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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 7, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with ben thompson and katherine downes. income tax, mental health and pensions — the political parties make major policy pledges ahead of the general election. labour says it won't raise income tax for 95% of taxpayers, while theresa may is promising to tear up what she says is outdated mental health legislation. good morning, it's sunday may 8. also ahead: choosing their new president — french voters go to the polls this morning. 82 of the kidnapped nigerian schoolgirls have been freed more than three years after they were captured by islamist militants. a rise in the number of holiday makers being ripped off by booking scams — and what you can do to avoid it. in sport, swansea's premier league future is in their own hands,
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as they win and the teams around them slip up. and louise has the weather. good morning. another wild day of weather, dry and west is best in terms of sunshine and warmth. more details later on. good morning. first, our main story. with just over a month to go until the general election, the political parties are making key pledges today. labour says if it wins, it will not raise income tax for those earning less than £80,000 a year. the conservatives are planning to reform mental health services, while the liberal democrats are vowing to protect pensions. 0ur political correspondent ellie price, can tell us more. ellie, the parties are making big promises today? they most certainly are. not putting up they most certainly are. not putting up taxes always a good tactic in any
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election campaign. that is what the labour party have done today. they suggested they will not raise the standard rate of vat, they will not increase national insurance contributions and they will not put up contributions and they will not put up income tax that people earning up to £85,000 a year. they say that will benefit around 95% of earners and they will politely ask higher rate taxpayers to pay a little more. if this sounds familiar it is because the conservatives had a similar policy in the last general election although they declined a similar commitment this time around. not surprisingly, the tories have criticised the labour party saying that there is a funding gap. elsewhere the lib dems have said they will protect the so—called triple lock on pensions. that is where pensions go up by the average wage increase or inflation or 2.5%, whichever is higher. they say they will protect that. it was a coalition government idea a few
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yea rs coalition government idea a few years ago. the tories have so far said they will not commit to that. but, the conservatives, sorry, the lib democrats say they will counsel winter fuel allowance for higher rate pensioners. —— council winter fuel allowance. —— cancel. let's get more on the conservative announcement about plans to replace mental health legislation in england and wales with a new law. our health editor hugh pym reports. injanuary, in january, theresa injanuary, theresa may read a speech outlining plans to transform attitudes towards mental hills with extra support for schools and employers. now in what is billed as the conservatives first major mr policy announcement of this campaign the prime minister has unveiled plans for new legislation if returned to downing street. she says she wants to scrap the mental hills act which is over 30 years old. she says it has brought discrimination and injustice with concerns that individuals are being held
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unnecessarily in hospitals and police delve with black people significantly more likely to be detained in secure mental hills wards. the party has also pledged to increase by 10,000 the number of staff working in mental hills in england, currently around 200,000. but labour said the number of mental hills nurses had fallen by 6000 since 2010 was unclear whether funding would come from. the liberal democrats said the promise of thousands of additional staff was based on thin air and reforms to the mental hills act had been proposed two years ago but delayed by the conservatives. —— to the mental hills act. —— mental hills act. polls in france will open injust under an hours time for the final round of the country's presidential election. voters are choosing between marine le pen and front—runner, emmanuel macron, as richard slee reports. today's vote is being seen as the most important in france the
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decades. the two candidates have very opposite views of europe in the future of france in the wider world. the national front‘s marine future of france in the wider world. the nationalfront‘s marine le pen would close the borders and quit the euro currency. emmanuel macron wants a closer european cooperation and an open economy. he is a former economy minister who last year quit the current socialist government to concentrate on this new independent political movement. this campaign was the last—minute victim of a hacking attack which saw an online lea k of hacking attack which saw an online leak of thousands of females and documents. the french election watchdog has advised the media not to publish details from the documents, warning it could lead to criminal charges. it admits some of the documents are probably fake. polls are open today until the earlier been that some french nationals living abroad were able to cast their vote from yesterday, including around 100,000 people who live in the uk. the winner is expected to be announced later tonight. eighty two nigerian schoolgirls who were abducted by islamist militants in 2014 have been freed.
