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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 6, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. after huge gains for the conservatives in the council votes, thoughts return to the general election campaign. while the labour leader jeremy corbyn says they face a historic task to win next month, theresa may has insisted she's taking nothing for granted. good morning, it's saturday the 6th of may. also ahead: the campaign of the french presidential candidate, emmanuel macron, says it's suffered a massive hacking attack before france goes to the polls. the teenage british racing driver who lost both legs in a formula four crash says he'll get back behind the wheel.
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i definitely want to take the positives out of this and make sure that i use it in a positive way for the rest of my life now. still got a few years left in me for sure. in sport, chelsea are on the brink of the premier league title as their closest challengers tottenham are beaten by west ham at the london stadium. these bopping bakers are just some of the people taking part in the first ever festival of makers. we'll be live there to find out what it's all about. and louise has the weather. good morning. another north—south divide with the weather across the country, a chilly start for scotland and northern ireland but here there'll be plenty of sunshine, more cloud for england and wales with outbreaks of showery rain into the extreme south—west. more details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. after a day of tory triumph in the local elections, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has admitted he faces an historic challenge ahead of next month's vote.
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campaigning for the general election on the 8th ofjune will resume today with the prime minister saying she's not taking anything for granted despite her party gaining more than 5,000 seats. 0ur political correspondent tom symonds has more. it was a curtain raiser for the general election to come, and as the parties begin the national race in earnest, each have their own impressions of what the local election results mean. the conservatives took 11 more county councils. they won a tight victory in the west midlands mayoral election and even eight seats on glasgow city council, far from traditional territory. but the tories know they can't regard the election as in the bag. i'm not taking anything for granted. i will be going out for the remaining weeks of this general election campaign to earn the support of the british people. last night, jeremy corbyn celebrated labour's best results,
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it's mayoral victories in greater manchester and liverpool, well aware that nine councils and 382 seats had been ripped from the party's grasp. the labour leader says he is facing an historic challenge. of course i'm disappointed. we have to get our supporters out to vote injune, we have to get our message across. the snp lost some votes in scotland where the voting system makes it harder to control councils overnight. a bad result? not occurred include nicola sturgeon. the snp vote has held up... our share of seats held up and we'll be the largest party in more councils, perhaps a majority of councils, but that's not absolutely clear yet so there's no way anyone can spin this result as anything other than a clear and very emphatic win for the snp. the lib dems face a long, hard road although their performance at the last general election will make
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any improvement this time round look good. and ukip is fighting for survival. the role of brexit guard dog is being stolen by the context, conservatives, leaving the party out in the cold. 32 days to go. tom symonds, bbc news, westminster. the liberal democrats are promising to increase funding for the nhs and social care by £6 billion a year if they win the election by raising income tax rates by a penny in the pound. the party is describing the pledge as its flagship spending commitment for the campaign. it echoes a promise by the lib dems in the 19905 to put a penny on income tax to fund spending on education. all this morning we'll be talking to the political parties about what they've learned from the local election results. the campaign team of the french presidential frontrunner, emmanuel macron, says they've been the victim of a massive hacking attack after thousands of documents were released online. they say genuine e—mails were mixed up with fake ones ahead of voters going to the polls tomorrow, where mr macron will face his far right opponent, marine le pen.
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0ur europe correspondent thomas fessy has been getting a sense of the atmosphere in paris ahead of the vote. it's election season in france and at this satirical theatre, comedians take a swipe at the politicians running for president. with the many twists and political scandals, this campaign has given them fodder for their work. we don't know who will be ourfuture president. we're scared about that. so we really need to laugh. it is an exceptional election. neither of the traditional parties that have governed france for over half a century is represented in sunday's run—off. instead, the 39—year—old centrist who wants to break down the lines between the right and left is now the favourite against a far right candidate. translation: both candidates have a different vision of democracy, of the country and the people.
