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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 15, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. 11 hospital trusts in england still have problems following friday's cyber attack — but fears of an escalation today appear not to have materialised. we have not seen a second wave of attacks and the level of criminal activity is at the lower end of the range that we had anticipated. microsoft say the attack should be treated by governments around the world as a wake—up call. russia says it was not behind the attack. jeremy corbyn pledges the nhs will receive an extra £37 billion s by 2022 if labour wins the election. meanwhile theresa may promises a big expansion of workers‘ rights if the conservatives win injune. in oxfordshire, theresa may is challenged by a member of the public mental health issues. i'm being serious, i want you to do something for us. we've got a lot of plans for people
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with mental health... i'm talking about everybody, not just me! everybody with mental... anybody who's got learning disabilities. the new french president emmanual macron has named edouard philippe, as his first prime minister. and in the next hour, why the sky's the limit for this daring ioi—year—old. d—day veteran verdun hayes becomes the oldest man in the world to complete a skydive. i woke up this morning one of the happiest men in the world. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. the government's emergency committee, cobra, is to meet in a hour's time to discuss friday's cyber—attack, which hit nhs
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trusts across the uk. ii trusts in england are still experiencing problems. patients have been urged to turn up for appointments unless they hear otherwise. the head of microsoft has said the attack should be treated as a "wake—up call" — and here questions are growing about whether the government had adequately prepared the nhs for such an attack. danny savage is in york for us. this was one of the hospitals worst affected by the events after friday and over the weekend. first and lasting impressions today have been that things are very much back to normal, almost. the car parks are busy, lots of patients are coming and going for their outpatient appointments. when you get inside and look around, it is quite obvious that it's not all right yet. a lot of computers are switched off and not working, they have labels attached saying not to touch them until they have been advised, and it is all because of this cyber attack. after the chaos of friday, things are, generally speaking, a lot better here, but not everywhere. have you been to your appointment?
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york is typical of many hospitals are crossing in today. a large number of computers are still unusable after friday's cyber—attack, leading to lots of pen and paper administration. the message to most patients is turn up as planned. there's no screens. everything is getting written down, you can't make appointments. hopefully they will send them out when they get them. did it slow things down? not really. they were professional about it, they did well. it must be a nightmare for them. i asked my gp, because i got referred from the surgery. what was their advice? to go down as normal. no problems at all? no. as time goes on, more and more computers are up and running again. it feels like business as usual, although the staff would say otherwise. once the situation unfolded, it became clear it was almost engulfing the organisation.
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at the last count, we had 2000 of our 6000 pcs out of action. clearly, that is quite disabling for clinical services in a health care environment. further south in lincolnshire, it's a very different story. the united lincolnshire hospitals trusts says... that's left patients like steve, expecting results on tests for cancer, still wondering about his diagnosis. i suppose it is because the nhs hasn't spent sufficient money on it safeguards that we are in the state we're in. the bottom line is, there is only one person going to suffer, and that's the tens of thousands like me.
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you knew that the nhs computer system was outdated and vulnerable to attacks. why didn't you take action when you could? could the system be better prepared? the health secretary, jeremy hunt, refused to comment on the situation when approached early today. but he has since spoken. what's being done about the situation? although we have never seen anything on this scale when it comes to ransomware attacks, they are relatively common. and there are things you can do, everyone, to protect ourselves against them. in particular, making sure data is properly backed up, and making sure that we are using the software patches, the antivirus patches sent out regularly by manufacturers. these are things we can all do to reduce the risk of the impact we have seen over the last 48 hours. there are clearly wide variations between hospitals overjust how badly they were hit and how quickly they are recovering
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from the cyber—attack. the fallout will be far—reaching and uncomfortable for some. it is difficult to know why, but some theories that are floating around are that some of the trusts might have been using older equipment and older software. it has been a very stressful few days for staff and and patients alike in the nhs. it has highlighted the system's dependency on computers and what needs to be done to prevent another meltdown. so what happens going forward? there are those people that had their appointments cancelled, and they will have to be rescheduled. you heard me talking to one lady in the report who could not make another appointment, going forward, because the system was not up and running and she was not able to do that. there is a lot of administration that will have to be done behind the scenes, in the coming few days at least, to get things caught up with each other again. there's still some way to go.
