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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 30, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with katherine downes and ben thompson. the parents of madeleine mccann tell the bbc they're convinced real progress is being made as they try to discover what happened to their daughter. speaking ahead of the 10th anniversary of madeleine's disappearance, kate and gerry mccann talk of their regret at the time they've lost together and of their hope that she'll be found. no parent is going to give up on there child unless they know for certain. —— there. but there is no evidence. we should have been a family of five for all of that time. and, yeah, it does feel like stolen good morning. it's sunday the 30th of april.
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also ahead: an spectacular win for anthonyjoshua. it was billed as the biggest fight in british boxing history, and it definitely lived up to expectation. joshua powers past wladimir klitschko to become the unified heavyweight champion of the world. a pension pledge from theresa may. she promises to tackle irresponsible bosses, as jeremy corbyn sets out his plan for workers rights. president trump marks his 100th day in office, insisting at a rally he's kept "one promise after another." more recycling, selling wonky veg, and scrapping best before dates. we'll hear why mps think serious action is needed to tackle food waste. and sarah has the weather. good morning. good morning. a rather mixed picture today. wet and windy weather for the south—west of england and wales as well. elsewhere, still breezy, but with some sunshine. i will have a full
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forecast for you in about 15 minutes. thank you very much. good morning. first, our main story. the parents of madeleine mccann say they believe their daughter is still alive and real progress is being made to find her. in an interview with the bbc ahead of the 10th anniversary of her disappearance they've also defended the costs of the ongoing investigation. last week, scotland yard confirmed it's still pursuing critical lines of inquiry. laura tra nt reports. not a day goes by where they don't remember her. but the ten year anniversary of their daughter, madeleine, and the disappearance, is a reminder of what happens we feel like we have lost that time. see disappeared from her bedroom while her parents were eating at an on—site restaurant at a hotel. more than £11 million at the end spent on the search for her. she is a single
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missing child. but you have a british subject who has been a subject of a crime. there is no evidence that she is dead. the prosecutor said there was no evidence we have been involved in any crime. for a decade, her disappearance has been a mystery. now there are only for office is working on the case. butjust days ago, the metropolitan police said they are pursuing a significant line of enquiry. her 14th birthday is in may. her twin siblings, who are now 12, were in the hotel the night she went missing. they are trying to protect her from abuse. they are saying things that are untrue and they need to be aware of that for they need to be aware of that for the both of us realised we have to be devoted to the twins to make sure their life is fulfilling, as they deserve. we have tried our best to achieve that. as a family, the
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mccanns vowed to never give up hope. bbc news. we'll be hearing more from that interview with the mccanns. that's coming up in five minutes here on breakfast. the british boxer, anthonyjoshua, is this morning celebrating becoming the unified heavyweight champion of the world after beating wladimir klitschko last night at wembley stadium. it means joshua remains undefeated as a professional, with 19 victories, but it was a close fight. jess is here to tell us more. it wasn't an easy win for aj, was it? i know you have had little sleep. the same as me last night. i was staying up to watch the fight. you we re staying up to watch the fight. you were watching. i was alive at wembley. i was watching on the tv. it was an absolutely epic fight. it was amazing. there were pyrotechnics, there were fireworks. it really felt epic. it had a sense of being quite spectacular. they said this was the biggest fight in
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british history. £30 million of fighting on offer. after he set himself up on that room walk so spectacularly, he had to follow it up spectacularly, he had to follow it up with a spectacular fight. he lived up to expectation. it was interesting because there were many questions before the bout about whether anthonyjoshua had questions before the bout about whether anthony joshua had the ability. he had never made it to around seven in an pro—fight. he a nswered around seven in an pro—fight. he answered all those questions against wladimir klitschko. he proved yesterday that actually he does have the heart. i remember in the fifth round, anthony joshua the heart. i remember in the fifth round, anthonyjoshua came out swinging at wladimir klitschko hoping to put him down. wladimir klitschko said, no, i will stay on my feet and hit back. it seemed like he did not have it in him to finish this fight. and then from somewhere anthonyjoshua had a second win in the all—importa nt 11th round. anthonyjoshua had a second win in the all—important 11th round. there was a massive upper cut landing on
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the chin of wladimir klitschko and then from that point onwards he was on the back foot and then eventually on the back foot and then eventually on the back foot and then eventually on the floor. let us look at some of the reaction from the fight. some famous faces. arnold schwarzenegger was at wembley. he said this. there is supposed to be a rematch in the contract. and sugar ray said that. this is lennox lewis. we will be hearing lots more about that fight, of course, through the morning. 0ne of course, through the morning. 0ne of the biggest sporting events in, definitely, british boxing history. thank you very much for coming in to
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talk about what happened. a bit busy this morning, i should think. thank you very much. and now on to the rest of the day's news. labour and the conservatives will today focus their general election campaigns on their proposals for improving life for employees. theresa may is promising to tackle unscrupulous bosses if she's returned to power in the general election while labour says it's planning to end zero—hours contracts. 0ur political correspondent, leila nathoo, joins us from our london newsroom. so, both parties here vying to be the workers' champion? it really is both parties trying to woo it really is both parties trying to woo the worker. this is the conservatives trying to move in on traditional labour territory. theresa may has done to labour heartland is already. she is promising to protect pensions during company takeovers. this is a reference to the collapse of bhs which went into administration with a deficit of more than £570 million.
