taylor swift and ed sheeran, the scottish bald cap with their unique flat ears has been growing in popularity. it is the look and temperament. they have a lovely temperament. dee has been breeding scottish folds for many years. even providing ed sheeran with his
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beloved cats. but it features a genetic mutation that makes them prone to health problems like arthritis. they do have a particular problem with the folding dream, it can cause stiffening of other cartilage within the body and it appears to be a progressive gene. you haven't got a nyway of progressive gene. you haven't got anyway of knowing what's going to happen as they age. it's becoming such a problem that the british veterinary association says any further breeding should be banned. they have incurable chronic painful conditions they will develop. we should not breed cats that have these known problems. the issue of designer pets has become a growing concern for that's. just last month of the industry's leading journal declared it would no longer have adverts containing certain flat faced dogs over concerns of their health. there is
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something wrong in the way we as a society believe it is right to breed animals for their looks. it's something we should perhaps question about that. the government says there are no current plans to ban specific breeding of cats in the uk while breeders themselves argue there's simply not enough evidence. considering some of the problems these cats are susceptible to, would you consider not breeding them?“ these cats are susceptible to, would you consider not breeding them? if i had discovered there would have been a significant problem i would have stopped breeding them but when you balance that against a number of other health issues that occur in other health issues that occur in other breeds, you could argue that for most pedigree breeds. whether they're bred to have a flat faced or flat ears, the fad for designer pets isn't going anywhere. but potential owners have been asked to think about their health before their appearance. holly hamilton, bbc news. we will be talking to a vet later in
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the programme about some of the implications of those breeds. when we look at some of the words coming out of the us administration at the moment, the one phrase that stands out, all options are on the table. can you do some translation, what does that mean? let's be very clear, the situation in north korea has changed substantially over the last few years in the sense that what people thought was an almost comical question, the north korean nuclear threat, has become very real and very dangerous indeed. we need to address it. i think the white house and the americans are right in escalating the seriousness of this
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question, all north korea's neighbours feel this thread very intensely. to what extent is there any kind of military solution? i'm very sceptical and so are the experts that i've talked to. i think the military options are not good. the best way forward i think, and i think this is what the white house wa nts to think this is what the white house wants to pursue, is to keep a calm, clear head and to work particularly with beijing to try to bring pressure on pyongyang, try to get them to see that they could have a great economic future if they can agree not to be so threatening, if they can agree a freeze or to the nuclear is. that has got to be the way forward —— denuclearisation. as people can see, the situation is tense and that's one of the reasons, to get to some of the things i've been saying earlier today, it seems incredible when you have a threat of that kind from a rapidly nuclear
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arming north korea that we should be proposing... 0r arming north korea that we should be proposing... or that arming north korea that we should be proposing... 0rthat there arming north korea that we should be proposing... or that there could be a risk thatjeremy corbyn could become prime minister of this country with a commitment to get rid of our nuclear weapons, spontaneously common unilaterally, for the uk to disarm. that cannot be the way forward for this country. that's not the way to deal with the threats we face. we will come back to that in a moment. explain a couple more things. we know senators we re couple more things. we know senators were called in and given what they said was a sobering briefing amongst other things about military options. you say that's not a good option but it's becoming increasingly realistic. the question people will be interested in, wanting to know and possibly fearful of, what would our role be in any potential military strikes on north korea? as you say yourself, this is almost an
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academic subject, it's becoming a realistic notion as people see those trials, those live fire trials going on, they will be thinking what happens if the call comes in from donald trump saying we are intending to ta ke donald trump saying we are intending to take some form of military action. will we be involved? let me go back to what i said. all the evidence i have seen suggests to me that the military options are very farfrom good. don't that the military options are very far from good. don't forget, that the military options are very farfrom good. don't forget, the capital of south korea, seoul, is only around a0 minutes as far as i can remember from the only around a0 minutes as far as i can rememberfrom the border with north korea. i've been there, you can go up and looked into north korea just north of that korean capital —— looked into. the risk of huge, hideous reprise all is against south korea as a result of any kind of attack on north korea have got to be very very severe —— look into. what we are working for in the uk
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government and urging is cooperation between the us and particularly beijing, and all the regional powers to try to get north korea to see sense. today i'm actually going to the un security council in new york to see what we can do at the un to try to build the international consensus. mrjohnson, if i may interrupt. 0ne consensus. mrjohnson, if i may interrupt. one of your criticisms of jeremy corbyn is he is meandering and nonsensical, ithink jeremy corbyn is he is meandering and nonsensical, i think i've quoted you correctly, and i think what you just did was meander. the question was pretty straightforward, would we bea was pretty straightforward, would we be a part of military action against north korea? be a part of military action against north korea ? you be a part of military action against north korea? you gave me an answer you've already given before about diplomacy and this is whatjeremy corbyn has said. what i'm trying to tell you is i think military action against north korea in my honest opinion to you is not a good idea at
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the moment. i certainly don't think it likely. in order that we don't repeat ourselves, can i make this more plain if i could. you are happy forjeremy corbyn if you like to be caught out by hypothetical questions about what he might do in the event ofan about what he might do in the event of an attack but you seem to be doing the same thing, you are prevaricating. what do we do if donald trump calls up... let me give you a hypothetical. donald trump calls up in three days and says i'm intending to strike north korea, whatever the strike may be, on some level, i would like us, the uk, would be involved, what is the answer? the answer is we think, as i told you now for the third time if i may, that i don't think that is the right way forward, we don't think a military strike is likely to be successful. we think the way forward is to have economic pressure of the kind we think china is essential to
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applying, we're working with the chinese to try to ratchet up the pressure, and in the meantime it would be the height of folly to get back to my earlier point for us to unilaterally disarm and get rid of our means of employing a nuclear deterrent against north korea and indeed others who are seeking to arm themselves with nuclear weapons. people will draw their own conclusions as to whether you they think you have directly answered the question. i think i've given you a very clear a nswer. question. i think i've given you a very clear answer. can i bring you back to the issue, you've mentioned it several times, you're very personal attacks onjeremy corbyn. it's a bit unseemly, isn't it? why do you feel the need to be so personal about it, why do you have to call him at and headed? why can't you deal with issues instead of personalities and insults? there's a very serious risk people will be looking atjeremy corbyn and not see the threat that he presents. i've just described one problem, you've