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humour is the best way to play down what is ahead of us. translation: at last we can have fun because what we've seen in the campaign was not funny at all. unemployment and how to revice the economy have dominated this campaign, but immigration and security issues have also been high on the agenda. the french are now left with a choice of two very different visions for france, with a globalist, pro—european candidate and an anti—immigrant nationalist. whoever wins will have to reunite a divided nation. thomas fessy, bbc news, paris. syrian activists say shelling and gunfire has been heard in rebel—held areas shortly after an agreement to set up safe zones in parts of the country came into force. the deal on four safe zones was reached at thursday's talks between russia and iran. turkey agreed to act as a guarantor but the main syrian opposition grouping says it has little faith in the deal. a texas police officer who shot and killed a black teenager
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in dallas has been charged with murder. roy 0liver was responding to a call—out about underage drinking at a house party when he fired his rifle into a car, killing 15—year—old jordan edwards. initially the police claimed the teenagers had reversed aggressively in their direction but later admitted they were actually driving away. three men are due in court this morning, charged with the murder of a business man from dorset. guy hedger was attacked in his home in ashley early last sunday. 41—year—old jason baccus and 44—year—old scott keeping from bournemouth will appear before poole magistrates court, alongside ao—year—old kevin downton from dorset. a teenage racing driver who lost both his legs in an horrific crash has said he's lost for words by the worldwide support he's received. billy monger was racing in the formula 4 championship at donington park last
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month when he collided with a stationary car. but despite his injuries, he's vowed to race again, as nick quaraishi reports. his story has touched motorsport fa ns his story has touched motorsport fans around the world and billy monger, all billy whizz as he's known, can't quite believe global superstars have wished him well. that's amazing. to turnover and read the signatures from many world champions, lewis hamilton, niki lauda, that really touched my heart. tragedy struck less than three weeks ago. billy was racing in the formula for championship at donington park when he was involved in a 120 mph collision with a stationary car. he was flown to the queen's medical centre in nottingham where it was decided he would have to have both legs amputated. now on his birthday, billy has thanked staff who helped
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him through the ordeal. without them i wouldn't be here today so a massive thanks to every single one of the staff that have helped me. £800,000 has been raised for billy and his payback will be to race again. i definitely want to take the positives out of this and make sure i'd use it in a positive way for the rest of my life now. still got a few yea rs left in rest of my life now. still got a few years left in me for sure. billy celebrated turning 18 with his first legal pint. today there will be more cheer as this brave teenager returns to the family home in surrey. nick quaraishi, bbc news. schools in england are to be given more powers to sack inadequate parent governors under new guidelines being issued by the department for education. head teachers have long campaigned for the change, saying the destructive actions of rogue governors can stop schools from running smoothly. the new rules will come into effect in september. 0ld £5 notes, the paper
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ones, are no longer legal tender in the uk, except for in northern ireland. the new polymer fivers have been in circulation since last september. some banks and building societies say customers can still deposit the old notes into bank accounts for now, giving people more time to hand them in. it's thought around 150 million old notes are still in circulation. those are the main stories. now a cute story coming up. brace yourself. take a look at these tree climbing bears. nothing unusual in that you might think. but this particular family's location caused a stir, being at the top of a very tall tree in the middle of a slovakian town. how did they get there? apparently the mother bear wanted to protect her cubs from attack. it's thought the mother bear wanted to protect her cubs from attack. she climbed down the tree to the delight of people watching. but after a while returned to her cubs in the tree. there we go, making their way back.
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they are very, very cute, aren't they? i like that little section, oui’ they? i like that little section, our cute pictures section, makes us feel better about the world and the news we have to read. let's have a look at this morning's papers. big stack this morning, saturday morning. the front page of the guardian, plenty of the papers musing a little bit on results from yesterday, made crushes ukip as jeremy corbyn admits we face an historic challenge cash made. reflection on where the parties are after those local election results ash may. the front page of the express —— may. heading for a landslide general election victory according to them. 0n the front page of the daily telegraph, great tory rebirth as the
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right unites is the headline, theresa may leads the conservatives as they head for a massive victory in local council elections. there's the suggestion that the right wing the suggestion that the right wing the british electorate very much now uniting behind the conservative party. we will have a look at some of those issues around that later on. front page of the mail, same story, the tories recording a stunning series of results yesterday, picking up 560 seats. you will see a picture of zoe ball after the sad news yesterday that her boyfriend was found dead at home. a full review of the papers later on but right now, it is 6:12am. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says his party faces an historic challenge to win next month's general election. theresa may insists she is taking nothing for granted. the campaign of the french presidentialfrontrunner, emmanuel macron, says it's been the victim of a massive hacking
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attack after thousands of documents were released online. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we are kind of stuck in repeat again, with a few subtle differences. if you are out and about this weather front will bring some rain and it is doing so in the isles of scilly and into cornwall. elsewhere, cloud for england and wales. the best of the sunshine further north and west. actually start here, temperatures down to “4 ina start here, temperatures down to “4 in a sheltered glens of scotland. less windy than yesterday for some of us, but the rain is a bit of a nuisance into the south—west. it will continue for much of the day. if you are heading off to many of the premiership matches in england and wales don't expect much sunshine. temperatures at about 12—
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15 degrees. the best sunshine further north and west. beautiful again. let's put some detail on it. ina again. let's put some detail on it. in a sheltered west of scotland we could have temperatures into the high teens. always along the murray firth coast a little more cloud. a lovely afternoon into northern ireland, perhaps through the lake district. anywhere south of manchester we will have more cloud. later in the afternoon we could see the cloud breaking up in the extreme south and east coast and if that happens temperatures respond. high teens here as well. but the rain and nuisance in the isles of scilly and cornwall. welcome rain for some. it will drift away further south. maybe showers along the south coast towards dorset. but it will ease as we go through the night. then the wind stop the pivot to a northerly direction. a change in the weather story as we move through tomorrow. a split between the east and west.
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west is best for sunshine. even west wales and the south—west, with the nagging breeze. the north sea posts will be disappointing. 9— 10 degrees will be disappointing. 9— 10 degrees will stop further inland, some warmth again. temperatures into the mid—to high teens. in the next week if you are out and about still no significant rain in the story. largely dry for most of us. along the east coast of england, if you are fed up with the breeze, things will slowly improve and get warmer as well. looking a little bit further ahead in the next week, is it going to get cold again? sally, it is 6:15am! no, on it coast it will warm up perhaps significantly because it has been about 10—11 degrees. scotland, significantly because it has been aboutio—ii degrees. scotland, i significantly because it has been about 10—11 degrees. scotland, i am not sure you will see the glorious weather. a bit more cloud. sorry, you can get me back next time! thanks.