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the conservatives promising to give the conservatives promising to give the pensions regulator more powers to potentially block takeovers and leaving scheme is underfunded and making itan leaving scheme is underfunded and making it an offence to put a pension scheme at risk. labour is also promising to protect pensions during company takeovers. that is pa rt during company takeovers. that is part of its 7—point plan on workers rights. that includes banning zero—hours contracts, banning unpaid internships, a higher minimum wage, and extending parental leave. jeremy corbyn puts taking on big business at the heart of his campaign is a busy man checked sir philip green, the former boss of bhs, in his first general election campaign speech as someone general election campaign speech as someone who should be scared of a labour government. so you can see that both parties are really squaring up in fighting over this territory to try to be the party of the ordinary worker. thank you very much. a little more from you a
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little bit later. donald trump has marked the 100th day of his presidency with a speech defending his record and attacking the media. addressing thousands of cheering supporters in pennsylvania, he insisted he's delivering his election promises "every single day" and dismissed criticism of him as "fake news." 0ur correspondent, laura bicker, sent this report from the rally. they came to support their champion, to celebrate 100 days of a president who calls them the forgotten of america. i think this first 100 days has been outstanding, myself. you haven't got enough credit for what he has done. i support him 100%. in the capital of the nation, the deliberate contrast. celebrities and journalists gathering for the glitzy white house correspondents' dinner which is usually attended by the president. but he said he wanted to shun the press in favour of his people. i could not possibly be more thrilled than to be more than 100
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miles away from the washington swamp. iam miles away from the washington swamp. i am spending my evening with all of you! back at the white house correspondents' dinner, the usual, rather it was replaced by a sombre defence. it is ourjob to report on fa cts defence. it is ourjob to report on facts and to hold leaders accountable. that is who we are. we are not fake news. but the president kept a determined note, and those who waited all day to hear those magic words were finally rewarded. we will make america safe again! and we will make america great again! donald trump has said there has been nothing like the last 100 days. he has proved to be unconventional and certainly unpredictable. 0n has proved to be unconventional and certainly unpredictable. on that, at least, both his supporters, and his critics, will agree. laura bicker,
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bbc news, pennsylvania. meanwhile, hours before the rally, thousands of people across the united states took part in protests to express their concern about climate change. much of their anger was directed at president trump, who has previously called climate change "a hoax." 0rganisers said they wanted to put the debate firmly on the agenda for next year's mid—term elections. pope francis has criticised the role of the united nations in tackling international concerns about north korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programme. he said the un had a duty to re—assert its leadership in global diplomacy which, he suggested, had been watered down. the pope said a third party, such as norway, could mediate in the dispute between north korea and the united states, which had become, in his words, "too hot." mps are calling for best—before dates on food to be scrapped, saying they‘ re unnecessary and contribute towards unacceptable levels of food waste. in a report published today, the environment, food and rural affairs committee also believes that supermarkets should sell more wonky vegetables, as claire marshall reports. mixed in with other waste, we throw
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more than £10 billion worth of food away every year. the committee calls ita away every year. the committee calls it a scandal. councils have to raise bills to dispose of it. and this is happening while food bag use is at a record high. mps say the best before date should be abolished. 0n packaging, it only refers to quality. it is perfectly safe to eat afterwards, but the food may not be at its best. industry experts told the committee it was meaningless. the important information to be displayed was the use by date, which is about safety. the best before date, i believe, can be scrapped, because it is a necessary. it means food is wasted and sometimes people don't actually it that good when it goes beyond the best before date. the use by date is still safe to
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eat. we need to make the best use of oui’ eat. we need to make the best use of our food. if it is still good to it, let's eat it. customer that a pioneering product in leeds sell food that otherwise would have gone in the bin. three times would arrive each day. they say we need to learn to love our wonky veg. it's taken him almost a week, but a man dressed as a gorilla has finally finished the london marathon, after crawling all 26.2 miles of it. tom harrison crawled the streets of london "gorilla—style" for around 12 hours a day, raising more than £28,000 pounds for the gorilla 0rganisation. he crossed the finish line on the mall with his sons and was presented with a trophy by the conservationist bill 0ddie. that looks absolutely back—breaking. no wonder it took so long!m that looks absolutely back—breaking. no wonder it took so long! it has taken him, what, a week, would you
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say? how do you... imagine standing after that. all of the blisters you get from running the london marathon, he would have them on his hands as well. and tom will bejoining us on the sofa tomorrow morning to talk about his achievement. for the mccann family, their life as they knew it ended when their daughter madeleine mccann went missing in portugal. they have been talking to the bbc about how they have coped, making yearly shopping trips to buy her birthday presents and holding on to hope that their absent daughter is still alive. everyday is another day without madeleine i think it isjust everyday is another day without madeleine i think it is just that number. it is that ten year mark which makes it more significant, i think, because it is a reminder of how much time has gone by. and