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things are loads better than they were on friday. you feel like the system is working again. but it is still one or two places where there is still quite a serious problem, but things are slowly getting back to normal. in some ways, it all going wrong on a friday, having saturday and sunday to try to get things back up and running again, has helped things today. the president of microsoft brad smith has been highly critical of the us national security agency, saying it should have notified them when it found serious software flaws in their systems. and in the uk, the national crime agency is warning victims not to give in to ransom demands — as there's no guarantee they'll regain access to their files. wyre davies reports. experts say this cyber attack was unprecedented — in the way it was able to affect vulnerable computer systems, but also how it spread across the globe, hitting major public bodies like the nhs, but also individual users and several large multinational companies. the attack was thwarted with what has been described
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as a master killswitch before it could spread further, but companies that specialise in cyber security say further incidents are almost inevitable. i would say phase one is over, but i would wager there are more phases to come, both in terms of this attack, making sure companies are not vulnerable to this kind of malware, but also secondary attacks that may be using variants of this. people need to be acutely aware of that possibility. with hundreds of thousands of victims in more than 150 countries, microsoft, which makes the operating systems that were targeted, says governments should treat the attack as a wake—up call. it criticised bodies such as the cia and us national security agency for developing and stockpiling software that could be exploited by hackers. microsoft's president brad smith said... this is an area that involves both
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government and the private sector, and there are a number of programmes where they need to work together. some of those are national critical infrastructure. as we look at everything from financial markets to travel, transportation, and the grid itself. those affected by the hack were faced with an on—screen demand for payment of $300 — about £230 — in the virtual currency bitcoin. in a tweet, the national crime agency warned victims not to pay any ransom, saying the recovery of files could not be guaranteed, although there is evidence that some targeted individuals are indeed paying up. the most important thing to say is, as of 10:30am, action fraud, who collate crimes in this area, have had no new reports in relation to this strain.
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it is important that the public understand that. if they were to be a victim of this kind of crime, we would say do not pay the ransom, but contact law enforcement through action fraud. the attack, described as the biggest of its kind, has exposed the inherent weakness of an interconnected world, increasingly reliant on computer systems that are not properly protected or updated. the digital equivalent of a globalflu epidemic, but much more sinister, and potentially much more expensive. 0ur correspondent wyre davies is outside the cabinet office where the cobra meeting will take place this afternoon. they have a lot to discuss? the government is being accused from some quarters of being caught with
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their trousers down and not being prepared for such a big crisis. jeremy hunt says this was a global attack, a crisis of which the nhs was just one attack, a crisis of which the nhs wasjust one victim. attack, a crisis of which the nhs was just one victim. but it has raised questions. was the government prepared? did the government send out those warnings to all nhs trusts, particularly in england, to use patching devices when they first learned an attack was imminent? we have heard from the nhs in wales that they did not suffer a single attack. that may have been because they did proceed with these upgrades to their computer systems. we're not sure what the difference is between various health trusts. the home secretary, amber ruud, and the health secretary, jeremy hunt, will be here in the next hour. they are very keen, this sensitive time, just before an election, to show the government is doing something to avert a further attack. the one good piece of news from the government's perspective is that this much anticipated large—scale second attack hasn't happened so far. there
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are still 16 health trusts across england suffering and coping with friday's attack, there has not been a big secondary attack that many people feared. i suppose one of the big issues for ministers is how to ensure that there is a uniform response to this, given that the health service in england is quite fragmented? it is fragmented, it is also huge. the nhs is the world's fifth biggest employer. there are american trusts in wales, scotland and northern ireland. it is very difficult making sure that these systems a re difficult making sure that these systems are updated. —— there are mirror trusts across scotland and wales. the prime minister said that they were all warned to upgrade their systems. whether that is being contradicted by help trusts themselves, we are not yet clear. it isa themselves, we are not yet clear. it is a massive management exercise, trying to make sure that many of
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these very old computer systems are updated with the necessary software to make sure they are safe from future cyber attacks. many thanks. with me is david stupples, professor of electronic and radio systems at city, university of london. picking up on that, how easy is it 110w picking up on that, how easy is it now that people are trying to clear up now that people are trying to clear up the mess, how easy is it to do?|j looked up the mess, how easy is it to do?” looked at this just before coming here. there are about 10,000 clusters of it associated with the national health service. a cluster could be as large as a hospital, one cluster. a gp surgery, people doing pathology, all of these units, about 10,000. if you consider that, they are all disparate, in the way they are all disparate, in the way they are linked to that organisation, and linked through a massive communication network so they can