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she almost did the hand on the hip! 6:15am, as we were just all. —— just told. now it is time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases as ever is mark kermode. this is a mixed bag this week. we have mindhorn, in which an 80s tv detective plays it for real. we have harmonium, a cannes prizewinner. and jamie foxx in the thriller sleepless. mindhorn, i'm smiling before i start. i show my age but i loved bergerac back in the day.
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a tv detective onjersey, you see images from mindhorn and all the the memories come back. so mindhorn is a 19805 tv detective but is more like alan partridge or garth marenghi. in the 19805 he played mindhorn with a bionic eye to see the truth. the actorjulian barratt play5 him. he's now washed up, balding, doing adverts for orthopaedic socks. he's desperate for a job. then the isle of man police get in touch and say, "we have a suspected serial killer who has been ringing u5 and will only speak to mindhorn, the fictional character who he believes is real." so the police say, "will you please come and play mindhorn for us to help us catch him." immediately, thorncroft thinks this is a career—reviving opportunity of which he is going to make the most. here's a clip. 0k, here's a list of prompts, so stick to script. and avoid any of
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these trigger words. "insane, nutjob, mental." blah, blah, blah, the usual stuff. is this the phone? that is the phone. great. yep. that's going to be ok. actually, if you could just keep it in its cradle until... sure, just connecting with the props. you were laughing all the way through that. so what then happened is he thinks this is going to be a massive publicity opportunity, but doing the course of that he meets with characters from his old life. e55ie davis as the person with who he used to co—star, but he's in love with her. she's now with his 5tuntman, his dutch 5tu ntman. steve coogan plays as the spin—off character who has become successful and of whom he is veryjealous. the film's very interesting, and funny in the moments
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when the comedy comes together. the supporting cast is terrific, kenneth branagh play5 himself, simon cowell playing himself — simon callow play5 himself, not simon cowell. there are plenty of laughs all the way through. my only reservation is that sometimes it feels like a 30 minutes sketch stretched out to 90 minute movie. that said, it's really nice to see the isle of man playing the isle of man. there are so many movies where the isle of man — you know, it played ireland in waking ned, and new york in me and orson welles, and cornwall in stormbrea ker. it's nice to see the point being that they are on the isle of man. although there are dramatic areas and it's uneven, when it's funny, it's funny and the physical comedy works well. especially if you have that nostalgic thing you are talking about. looking at things like bergerac and the six million dollar man. tho5e jokes will work. so i thought it was funnier than i was expecting, yes, it's uneven and inconsistent
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but it works when it works. it's nice it's got such a great supporting cast. andrea riseborough is great. the joke is funnier because she is playing it straight, reacting with a straight face. so it entertained me, even though it's uneven. 0k. and it could not be more different from harmonium. yeah. so this is a cannes prizewinner. it has a mysterious 5tranger who turns up on the door of a family — father, mother and young child. the father immediately recogni5e5 him, gives him a job and food and lodging, and the wife says, "who's he? "where does he come from? "how do you know him?" he says he's an friend. it's evident he's an old friend from a part of the husband's past that the wife doesn't know about. slowly, the film starts to reveal5 its secrets. what i liked about it was it's a movie in which the story is not told so much through what people say but through what they do, through their actions,
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the way they stand and behave. you immediately get to see with this character, he has been possibly in confinement. he can only sleep with the light on, he eats food fast as if he's protective of it. so you know more about these characters than they tell you. the film itself then moves from something that seems to be understated and low—key to something that is actually quite tragic and dramatic. the change happens almost imperceptibly. it's a film that wrong—footed me several times. i didn't know where it was going, but i found myself gripped. so when the big revelations occur, they are all the more powerful. it's called harmonium because, during it, the young daughter is learning to play the instrument. this 5tranger actually starts to teach her how to play the instrument, which, on the one hand, seems to be partly innocent, but also seems oddly threatening, which is pretty much the tone of the whole film. i have read the word bleak in relation many times. people have certainly 5aid bleak.
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it is bleak, but it is also very human. it's not just bleak. it's engaging in the way it makes its dramatic punch work even better. let's move to sleepless. this is a jamie foxx vehicle? what's your take? oh, it is that. from a film in which 5ilence is everything to one where noise is everything. jamie foxx is a cop who, very early on, we see him get a large stash of drugs with his partner. clearly if you have a large 5ta5h of drugs they belong to somebody. they belong to a casino owner who wants them back and decides he'll get it back by kidnapping jamie foxx‘s 5on. meanwhile, rachel monaghan is a internal affairs agent on the trail of these bad cops and there's another criminal, all of whom end up in this ca5ino building, all chasing each other, all, double—cro55ing each other and fighting each other. here is a clip. rap music stay right there!