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obviously ten is a big number. i think the day, and the poignancy of it, that we don't tend to go back, because it is so draining. but inevitably, anniversaries and on her birthday, they are by far the ha rd est birthday, they are by far the hardest days, by far. how different is your life now to what you must have imagined, all those years ago? that is a hard one, isn't it, because it is such a long time. that is a hard one, isn't it, because it is such a long timelj think before madeleine was taken, we felt we had managed to achieve a little perfect nuclear family. we had that for a short period, and you had that for a short period, and you had to have a new normality, fortunately for us a new normality fortunately for us a new normality for the minute is a family of four. and last time you talk to me, it told me you are still buying birthday presents and christmas presents for madeleine are you, ten yea rs presents for madeleine are you, ten
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years ago, still doing that? we are still doing that. so you go to the shops, you think madeleine would be this age now, you think what would she want? you have to think what age she want? you have to think what age she is, and something that, you know, whenever we find her will still be appropriate. so there is a lot of thought that goes into it. she is still a daughter, she will always be our daughter. one of the police officers in portugal has been a thorn in your side for many years. he wrote a book which complicates you. and you fought it through the courts. at the moment you have lost and he has won. the lastjudgement, i think, is terrible, so we will be appealing. we haven't lodged that yet, what we will be. suggesting that you were involved. yet, what we will be. suggesting that you were involvedlj yet, what we will be. suggesting that you were involved. i think that what people need to realise, though, as assistant commissioner riley has
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said again this week, the portuguese have said, the final report has said, there is no evidence that madeleine ‘s dead. the prosecutor said there is no evidence we are involved in any crime. the police have talked about one significant lead that they are still pursuing. can you tell me anything about that? well, very much the investigation is in the hands of the metropolitan police. clearly there are ongoing enquiries. they have come a long way, and there is progress. there are some very credible lies of enquiry that the police are working on. and while there is no evidence to give us any negative news, you know, that hope is still there. it really is that, in your hearts? absolutely. that one day you will be reunited with your daughter? no pa re nt reunited with your daughter? no parent is going to give up on their child unless they know for certain the child's dead, and we just don't have any evidence. our hope of
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madeleine being out there is no less thanit madeleine being out there is no less than it was all those years ago. apart from the first 48 hours, nothing has actually changed since then. i think the difficult thing has always been how will we find her? because you relied on the police doing everything they can, and you relied on somebody with information coming forward. and you can see the full version of that interview on panorama, wednesday night at 9pm on bbc one. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the parents of madeleine mccann say they still believe their daughter is alive, almost ten years after she went missing in portugal. donald trump has defended his record as president and attacked the mainstream media in a speech to mark 100 days in office. also coming up in the programme: rising from the ashes. ancient egyptian artefacts that were badly damaged during the second world war are going back on display in liverpool. we will see how they
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have been restored. here is sarah with a look at this morning's weather. how is it looking out there? good morning to you both. it is looking a little bit mixed out there today. a bit of a mixed forecast certainly. some rain towards the south—west but for many of us another dry day. i couldn't resist showing you this picture sent in by one of our weather watchers, a beautiful sunrise ta ken weather watchers, a beautiful sunrise taken in norfolk this morning. as we head through the course of the day, quite a blustery feel to the weather. there will be some sunshine for many of us but across the south—west of england and across the south—west of england and across parts of wales you are going to be seen some pretty wet and windy weather as well. that is down to the fa ct weather as well. that is down to the fact that we have this area of low pressure down from the atlantic. the squeeze on the isobars as well so although it will be dry across many parts of the uk, quite a brisk south—westerly wind blowing, and you
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can see the rain working in across the south—west of england, south wales, to a roundabout lunchtime, quite windy with those outbreaks of rain as well. if you are camping in the west country it is looking a little bit soggy and breezy through the day. that rain just nudging the south—east of england, perhaps up to what the midlands as we head towards the afternoon. still some sunshine for east anglia, much of northern england, northern ireland as well, and for scotland we are looking at a largely dry day. the warmer spot is likely to be in the north—west of scotland, where we could see 17 degrees or so. taking the edge of that with the south—westerly breeze. it is looking dry for the cycling, stage three today. temperatures around 15 degrees or so and it will bea around 15 degrees or so and it will be a little bit lottery as well. as we move through into the evening, we have the dry weather continuing across much of scotland, northern ireland and northern england, the rain edging its way northwards and eastwards. low pressure in charge across the southern half of the uk as we start on holiday monday but further north it is a quite a picture. a mixed day tomorrow.
