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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  May 3, 2017 5:30am-5:46am BST

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this is bbc news — the headlines. ten years since madeleine mccann disappeared on holiday in portugal, one of the men questioned by scotland yard has been speaking for the first time. paulo ribeiro is no longer a suspect but was questioned at the time. britain's pa rliament‘s been formally dissolved — paving the way for next month's general election. prime minister theresa may will visit buckingham palace later for an audience with the queen to herald the start of the campaign. there's been widespread international criticism of president nicolas maduro‘s plans to set up a new body which could rewrite venezuela's constitution — and get around the current parliament which is dominated by the opposition. sweden is to lift identity checks on people entering the country from denmark imposed at the height of the migration crisis in 2015. another four countries from the schengen area are expected to follow suit in the coming months. now it's time for world business report. apple reports a surprise fall
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in iphone sales as customers wait for the ten—year anniversary phone. we talk you through the tech giants latest numbers. and as the french prepare to make their choice on sunday, we look at the contentious issue of immigration. welcome to world business report. i'm sally bundock. also in the programme, the impact of trumps visa review — infosys says it will hire 10,000 americans. details in a moment. but first, apple is the world's most valuable company and it made another huge profit in the first three months of the year. but it was a bit of a mixed bag. the california based firm sold just
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under $53 billion worth of products as it continues to dominate the smartphone market. but surprisingly iphone sales actually fell by 1% — mainly because customers are holding off purchases while waiting for the 10th anniversary model expected this autumn. they still sold over 50 million of them though and more of their expensive seven plus smartphone. apple shares were down 2% in after hours trading but that is a mere blip if we look at the stock's long—term performance. five years and hit a record high of $1117.51 just ahead of this trading update,
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making the company worth a whopping a whopping $773 billion. over the last year alone there's been an increase of more than 60% this is partly because during that time iphone sales have gone up. but also because investors are betting if apple brings back to the us its huge cash reserve that now tops 250 billion dollars — they will benefit. iphones are of course apple's best—selling product, but services are the second biggest part of the business. that includes app store downloads, apple pay and apple music, and they are now worth 13% of total revenues. with me is nicholas 0liver, founder, people.io. good morning. just because of the sheer size of apple, all of those numbers sound impressive. what is your take on how they are doing? people are talking about everyone waiting to get the new iphone later in the year, but if you were to speak to a friend about the latest version of the iphone, it is missing
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a headphone jack. that in itself may be putting people off purchasing the phone right now. whether they are waiting for later versions or replacing it with the current version is a question to be asked. apple need to find their way in revolutionising the industry. there is talk of apple going out and purchasing other tech companies, we have already seen delays in the introduction of carpool karaoke, so i wonder where they will be making their name in the innovation space. that has been a problem for a while now, with apple. we keep talking about the next big thing but we have not had that for a long time. the iphone has become the bread and butter. how long can they be in that place for when other companies are really stepping forward? place for when other companies are really stepping forward ?|i
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place for when other companies are really stepping forward? i think you are absolutely right. looking at nokia, there was a smart phone revolution several years ago. now we are seeing companies like amazon and the like, that could perhaps be a driving force in where they need to go. they obviously have a huge amount of data from a huge amount of customers, but what are they going to do with that in terms of their customers? if you were to bring back the profits to the united states, what are they likely to do with their shares? they are talking about a share buyback, share dividends are not sort of thing. will they plough back into some sort of great new idea? you could do a lot with that kind of money. you certainly could. i think my personal view would be that perhaps they are going to need to look at an acquisition. that is
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going to help drive direction. the tax implications and benefits associated would play a role in that decision. they need to look at how the cash is going to let them move ina the cash is going to let them move in a slightly more innovative direction, beyond what everyone already knows. what will we be saying about them in a year's time? iphone sales dipping?” saying about them in a year's time? iphone sales dipping? i hope we are not talking about the iphone as much as everyone is now! thank you for coming in. now, an indian it firm says it will go on a hiring spree in the us. rico hizon in singapore will tell us what's going on. what is going on? it is a jobs bonanza from infosys technologies, they will be opening for mac
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technology centres in america over the next two years, employing 10,000 people. this comes as indian technology conglomerates are facing criticism over hiring low paid workers on temporary visas —— four. many of them rely on a visa which donald trump has told federal agencies to review. infosys did not give specifics onjobs, agencies to review. infosys did not give specifics on jobs, but it did say it would seek experienced candidates from colleges. we will know soon. vienna is the home state of mike pence, and analysts say that more hirings would push up costs for indian it firms. politicians, lawmakers and officials from the donald trump administration have also said they may not make dramatic changes to these these rules. ——
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these visa rules. france goes to the polls on sunday in a tightly contested presidential election. in these final days of campaigning immigration policy has increasingly ominated the airwaves, but as theo leggett reports, immigration is integral to many parts of french society. this town is a melting pot of different races and cultures, the results of more than a century of continuous immigration. this building tells a story about how the effects of immigration are woven into the fabric of this town. immigrants built it in the 1930s and it housed the families of other immigrants who came here, attracted by industry and the need for manpower. the history of migrants is categorised at a local cultural centre. the first arrivals came in the textiles industry. more recently, newcomers have been refugees. we have welcomed a number
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of people from the calais jungle. mostly people from east africa and afghanistan. we are working on thinking of a better way to welcome these people and to face the economic, social and political challenges that raises. immigration has become a central issue in the election campaign. it divides opinion. i don't know whether we need more immigrants, but we have room for many more. there are too many immigrants. it would be great for the country to have more immigrants. life is not always easy for emigrates. teaching a group of people to speak french, they arrived in the country decades ago. now retired, many live in poverty and struggled to cope —— immigrants.