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got kim jong—un, who just described one problem, you've got kimjong—un, who is in the process of acquiring nuclear weapons, i think our nuclear deterrent is vital in keeping us safe. it seems incredible to me that there should be a risk in having a prime minister who wants to discard that nuclear weapons in the circumstances. i also think it's extraordinary that this is a guy who's campaigned not just extraordinary that this is a guy who's campaigned notjust against nato but has said he would get rid of our armed forces. this is at a time when you have a revanchist russia increasingly throwing its weight around in the countries of the former warsaw pact, trying to rebuild that sphere of influence in the baltics, in the western balkans, in eastern europe, and the uk has just sent, as you know, an enhanced forward presence to estonia of 850 troops, this is the time for the uk to stand tall and to be strong and
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to stand tall and to be strong and to support our allies and to recognise that in an uncertain world you need to be tough. all give you a further reason. we are about to engage in some very difficult negotiations with our 27 friends and partners in the eu —— i'll give you. the atmosphere at the moment has changed remarkably, people are positive and they can see a way forward. theresa may's beach on the 17th of january was strong and clear, people can see how and negotiation can be conducted —— speech. i look at the labour party position on this, i don't understand, it is chaotic. are they in the single market, the customs union, in, out, in, out, it's impossible to work out what they wa nt to impossible to work out what they want to achieve. we need a strong and clear mandate for theresa may to get on and to deliver the result people want, taking back control of our laws, our borders and very
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substantial sums of money. foreign secretary, thank you very much for your time. boris secretary, thank you very much for yourtime. borisjohnson, secretary, thank you very much for your time. boris johnson, the foreign secretary, speaking to us from our london studio. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the conservatives have chosen zac goldsmith to fight his old seat in richmond park injune's election just months after losing it to the liberal democrats. he lost it after triggering a by—election by leaving the conservative party in protest at the government's backing of a third heathrow runway. the lib dems say he's lost his last shred of credibility by standing again but he says he can win. i think the circumstances of this election are very, very different to the circumstances of the by—election. that was a one—off, very rare opportunity caused by my resignation over heathrow, but it gave people an opportunity to express their rage about the outcome of the referendum, and it was an opportunity they weren't going to miss. it's feared a tottenham
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football supporter who was attacked by a fellow spurs fan at their game against chelsea at the weekend may have suffered permanent damage to his eyesight. police have released an image of michael voller, which you may find upsetting. the 23—year—old, who used to work as a gardenerfor spurs, suffered a broken cheek—bone, eye—socket and skull after being punched in the face. education programme to teach and inspire london's victoria and albert museum says it will fund a national education programme to teach and inspire the next generation of young artists and designers. it's using its prize money from winning the museum of the year award in 2016 to pay for the programme in secondary schools. the waterloo & city line has been suspended in the last few minutes because of a signal failure at bank. this is how it looks on the m11. there's been an accident and it's slow southbound towards junction 5 for loughton, those delays back tojunction 6 and the m25. and in the west end, cockspur street on the west side of trafalgar square
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is partly blocked eastbound. we have queues on both the strand and the mall. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a chilly morning with a widespread frost to start the day but the weather won't be as dramatic as it was yesterday when we saw thunderclouds and hailstorms. instead today a much quieter day of weather with some sunshine around through the morning and then cloud will thicken into the afternoon, eventually we'll get some outbreaks of rain. but it's a nice morning, there's lots of sunshine around and then the cloud will thicken from the north as we head through the afternoon. possibly a few light showers by the time we end the day as well, this is a very weak warm front coming through but it's still going to feel cold today, top temperatures only between 10—12 but the temperatures will start to improve over the next few days. so still a few light showers around this evening but a lot of dry weather too. it's going to be quite a chilly night again but not as cold as it was last night. temperatures out in the more rural
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spots could possibly dip low enough to get a touch of frost. tomorrow another quiet day, should be mostly dry, just the small chance of one or two showers here and there will be plenty of brightness and sunshine as well. temperatures coming up over the next few days or so. saturday probably the nicest day of the bank holiday weekend, it will turn wet and windy later on on sunday and possibly monday too. i'll be back in half an hour with more news, travel and weather. you can also check out our website at the usual address. now it's back to charlie and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. the main stories: tensions are rising in north korea, as the us call for more pressure to force the country to give up its nuclear weapons programmes. last night, president trump briefed all 100 members of the senate. his government revealed a strategy of economic sanctions and diplomacy, but said they were also prepared to defend themselves and their allies. large—scale military exercises have been carried out in both the north and south of the peninsula.
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borisjohnson boris johnson says borisjohnson says china, the us and the uk must work together. the best way forward i think, and i think this is what the white house wants to pursue, is to keep calm, clear head and to work particularly with beijing to try to bring pressure on pyongyang, try to get them to see that they could have a great economic future if they can agree not to be so threatening, if they can agree to the nuclear is. that has got to be the way forward. —— de—nuclearise. but at the moment as people can see the situation is tense. borisjohnson has used his first intervention in the election campaign to mount the conservatives' most personal attack yet onjeremy corbyn. councils in england will have to do more to tackle homelessness, under a new law introduced today. the conservatives have recently set
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out a clear plan to build more affordable housing, with the number of new homes up three quarters since 2010. the liberal democrats said they would content of the brighton seat currently held by the only green party nominee. the parties did not put up candidates in some seats to avoid the vote against the conservatives being split. united airlines says it will offer passengers up to £7,000 as an incentive to give up their seats if flights are overbooked. the us airline was widely criticised after video emerged of a passenger being forcibly removed from one of its planes. a simple eye test could mean far earlier detection of glaucoma, the leading cause of sight loss in the uk. scientists found that injecting patients with a florescent marker enabled them to identify sick nerve cells. it means the condition could be detected before a person's eyesight begins to deteriorate. the number of new cars built in
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britain reached a 17 year high last month. figures show exports continue to drive the increase, with an average of one car exported every 20 seconds in march. a village in north yorkshire, which was put up for sale last year with a £20 million price tag, has been sold. yes, west heslerton, near malton, includes a mansion, a3 houses, a pub and 2,000 acres of farmland. it had been owned by the same family for more than 150 years but has now been sold to a property investment company. what are they going to do with it? hopefully not much because it doesn't need anything! coming up, carol will have the weather and i think she said it will get a little bit warmer next week. it needs to because it is chilly!