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their kidnapping from their school in the town of chibok sparked international outrage as stephanie hegarty reports. they were taken three years ago as schoolgirls, but they will be coming back as young women. after lengthy negotiations between government and militants, 82 of the chibok girls have been released. it was essentially a prisoner swap. the president said in a statement that some boko haram suspects were freed in exchange for the girls. the young women are now in the care of the nigerian army, and are expected to be brought to the capital, abuja, today. it is the second time that the government has successfully rescued a group of chibok girls. last october, 21 young women were returned to their families. the chibok girls were taken from their school by islamist militants in 2014, just as they were about to sit
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theirfinal exams. their kidnapping inspired a global campaign calling for their release. many families in chibok will be rejoicing today, but of the 276 girls taken that night, over 100 are yet to be returned. while chibok is by far the most high—profile case, thousands of people have been kidnapped by boko haram in the eight years of this insurgency. the number of people ripped off by holiday booking scams rose by almost a fifth last year, new figures have revealed. actionfraud, the uk's fraud and cyber crime reporting centre, says there were almost 6,000 reported cases in 2016, with each victim losing an average of £1200. around 50,000 people will be evacuated from the german city
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of hannover later so experts can remove five unexploded wartime bombs. the bombs were found during work at a building site. some 2,500 firefighters, rescuers, and police officers are being deployed to help with the operation which effects around a tenth of the city's population. —— which affects around a tenth of the city's population. more billionaires are based in the uk than ever before, according to the annual sunday times rich list published today. the hinduja brothers, who made their money from banking and manufacturing, top the table and are said to be worth more than 16 billion pounds asjoe lynam reports. these brothers have been associated with the labour party since the mid—19 90s and acquired british passports in 1997. their investments in oil, it, energy and the media have made them worth £16.2 billion
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according to the sunday times rich list. by a quarter in one year. not behind on £16 billion is the ukrainian music mogul. he owns warner music as wallace stakes in a number of other companies. at number nine, the duke of westminster worth £9.5 billion is the highest ranking reddish warm person on the list. he owns property in large parts of central london. there are a record 134 billionaires in this year's top 1000 on the list was accumulative wealth of £658 billion. in order to get on the list you need to be worth at least £110 million. although there are no women in the top 20 who became billionaires in their own right, the sunday times says this year ‘s list is more diverse than ever stop it says that many have benefited over the past year from booming stock markets in europe and north america. just approaching ten parsecs so let's ta ke just approaching ten parsecs so let's take you to the front of the newspapers. and to the rich list of costs dominating the front of the
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times, —— approaching ten minutes past six. the self—made rich, not inherited is high up the list as you heard there. also featuring on the list although you may not recognise her, that is the singer adele who featured heavily on the list turning 29 this week. one of the richest women in the country, given her outstanding success on the music scene. she is having a laugh at herself, isn't she? we should explain the picture. here is the sunday telegraph in their take on the labour announcement today that they will not increase in contacts for workers on less than £80,000 but they will be asking for more taxes for those who earn more than £80,000. the sunday telegraph saying that they will hammer workers who earn more. a big picture thereof prince harry's girlfriend who turned out to watch and play polo. on the front of the sunday mirror, news of
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this with wall and her boyfriend who was found damp at this home this weekend. this is the story on the front of the sunday mirror. they are calling it an exclusive. another sad story of the front of this sun on sunday. they have an exclusive interview with george michael's partner for 20 years, talking about the death of the star. but spring you up—to—date with the main stories on breakfast this morning. the conservatives, labour and the liberal democrats or made key policy pledges ahead of the general election. meanwhile, french voters go to the poles today in the final round of the country's presidential election. also coming up on the programme, can you tell the difference between the song of a thrush, a robin, a black cab ora blackbird? new thrush, a robin, a black cab ora blackbird ? new research thrush, a robin, a black cab ora blackbird? new research says that most of us cannot. we will get some tips on how to spot some of our most
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common birds. i can tell the difference between them by looking at them but i am not sure about the birdsong. i think that defeats the object, doesn't it? we will test your knowledge as well and viewers at home as well. louise, is the bird whether this morning? it is. it is quite why actually. a little more straightforward than yesterday. we are seeing some clear skies through the night. across the north—west there is a touch of frost, light frost but the temperature hovers close to freezing. as we had through the night the winds are strengthening with cows across the northern ireland that cold flow is just driving the warm air a little further south today. not quite as warm across the west of scotland as it has been in the past few days. that said you were still got some lovely spells of sunshine. quite cold into the far north—east of scotla nd cold into the far north—east of scotland where the breeze comes in
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the sea. the bill warmest weather likely to be across northern ireland, 21 degrees or above, the warmest day of the year so far. not too bad across north—west england as well, west is best in terms of sunshine. if we get a suntan coming through in temperatures should respond. looks nicer the premiership this afternoon, both for liverpool and arsenal. still more cloud and disappointing feel across the east coast in a cloud continues to linger through the night as well. so where we see the best of the sunshine by day, perhaps we will see clear skies and temperatures in rural parts for and temperatures in rural parts for a touch of light frost in a couple of places. as we go on into monday we continue with this west east divide. the northerly breeze driving in more cloud of the north sea and a cooler feel whether cloud lingers all day. in the west you will have sunshine and some warmth. we are still looking at around nine to 11
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degrees on the east coast, further west not quite as warm because it is a cold northerly wind from a colder direction but we will see highs around 14 or 15 degrees. into the early half of next week looks as though we will see a rigid high—pressure building across and it continues to keep things quiet. little change to the early half of next week. it will stay predominantly dry some sunny spells but with the potential as we move into thursday and friday of perhaps seeing some rain and some of it heavier and more persistent than we have seen recently. thank you for that, we will see you a little bit later on. 75 years ago, during the height of the second world war, the isle of wight came under a ferocious aerial attack by the german luftwaffe. 70 people lost their lives in the air raid, but the destruction would have been much worse had it not been for the actions of the crew of a polish warship. this weekend their heroism is being remembered,
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as kasha madeira reports. archive: polish destroyers, co—operating with the british navy, are visited by the polish president... the blyskawica, one of two grom destroyers built in cowes, was the pride of poland. during a refit, back on the island, the crew could not have foreseen the role they would play in defending cowes against that devastating air raid. ..you are not only serving the cause of poland, but the cause of mankind. josef wlodarczak is last surviving crew member. he recalls how all on board had a critical role to play. translation: when it comes to the isle of wight, our guns were blazing. i was down in the engine rooms ensuring the motors were running, so the gunners could keep firing. whilejosef was in the engine room, tom guy was next to the ship, on dry land. it was dangerous, because the guns were so red hot, and i can prove it.