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sunshine and scattered showers across much of england and wales. the heaviest showers down to was south—west. could be the odd rumble of thunder. further north it is less windy and also drier. not on to tuesday, high pressure brings largely dry weather and we will import this easterly breeze which will make things feel quite chilly along the east coast, warmer and brighterfurther along the east coast, warmer and brighter further west. and that is really the outlook through the rest of the week ahead. still lots of dry weather. there will be some sunshine, especially across western parts of the country, and things are going to be turning a little bit cooler in the east. no snow in the forecast this week, which makes us all much for that. we will be speaking to you a little bit later on. you don't expect snow in april! looking at the front page of the newspapers, the sunday telegraph leads on news from brussels, which will be on the front pages a lot as these negotiations get under way. the headline, theresa may dismissing a series of hardline brexit demands,
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as both sides begin negotiations for the uk to leave the european union. 0n the front of the daily mail, kate mccann, ten years on from the disappearance of her daughter madeleine and theresa may waging war on pensions cowboys, labour and conservatives setting their senses on workers' writes, and an anti— philip green charter protecting pensions, she says, in the future. the front page of the sunday times, donald trump marking his hundredth day in office and the story we discussed about negotiations with brussels. this is a story we have been keeping an eye on, the high—speed train line, hs2, they suggest the trains will be wider and for taller people, as the nation is changing shape and there are too many complaints that modern seats had no relation to the size of modern travellers. there will be a
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little bit more legroom, which i am. —— which i am happy about. little bit more legroom, which i am. -- which i am happy about. and the eu putting tough terms for brexit on the table, with a hard line on trade. a picture of theresa may out on the campaign trail in aberdeenshire yesterday. and on the front of the observer, the anthony joshua victory we talked about last night, back from the brink to win the world heavyweight title. and of course, politicians out on the campaign trail ahead of the general election, and it is workers' writes that are at the centre of the debate, labour and jeremy corbyn promising to outlaw zero hours contracts. the anthony joshua fight making a lot of the papers but the other story, sunderland finally relegated from the premier league,
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and david moyes apologise to fans, saying they are the ones who go out and spend their hard earned cash, and spend their hard earned cash, and the team haven't given them enough to enjoy over the last season. we will be watching that space, and what happens to david moyes, his future at sunderland being decided in the next few weeks. diving inside some of the front pages, lessons in brushing teeth for children, and some amazing statistics. data released earlier this year showing there were more than 9000 extracted teeth, of children under the age of four, and 47 of those were four babies under the age of one. so schools in some parts of the country, devon, yorkshire, london, wales, have introduced schemes teaching children how to brush their teeth, giving them free toothbrushes and toothpaste. this is something we have been talking about in the office. it is so true. half empty packets cheat shoppers. in the
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sunday times they have pictures of... you know, you go out and buy something, especially when it comes to crisps, you look in and you find five crisps in the bottom of the packet and everything else is just a. you get that pop of a when you open the packet, and you look in and... —— pop of air. open the packet, and you look in and... -- pop of air. that is cheating, isn't it, that they hide the gap. some terrible examples of fresh air at. the firms which make it will say it is important to have fresh airfor packaging it will say it is important to have fresh air for packaging and safety of the product. yes, naturally. it feeds the argument that things are getting smaller. maybe it is not things getting smaller but packaging getting bigger. maybe that is the case. the sunday telegraph, why feeding seagulls could put you in front of the big, obviously that means being in court —— in front of the beak. in devon, if you feed the
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seagulls you could be fined £80 and end up in court, apparently, because they are such a pest. they have these examples of things that seagulls have done. they killed a taut —— tortoise named stig. sue atkinson left with blood pouring out of her eyes when she was packed on the head. it sounds horrendous —— pecked. there is a real problem, and people being properly harmed by seagulls. no chance you could feed them any of those things which are getting smaller, anyway. we returned to one of our top stories. very exciting and very productive — that is how president trump has described his first 100 days in office, at a rally to mark the occasion. he told supporters in pennsylvania that he was keeping one promise after another, and attacked
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journalists, dismissing their criticisms as "fake news". if the media'sjob is to be honest and tell the truth, then i think we would all agree the media deserves a very, very big, fat, failing grade. mr trump decided to hold a rally to celebrate his first 100 days instead of going to the annual white house correspondents' dinner. he is the first president to miss the event since ronald reagan, in1981, and mrtrump's absence was noted. we've got to address the elephant thatis we've got to address the elephant that is not in the room. the leader of our country is not here. and that's because he lives in moscow, and it's a very long flight. it would be hard for vlad to make it. vlad can't just make would be hard for vlad to make it. vlad can'tjust make it on saturday, it's a saturday! as for the other
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quy: it's a saturday! as for the other guy, i it's a saturday! as for the other guy, i think is in pennsylvania because he can't take a joke. joining us now from washington is anneke green, a former speech writerfor george w bush. anneke was there at the correspondents' dinner. you are still in your address because you were at that dinner. was it strange not having the president that? it was a little more boring not having the president there. i have been two previous dinners, i went to the dinners previously with barack 0bama, when he was president, andi barack 0bama, when he was president, and i actually was at the dinner in 2011 when president barack 0bama made fun of donald trump, who then had no intention of running for president, that he had announced. and that was very uncomfortable. the president not there to hear the jokes, as you say, makes it feel a little bit less exciting, but he is not there to kind of sit there and listen to what the comedians and journalists were saying about him. but does this sum up his relationship with the press, doesn't it? he chose not to go to the white
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house correspondents' dinner, and that relationship at the press has been such a feature of his first 100 days. yes, so prior to his announcement he would not go, several media organisations said they would not be hosting the after dinnerand they would not be hosting the after dinner and before dinner programmes that they normally do. they cited various reasons for doing that. people were saying there wasn't a lot of interest, so it could be that the celebrities who normally come to the celebrities who normally come to the dinnerjust were not interested in attending for president trump, and so then—president trump said, well, i am and so then—president trump said, well, iam not and so then—president trump said, well, i am not coming down, and and so then—president trump said, well, iam not coming down, and he hosted a live campaign rally, not a campaign rally since he is not campaigning, but it was a rally in philadelphia, because many reporters went to cover that rather than the party. so in a way he spoilt the party. so in a way he spoilt the party for the press and got his way. what do you make of his first 100 days? what you think has been a success and what do you think failed? so his greatest success has