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things are heating up in the premier league. every match counts at this stage in the premier league. you could argue it does earlier in the season but at this stage everything really matters. tottenham played arsenal at the weekend. the manchester derby tonight again. massive for both sides when it comes to the champions league stages. it's all very exciting. tottenham can still catch chelsea at the top of the premier league. christian erikssen scored the only goal of the game as spurs beat crystal palace. the gap at the top of the table now four points with five games to play. there are only five games left and we know we need to keep close to chelsea if we want to have a chance. we can cross our fingers that chelsea will lose points, but it's up to us to end the season better and give ourselves the extra boost. tottenham's next game is on sunday against their north london rivals arsenal.
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a robert huth own—goal gave them a 1—0 win over leicester last night, to boost their chances of finishing in the top four. sunderland are on the brink of relegation after losing to middlesbrough. marten de roon scoring the only goal of the game. boro are still in deep trouble themselves, but sunderland could be relegated this weekend. the burnley midfielderjoey barton said he'd effectively been forced to retire early, after receiving an 18—month ban from football for breaking the fa's betting rules. he admitted the charge but plans to appeal against the length of the ban and he called on the fa to look at their own relationship with the gambling industry. maria sharapova has received her strongest criticism so far from a fellow—player. eugenie bouchard said she doesn't think a cheater in any sport should be allowed to play that sport again. well, sharapova won herfirst competitve match since returning from a 15—month doping ban, beating italy's roberta vinci in straight sets at the stuttgart grand prix. vinci had questioned sharapova being given a wild card for the event.
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it was a moment that i've obviously been looking forward to for a very long time. training quite intensively for the past few months and visualising myself going back at it and competing again. so in ways of course i was rusty, but in so many other ways i felt like i hadn't left. and britain'sjohanna konta is safely into the last 16, after a three—set win over japan's naomi 0saka. ronnie 0'sullivan's been knocked out of the world snooker championship by dingjunhui. 0'sullivan says he's in a happy place, even though he hasn't won a ranking tournament this season. i love what i do, so why would i not do it because i'm not winning tournaments or be unhappy because i'm not winning, when you love what you do? it's kind of all the stuff that comes with snooker is a bonus. the real love is just playing. if you were as good as me you would love it as well! ronnie 0'sullivan in entertaining
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form as always! battle was fought. —— that's all the sport. the struggle to get a gp appointment when you want one is something we've talked about a lot here on breakfast. but it's a problem thatjust doesn't seem to be going away. injanuary, the prime minister urged doctors surgeries to make more effort to open between 8am and 8pm, seven days a week, unless they could prove a lack of demand. and ministers have pledged an extra £528 million a year by 2020/21 to help make it happen. but figures from the national audit office, released earlier this year, suggested nearly half of surgeries were actually struggling to stay open between their core hours of 8am and 6:30pm, just five days a week. now an influential group of mps, the public accounts committee, say access to and experience of gp services varies significantly according to who you are and where you live. so what can be done
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to improve the situation across the board? professor helen stokes—lampa rd is the chair of the royal college of gps. good morning. what can be done to improve the way that patients have access to their gps? there are quite access to their gps? there are quite a lot of things that can be done. first of all we need far more gps and we need more members in the community. that's practised nurses, pharmacist and other healthcare professionals that work alongside us. so mental health therapist and so on. to make that happen we need more resources. practice premises and it to be better. so there are a raft of things that need to be better to fix this problem. almost half of gp surgeries, around a6%, close early, in the mid— afternoon. why can't they remain open? firstly, we don't believe those figures. we think they are misleading because of the way the data has been collected.
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the gps are often out of visiting patients in their homes or conduct in consultations over the telephone or sometimes by skype. so it's not as big a problem as is suggested. however, there are some surgeries that quite amply very small and don't have the staff to day open all the time because of the extended hours they are trying to work. there's a big thing about resource, understanding the local community andi understanding the local community and i guess the help that problem getting surgeries to work collectively to deliver these services is a lot of the way forward. it seems from these figures, and you see the necessary believe them, but you can that gp practices aren't managing to work extra hours and funding levels have increased again by a.7% in the past year. those increases as in april this year, whereas that it is in this year, whereas that it is in this report is from previous years. even with that there are a lot of areas where we just haven't got enough doctors to do the job.