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i could actually see them. they was red hot, they was. they put water on them all the time. but that decision to fire was controversial. while in dry dock, the blyskawica should not have had any live ammunition on board, yet her captain, wojciech francki, was convinced an attack was imminent, after seeing german reconnaissance flights. june week's father saw the same planes. he was looking out of his bedroom window, and these german reconnaissance planes were so low, he could actually see the swastikas on them. they were really, really low. and he said to my mother, we're going to get it soon. the isle of wight was used to coming under attack. the luftwaffe would use the light reflected off the medina as a guide to fly further north, to attack cities on the mainland. but that night the attack was unprecedented, because they were aiming directly cowes itself. captain francki was denied permission from the admiralty to arm
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the blyskawica, and in doing so, he risked court—martial. playing at his commemorations, his granddaughter said he took the initiative. when the bombing started, he sent smokescreens out. which actually they did afterwards praised him for his initiative in that. because that was quite an unprecedented thing to do, to disguised the ship, to kind of create a fog. his action and that of the blyskawica's crew saved countless lives. today, a modern polish navy destroyer is anchored off the coast of isle of wight, not to defend, but to honour the blyskawica's memory. we will be back with a summary of the news at 6:30am. now it is time for the film review, with jane hill and mark kermode. hello and welcome to
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the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases as ever is mark kermode. this is a mixed bag this week. we have mindhorn, in which an 80s tv detective plays it for real. we have harmonium, a cannes prizewinner. and jamie foxx in the thriller sleepless. mindhorn, i'm smiling before i start. i show my age but i loved bergerac back in the day. a tv detective onjersey, you see images from mindhorn and all the the memories come back. so mindhorn is a 19805 tv detective but is more like alan partridge or garth marenghi. in the 19805 he played mindhorn with a bionic eye to see the truth. the actorjulian barratt plays him. he's now washed up, balding, doing adverts for orthopaedic socks.
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he's desperate for a job. then the isle of man police get in touch and say, "we have a suspected serial killer who has been ringing us and will only speak to mindhorn, the fictional character who he believes is real." so the police say, "will you please come and play mindhorn for us to help us catch him." immediately, thorncroft thinks this is a career—reviving opportunity of which he is going to make the most. here's a clip. 0k, here's a list of prompts, so stick to script. and avoid any of these trigger words. "insane, nutjob, mental." blah, blah, blah, the usual stuff. is this the phone? that is the phone. great. yep. that's going to be ok. actually, if you could just keep it in its cradle until... sure, just connecting with the props.
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you were laughing all the way through that. so what then happened is he thinks this is going to be a massive publicity opportunity, but doing the course of that he meets with characters from his old life. essie davis as the person with who he used to co—star, but he's in love with her. she's now with his stuntman, his dutch stu ntman. steve coogan plays as the spin—off character who has become successful and of whom he is veryjealous. the film's very interesting, and funny in the moments when the comedy comes together. the supporting cast is terrific, kenneth branagh plays himself, simon cowell playing himself — simon callow plays himself, not simon cowell! there are plenty of laughs all the way through. my only reservation is that sometimes it feels like a 30 minute sketch stretched out to 90 minute movie. that said, it's really nice to see the isle of man playing the isle of man. there are so many movies
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where the isle of man — you know, it played ireland in waking ned, and new york in me and orson welles, and cornwall in stormbrea ker. it's nice to see the point being that they are on the isle of man. although there are dramatic areas and it's uneven, when it's funny, it's funny and the physical comedy works well. especially if you have that nostalgic thing you are talking about. looking at things like bergerac and the six million dollar man. those jokes will work. so i thought it was funnier than i was expecting, yes, it's uneven and inconsistent but it works when it works. it's nice it's got such a great supporting cast. andrea riseborough is great. the joke is funnier because she is playing it straight, reacting with a straight face. so it entertained me, even though it's uneven. 0k. and it could not be more different from harmonium. yeah. so this is a cannes prizewinner. it has a mysterious stranger who turns up on the door of a family — father, mother and young child.
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the father immediately recognises him, gives him a job and food and lodging, and the wife says, "who's he? "where does he come from? "how do you know him?" he says he's an old friend. it's evident he's an old friend from a part of the husband's past that the wife doesn't know about. slowly, the film starts to reveals its secrets. what i liked about it was it's a movie in which the story is not told so much through what people say but through what they do, through their actions, the way they stand and behave. you immediately get to see with this character, he has been possibly in confinement. he can only sleep with the light on, he eats food fast as if he's protective of it. so you know more about these characters than they tell you. the film itself then moves from something that seems to be understated and low—key to something that is actually quite tragic and dramatic. the change happens almost imperceptibly. it's a film that wrong—footed me several times.