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been getting gorsuch, the supreme court justice been getting gorsuch, the supreme courtjustice confirmed. he nominated him from the list, he had a list ofjudges he would consider, and that person has now been confirmed, and that is a lifelong appointment, and as your viewers may remember, it is the third branch of government, along with congress and the president, which presents a balanced of powers. so he filled him into a conservative justice's balanced of powers. so he filled him into a conservativejustice's seat, and that has been successful for him, and it has gone a long way with his supporters, along with his instituting on the social conservatism side a policy which keeps federal us dollars from going to organisations that promote abortion overseas. and that is important one for him, and a very important one for him, and a very important policy, and an important one for him in terms of uniting the republican party behind him. not every one will agree with that, and democrat opposition to that is very strong. but it is important for him
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to unite the republican party behind him with policies like that, isn't it? well, it is something that was originated by president reagan, and then supported by george hw bush, then—president couldn't overturned it with an executive order, then president george w bush put it back m, president george w bush put it back in, then president 0bama took it back out, and now it is back in with president trump, so it is one of those things that goes back and forth depending on who is in the white house. when he started his presidency, and one that shock election, lots of media outlets, lots of people across america, across the world, said this will be an utter disaster. the trump presidency is going to be a disaster, he is a monster. do you think it has been as bad as people thought it was going to be, or do you think it has been a lot better, and he has surprised some people? the people he surprised were those who thought it was the end, those
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with trump derangement syndrome, who say it was the worst thing that could possibly happen and it was a hostile regime. he has come into office and has not filled the office with loyalists. he has actually been slow filling all of the posts, making it hard to accomplish all of the things he wants to do. and some say he is not conservative enough and was not able to repeal 0bamacare in the first 100 days, as he said he would do. thank you for telling us about those first 100 days. thank you for staying up so late. you can get in your pyjamas now. we will be back soon. hello. this is breakfast, with katherine downes and ben thompson. coming up before 7am, we'll have the bank holiday weather and sport.
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but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the parents of madeleine mccann say they believe their daughter is still alive and real progress is being made to find her. in an interview with the bbc ahead of the 10th anniversary of her disappearance they've also defended the costs of the ongoing investigation. it is time we should have had with her and it does feel stolen. we don't tend to go back. it is so draining. inevitably, on the anniversary of her birthday, it is by far the hardest. by far. labour and the conservatives will today focus their general election campaigns on their proposals for improving life for employees. theresa may is promising to tackle
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unscrupulous bosses if she's returned to power in the general election while labour says it's planning to end zero—hours contracts. donald trump has marked the 100th day of his presidency with a speech defending his record and attacking the media. mr trump missed the annual white house correspondents' dinner to address thousands of cheering supporters in pennsylvania, where he insisted he's delivering his election promises "every single day" and dismissed criticism of him as "fake news." there is no place i would rather be than right here in pennsylvania to celebrate our 100 day milestone, to reflect on an incredible journey together, and to get ready for the great, great battles to come, and that we will win in every case, 0k?
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we will win. at the grand old age of 105, mary hayes has finally received her birthday wish. every year at her care home in bath, she's asked what she'd like for her birthday, and every year mary says "a fireman!" well, this time, they took her at her word, and avon fire and rescue's finest came to present her with a cake. hgppy happy birthday, mary, happy birthday. any more? that is not the kind of fire a man i think she was hoping for. that is not the kind of fire a man i think she was hoping forlj that is not the kind of fire a man i think she was hoping for. i think she wanted more baby oil. just the way she asked for more as well.
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hgppy way she asked for more as well. happy birthday. i hope your dream comes true. it's time for the sport. what a night it was last night. anthonyjoshua. you can see him. he looks like he was in a war. you get the impression she enjoyed watching. i was the impression she enjoyed watching. iwas up the impression she enjoyed watching. i was up way past my bedtime. his walk in was fantastic. people were wondering whether he could go the distance with wladimir klitschko who has been at the top of his game for over ten yea rs has been at the top of his game for over ten years now. he answered all of his critics. he had only had 18 fights going into that. people wondering whether he had the stamina
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and the heart, he proved that he certainly did. good morning, everyone. i am still getting my breath back. 90,000 fans were at wembley last night to see anthonyjoshua became the unified heavyweight champion of the world. he stopped wladimir klitschko in the 11th round, and it means joshua has added the wba belt to his ibf title. it was an epic battle. joshua knocked klitschko down in the fifth round. the 41—year—old ukrainian showed remarkable stamina, though, to recover, and knocked joshua down in round six. going into the 11th, klitschko seemed to have edged ahead. butjoshua twice had klitschko on the canvas in the penultimate round before the referee stepped in. joshua remains undefeated as a professional, with 19 victories. he came to show what he was about, that he still had it. but i knew it was going to be tough for him to kind of show what he was about, because i wanted to do the same, to go in there and be confident. against anyone else in the division,
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he may have come out on top. as i said, i have the ultimate respect for him and what he has achieved outside and inside the ring. but i would not mind fighting him again if he wants the rematch. no problem. would not mind fighting him again if he wants the rematch. no problemlj think it was a good fight. and i think it was a good fight. and i think the audience, france, enjoyed it. -- think the audience, france, enjoyed it. —— fans. iwish think the audience, france, enjoyed it. —— fans. i wish i would have been the winner of the nightno contest, tonight's fight. he did a good job. he was trying. he was focused. and, umm, even if he went down, he got up. i will bring you up—to—date on the football. after ten successive seasons in the premier league, sunderland have been relegated to the championship. their fate was sealed by a 1—0 defeat at home to bournemouth. that means sunderland went down to their 23rd league defeat this season. david moyes's site goes down
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now. sadly, we are all disappointed. we feel more sad for the supporters who came to watch. that is who we feel the worst about. but we all take collective responsibility from the top to the bottom. hull city are still very much in a scrap for safety despite their goalless draw at southampton. hull keeper, eldin jakupovic, saved dusan tadic‘s penalty kick in stoppage time to earn a vital point for the tigers. the players looked very happy, didn't they? burnley have taken a huge step towards safety with a 2—0 win at crystal palace. goals from ashley barnes and andre gray secured burnley‘s first away win in the league this season. they're up to fourteenth place while palace slip back to 16th. brighton missed the chance to clinch the championship title after suffering a surprise defeat at home to bristol city. josh brownhill‘s first half goal earned city a 1—0 win. brighton, who are already promoted, must better newcastle's result next weekend to finish top.