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currently there is an average of at least one doctor vacancy in every single surgery in the country. that's a terrible situation and it's no wonder people are struggling to get appointments. in my own practice we are one doctor down. there aren't any out there at the moment so there are huge initiatives to get more gps trained, to retain people in service when they might otherwise retire and also to say to those doctors who are at risk with their health, we need to protect gps and teams because beating them up at a time like this is the last in that will help anybody. let's talk about that. training to be a doctor takes a long time but it's a well—paid job at the end of it. why are doctors so demoralised and how can you motivate gps to feel better about the work they are doing? this isn't about salaries the doctors are paid, this is about the working conditions. 0ne of the most stressful things as a healthcare professional is feeling that you can't do a safe job, the best for your patience. that's why we are all in it at the moment. we
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become healthcare professionals because we truly care and if you are working in a service that is so stretched, under resourced and staff, and that causes huge personal stress. if at the end of the day you are worried when you go to bed, worried that you haven't done a safe job and you haven't done the best for your patience, that's what grinds people down and causes stress and burnouts. they just grinds people down and causes stress and burnouts. theyjust say they can't do it any more. there is a big issue but we are aware of it, we are working together to tackle it. and in fact working together to tackle it. and infact our working together to tackle it. and in fact our colleges put out a ma nifesto, in fact our colleges put out a manifesto, calling for the delivery of the promises we've already had by the current government, to be delivered after the election, regardless of who is in power. we've had a huge response from people at home. one woman says she works in a gp surgery, it's difficult for people to book in advance. rachel says her surgery doesn't have same—day appointments. victor says, it is getting harder and harder to getan it is getting harder and harder to get an appointed. i have complete
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hot conditions but there's no point phoning. sometimes i have to wait a fortnight. the list goes on and on. i understand is a gps are demoralised because they want to do theirjobs properly, but the patients are also demoralised. that's why we all need to unite in our voice to the government and say this can't go on. this is not sustainable. we need a safe and effective gp service. because when the general practice service falls over the whole nhs crumbles around it. we've got many examples of surgeries across the country having to close their doors and to give back their contracts and say, we can't do this any more, and that's a disaster for local communities and it puts pressure on other surgeries in the area and huge pressure on hospitals. it is in nobody was back interest when general practices are failings, so we all need to put pressure on and have a clear message that we need the resources and the people together to do it. then as gps what we have to do is work in more creative ways, to increase the different healthcare professionals. people have to accept they won't
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a lwa ys people have to accept they won't always be able to see a gp. it might be another healthcare professional who is more appropriate in that time of need. we work as a team to deliver the best care, because that's in all of our interest. thank you very much indeed. let's have a look at the weather with carol. good morning. 0ur weather watchers have been busy this morning, another beautiful picture from north and shirt. variable cloud, sunny skies but not as cold in scotland at the moment, neither in northern ireland or northern england because there's more cloud around ash north fair share. in edinburgh and belfast, currently seven —— north air shire. some frost around this morning, it will melt because the sun is up. what we're looking at today is a cloudy day than yesterday, a few showers around, some of those will be heavy. we have some showers moving across northern england and
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in through north wales, heading south through the day, although it's a sunny start, in the south it won't last. in the south and other weather front producing showers across scotla nd front producing showers across scotland and more into northern england by the afternoon, some of those into northern ireland but south—west england will hang onto the sunshine for much of the day and it should stay dry. in other southern counties, more cloud building through the day but nonetheless we will still see brighter breaks and these are showers moving into east anglia, the midlands and northern england. some, particularly in northern england, will be heavy but even so still some brighter breaks in that cloud and in cumbria in any sunshine you could hit 1a. brighter skies coming in behind this weather front, moving towards northern ireland, taking its cloud and showers with it in doing so. again some brighter breaks but they will be limited. then as we go into wales, compared to this morning, much more cloud building and a few showers. through this evening and overnight you can see
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what happens, here's our weather front slipping south, out to the west a bit more cloud, to the east under clearer skies they will be some grass frost. colder than these temperatures suggest the countryside. tomorrow where we've got the clear skies is where we'll start with some sunshine, still a bit more cloud out to the west, still the odd shower but for most of the country tomorrow it will be dry and it won't feel as cold. 0ur the country tomorrow it will be dry and it won't feel as cold. our range will be roughly 8—15. then into the weekend, saturday is looking bright for most with a few showers but sunday is what we're watching, low pressure from the south—west will introduce some rain and the squeeze in the isobars tells us it will be windy. saturday will be largely dry, a few showers to the west, rain gathering in the west but we have this southerly flow so that means it will be milder and a fast look at sunday, here comes the rain from the south—west moving north—eastwards, not getting to the north of the
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country but it will we think during monday. thanks very much, we will see you again soon. we when we have banked profits announced for all sorts of reasons. this is important today. it is lloyds and we still have a bit of a sta ke lloyds and we still have a bit of a stake but the results are looking good for them this morning. lloyds, which owns the bank of scotland and halifax brands too, has announced some good results today. you'll remember though that during the financial crisis the bank had to be bailed out with the government taking a a0% stake in the business. it cost £20.3 billion, but that has now been paid back... so the government now owns just under 2% of the bank and that's expected to be sold off soon, making the government a profit. this has been possible because it's been performing well. results this morning showed a doubling of profits over the last three months to £1.3 billion. let's talk to laith khalaf from the stockbroker hargreaves lansdown. good morning. what are your thoughts
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on the profit numbers, they look good? they do, especially if you look at what's happened over the last year, and interest rate cut from the bank of england last august, that's not good for banks —— an. the fact it has kept its head above water is a good sign. 0bviously above water is a good sign. obviously there are issues in terms of compensation payments and pp! and the nasty is we are familiar with with banks but the numbers are looking pretty good. on the pp! mis—selling scandal, it's amazing how much it has cost lloyds, something like £17 billion, that's mega money for them. a huge amount, yes, the estimate for the industry asa yes, the estimate for the industry as a whole is £35 billion and banks have been trying to draw a line under it for years and they keep having to rub it out and draw it again and today we've seen £350 million, lloyds taking a charge for ppi. we know for sure it will end in 2019, the financial conduct authority say there will be no more claims on banks after that period, so they got to get through the next
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two years and then they're in the clear. our stake in lloyds has been reduced, only around 2% now, that's likely to be sold off so our hands will essentially be washed from lloyds. that's right, the taxpayer got their money back, £20 billion invested back into thousand nine. we've got that back and the government will be out in the next couple of weeks we think —— in 2009. back to normalfor couple of weeks we think —— in 2009. back to normal for lloyds. royal bank of scotland, the other bailout, £a5 billion, the share price needs to double from where it is to break even so that's why we've had the chance to come out and say it could be sold at a loss. what is lloyds doing right that royal bank of scotla nd doing right that royal bank of scotland isn't? with lloyds they had fewer problems to start with. during the financial crisis royal bank of scotla nd the financial crisis royal bank of scotland was the bad bank at the start. the management has been spinning plates all the time, so they're gradually moving in the right direction towards where lloyds is now but it's a much slower burn.