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dad! the cop's son, we have him! he'll bring the dope. 0k? that's pretty much the tone of the film all the way through. the thing is, that idea of the sort of single location, if you think about a thing like die hard, or snake eyes, you think, maybe this i5 tapping into that, but it doesn't have the punch or panache of either of those films. what you have is a bunch of people chasing each other around a confined space and it's lots of running, jumping, pointing, shooting, car cha5e5. it never engages on a dramatic level. there are some good performances in it and you keep thinking, it's ok, i quite like watching this, but it never actually get5
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under your skin. and it's ironic that it's called sleepless, because it isn't a movie that engages or keeps you awake. there are whole sections in it where you think, yeah, i have been here before. i've seen this done better. i'm not particularly gripped this time round. is it a remake of a french film? apparently the french film is very good. i always wonder why films that were made a few years ago need to be remade another language. there is no reason for it. 0k, well, on that note, let's talk about lady macbeth. if there wasn't a general election on i would have seen this by now. i'm looking forward to it. it's really good. firstly, the director has come out of theatre. i think he made one short film before. and, you know, this is a really good piece of cinema. fantastic central performance by florence pugh — who is going to be huge. she will clearly be a major star and she dominates the screen in this.
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it's based a version — siberian lady macbeth is one version, and it takes the action to victorian north—east england and it is a really engaging story with a great central performance and one of those 5ound5cape5 that draws you in, sort of tells the story again more through the whi5tling of the wind and the creaking of the chairs than it does the dialogue. you'll love it. it's worth seeing, but see it in this cinema, don't wait for the dvd. 0k, good tip. talking of dvds, though, for someone who does have — well, in this week's case — a lot of time in our hands, for the scor5e5e. i was ambivalent about silence when it came out in the cinema. this is a project that scorsese wanted to do for decades and decade5. it's based on the 1966 historical novel on religious persecution in 17th century japan. it is a film made with great integrity and honesty. i think it has some dramatic failings in it, but it looks
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look5 absolutely beautiful. liam nee5on, andrew garfield, adam driver are nominally the stars but the japanese 5tar5 steal the show. including one of the stars we saw in harmonium. perhaps i underestimated it first time round. although it's farfrom perfect, it was interesting watching it again and thinking, it is deeper and richer and more re5onant than first time round. so worth having a go, although it is a tough watch. no question, it's a tough watch. mark, thanks as ever. see you next week. a quick reminder before we go that you can find all the film news and reviews from across the bbc online. i'm sure you know the address by now. you'll find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that's it for this week from both of us. thanks for watching, happy cinemagoing. goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. coming up before 7am, louise will have your full weekend weather forecast. but first at 6:28am, a summary of this morning's main news. after a day of tory triumph in the local elections, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has admitted he faces an historic challenge ahead of next month's vote. labour lost nearly 400 council 5eat5, while the conservatives gained just over 560, making it their best result in nearly a decade. campaigning for the general election on the eighth ofjune will resume today, with the prime minister saying she's not taking anything for granted. the campaign team of the french presidential frontrunner, emmanuel macron, says they've been the victim of a massive hacking attack after thousands of documents were released online. they say genuine e—mail5 were mixed up with fake one5 ahead of voters going to the polls tomorrow, where mr macron will face his far right opponent, marine le pen. a texas police officer who shot and killed a black teenager in dallas has been charged with murder. roy 0liver was responding
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to a call—out about underage drinking at a house party when he fired his rifle into a car, killing 15—year—old jordan edward5. initially the police claimed the teenagers had reversed aggre55ively in their direction, but later admitted they were actually driving away. syrian activi5t5 say shelling and gunfire has been heard in rebel—held areas 5hortly after an agreement to setup 5afe zones in parts of the country came into force. the deal on four 5afe zones was reached at thursday's talks between russia and iran. turkey agreed to act as a guarantor but the main syrian opposition grouping says it has little faith in the deal. three men are due in court this morning, charged with the murder of a business man from dorset. guy hedger was attacked in his home in a5hley early last sunday. 41—year—old ja5on baccus and 44—year—old scott keeping from bournemouth will appear before poole magistrates court, alongside ao—year—old kevin downton from dorset. a teenage racing driver who lost both his legs in an horrific crash has said he's lost for words by
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the worldwide support he's received. billy monger, who turned 18 yesterday, wa5 racing in the formula 4 championship last month when he collided with a stationary car. he's received support from former formula 1 world champions lewis hamilton and jenson button, and motor racing fans have raised over £800,000 for him. schools in england are to be given more powers to sack inadequate parent governors under new guidelines being issued by the department for education. head teachers have long campaigned for the change, saying the destructive action5 of rogue governor5 can stop school5 from running smoothly. the new rules will come into effect in september. 0ld £5 notes, the paper ones, are no longer legal tender in the uk, except for in northern ireland. the new polymer fiver5 have been in circulation since last september. some banks and building societies say customers can still deposit the old notes into bank accounts for now, giving people more time to hand them in.
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it's thought around 150 million old notes are still in circulation. so we will be seeing them for a little bit longer i would imagine. we discuss this earlier in the week, curiou5ly they retain their value permanently. you can always take them to the bank of england. in fa ct, them to the bank of england. in fact, if you still have one down the back of the sofa in 20 years, does it increase in value? it does. maybe. i'm hoping there's one tucked away. if you had a very old one. with dust on. what have you got for u5? with dust on. what have you got for us? josie fans are rearranging what they are doing on friday evening, thanks to west ham beating tottenham 1-0 thanks to west ham beating tottenham 1—0 —— chel5ea. if they can beat middlesbrough on friday and west brom on monday, chelsea can do it.