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i didn't know where it was going, but i found myself gripped. so when the big revelations occur, they are all the more powerful. it's called harmonium because, during it, the young daughter is learning to play the instrument. this stranger actually starts to teach her how to play the instrument, which, on the one hand, seems to be partly innocent, but also seems oddly threatening, which is pretty much the tone of the whole film. i have read the word bleak in relation to it many times. people have certainly said bleak. it is bleak, but it is also very human. it's not just bleak. it's engaging in the way it makes its dramatic punch work even better. let's move to sleepless. this is a jamie foxx vehicle? what's your take on it? oh, it is that. from a film in which silence is everything to one where noise is everything. jamie foxx is a cop who, very early on, we see him get a large stash of drugs with his partner. clearly if you have a large stash
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of drugs they belong to somebody. they belong to a casino owner who wants them back and decides he'll get it back by kidnapping jamie foxx‘s son. meanwhile, rachel monaghan is a internal affairs agent on the trail of these bad cops and there's another criminal, all of whom end up in this casino building, all chasing each other, all, double—crossing each other and fighting each other. here's a clip. rap music stay right there! dad! the cop's son, we have him! he'll bring the dope. 0k? that's pretty much the tone
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of the film all the way through. the thing is, that idea of the sort of single location, if you think about a thing like die hard, or snake eyes, you think, maybe this is tapping into that, but it doesn't have the punch or panache of either of those films. what you have is a bunch of people chasing each other around a confined space and it's lots of running, jumping, pointing, shooting, car chases. it never engages on a dramatic level. there are some good performances in it and you keep thinking, it's ok, i quite like watching this, but it never actually gets under your skin. and it's ironic that it's called sleepless, because it isn't a movie that engages or keeps you awake. there are whole sections in it where you think, yeah, i have been here before. i've seen this done better. i'm not particularly gripped this time round. is it a remake of a french film? apparently the french film is very good. i always wonder why films that were made a few years ago need to be remade in another language.
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there is no reason for it. 0k, well, on that note, let's talk about lady macbeth. if there wasn't a general election on i would have seen this by now. i'm looking forward to it. it's really good. firstly, the director has come out of theatre. i think he made one short film before. and, you know, this is a really good piece of cinema. fantastic central performance by florence pugh — who is going to be huge. she will clearly be a major star and she dominates the screen in this. it's based a version — siberian lady macbeth is one version, and it takes the action to victorian north—east england and it is a really engaging story with a great central performance and one of those soundscapes that draws you in, sort of tells the story again more through the whistling of the wind and the creaking of the chairs than it does the dialogue. you'll love it. it's worth seeing, but see it in this cinema, don't wait for the dvd.
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0k, good tip. talking of dvds, though, for someone who does have — well, in this week's case — a lot of time on our hands, for the scorsese. i was ambivalent about silence when it came out in the cinema. this is a project that scorsese wanted to do for decades and decades. it's based on the 1966 historical novel on religious persecution in 17th century japan. it is a film made with great integrity and honesty. i think it has some dramatic failings in it, but it looks absolutely beautiful. liam neeson, andrew garfield, adam driver are nominally the stars but the japanese stars steal the show. including one of the stars we saw in harmonium. perhaps i underestimated it the first time round. although it's farfrom perfect, it was interesting watching it again and thinking, it is deeper and richer and more resonant
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than first time round. so worth having a go, although it is a tough watch. no question, it's a tough watch. mark, thanks as ever. see you next week. a quick reminder before we go that you can find all the film news and reviews from across the bbc online. i'm sure you know the address by now. you'll find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that's it for this week from both of us. thanks for watching, happy cinemagoing. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and katherine downes. coming up before seven, louise will be here with the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. labour is pledging not to raise income tax for those earning less than £80,000 if it wins the general election. the party says it will not increase vat or employee national insurance rates. but says the top 5% of earners will
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pay more to fund public services. the conservatives, who have also ruled out a rise in vat, say there is a £45 billion black hole in labour's tax proposals. meanwhile, the prime minister says that if her party is re—elected, the conservatives will replace current mental health legislation in england and wales, with a new law tackling discrimination and the unnecessary detention of vulnerable people. the party is also promising 10,000 more staff working in nhs mental health treatment by 2020. labour says the tories appear to be offering no extra funding to back the plans. polls in france will open shortly for the final round of the country's presidential election. voters are choosing between marine le pen and front—runner, emmanuel macron. results are expected before midnight tonight in what's being described as the most important election in france for decades. the nigerian presidency has confirmed that 82 schoolgirls who were kidnapped by islamist
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militants in 2014 have been freed. they were among more than 270 girls seized from a boarding school in the town of chibok in a night time attack. more than 100 girls are still missing. the italian coastguard say around 6000 migrants trying to reach europe have been rescued in the past 48 hours. they say they co—ordinated around 40 separate emergency missions. many migrants were trying to cross from libya in rubber dinghies and other makeshift vessels. the number of people ripped off by holiday booking scams rose by almost a fifth last year, new figures have revealed. actionfraud, the uk's fraud and cyber crime reporting centre, says there were almost 6,000 reported cases in 2016, with each victim losing an average of £1200. around 50,000 people will be evacuated from the german city of hannover later so experts can remove five unexploded wartime bombs. the bombs were found during work at a building site.