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and the government will probably make a loss on that stake? we still own three quarters of royal bank of scotla nd own three quarters of royal bank of scotland and the share price needs to double from where it is and that won't happen any time soon. thanks very much. . that's it from me for now. when it comes to reading, do you savour the smell and feel of leafing through printed pages or perhaps prefer the more modern concept of an e—reader? new figures show that sales of the more traditional book are at record levels. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at a shop in wirral for us this morning. i'm going to tell you something now. we sent jayne mccubbin we sentjayne mccubbin into a bookshop, a special bookshop, i'm going to tell you why it is special, it's where i got all my school books from when i was a kid. jayne, how old were you then? i would have been 11, picking up my school books in
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rural. and it hasn't changed. good morning. has it not changed? -- rural. this is so, the proprietor, we've got a bit of a crowd in today. good morning. is it always this busy at 8am? absolutely! of course it is. this is a huge success for books, not only our e—book sales down significantly, but books you can smell and feel can smell and feel and smell are smell and feel can smell and feel and smellare up, smell and feel can smell and feel and smell are up, a huge success story. you are from a charity called the reader and it's all about bringing people together over a good book, you've tried bringing people together over an e—book. does it work? there's something special about a physical book, we read with people who maybe don't own a book let alone go to bookshops, it is magical when you can bring a book into people's lives, it gives you a close connection to the story, something real and human. you don't
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get that with an e—reader? something real and human. you don't get that with an e-reader? it's a different experience. not as physical, it's the physicality that matters. thanks for your time. some fascinating statistics, sales of children's books are up 16%. let's bring overjude lennon, a children's author, here are some of your books, why are children's sales up so significantly? children love to read a book and grown—ups like to do it with children. it's coming back into fashion, people want to reconnect? they do, snuggle up with a teddy under the duvet. can't you do it with an e—book? under the duvet. can't you do it with an e-book? it glares at you and you can't lift the flap! that's true, thanks for your time! you can't lift the flap! that's true, thanks foryourtime! mind you can't lift the flap! that's true, thanks for your time! mind the step, cameraman. skilled! another fascinating stat and it surprised me, fiction is down, non—fiction is up. i would me, fiction is down, non—fiction is up. iwould have me, fiction is down, non—fiction is up. i would have thought in this day and age, this is emma, who is a
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non—fiction fan, i would have thought people would want a bit of escapism. i think people are looking for their own facts as an antidote to the fake news, that might be the story of it. none of it here! all good news, no fake news! thanks for that theory! this is tiny, you are a fiction fan, what is your theory, why is it so special to hold a book and notan why is it so special to hold a book and not an e—reader? —— tania. why is it so special to hold a book and not an e-reader? -- tania. it save decision, when you pick up a book it's not like picking up your phone or an e—reader, it's a decision to step away and really calm down and have a different experience. —— it's a decision. thank you for your theory is this morning. there was some academic research last year that said you engage more with the printed page than an e—reader. they did a test on people and they found people had a
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far better understanding of the words they were reading in a real book, so not only are the sales up but that's probably better for us as well. jayne, thank you very much and also some happy memories there. how do you like to read? do you have experiences or anything about books you want to let us know about? do you like to read on an e—reader, if you travel a lot and you don't want to carry heavy books, maybe that's your thing. we're told never to work with children or animals, but simon nye did just that to bring the conservationist gerald durrell‘s life to our screens. he'lljoin us after 9am to tell us about the second series of the durrells. animals and all! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the conservatives have chosen zac goldsmith to fight his old seat in richmond park injune's election just months after losing it to the liberal democrats.
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he lost it after triggering a by—election by leaving the conservative party in protest at the government's backing of a third heathrow runway. the lib dems say he's lost his last shred of credibility by standing again but he says he can win. i think the circumstances of this election are very, very different to the circumstances of the by—election. that was a one—off, very rare opportunity caused by my resignation over heathrow, but it gave people an opportunity to express their rage about the outcome of the referendum, and it was an opportunity they weren't going to miss. it's feared a tottenham football supporter who was attacked by a fellow spurs fan at their game against chelsea at the weekend may have suffered permanent damage to his eyesight. police have released an image of michael voller, which you may find upsetting. the 23—year—old, who used to work as a gardenerfor spurs, suffered a broken cheek—bone, eye—socket and skull after being punched in the face. london's victoria and albert museum says it will fund a national
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education programme to teach and inspire the next generation of young artists and designers. it's using its prize money from winning the museum of the year award in 2016 to pay for the programme in secondary schools. the tube is all running normally at the moment, no reported problems on any of those lines there. let's take a look at the aao and after an accident there are lane restrictions eastbound just as you come up to the greenford flyover. it's slow back to hillingdon circus. and the m25 is down to two lanes anticlockwise between junction 12 for the m3 and junction 11 for chertsey. there's been an accident between a lorry and a car, queues are building up there. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a chilly morning with a widespread frost to start the day but the weather won't be as dramatic as it was yesterday when we saw thunderclouds and hailstorms.
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instead today a much quieter day of weather with some sunshine around through the morning and then cloud will thicken into the afternoon, eventually we'll get some outbreaks of rain. but it's a nice morning, there's lots of sunshine around and then the cloud will thicken from the north as we head through the afternoon. possibly a few light showers by the time we end the day as well, this is a very weak warm front coming through but it's still going to feel cold today, top temperatures only between 10—12 but the temperatures will start to improve over the next few days. so still a few light showers around this evening but a lot of dry weather too. it's going to be quite a chilly night again but not as cold as it was last night. temperatures out in the more rural spots could possibly dip low enough to get a touch of frost. tomorrow another quiet day, should be mostly dry, just the small chance of one or two showers here and there will be plenty of brightness and sunshine as well. temperatures coming up over the next few days or so. saturday probably the nicest day of the bank holiday weekend, it will turn wet and windy later on on sunday and possibly monday too.
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i'll be back in half an hour with more news, travel and weather. you can also check out our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. deepening tensions in north korea. the us calls for tougher sanctions until it dismantles its nuclear programme. america is piling on the pressure as all 100 us senators attend a special briefing at the white house. the uk foreign secretary boris johnson told us there is a very real threat. that north korea nuclear threat. that north korea nuclear threat has become very real and very dangerous indeed and we need to address it. good morning, it's thursday 27th april. also this morning: the pioneering eye test which could save people's sight by helping doctors to diagnose glaucoma. lloyds banking group has doubled its
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profits in the last three months despite being the most complained about bank. i'll have lloyds results for you shortly. in sport: still in the title race. tottenham beat crystal palace and keep the heat on leaders chelsea. books are making a fightback with sales of e—books town and sales of real books up, we'll be back with this bunch of avid readers to find out why in a while. # every time we say goodbye #. celebrating the life of ella fitzgerald — soul singer mica paris will be telling us how she's paying tribute for the star's100th birthday. and the weather with carol.l and the weather with carol. a cold, sunny start to the day in england and wales but we will see cloud with showers. for the rest of the uk a cloudy start with a few showers,
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some areas will see bright spells. more in 15 minutes. thank you. first, our main story. tensions are rising in north korea, as the us call for more pressure to force the country to give up its nuclear weapons programmes. last night, president trump briefed all 100 members of the senate, revealing a strategy of economic sanctions and diplomacy. but washington also said they were prepared to defend themselves and their allies, as our correspondent laura bicker reports. the us is piling on the pressure. this is a military exercise just miles from the north korean border. a message for kim jong—un, that the us is ready if diplomatic efforts fail. this is how the head of the us pacific command put it to members of the house in washington. all options are on the table. we want to bring kim jong—un to his senses, not to his knees. later, all 100 senators were bussed to a briefing at the white house from their commander in chief.