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chelsea are on the brink of the premier league title after their closest challengers tottenham lost at west ham last night. the hammer5 frustrated spurs on a raucous night at the london stadium, and manuel lanzini scored the only goal in the second half. the result means chelsea can go seven points clear if they beat middlesbrough on monday. it's not over. it's true it will be difficult. but it was a game that if you want to put pressure on your opponent, you should win. it was not the case now and now it's too late but thinking that it would be difficult to catch chel5ea. with chelsea playing monday and liverpool, arsenal and manchester united in action tomorrow, today is more about the fight to stay in the premier league. hull city, who are two points clear of the drop zone, could give their survival hopes a big boost with victory over already relegated sunderland. swansea city occupy the final relegation spot and welcome everton, while starting it all off, manchester city, who are chasing
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a champions league spot, could move to third with victory over crystal palace. in the scottish premiership, celtic wrapped the title up weeks ago. still plenty at stake though at the bottom. bottom side inverness caledonian thistle welcome fellow 5truggler5 hamilton academical in the lunchtime game. celtic could stretch their lead to an incredible 30 points with victory at home to stjohn5tone. england hosted ireland in international cricket for the first time yesterday and were comfortable winner5 in the first one—day international in bristol. leg spinner adil rashid took five wicket5 a5 ireland were bowled out forjust 126. england reached the target with 30 over5 to spare thanks to alex hale5' 55 and an unbeaten 49 from joe root. they'll meet again at lord's tomorrow, with england captain eoin morgan expecting a stronger opposition absolutely it's a big occasion.
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you're playing the second opening game of the international summer at the home of cricket, they'll probably want to make the most of it but likewise we will as well. we enjoy playing there and, it's another fixture that we want to come out with a result from. in rugby league's super league salford red devils have moved up to second thanks to a 31—16 win at wigan warrior5. elsewhere, warrington came from 14—0 down to beat st helens 40—18, including two second half tries from ryan atkin5. the win moves the wolves above saints and catalans into 5eventh. well we've seen a number of sports downsizing in recent years with a fair amount of success, twenty20 cricket and the rise of rugby sevens are just a couple of examples. well, now golf is trying to gatecra5h the party, with an experimental competition today in st albans. sixes will feature a 32—player field consisting of 16 teams of two each representing a nation. the whole tournament
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will be knock—out format with each match played over six hole5. we're trying to produce something that's a little bit different, a little bit that pushes the boat and tries to find a slightly different audience but at the same time keeping your guys who play every saturday, have their medal to come along and watch some great golf. look5 looks good, we wish them well with that! there's a quite incredible final day of the regular rugby union premiership season in store, three teams can still finish first. leaders wa5p5 face third placed saracens. exeter chief5 need to beat gloucester, and can leicester hang on to a play—off spot at bath's expen5e? tigers are at worcester. bath at sale. and northampton and harlequins face each other for the final automatic european champions cup spot. the pro 12 regular season also comes to a close. leinster or munster will finish top ahead of the play—offs.
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scarlets and 05preys should join them. it will be the final game for gregor townsend at glasgow as they face edinburgh. in rugby, team work is everything, yet despite their best efforts the british and irish lion5 haven't won against new zealand's all blacks since 1971. this year's squad of english, irish, welsh and scottish player5 gather on mass for the first time on monday, and some of the team have bonding in the malvern hills. i've went along to join them. ina in a field of sheep, three root to going off—road. in a field of sheep, three root to going off-road. straighten up now... with one of them blindfolded. keep coming forward. your goods ayr, left hand down. unable to see where he's going, it's england's billy
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vunipola, guided by leigh halfpenny of wales ju5t vunipola, guided by leigh halfpenny of wale5just in vunipola, guided by leigh halfpenny of wales just in front of the bonnet. and being thrown around in the back, ijoined england's kicking king, 0wen farrell. the back, ijoined england's kicking king, owen farrell. we're tipping out. we're tipping out, it feels like it. it does feel a lot worse when you're in here than it does on the outside. one slip by billy here and leigh could get hurt. it's all about building up trust and friendship between player5 about building up trust and friendship between players that are normally rivals. from wale5 friendship between players that are normally rivals. from wales and england, now united a5 lion5 teammates. i've never met leigh before and it's nice to meet him, he's a very humble guy and i've heard they're all like that from wale5, so... leigh, talk to me, make. left, moore, left, more. it is pretty scary facing billy on the field, he takes some taking down but it's great to be with him, a great quy- it's great to be with him, a great guy. this bonding will be crucial in
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new zealand and halfpenny's ability to guide his teammates on the pitch and hit man of the series on the last lion5 tour to australia and he got billy through the posts here. good work. teamwork like that in new zealand... good work. teamwork like that in new zealand. .. well good work. teamwork like that in new zealand... well done, good work. teamwork like that in new zealand. .. well done, leigh. teamwork like that in new zealand and you'll be fine. that's what it's all about, having that friendship and that bond, if we can get the things off the feel right i think the things on the field will take ca re of the things on the field will take care of themselves. this was also about testing the players‘ accuracy and control and away from the pressures and control and away from the pre55u res of and control and away from the pressures of a busy end to the season pressures of a busy end to the season with the lions tourju5t three weeks away. off-road driving i5 three weeks away. off-road driving is something to take the mind off it. you come back and you feel quite rough fresh, running into the back end of the season with all these games coming up. with all these