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some 2,500 firefighters, rescuers, and police officers are being deployed to help with the operation which effects —— affects around a tenth of the city's population. more billionaires are based in the uk than ever before, according to the sunday times rich list which is published today. the hinduja brothers, who made their money from banking and manufacturing, top the list and are said to be worth more than £16 billion. only one person in the top ten was born in the uk. ijust think it is i just think it is fascinating reading the sunday times rich list because it is dream figures, really. i also like that it tells you where the money has come from. that is your business brain. you are that sort of thing. you just fell off the
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list this year, is that right? just buy a little bit. a few hundred million. you are here with sport today. premier league action? yes, the only goal scored for swansea city. this is all about the battle at the bottom of the premier league to avoid relegation. they defeated everton1—0. crystal palace also lost. so swansea city seem a little more secure after those defeats for hull city and crystal palace. their destiny now lies in their own hands. if they win their two remaining matches, they'll stay up. nick parrott reports. it was a rare sight neither set of supporters were expecting to see. hull city defeated at home for the first time since marco silver took overin first time since marco silver took over in january. first time since marco silver took over injanuary. already relegated sunderland are celebrating their first victory in 11 matches. jermaine defoe struck in the second half to make premier league tigers and endangered species. what is important is today's result. we
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don't need to change anything, we need to work harder with in the next week to prepare for the next game. it is not a good moment but the moment had to come. the threat to hold's existence in the top—flight with swansea keeping vehicle to secure a win over evidence of the first time in their history. the 13th goal of the season will not be remembered for the finish but it was enough to see the swans fly over hull and it out of the relegation zone. if they stay there, the effort of the spaniard will be remembered for years. when you do not get that second goal you are always wondering if you will be punished for it. one of the post, a couple of great saves, a header that was deflected, there are a fair few chances but we got there in the end and when the final whistle went to was a great feeling. crystal palace are not safe yet after losing 5—0 to manchester city. with two games to play against
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fellow strugglers hull and managers that united, their future fellow strugglers hull and managers that united, theirfuture is fellow strugglers hull and managers that united, their future is far from certain. five different names on the scoresheet showed a solid all—round performance that has been lacking of late for pep guardiola's men as they moved up to third and closer to champions league qualification. here are the rest of yesterday's results, champions leicester city guaranteed their premier league survival with a deserved 3—0 win over watford. sam vokes scored a late equaliser for burnley as they edged towards safety with a 2—2 draw against west brom. and bournemouth and stoke both know they'll be in the premier league next season after they drew by the same scoreline. today is all about the chase for european football. it's fifth versus sixth as arsenal host manchester united in the late kick off. before that liverpool take on southampton, asjurgen klopp's side chase a place in next season's champions league. there is absolutely no club in the top spot who can waste points right now. that's how it is. not chelsea,
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not tottenham, not liveable, city, or united, arsenal, no club has the opportunity to rest. we all have to fight with all we have and that makes the league so exciting. in scotland, inverness caledonian thistle are still fighting to stay in the premiership. the bottom club are nowjust four points adrift of safety after a 2—1 win against relegation rivals hamilton. brad mckay scored their first on ten minutes. they doubled their lead with a penalty and hamilton could only manage a late consolation goal. elsewhere there were wins for dundee, ross county and champions celtic. and congratulations to portsmouth who have been crowned league two champions. they thumped cheltenham 6—1 at fratton park to seal the title and jump from third place as both sides above them, doncaster and plymouth, dropped points. doncaster were beaten by hartlepool united. but because of results elsewhere the north—east side were relegated ending their 96—year stay in the football league. wasps have finished top of rugby union's premiership
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for the first time in 20 years. victory against saracens secured first place in the regular season, just ahead of exeter. saracens finished third overall, while leicester got the last of the four play—off spots. tim hague has the details. eight months, 126 matches and the search was still on to find first place in the english premiership as well as a home time to play—offs. wasps in the saracens had a chance of both. even more fitting the christian wade scored for wasps, his 17th drive the season equalling the record. there only line, elliot bailey, will hope to feast against your blacks next month. —— against the all blacks. 35— 15 to score. wasps top, saracens third. in
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between them, exeter, they defeated gloucester to secure second is the second successive season while the final play—off spot went to leicester. they got over the line at worcester but the celebrations can not last long. the play—offs come next and the surge to the top team in england continues. meanwhile, northampton and harlequins were battling for the final guaranteed spot in next season's champions cup. and although northampton ran out narrow 22—20 winners, it wasn't enough to overtake quins in the table. so as tim was saying. leicester's victory over worcester gave them the final playoff semi final spot. they'll travel to wasps in a couple of weeks. bath miss out in fifth. if gloucester win the challenge cup on friday, they'll take the champions cup playoff spot ahead of northampton. bristol were already relegated. in the pro12, munsterfinished the season top of the table to secure themselves a home semi—final. they pipped leinster on the final day, who
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lost to ulster in belfast 17—13. roger wilson, ulster‘s most capped player who retired after the game, scored their first try with andrew trimble adding another in the second half. glasgow warriors couldn't give their departing coach gregor townsend a winning send—off. he's off to take charge of the scottish national team, but ended his spell with the warriors in defeat as they lost 29—18 to edinburgh. scrum half ben youngs has withdrawn from the british and irish lions tour to new zealand. he's staying in england to be with his family after his brother's wife was diagnosed with terminal cancer. scotland's greg laidlaw will replace him. in theirfinal warm—up match before the rugby league world cup in october england beat samoa 30 points to 10 in sydney. wayne bennett's side had travelled half way round the world in the middle of the super league season for this game but they ran