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a highly unusual move to show politicians from both sides of the aisle just how serious the situation has become. north korea is the most dangerous spot on the planet right now, and kimjong—un is a dangerous and wildly unpredictable dictator. donald trump is hoping china will use its political and economic leverage over pyongyang to persuade kim jong—un to end his missile programme. other options include redesignating north korea as a state sponsor of terrorism, which will allow the us to impose greater sanctions. meanwhile, the us show of might continues. this is a missile defence system in south korea. the current goal is a path to peace through negotiations, but the trump administration said it is prepared to defend itself and its allies if necessary. laura becker, bbc news, washington. we spoke to borisjohnson earlier he
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reiterated that the best way to combat north korea would be to work together. the best way forward, i think this is what the white house wa nts to think this is what the white house wants to pursue is to keep a calm clear head and work particularly with beijing to try to put pressure on pyongyang. to try to get them to see that they could have a great economic future if they could agree not to be so threatening, if they could agree a freeze or two denuclearise. that's got to be the way forward. but as people can see at the moment, the situation is tense. boris johnson, speaking a short time ago. the foreign secretary has also been making the headlines this morning with his contribution to the election campaign. we're joined now from westminster by our political correspondent alex forsyth. alex — it's all getting a bit personal isn't it? it certainly is. borisjohnson has been wading into the campaign in
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typical flamboyant style, writing an article in the sun row, in which he callsjeremy article in the sun row, in which he calls jeremy corbyn article in the sun row, in which he callsjeremy corbyn a mutton headed old mugwump who asks meandering and nonsensical questions in parliament who would be calamitous in downing street and disastrous for brexit. this morning boris johnson street and disastrous for brexit. this morning borisjohnson defended those highly personal comments, saying there was a big risk that people did not realise the threat thatjeremy corbyn as a potential prime minister would pose to britain's national security. this is what the tory election campaign is all about, they want to frame this asa all about, they want to frame this as a choice between theresa may and jeremy corbyn which is why we keep hearing arguments about leadership. although labour has been very critical of the comments from mr johnson saying they are crass and offensive and undermine his position as foreign secretary with a key role to play in brexit negotiations. we aren't long into the campaign. we still have six weeks to go and already it is very personal. alex,
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thank you. labour will today promise to tackle the housing crisis by building a million homes, half of them council houses, if the party wins the general election. labour claims the number of affordable homes being built is at a 2a—year low. the housing minister gavin barwell mp said the conservatives have recently set out a clear plan to build more affordable housing, with the number of new homes under construction up three quarters since 2010. ministers from twenty—seven european union countries will meet today for final discussions about the eu's negotiating stance on brexit. they're set to approve the draft negotiating guidelines for the uk‘s divorce from the eu and discuss the next steps in the process. united airlines says it will offer passengers up to £7,000 as an incentive to give up their seats if flights are overbooked. the us airline was widely criticised after video emerged of a passenger being forcibly removed from one of its planes. a simple eye test could lead to much earlier detection of a condition which causes irreversible sight loss, according to researchers
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from university college london. diagnosing glaucoma sooner would mean patients could start treatment before their vision deteriorates. 0ur health correspondent jane dreaper has the details. francesca's eyesight is crucial for her work as an artist. glaucoma develops slowly over many years. there is no cure, but doctors in london believe this new injection will eventually help patients get diagnosed and treated much sooner. to lose one's eyesight early or later is devastating, really, especially if you have an artistic background. but this sort of gave you hope that they could monitor the condition and then, if need be, they could give you drops, which would slow it down slightly. glaucoma is more common as you get older. it affects 600,000 people in the uk. if left untreated, nerve cells in the retina die, leading to sight loss.
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the test uses a special fluorescent marker to highlight failings cells, potentially revolutionising treatment. we believe that, in glaucoma, it is ten years between a visual defect being identified and when the actual process starts. that ten—year delay could mean that you have delayed starting treatment at the time when it is most accessible to treatment, and when you could even prevent vision loss occurring in the first place. francesca wants to save her sight from deteriorating, and she is hopeful the new test will help many others too. 16 people have been involved in trials so far, so more research is needed. but the london team say these are promising results which could also perhaps be used to detect early signs of degenerative brain illnesses. jane dreaper bbc news. councils in england will have to do
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more to tackle homelessness, under a new law introduced today. the homelessness reduction bill means local authorities now have a legal duty to help homeless people to find a place to live. the legislation has been broadly welcomed by homelessness charities, though they warn more still needs to be done to tackle rough sleeping, which has risen by 16% in england in the last year. patients are still struggling to get gp appointments and many surgeries are closed during core opening hours, according to mp5. a report from the public accounts committee says the government's drive to force surgeries to open longer risks duplicating services. they also warn "no credible plan" is in place to recruit more doctors. the government has pledged an extra £500 million per year in funding by 2020 to operate a seven—day service. now for something cute. well, a few things a little bit fluffy things to be precise. a zoo in austria has shown off a litter of white tiger cubs
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to the public for the first time. they're so cute! their names — falco, toto, mia and mautzi. born a month ago and weighed about a kilo then. as you can see from these pictures, they've been eating well and have grown quite a bit in just a few weeks. white tigers are very rare, so the cubs are bound to be a big hit with visitors, before they're donated to other zoos around the world in about a year's time. it is ten past eight, you are watching breakfast and bbc news. more than 700 thousand people in the uk have some form of autism. but despite so many being affected by the condition, it is often misunderstood. eleven year—old jaco — who himself has autism — and his dad, richard mylan, are trying to address that. so they've made a documentary about their lives. we'll speak to them in a moment, but before we do, let's take a look. jaco is the 11 and he loves life. he loves wind farms, rugby, and washing machines.