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games coming up. with all these games coming up together it's exciting and pretty unique. the road to the opening lion5 te5t exciting and pretty unique. the road to the opening lion5 test is long and treacherous, history tells us some of the lions player5 and treacherous, history tells us some of the lions players could be injured by the opening first whistle goe5in injured by the opening first whistle goes in earnest. at least this means they‘re better prepared for anything, including apparently in the5e anything, including apparently in these parts there are the this vicious pheasant brian. he's not scared. look at him! brian has attacked before, so leigh and the rest were thankful they were in the safety of their cars. to be fairto to be fair to brian when they are marauding through his wood, it is his, he wants it to himself. that looked a bit scary. the pheasant? it looked a bit scary. the pheasant? it looked like you are going to tip over. owen farrell said we were tipping over but thanks to billy‘s driving and the guidance of leigh, they met for the first time, incredible, but we were safe thanks
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to both of them. thanks very much. with programmes like bake 0ff 5howca5ing skills ranging from cooking to sewing to painting, it‘s clear we‘re big fans of home—made stuff here in the uk. so this weekend blackburn is hosting the first ever national festival of making, celebrating everything to do with britain‘5 manufacturing, food and creative industries. colin paterson is there. may with some cakes? the reason why blackburn has been chosen for this festival is 25% of people work in the making industries, whether that i5 cakes or fashion, manufacturing, or cooking, victoria will be doing cooking demonstrations later, aldo zilli's cooking demonstrations later, aldo zilli‘5 ri5otto will be shown off and the other thing the festival has done is pairup and the other thing the festival has done is pair up local industries with artists to create new works of art performed at the festival. i‘ve
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been to visit one and a warning, this report contains me in a hairnet. two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, and go, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eightand eight, and go, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight and go.‘ day 85,000 muffins and cakes are made at the cherry tree bakery. that require5 made at the cherry tree bakery. that requires a lot of repetitive movement. the latest creation to emerge from the factory for, it is chorley cake needs swanlike. the worker5‘ action5 turned into dance. the idea of making bakers and burnley balletic came from choreographer ruth jone5. burnley balletic came from choreographer ruth jones. these machines now make the workers work really fast, so when they do many mefin davies are squeezed up like this and working really fast whereas in the olden days they could move
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and it was lower and they have more space —— many mefin davies. and it was lower and they have more space -- many mefin davies. and this is incorporated into the dance? yes. we wa nted we wanted to be inspired by all the activity that goes on on this factory floor. the movement is unique. and it was a very collaborative process. i showed her how to decorate brownies my we have to take a pie piping bag and do circles on the ground. it was so beautiful how what we are doing became such a beautiful dance, it was beautiful. amazing really. it was great, we we re amazing really. it was great, we were ready impressed, we didn't think we could do that by general
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movements in a bakery. it was really fun to watch and learn. and go, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight... the idea that it could be beneficial to the staff is a big reason why the bakery allowed a choreographer into the mix. there is method to this that it could improve performance? that's what the choreographer said, performance? that's what the choreographersaid, being performance? that's what the choreographer said, being more conscious of your movements and changing it so it is betterfor your body. you've offered to take part yourself, any reservations?‘ body. you've offered to take part yourself, any reservations? a lot but i couldn‘t really ask them to do something i wasn‘t willing to do myself, so i was, like, 0k. something i wasn‘t willing to do myself, so i was, like, ok. with four performances this weekend at the festival of making, it‘s hoped the festival of making, it‘s hoped the bakers will rise to the occasion. while we‘re talking about the bakers, they will be on breakfast at around 8:50am and while they will be
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doing demonstrations over the weekend, you can see what hard work it‘s done here. there‘s a prep kitchen whenever you watch cooking shows on tv, victoria, this is where the hard work is done, what are you doing? prepping aldo zilli's tray so we have all his ingredients. doing? prepping aldo zilli's tray so we have all his ingredientsm doing? prepping aldo zilli's tray so we have all his ingredients. it is 6:4aam and he isn‘t on until 10am, you have to be here so early? we don‘t want anything missing. you have to be here so early? we don't want anything missing. what will you be cooking? we have aaron scheers knee for aldo, he is making aaron genie bra all is, for the risotto as well, we have nigel harris, he is making rhubarb omelette. show us your fridge, this has all been done already? it is all very finely labelled. i will put it back where i got it. more from the festival of makers through the morning. when we hear people say
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here‘s one i made earlier, there is someone here‘s one i made earlier, there is someone behind a black curtain doing that. this is it. hours and hours earlier. all kinds of things. i don't know why there are soft drinks in here. we have aldo hero pasta here as well. fascinating, colin. does anyone know what colin‘s cooking is like? can he cook? i don‘t know, we will find out in the next hour or so. here‘s louise with a look at this morning‘s weather. i‘ve got a special graphic for you coming up at the end because you asked me about next week and i‘ve been searching just for you. there a north and south divide will stop the best of the weather for the north and west. this weather front is bringing rain to the isles of scilly and cornwall. that‘s most likely it through the day and for much of england and wales it is rather cloudy and grey and at times a