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in five tries including this from josh hodgson to seal a comfortable win. britain's number one johanna konta has lost in the first round of the madrid 0pen. she was beaten in three sets by the germany's world number 30 laura siegemund. konta, who was seeded six for the tournament, has won just three games on clay in her career. there could be a first female winner of the badminton horse trials in ten years as germany's ingrid klimke leads going into the final day of competition today. after the cross country event she has point four of an advantage over the reigning badminton and olympic champion michaeljung. the gloucestershire event finishes with the final show—jumping phase. britain's geraint thomas is up to eleventh overall at the giro d'italia after finishing eighth on yesterday's second stage in sardinia. germany's andre greipel was first across the finish line after the 137 mile ride. that saw him take a four second lead over austria's lukas postlberger, who won the opening stage on friday. and finally,
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motogp riders are often some of the toughest sportspeople around, racing with broken bones and all sorts of injuries. turns out they have an achilles heel. wasps. cal crutchlow qualified third for today's spanish grand prix but on his cool down lap — something gets into his leathers and he doesn't like it one bit. he even pulls over and tries to get the insect out. crutchlow said he'd been stung about five or six times. how h ow na sty how nasty is that? that is horrible. how nasty is that? that is horrible. how did it get in i was wondering bad. those leathers are so tight. how did it get in i was wondering bad. those leathers are so tightm is probably not a pretty place to be, you can understand why the wasp would sting back. do not blame the wasp! thank you so much, richard and
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you will return later on. were about to discuss the rich list and sports people guess who is the highest earning sportsperson?” people guess who is the highest earning sportsperson? i saw red. british sportsperson is lewis hamilton. the next one is zlatan ibrahimovic. the thousand richest people in the uk "kept calm and carried on making billions" following last summer's brexit vote according to the annual sunday times rich list. it's found that their combined wealth went up by 14% over the last year to a record £658 billion. the report is compiled by robert watts who joins us now. nice to see you. so let's start with first of all, how you work this out. many of these people are not particularly open about how much money they have and where they spend it. how do you find out what money they earn? it is a jigsaw puzzle that keeps me occupied all the way through the year. much of my life is
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spent in nursing myself in company accounts, shareholderfindings, annual reports. but many of these people talk to us. they see the times rich list is a matter of public document and they want the number attached to them to be correct so we do have extraordinary conversations. some people put us in touch with their accountants, others ascend as their tax returns. i have had meetings where people have craned over their smart phone and shown me a balance of £700 million. in their bank account? on their portfolio with a wealth manager. it is an extraordinaryjigsaw puzzle but it is something that we do our best to get as accurate as possible. we have to be conservative so it is possible that many of these people are wealthier. you do get people who complain if you don't get quite quiet white or they think they are
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worth more. it is a matter of public record but one of pride for them? absolutely. we get people, we need to be careful because we get people who want to be, who want to talk themselves out of the rich list and people who want to talk themselves in because they see it as a badge of judas. some people trying to manage down their wealth, perhaps because of tax or divorce, and other people, i have been told, that if you are in the sunday times rich list it has, in the past, meant that you get an easier ride from your bank is when it comes to getting business lending which, i have no proof of that. what is it about the rest of us that we are is it about the rest of us that we a re interested is it about the rest of us that we are interested in seeing how rich everybody else is? those of us who are far away from the rich list, it is something we look forward to reading because you can see how much these people earn, particularly those in the public eye like lewis hamilton, andy murray, people like
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that. well, i think a lot of people have inspiring stories and we are not interested in the profit numbers themselves, but how these people did it and where they came from. we have a list of refugees in the sunday times rich list today, people who came to this country with pretty much nothing, if not nothing. and they are all now worth £110 million, they are all now worth £110 million, they are all bought businesses that have got them that far. it is those inspiring stories, people who have had perhaps unsuccessful first careers, an ex— coalmine in today who is worth £250 million now from his delivery business. i think people find that captivating, but also it is something interesting about being british and our attitudes to money that we are quite private about it, but we are also quite interested. i couldn't help using the word businessman, and it tripped off my tongue, and you can't
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help notice that people on this list are mail. have you seen an improvement in female wealth, at all? yes, we have. 130 women this year, but yes, out of 1000 that doesn't sound like very much. interestingly the women who are breaking and now are people who often started their businesses in the 19705 and 19805, and that was an even harder time, i think for women entrepreneurs. we have this amazing story, u nfortu nately sadly entrepreneurs. we have this amazing story, unfortunately sadly this lady died earlier in the year, at an inspirational woman called catherine paver north of england who wandered into a paver north of england who wandered intoa bank paver north of england who wandered into a bank in the 19605 to borrow money to start her business and was told absolutely not, no, no. the influence being, you are a woman. when she went back in to apply for a loa n when she went back in to apply for a loan for the same amount for a sofa, no problem. so she got her money, 5he no problem. so she got her money, she didn't buy a sofa, 5he no problem. so she got her money, she didn't buy a sofa, she started her business which is now one of the biggest shoe chains in the country.