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when they told me that he was autistic, i was terrified. sometimes i still autistic, i was terrified. sometimes istillam. mainly autistic, i was terrified. sometimes i still am. mainly about his future. i'm lucky, i'm an actor and ifeel grateful my life. i want jaco to have the same, to be fulfilled and independent. the world isn't set up for people like him. will he live without support? will he ever get a job, will he find love? how will he fit into this world? let's take a look at a clip from the programme where you meet joining us now in the studio
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are jaco and his dad richard. the film is lovely and is a real search for us and feel, a dad worried about his son. exactly, it isa worried about his son. exactly, it is a voyage of discovery because a lot of time and effort put into a joint in his formative years, jaco is lucky, he went to a great primary school. after that there doesn't seem to be so much of a plan and if there is one it is not clearly signposted. that's why i went on the journey to see what was available for my son, higher education, employment and beyond. jaco, the film is lovely and you play a great pa rt film is lovely and you play a great part in it, we can see lots of images of you when you were young and now grown up, a big boy like you are now, is life sometimes tough for you because of the autism? yes,
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because i have autism, when things are too noisy or that fire alarms or something... what happens when you are somewhere because i am quite tense, because i am quite tense, because i am scared of bees buzzing and flies... you wear headphones, don't you. i wear headphones because it is too noisy. can you explain a couple of things, jaco, you wear headphones and you often film things. why do you do that. because i've got autism. and that helps you, does it? yes. how does that work? you like to watch them back, don't you. you learns through immersion. he will film his life and watch it back and will soak it all up over time because he loves to watch things on repeat. as jaco walked in
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here this morning he filmed himself andi here this morning he filmed himself and i would say, he isn't happy with loud noises and things like that, even just sitting here on our sofa in this busy studio with a lot of bright lights he is doing brilliantly. exactly. yes, exactly. he's confident, as you can tell, he ta kes he's confident, as you can tell, he takes things in his stride, he is a real star, brilliant in the film. we see you in your new school because you started a new secondary school, how is school going? because my school is cool. a cool school. it's ysgol glantaf. we can see he is
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really popular at school. is popular. he's grown up with his peers and they really understand him. it is a kind of nature — nurture thing, when people grow up without it is beautiful. in the film you meet someone who has grown up with autism because that is one of the things that you talk about, as jaco grows up what will life be like for him. let's take a look at a clip from the programme where you meet alex who has autism. jaco taxis face and hands. alex is more physical. i've broken things several times. i don't have the control, if you know what i mean. alex doesn't need an exercise class. he keeps himself fit! it was amazing meeting him. alex
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really explained stimulating the behaviour to me anyway i hadn't heard before. he made me understand it on heard before. he made me understand itona heard before. he made me understand it on a deeper level. if you take it away it is like taking away an operating system. society needs to get their head around it. it is normal behaviour. he does it, he ta ps normal behaviour. he does it, he taps his face can make six bottle tops, and it's normal behaviour. tell us some of your favourite things. —— clicks bottle tops.|j like clicking the bottle tops, because it makes noises. it goes like that. you interested in the goals? did i see that in the film? —— in the
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—— are you interested in sea gulls. i talk to them a lot. there was talk earlier on in thejourney i talk to them a lot. there was talk earlier on in the journey about how much people understand or how they react to your situation and jaco. much people understand or how they react to your situation and jacom was difficult at the time. nine yea rs was difficult at the time. nine years ago our understanding of autism is not as good as it is now. a lot of my friends, especially my male friends, did not know how to handle it. men, generally, if they don't understand something back away from it. i felt like don't understand something back away from it. ifelt like they don't understand something back away from it. i felt like they didn't get much support, you know? do you have it now? absolutely. has the film helped? it's been overwhelming, the response in wales was incredible. because we showed at there first. i'm blown away by the response. thank you both for coming in. lovely
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to see you. it's been a pleasure to have you. has it been 0k it's been a pleasure to have you. has it been ok for you? yes. you filmed before. iwould has it been ok for you? yes. you filmed before. i would like to see that later. yes, see that later, thank you very much. you're really welcome. richard and jaco: a life with autism is on bbc one next tuesday at 11.20pm. the us says it will tighten sanctions on north korea and step up diplomatic moves as it tries to get the country to end its nuclear and missile programmes. scientists say they've developed an eye test which could spot the main cause of blindness a decade before symptoms appear. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we have had some beautiful pictures this morning.
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this one from the vale of glamorgan. lovely picture. and another one, this is from cambridgeshire. some cloud in the sky and a frosty start. it was a frosty start, now the sun is up that will be melting readily. today, generally speaking, cloudier than yesterday. there will be showers around. that is the scenario we currently have. under a cloud, especially in the north, it'll be a cold start today, but the cloud and showers across northern england and north wales will continue to sink south during the course of the day. behind it, brightening up over north—eastern scotland, but another weather front is producing showers across western scotland and northern england. brighter skies and driest weather will be over the south—west through daylight hours today. across other southern counties, although there will be brighter spells the cloud will build on the day, introducing showers. showers of east anglia and the east midlands and into northern england. they could be heavy here. even so, there will be
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brighter skies. if you get one, for example, in cumbria, we could hit 1a celsius. northern scotland brightening up nicely with sunshine. this is the weather front introducing showery outbreaks of rain. there are some holes at the moment in the cloud, but it'll be a cloudy day with few sunny breaks. a bright sunny start over in wales. but little cloud over with showers. through this evening and overnight, here is the weather front, continuing to the south and west. in the west it'll be fairly cloudy. in the west it'll be fairly cloudy. in the east under clear skies it'll be a touch frosty. these temperatures represent towns and cities. in the countryside they will be lower. under clear skies, first thing tomorrow, we will have a lot of sunshine first thing. in the west, with the week weather front, there will be more clout to start with, but it'll break through the day and we will see some showers coming out of it. temperatures tomorrow, eight to 15 celsius. feeling better than it is going to feel today.