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little bit of drizzle around. this morning there is a breeze coming in off the north sea. not as strong as yesterday. you can see where the cloud and rain is sitting in the south—west and that will likely continue through the day. further north and west, despite the chilly start, into the afternoon we have lovely spells of sunshine. it could have highs of 19 degrees in the western highlands. a bit of breeze along the moray coast. further south will be cloud continuing across england and wales, but a bit of brightness coming into the south—east by the end of the afternoon. temperatures will respond. 18— 19 degrees. in the south—west of the rain will continue through the afternoon. elsewhere for the football matches it will be a cloudy but dry affair and temperatures could be worse. with lighter winds it won‘t feel bad. in the scotland we continue to have lengthy spells of sunshine. very nice indeed. 0vernight the weather
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front is sitting to the south—west and it will drift into the near continent. that overnight we keep quite a lot of cloud around. in the north—west we are likely to see the best of the sunshine. west is best on sunday. we will have more sunshine through western areas. the breeze coming from the north and down the north sea coast it will continue to feel disappointingly chilly. 9— 10 degrees. sunshine in the western areas, highs of14— chilly. 9— 10 degrees. sunshine in the western areas, highs of 14— 18 for sunday. into the early half of next week it stays predominantly dry. not likely to see any significant rain until the end of the week. but with subtle differences, this is what you were asking me for, this week we have a lot of warmth in the north—west, but through the western half temperatures are about 21— 22. with a change of wind direction and more cloud it will feel disappointingly weak, but along the east coast where it has been cloudy and cool things
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will get better and by the middle of the week we have some warmth returning. 60— 18 degrees. —— 16. now, if you could tell me what it will be like three weeks from tuesday, i would will be like three weeks from tuesday, iwould be will be like three weeks from tuesday, i would be really grateful! ifi tuesday, i would be really grateful! if i could do that i would be a very wealthy lady! thanks very much. time now for a round—up of all the latest technology news in click. we‘ll be back with the headlines at 7am. school, it‘s changed a lot since i went through the education mangle all those many years ago. many years ago. the school buildings may look the same but technology has been infusing education for quite a while now. we have smart whiteboards,
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we have increasing use of tablets and laptops. we have e—textbooks instead of textbooks, but also there are some systems which mean the way in which kids learn and are taught is changing completely. it seems many tech giants want to become part of education. after all, an early introduction to their brands may one day add up to a greater number of users. microsoft this week launched its education offering, which includes a new version of windows called windows s, a budget surface pro in various colours and some tweaks to its office applications. apple‘s teaching tool classroom had a face—lift last month and now offers more tools for teachers. but before both of these came google classroom. and today i‘m finding out more about it from mr lickfold, director of learning at tring secondary school. they‘ve been using this online system for the past 18 months to teach and monitor the students‘ progress.
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today i‘m learning about the galapagos islands and i have to say, the lesson that chris has constructed certainly looks more engaging than my old textbooks. but tech can do a lot more than just provide media rich lesson plans. we‘re able to personalise what we do far more than we have ever done before and take them to different resources that are available in the system. every student‘s learning journey will be different. taking teaching online also means teachers have a lot more access to children‘s individual learning data and even their thought processes. for example, this browser extension, draftback, lets the teacher watch how an essay was written and refined. if i‘ve got a student who in preparation for their exams is not constructing their paragraphs correctly, i can say, "ok, let‘s look at how you constructed your particular paragraph. what did you do? where did you develop it? what can we do differently?" if it‘s maybe two or three
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paragraphs and they spent so long on the first one then i can also just say, "look, this is how long you spent on this first document, it‘s like half an hour. you only spent five minutes on the second and third one." using online tools and data is one way to enhance learning in schools, but lara lewington has been looking at other tech that promises to change how children learn completely. vr, robots, holograms, it wasn‘t like this in my day. i am robot. at the bet education show earlier this year we saw some of the most cutting edge ideas heading to the classroom soon. over the past few months i‘ve seen quite a few devices that bring together the idea of kids coding and toys aiming to make the activity more fun. but good old lego here have gone a step further. they‘re trying to recreate real life situations where robots would be used so that children can find problems and then find the solutions, and the mission we have here is for a space robot
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which needs to move around the space base collecting these theses all together and taking them back to one place. but obviously the coding should do that bit. using the drag and drop blocks to create sequences that carry out actions is just part of the learning process as science is being taught at the same time. but brickso‘s vision of what could be learned through these small plastic blocks was quite different. look at this. this is a way to bring your existing lego set to life. it has got a couple of led lights, a sensor, and these blocks actually conduct electricity. from there you can create whateverspinning, moving, lighting functions take your fancy. but this use of technology isn‘t just about teaching ict. this adaptive learning is also about employing new methods of teaching traditional classes. the teacher guides the experience but as a student you can really roam about.