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celtic registered their biggest away win over old firm rivals, rangers, at ibrox with a 5—1 thrashing yesterday. leigh griffiths' spectacular effort put them two up inside 20 minutes, and they dominated this one throughout. that was a fine strike, that. mikael lustig curled in the champions‘ fifth late on. celtic are still unbeaten in the league this season. elsewhere there were wins for stjohnstone, kilmarnock, and dundee. hearts drew with partick. lewis hamilton could be in for a tough afternoon at the russian grand prix after qualifying well off the pace in fourth. championship leader, sebastian vettel, qualified on pole position in sochi, alongside kimi raikkonen. hamilton, for the second race running, was outqualfied by his teammate, valterri bottas. world number one, andy murray, has been knocked out of the barcelona 0pen at the semi—final stage. murray was broken three times in the opening set by the austrian world number nine dominic thiem. despite recovering to win the second murray lost the deciding set 6—4. thiem will play rafael nadal in the final later today. home favourite lizzie deignan has
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won the women's tour de yorkshire. the former road race world champion and london olympics silver—medallist crossed the finishing line in harrogate 54 seconds ahead of the chasing group. what a win. in the radio, the team manager was saying you have got this, you have got this. i thought i have not got this. you are in a world of pain and you don't dare relax until you are at the finish—line. i didn't circle up until i had about 500 metres to go. the second stage of the men's race was won by frenchman nacer bouhanni. australia's caleb ewan finished second to take the overall lead. the highest placed briton was christopher lawless who was fourth. and simon yates has won the fourth stage of the tour of romandie in switzerland. the briton finished just ahead
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of ritchie porte and has a nineteen second overall lead over the australian. britain's two time winner chris froome struggled, finishing more than a minute behind yates. exeter moved level on points with leaders wasps in rugby union's premiership with a 36—12 win over northampton saints. they ran in six tries in front of their home fans at sandy park to erase the gap at the top after wasps‘ defeat on friday. centre ian whitten's score helped to make it a record seventh straight bonus—point win in the premiership for the chiefs. in the pro 12, 0spreys' 24—10 win over ulster has left them on the verge of a semi—final play off spot. they need just a point from their final game of the season to secure their place in the end of season playoffs. elsewhere there were comfortable wins for munster and scarlets. mark selby is on course to win consecutive world snooker titles after he narrowly beat china's ding junhui 17—15, to reach the final.
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these two resumed at 12 frames all, and it was 16—15 when selby‘s break of 72 got him the victory. he was pretty happy about it too. he looked pretty happy with that, i think. and the man who will take on the world number one isjohn higgins. the four—time champion needed just one frame to seal victory against barry hawkins in yesterday's evening session and he secured it with the very first of the evening. 17—8 the final score. that was a busy weekend of sport. that was a busy weekend of sport. that was a lot to go through. you can go and have a bit of a nap. we will wake you up. thank you. priceless egyptian artefacts badly damaged in the second world war are going on display at liverpool's
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museum for the first time in 70 yea rs. museum for the first time in 70 years. the gallery expansion and restoration work means they are part of the largest egyptology collection outside london, as our correspondent reports. from the everyday to the beautifully decorative, these objects reflect the rise and fall of ancient egyptian society. it is our most ambitious exhibition we have done for egypt. we have got a whole range of a rtefa cts, for egypt. we have got a whole range of artefacts, right from the prehistoric period, we have stone vases and stone tools, all the way through the christianity in egypt, so we through the christianity in egypt, so we have got these beautiful leather slippers that people would wear in life, and also be buried in. when the museum was bombed during the second world war, part of its priceless collection was badly damaged. we have two granite statues ofa damaged. we have two granite statues of a goddess, a human form with a
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lioness head, and they were both shattered. the fire damage the two pieces, which were intact before then, and it wasn't until recently we have restored them, pieced them back together and put them back on display for the first time with the rest of the egyptian collection. the challenge for this team is to move the statues into the gallery without breaking them. at the same time, mummies who were also firedamaged are being installed. we keep the object is not because they look stunning because they look beautiful. it is because of the information they hold. so part of what we do is unlocking the story is that they hold, and revealing their hidden histories. we have two romano period mummies here, and they are both quite young. 0ne period mummies here, and they are both quite young. one is a teenager. we have wondered in the past if they we re we have wondered in the past if they were associated with each other, so they could be sisters. you never know, they could be. this display at liverpool's world museum is now the
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largest ancient egyptian gallery outside of london. here is sarah with a look at this morning's weather. from egypt to our weather. nice sunrise. beautiful, isn't it? coyte sareen start to the day, and so many of usa sareen start to the day, and so many of us a lot of decent weather on the cards as we had to ride into the afternoon. not everywhere, certainly quite a mixed forecast today. it will feel quite easy, turning windy towards the south—west, and there will be some rain around. it wouldn't be a bank holiday weekend without the mention of a bit of rain. most places won't see it today but we have low pressure approaching from the south—west. this frontal system is spilling some rain across the far south—west of england, it will continue to nudge its way slowly north eastwards across south—west england and much of wales as we head through the day. further north and east, many places looking dry and bright although it will feel