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life is not easy, they have been here for 50 years, and now they are just trying to survive. whoever wins the election will have to face the question of what to do at that future migration, and also the social and economic questions raised by past generations of foreign workers. in other news: italy's troubled flagship airline alitalia has gone into administration after the italian government formally approved the move. the company said its flight schedule would continue to operate as planned, while administrators examine whether the firm can be turned around. alitalia has received more than 7bn euros from the italian state over the last decade. that is the world business report. most of the markets in asia are closed. i will see you soon. sally will bejoining
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sally will be joining me shortly to look at the papers. labour is —— labour is promising to put 10,000 more police on the streets of england and wales if it wins the election — to be paid for by reversing conservative plans in the 2016 budget for capital gains tax cuts. but the conservatives said labour were already committed to funding other pledges and the liberal democrats said the figures being talked about by labour were "fanciful". labour leaderjeremy corbyn has confirmed the policy would cost three—hundred million. what we are putting forward is a proposal to increase police numbers. the conservatives have cut to 20,000, we are putting 10,000 more police officers out there, because it isa police officers out there, because it is a question of community policing and community involvement. there are many causes for crime, they have to all be addressed. it is a collective approach. we have reduced the number of policemen on
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the street, but because they are spending wisely and we have worked on reform, there has been nearly a third of a reduction in crime since 2010. we believe we can protect funding and also reduce crime. jeremy corbyn has insisted the shadow home secretary diane abbott retains his full support after a blunder about labour's new policing policy. diane abbott says she "misspoke" in an interview with lbc, when she appeared to be confused over the extra policing costs. how much would 10,000 police officers cost? we believe it will be about £300,000. £300,000? sorry... 10,000 police officers? what are you paying them? no, i mean... an inquest has found there was no adequate care in place for an anorexic teenager who killed herself five days after being released from a psychiatric hospital. pippa mcmanus — who was fifteen — stepped in front of a train
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in december 2015. the hearing at stockport coroner's court heard the lack of support available to her family contributed to her death. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: ten years since madeleine mccann disappeared on holiday in portugal, one of the men questioned by scotland yard has been speaking for the first time. paulo ribeiro is no longer a suspect but was questioned at the time. britain's parliament has been formally dissolved, paving the way for next month's general election. prime minister theresa may will visit buckingham palace later for an audience with the queen to herald the start of the campaign. there's been widespread international criticism of president nicolas maduro's plans to set up a new body which could rewrite venezuela's constitution and get around the current parliament which is dominated by the opposition. now it's time for our news review.
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as with many of the uk papers, the ft leads with tensions between britain's prime minister and the president of the european commission ahead of the brexit talks. theresa may has told jean—claude juncker she will be a "bloody difficult woman" during the negotiations. le figaro looks at france's upcoming presidential election, where national front candidate marine le pen says she wants to replace the euro. ms le pen also says she could introduce capital controls if savers rushed to take their money out of banks ahead of a change of currency. the irish times says us president donald trump and russian president vladimir putin have discussed over a phone call how they could work together on problems ranging from north korea to syria. they agreed to try to meet at the g20 summit injuly. also in the ft, infosys, the indian it services company,
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plans to hire 10,000 americans after the whitehouse announced it was reviewing the h1b visa programme, which companies like infosys use to hire low cost workers from overseas. the guardian financial section reports on troubled italian airline alitalia, who has asked the government to put the airline into administration. employees rejected a restructuring plan that would have unlocked funds but meant cuts to jobs and salaries. and, finally, the times writes that according to the british psychological society, trying to lift your mood by seeking validation or likes on social media sites could actually show others that you suffer from low self—esteem.

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