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this is google expedition. now, jen here is going to play the part of a teacher. she‘ll be talking through what we are all looking at through the goggles at the same time. that actually represents all of you and that‘s actually a really important thing... the pictures are amazing. i mean, looking at the difference between the healthy lungs and the smoker‘s lungs i definitely think we should stick with the kids. the idea of an image in your mind is certainly something that could be easier to maintain than just someonejust talking. but my issue is actually with the idea of wearing the goggles. they‘re fine for a couple of minutes but then i do feel the urge to take them off so i can‘t imagine actually wearing them for a full half—hour lesson or beyond. many of these ideas will be picked up by individual schools, but although the ideas and devices are out there, the challenge comes in making them available to the masses and that‘s something which one not—for—profit in finland,
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a country considered to have one of the world‘s best education systems, is trying to overcome. i would say that education is one of the few big industries that is still waiting to be disrupted. one of the biggest challenges in our education system is that it is based on the ideals of the industrial world, so it is kind of like teaching everyone to be the same. and in tomorrow‘s world it‘s crucial to be individual. one idea turns things on its head, though, focusing not simply on new ways of teaching, but firstly analysing how we learn. well, i‘m on my way to maths class, which should cause me a bit of concern because i am not sure i remember that much from school, but with this class everybody‘s having their own private lesson. the teacher doesn‘t stand up and project their voice to start the session. the kids take their places at computers where century a! will take you through the lesson. this artificial intelligence system aims to teach each pupil at their own pace and in a way that suits them best, constantly getting to know them better and tracking their progress. the entire purpose of this machine
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is to learn how your brain learns and then utilise that data, and it constantly adapts to provide them with a top—tier education at any single moment and then take that data and offers it to the teacher in real—time. here the student generates the data. it‘s provided by real—time teachers and they can intervene when necessary and they can spend more time on the human interactions with the student, the pastoral care that they need to provide to that individual. now, you may remember last year we tickled your earbuds with something called binaural sound. now, this is a way of recording audio so when you listen back through headphones, the sounds actually sound like they are coming from the right place in 3—d space. well, it turns out someone was listening. notjust someone, but the doctor, and he invited kate russell to hear all about it. paul, go and have a look.
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why me? you‘re physically bigger. maybe it'sjust the central heating. oh, sorry, didn‘t mean to scare you. unlike a new episode of doctor who, that uses binaural sound to really get inside your head. i have come to south wales, where the episode knock knock was filmed. in this spooky—looking house, the doctor investigates some strange noises. err, what‘s going on? using binaural sound, the show‘s producers are able to ramp up the fright factor by placing sound effects all around the listener, so they feel like they are actually inside the room with the actors. so if you see a normal, digital audio workstation,
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everything is layered up in tracks. but actually, we can see those tracks on the computer as little objects, like you are looking down on top of a room. so you can see these dots with a cross showing where the left and right is, and the up—and—down axis. when the sounds are then put through into the bbc renderer, which is a piece of software that the r&d team have made, then you can see where those sounds are hanging in 3—d space. to experience the binaural effect you must be using stereo headphones. even a top—of—the—range 5.1 surround sound speaker systems will not deliver the results, as the microscopic time delays in sounds arriving at your ears are vital to creating the 360—degree immersive effect. that was super, super scary and spooky and atmospheric. very subtle. if you are expecting the kind of like sideshow act ofjumping around sound that really wows you, this is not what this is about. this is about a subtle experience of placing you in a three—dimensional soundscape. the reason why this episode lent itself so brilliantly to the binaural mix is because of it
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being a kind of horror, playing with the horror genre, and the tropes of that, and a lot of what makes things scary is what you don‘t see, and building up the atmosphere to that moment of scare is really what the audience are looking for. we were told 3—d tv was going to be the next big thing. well, that didn‘t happen. so why should this be any different? the reason why binaural is really taking off now is because we‘re in the age of the smartphone and the tablet. people are consuming their media with headphones. the headphones are hugely popular. we‘ve got... even in my family, my kids will sit down watching their own content that they‘re interested in with a pair of headphones so as not
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to disturb each other. i think what will happen when people experience binaural audio with tv content, radio content, and then they go back to stereo, they‘ll feel a little bit... it‘s quite a claustrophobic feeling. and you think, "i want that other sound, please. what was that? it was binaural, let me have some more of that, please." i think that is where we‘ll start to see binaural really take off. this spooky episode will be broadcast with regular sound on uk tvs this weekend. i‘m afraid viewers from the rest of the world will have to wait. for the binaural experience, watch it on iplayer. i recommend a darkened room, some decent stereo headphones, and a steely nerve. and remember, if you do hear knocking sounds in the night, it‘s probablyjust your pipes... probably. and that‘s it for the shortcut of click for this week. the full—length version is up on iplayer to watch right now. follow us on twitter throughout the week @bbcclick.
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thank you so much for watching and we‘ll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. after huge gains for the conservatives in the council votes, thoughts return to the general election campaign. while the labour leader jeremy corbyn says they face a "historic" task to win next month, theresa may has insisted she‘s taking "nothing for granted."
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