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quite windy wherever you are today. this is 4pm this afternoon, you can see outbreaks of rain across england. 0ne see outbreaks of rain across england. one or two showers getting into the south central parts of wales as well. much of northern england, northern ireland and scotla nd england, northern ireland and scotland we are going to keep these sunny spells for quite a good part of the day and temperatures reaching 17 degrees. probably the warmer spots across the north—west of scotland. should be dry for stage three of the tour de yorkshire. it remains breezy into the evening hours and overnight we will see this rain in the south nudging further northwards and eastwards. so quite u nsettled, northwards and eastwards. so quite unsettled, breezy, showery sort of night across the southern half of the country. further north, clear and dry but it should be frost free for almost everywhere first thing tomorrow morning. perhaps just a touch of frost across parts of scotland. during your bank holiday monday we will keep the chance of some heavy showers across southern parts of england. later, patchy at rain further north, and scotland and
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northern ireland should have the driest of the weather. by the time we get the tuesday we will start to see this easterly breeze developing, so see this easterly breeze developing, so fairly cool with a few showers towards eastern parts of england. further west it is looking a little bit warmer and sunnier, and that theme continues through the week ahead. lots of dry weather still on the cards, some warm sunshine especially in the west, but cooler at times in the east. and importantly, bank holiday monday not a washout. brilliant news. famous last words. the news is coming up in a few moments here on breakfast. but first, it is time for click. over the last few years, billions of e—mail accounts have been hacked.
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has yours? last year, yahoo announced that over 1.5 billion e—mail accounts were compromised between 2013 and 2014, the largest breach in history. then it emerged that russian hackers had gained access to 60,000 e—mails from hillary clinton's presidential campaign. some believe the resulting leaks helped swing the election for trump. and what it certainly did reveal is something most of us already knew. we send, each of us, all the time, hugely personal information around the internet. information that we'd like to keep private, but others are all too often able to see. so how about something that guarantees to protect all of those e—mails? sounds like something you wanna have, doesn't it? well, this is nomx, a box which promises to secure your e—mails 100%.
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it was at ces that we came across this device as it was introduced to the world and it caught our eye. i met the boss, will donaldson, who has impressive security credentials himself. he's worked in computer security and built web applications for the pentagon, the marine corps and he was chief technology officer for the f35 joint strike fighter communications facility. so what does he think is wrong with bog standard e—mail? well, the nomx promotional videos explain the problem. when you send an e—mail, copies of the message end up on several internet servers along the way. will says all of the recent big e—mail hacks have involved one of these servers being compromised, and what's more, through a known vulnerability. so those vulnerabilities, we've identified six core ones that encompass 100% of the hacks that have occurred to date. will's solution is a $199 box
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that acts as your own personal e—mail server. it'll talk to other e—mail services, but where it comes into its own is when it connects directly to another nomx box at the other end, the pair of them replacing the cloud servers that your message would usually flow through. that means no copies are stored anywhere but on your box and the recipient's. the idea has caught the imagination of some in the security industry, who've called it a "personal cloud on steroids" and will himself has become a bit of a star, being interviewed on us national television and elsewhere in the media as a security guru. so what you're pitching here is that you can make a black box, that black box there, that is more secure than a multibillion dollar compa ny‘s servers? absolutely. it's been proved they're vulnerable, my question is to you is,
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you're not a multibillion dollar company. not yet. why should i believe that your security is any better than theirs and why should i believe that there are no vulnerabilities that you've accidentally left in your box? what we've done is identify the categories of those vulnerabilities and all of the hacks have occurred have been in those traces vulnerabilities. by removing them from the equation, we've now negated them on our protocol. so the theory sounds a good one, avoid making multiple copies of your messages across potentially vulnerable servers on the internet. you just have to rely on the nomx boxes themselves not being open to hacking. well... you all know this man, dan simmons, one of click‘s most experienced reporters and famously, if someone says something is unbreakable, you try and break it? yeah! well, look, often on this programme we look at new things and we are as excited
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as anybody else to see them, but sometimes, just sometimes, something seems a little bit too good to be true and absolute security, i've never heard anyone in the cyber security industry promise that, but that's exactly what this company are doing. so to prove a point, you're going to try and hack this box? yeah. i think i've found somebody who might be able to do it. 0k! scott helm is one of the uk's most respected professional white hat hackers, or penetration testers. he's helped discover some big security flaws in the past, including hacking home routers and electric cars. scott's had the nomx box in his hands forjust a few minutes and he's already suspicious. hey, scott. how's it going? how'd you get on? good, yeah. i've had a look over this device and i was quite surprised when you first gave it me. so when i flipped it over, we saw what we call the mac address here, which is the device's unique