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particularly in the south. we have a change in the wind direction, as well. during saturday, mostly dry, but on sunday this area of low pressure comes our way. it is drifting to the north—east. quite a breezy day during the course of saturday and sunday. 0n breezy day during the course of saturday and sunday. on saturday, variable cloud, just if you showers here and there. lighter breaks around. the temperature continuing to climb. breezy to the west. but this is a mild direction for us. on sunday, remember the low pressure? it'll come in from the south—west. it'll come in from the south—west. it will sweep north during the course of the day. its extent is still open, but this is what we think, quite breezy, temperatures between nine and 16 celsius. 0n monday we think this will continue
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to travel to the north east. if you are sick of the cold weather, as we head into the middle part of next week temperatures will recover, for some of us into the high teens, or indeed low 20s. thanks very much. let's pick up on those figures from lloyds bank coming in this morning. great figures from lloyds bank. i have seen their profits over the last three months double to £1.3 billion. a good result for them. this is an important bank for us because it's one of the ones that we bailed out during the financial crisis. the government took over a a0% stake, which cost £20.3 billion. that money has now been paid back. we have slowly been selling off shares in the company. we've got that money back. we still have a sta ke that money back. we still have a stake in them, just under 2%, so any money made from the sale of that will mean pure profit for the government. good result. all good
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news for the taxpayer in the fact that we have the money back and made a bit, as well. figures are good. but there have been issues along the way. yes, one of the big ones is ppi. everybody has had those messages saying you can get your money back. it has been going on for years and it has cost lloyds bank something like £17 billion. money they have had to set aside to compensate customers. again, and the figures today, there was another £350 million. that has been set aside. are they still expecting more claims? it'll stop in 2019. but we are still seeing it on the balance sheets of the bank at the moment, they are still having to fork out for this. that's been a big scandal for still having to fork out for this. that's been a big scandalfor them. thanks very much. many same—sex couples in australia are choosing to get married using uk law — but without the need to travel halfway across the world. same—sex couples can't get married under australian legislation, but despite this, hundreds of weddings have taken place with the help of the british high commission.
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from canberra, hywel griffith reports. # i never thought i'd miss you... # i neverthought i'd miss you... #. walking down the aisle and into married life, ben and simon have come to exchange vows and rings all with the help of a diplomatic loophole. marrying at the british high commissioner's residence in canberra means they will be legally wed in britain, but not australia. as i'm sure you're all aware, this ceremony is taking place under uk law... it can only happen because ben has a british passport. and once they leave these stately grounds, their reunion won't be recognised on australian soil. this is honoured by the queen, god dammit, so who is more important, the queen or your bigotry, basically? usually the queen. there is nothing lesser about these relationships.
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they're just, they're as strong as anybody's. canberra is right at the centre of australia's struggle with same—sex marriage. polls suggest there is public support but the politicians here in parliament simply can't agree the best way forward, a nationwide vote planned for earlier this year had to be scrapped because of fears it would stoke homophobic hatred. because the central purpose of marriage is to produce offspring... those campaigning against same—sex marriage claimed their views are being discriminated against, and they'd prefer countries like britain to keep out of the debate. just because britain has made a decision doesn't mean australia has to follow suit. we're seeing the negative consequences of the decision britain has made in terms of the impact on the rights and freedoms of other people in the uk, particularly people of faith. so i think it's up to australia to make its own decision and not to be swayed by what other nations might do. to mr simon tolhurst and mr benjamin waldorf,
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husband and husband. ben and simon's same—sex marriage means there have now been 380 under british law in australia. a few have taken place in other countries too, from azerbaijan to vietnam. so is britain trying to exert some soft power? we wouldn't ever seek to enforce our values on other countries, particularly not a country like australia, with which we have such close and warm and respectful relations. this is much more, i think, about the service, as i said. but also a celebration of our own values, we have taken that step. for ben and simon, today is about their future together, but they hope the time will soon come when all of australia will embrace their marriage. always nice to guest on the programme whose birthday it is. but it is amazing that they have got up but it is amazing that they have got up so early on their birthday. mica paris dom will bejoining us
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this morning. she is paying tribute ella fitzgerald who would also be celebrating her birthday today. coming up next, the latest global news in business live. this will be followed at 9am by the victoria derbyshire programme home to lively debate and the latest stories. at 11am newsroom live for breaking news and discussion. it still won't be warm today, we start off frosty in the south of the uk, this was a typical scene in bedford just sent in bya typical scene in bedford just sent in by a weather watcher. the early sunshine will fade because all this cloud is moving from the north and bringing with it showers and possibly longer spells of rain so a more limited amount of sunshine as
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we head into the afternoon. the far south—west of england should stay dry and bright, 13 degrees not impossible, some light showers in south—east england later. through the midlands, and east wales, some of these showers could move into north england and could be happy. not much sunshine in northern ireland, not much rain either, some showers in scotland, sunshine in the north and east, 1a degrees possible for edinburgh, typically 11 celsius under the cloud. the cloud brings bands of showers this evening. they clear away from the east of the uk, keep a few showers out towards wales, the west country, west of scotland, the lowest temperatures in the east, two or three degrees in rural areas, a chilly start, early sunshine, some coastal showers perhaps, some towards wales, western scotland, south—west england, those would amount to much, most places will be dry today, the cloud could
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limit the sunshine to a certain extent, dry and bright for the most pa rt extent, dry and bright for the most part with sunshine at times and those temperatures creeping up to 15 possible in the south of england. the start of the weekend looks like this, dry weather, sunshine at times, it will be milder, the breeze will strengthen and that is the simple part of the weather this weekend, stronger winds likely, lifting this temperatures, threat of rain particularly towards the south—west but some uncertainty. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and aaron heslehurst. trump's trade turnaround. and turnaround. the us president tells mexico and canada he won't scrap their free trade deal but will try
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to renegotiate it. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 27 april. with farmers amongst those under pressure we'll look at what keeping nafta means for trade across north america as the peso and canadian dollar soar. also in the programme. the great shareholder revolt.
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