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thank you so much for coming in. later on we will learn more about who made the sunday times rich list but thank you for talking u5 who made the sunday times rich list but thank you for talking us through that initially this morning. we will have a chat a5 that initially this morning. we will have a chat as well about where we will place next year. here is louise with a look at this morning's weather. louise, not on the list either, sadly. just off the end, i am afraid. we had a few early birds out taking some lovely photographs. this was a beautiful sunrise in belfast. it could be the warmest day of the year so far it could be the warmest day of the yearso far in it could be the warmest day of the year so far in northern ireland and despite some low cloud and a little bit of patchy fog across cornwall, it is not raining like it was this time yesterday. and you may well see a little bit of sunshine coming through. generally speaking today we will see some sunshine the further west you are. there is a cold northerly wind coming in, ousting the gale force eventually into the northern isles today. and that will continue to drive in quite a lot of cloud across the east coast yet again. because it is coming from the
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north, temperatures perhaps in sheltered western areas of scotland not as high as in recent days but nevertheless around 16 degrees, still quite cold with the strength of that wind further north and east. northern ireland, a little bit more shelter. some lovely sunshine, you could see 21 and generally speaking we could see the high teens into sheltered western areas, perhaps down into wales as well, maybe on the south coast. all the time coming in off that north sea we will see more cloud and the colder feel. solway from the east coast, little bit better and brighter and in the sunshine it will feel quite pleasant. through the evening and overnight where we have the best of the sunshine we will see the lowest temperatures. 0ut the sunshine we will see the lowest temperatures. out to the west, clear skies. maybe we could have a touch of light frost in rural parts, perhaps temperatures close to freezing in one or two makes pots but again that is where we will see the best of the sunshine. little change as we go into the first half of the working week, as we can see. west is best in terms of sunshine, that nagging north to north—easterly
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breeze dragging in the cloud and will peg that temperature back a degree or so. 9211 degrees, sheltered in the sunshine. we are looking at about 14 or 15 degrees again on monday. not much change for the early half of the week. as you can see we still have that ridge of high pressure in the driving seat, and soa high pressure in the driving seat, and so a good deal of dry weather for the early half of the week, with some sunny for the early half of the week, with some sunny spells. if you want to know whether we are going to see the potential for some significant rain, fingers crossed we might get some towards the end of the week. back to you two. thank you very much. sunshine to begin with, so we are happy with that. airline tickets that never arrive, fake holiday websites, and fraudulent time shares. these are some of the things that have caused heart ache and financial loss to thousands in the past year. the number of holidaymakers ripped off by booking scams is on the rise, according to actionfraud, the uk's nationalfraud and cyber crime reporting centre. there were almost 6,000 reported cases in 2016, up 19% on the previous year, causing a total loss of over £7 million, at an average
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of £1,200 per victim. the deputy head of actionfraud joins us from our london newsroom, and here in the studio is a recent victim of holiday fraud, stephanie gager. nice to see you both, welcome. stephanie, if i can start with you, we talked about the statistics, horrifying statistics for people who have fallen vic into this. talk us through what happened to you. well, i wanted to travel in november, and 0ctober i wanted to travel in november, and october i i wanted to travel in november, and 0ctober ijust i wanted to travel in november, and october i just looked i wanted to travel in november, and 0ctober ijust looked on some websites and i was just looking for the best price, really, and that was the best price, really, and that was the deciding factor. and they had the deciding factor. and they had the best price. and i called them up, and! the best price. and i called them up, and ijust said i will give them a deposit. i was a little bit apprehensive about buying tickets online, however they did have all
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the right governing bodies, regulatory bodies, so i thought 0k, you know. so i put a deposit down. they wanted it to be paid into a bank account, and i did that i think at the end of the day on friday, i paid into the bank deposit, and they agreed with them, because i was a little bit apprehensive, and i agreed with them that i would pay the remaining balance in a fortnight. and then i got a call where they said, no, no, no. you have got to pay immediately the remaining balance. and i said, one moment, i mean, you have agreed that i would pay, you know, moment, i mean, you have agreed that iwould pay, you know, in a moment, i mean, you have agreed that i would pay, you know, in a couple of weeks. and he was sort of putting some pressure on me and saying, no, you have got to pay this. and i thought maybe because i had a really good price, and he was saying to me that because it was at that price, i will not be able to give you another price, so i need to pay it
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immediately and he was under pressure from his boss. so i paid it, of course, and they sent me receipt, the e— ticket, i didn't really examine it, i think even if i did examine it i wouldn't know what to look for, really. so they sent the e tickets, the receipt, and things like that, and it was co nsta nt things like that, and it was constant communication by the website. and so i thought that was that. and then, on the day of travel, i looked at the e—ticket and i realised, there is in the terminal they are. which terminal am i going to? —— there isn't a terminal there. i was working in the day, my flight was in the evening and i called them up was in the evening and i called them up and they said terminal 3, it wasn't terminal 3, it was terminal 4. and once i got to terminal 4, they told me i wasn't on the flight. let's just bring in steve. how typical is that story? how many times have you heard stories like that? sadly it is very difficult,