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identifier and these first three segments there identify the manufacturer, that tells you who builds the device. so i went away and i looked these up and they're actually registered to the raspberry pi foundation that make the raspberry pi computer. that's the hobbyists' computer we've seen a lot of times on click. the credit—sized device. but nomx is the manufacturer, right? yeah. so what i did, i went ahead and opened this up and what we found inside... if i canjust open these parts here. is there is in fact a raspberry pi inside this, which is white felt, all white. wow. there's nothing else they've done with this that we can see inside. that's just a standard £35 raspberry pi. correct. but what does that say to you when as a security guy when you look inside? i guess, there are further things to be found here that may surprise us. i've also asked professor alan woodward, a well—known cyber security expert, who's advised the uk government and europol, to take a look at the nomx box to see how it works. so, how have you got on? well, already through the set—up process, there's a few things
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for a product that bills itself as being absolutely secure, there's a few things that we found that give rise for concern. and we certainly want to look a bit further into it. just plugging it in has sent alarm bells ringing for alan. the set up of the device is through a web application that wasn't particularly helpful. it doesn't ask alan to open up port 25. now, that's a key port on his router he'll need to communicate with popular e—mail servers like gmail or microsoft accounts. it's never going to receive e—mail from an external service. unless you change your router? unless you know to go to your router and change port 25. and does it tell you that? no, it doesn't, the documentation doesn't have it in there. it tells you all these other ports, but not port 25. so you're having a quiet life for a few years to come receiving no e—mails at all. but it gets better. hotmail instantly knows that you're sending it from a domestic ip address.
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it's what's called a dynamic address because it changes. it's not yours for life. every time you turn your router on you get a new one. it spots that and says, we don't accept e—mails from dynamic addresses. because theyjust assume nobody's going to be running an e—mail server on a domestic system like this. so this box can't send an e—mail to hotmail? to any hotmail address? no. and if you try and send it to something like gmail, then what happens is, because of things like the way hotmail spots it, as you'll see there, we're actually blacklisted already. spam house, which is one of biggest spam filters, says this is a spam box. it's blacklisted us. now, to be fair, nomx doesn't open port 25, it uses port 26. but as we've seen, without 25 open, it's going to be difficult to hear from the rest of the world. well, bearing in mind it's got one job to do, which is be an e—mail server, that's a pretty poor show. and there were more surprises
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to come when alan opened the box. one of the simplest machines to break into is a raspberry pi. everything is on this one little card. it's on one of these tiny little cards. so all of your e—mails, all of your software, everything is running on one of these tiny little cards. now, actually, if somebody did have physical access to this what they could do is they could whip that card out, copy it, put the card back in, put it all back together and you'd be none the wiser and they've got a copy of everything, including your e—mail. because one of the things about this is it's not encrypted in any way on the card. this is not using any encryption at all? for storage, none at all. and what we did was, you said the simplest thing to do, because it is a complete raspberry pi, the simplest thing to do was actually plug it into a monitor and see what came up. so this is an hdmi cable? hdmi cable. here we go. the first concern would be if it is actually running raspberry pi as an operating system, which it is, it immediately tells
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you it is. postfix is the mail transport agent, that's part of the mail server. it wasjust all totally standard stuff. so how old is the software on there at the moment? well, that's another thing that we found, which was really... i would say alarming. in that it's so old we couldn't actually get hold of some of the software. it's running raspberry pi's own operating system. it's a version called wizi, which you can no longer download from the raspberry pi website. they've taken it off because they don't want people downloading it, it's that old. likewise there's this postfix admin, there is another another piece of software called dovecot, all of which are free bits of software, but some of it dates back to 2009. it's inevitable that people will find bugs, flaws, in any bit of software and what people do is they release a later version with the bug fixed. the problem with the way this is put together is there's no way of doing that. there's a whole series of things about the way this is put together
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that make you think, absolute security is... a stretch. now, it's important to say at this point, there's nothing wrong with the hardware or the software that you're talking about per se, raspberry pi is fine, the software used, postfix, admin, isjusta piece of off—the—shelf software. yeah, i mean, the raspberry pi is a great bit of hobbyist kit and postfix, as in the other programmes we have looked at, they do the job, if you've got the latest versions of them. but this box doesn't run those. by a mile it doesn't run those. they are still selling this box right now as a finished product? it was being sold when you were testing it? absolutely, and as we're filming it is today. 0k, you've studied the box, what next? well, surprise, surprise, scott thinks he can hack it. i'm afraid because this is the short version of click, we're going to have to leave the story there. if you want to know more details about the hack and if you'd like to hear from alan and scott about what happens after you hack a box like this, you're going to have to watch the full version, which is on iplayer right now.
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follow us on twitter too @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon.

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