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i'm afraid —— very typical, i'm afraid. and we are talking to stephanie, saying this is what happened to her, and this is very common. it looked like a legitimate website, she was in contact with the people selling the tickets. you have even had the promise that they would refu nd even had the promise that they would refund the money, even though you haven't had a refund yet. what can be done to track down these people who look legitimate only internet? well, that is the problem. the criminals will spoof websites to make it look genuine. they will put the trade bodies on the bottom and everything, so it looks to all intents and purposes that it is genuine. so everybody must be alerted to this, and do some due diligence before you take that plunged for the ticket. the trade bodies have registered people within that, so even if you see a website that, so even if you see a website that has that there, you can
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research to make sure they are actually members and it is notjust actually members and it is notjust a spoof. also it is all about the money transfer. genuine companies will not put pressure on you to make payments into bank accounts. so whenever possible please use a credit card, because you have additional protection they are. and the other thing is, if you have any suspicions whatsoever about a website you are on, and you have started a transaction on there, it is not a case that i have started so i have to keep going. so bailout, shut down your browser and start again. and you had your suspicions and thought something wasn't quite right, but you were very busy at the time and you looked at the ticket and it had the right logos, all that sort of thing. it is not that you we re sort of thing. it is not that you were looking at this and coming into it quite naively. you knew what you are doing and still managed to fall victim to it. the e-ticket, when i went to the ticket desk, they looked
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at the ticket and saw there were some genuine pieces on the ticket, and they knew that there was no way i would have known that would have been a false e—ticket. i did have my suspicions, and like steve said, i do agree, there was that point when i put do agree, there was that point when iputa do agree, there was that point when i put a deposit down and where they put the pressure on me, i wish i had actually have stopped it. and i wa nted actually have stopped it. and i wanted to, but i also was sort of battling between the decision, that i want to go on this trip and i need to commit to what i have done. so there was a little bit of that. and a good price, as well. that was it as well, yes. thank you for sharing your story. i know it is hard to come on and talk about mistakes that you have made, but hopefully you have stopped other people from falling into the same trap. and steve, thank you forjoining us from london. thank you. do you know your greenfinch from your goldfinch, or your blackbird from your blackcap?
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no? well, you are not alone. research commissioned by the bbc and rspb has found that many of us struggle to identify even the most common of british birds, and the songs they sing. here to tell us what to listen out for, on what is international dawn chorus day, is ornithologist and keen bird—watcherjamie dunning. thank you so much for coming in. it turns out that... i mean, lots of us can spot birds, and i can definitely identify birds that acy in my garden and on bird table, but it is the songs that they sing that people aren't spotting —— birds that i see. yes, i think on international dawn chorus day, it is the obvious that we should be able to identify, i hope the easy ones! you say that you should be able to identify some of the easy ones. shall we test some of your knowledge? yes, all right.
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tweets. 0k, your knowledge? yes, all right. tweets. ok, that is robin. it is a robin. i was terrified you were going to play something really tricky. no, they are all the straightforward bird that you see in the garden every day. how about this next one? tweets. that is a song thrush, isn't it? within a second! and there is one final one, so let's try this one. this might be a little bit more difficult. tweets. blackbird? congratulations, three out of three. well done. blackbird? congratulations, three out of three. well donelj blackbird? congratulations, three out of three. well done. i wasjust saying, we are laughing at some of the things this study found. a fifth of respondents were not aware that it was a red kite, some thought it
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was a bad guy from a batman movie, some thought it was a species of fish. it is funny, but it has quite serious complications for how much interest we take. it does, so we we re interest we take. it does, so we were speaking about this, me and a friend, last night, and we were coming to the conclusion that a lot of birds you recognise and register, swifts flying over the barbecue in the summer, you might not know it is a swift but if you were to play that call to people in the street, they would associated with that time, place and situation. and now is the time to hear them, we have lighter mornings, laying awake in beds and listening to it. all well and good if you listen to make live somewhere relatively quiet, in the countryside. in the cities, can you expect to hear it? yes, so there was a study that birds in city centres sing louder than in rural environments. to make themselves heard. over the traffic and noise of
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the city. so there is hope yet. we will be speaking to you a little later on, testing that word knowledge and i want to learn a bit more about how you can get involved. is it more about how you can get involved. isita more about how you can get involved. is it a case of getting out with your book and spending some time in the garden? three out of three, i am really impressed. stay with us. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with katherine downes and ben thompson. income tax, mental health and pensions — the political parties make major policy pledges ahead of the general election. labour says it won't raise income tax for 95% of people, while theresa may is promising to tear up what she says is outdated mental health legislation. good morning, it's sunday the 8th of may. choosing their new president — the polls havejust opened in france
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