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share data. a complete luddite would ask, if it is so easy to spread this around, the problem, why isn't it so easy if there is a fix to get that around just as effectively? that is the note of the problem, you have hit it. because they are running windows xp, then... and it is only windows xp, then... and it is only windows xp? in the majority of cases. they would have two roll out the update to the latest windows system, all the patches. let's assume the latest windows system, on assume the latest windows system, on a cluster by cluster basis, to make sure it is working, and make sure it works on the network. it is a massivejob. works on the network. it is a massive job. hindsight is a wonderful thing. there will be people in various organisations thinking, gosh, is it my login that did it? is there anything anybody could have done to stop it entering
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a system ? could have done to stop it entering a system? it is difficult to know how the virus or worm came in. it is my belief that came down to the organisation that arranged this, sending out a whole bunch of m essa 9 es sending out a whole bunch of messages through what is known as a bot net. they will have got e—mail addresses for people that are working inside the national health. where do you get the e—mail addresses? well, if you think about it, most people surf the web. they go to facebook, do other things, buying things. their identities are going onto the web, and also their e—mail addresses. if the e—mail address allows communication to come direct to them, which in some cases it would, there is one way of getting the virus in. i understand also this was a worm, once it got m, also this was a worm, once it got in, it would burrow its way around the health service system, in this case. it is worrying enough so many other systems could be affected. if
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it was air—traffic control, what is to stop this thing being brought into any sort of organisation? air—traffic control is a different system, first of all, it is not an open system that everybody is using colour from the point of view of passing e—mails, doing word processing, doing surfing on the web. it cannotjump in effectively? there are links that go into the outside world, but they are very few and far between. getting information into the air traffic system, this type of virus is very difficult. there is some good news anyway? yes, but not for the national to sort it out? —— but not for the national health service, it will take months to sort it out. the real issue then is updating it. i think your previous interviewer was saying that the hardware is out of date. some of the hardware is out of date. some of
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the hardware is out of date. some of the hardware will not be able to ta ke the hardware will not be able to take the new operating systems. we will have to update the hardware and the operating systems. it is an expensive update. thank you very much for coming in. the headlines on bbc news: 11 hospital trusts in england still have problems following friday's cyber attack — but fears of an escalation today appear not to have materialised. jeremy corbyn pledges the nhs will receive an extra 37 billion by 2022 if labour wins the election. theresa may promises a big expansion of workers' rights if the conservatives win injune. in sport, david moyes has suggested some of the sunderland players have not pulled their weight and may be looking to leave following their relegation from the premier league. he insisted his own reputation is not in tatters. maria sharapova guarantees a place in the qualifying
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competition for wimbledon after winning herfirst competition for wimbledon after winning her first round competition for wimbledon after winning herfirst round match competition for wimbledon after winning her first round match at the italian open. if she reaches the semifinal, she will make the main draw in the all—england club. and andy murray admits he is not massively into birthdays as he turns 30, although he would no doubt like to celebrate with a return to form before the defence of his title in rome. more on those stories just after az30pm. all the party leaders are out on the campaign trail this afternoon with theresa may promising the biggest expansion of workers' rights by any conservative government — if her party wins the general election. a woman who raised her own mental health issues with the prime minister has confronted her as she was out campaigning, over government cuts to disability payments. cathy mohan told mrs may how changes to benefits left her living on £100 a month. mrs may responded saying it was important to ensure more help is given to people with mental health problems and learning difficulties. i'm being serious, i want you to do something for us. we've got a lot of plans for people with mental health... i'm talking about
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everybody, not just me! everybody with mental... anybody who's got learning disabilities. i want them not to have their money taken away from them, and being crippled! let's hear what the prime minister said in response. i am sure we will find a way. for your case. for everybody, not just for me. find a way. for your case. for everybody, notjust for me. i am sticking up for them, i go to a club for disabled people. nicola can help you specifically, what i can do is make sure we are giving more help for people with mental health and learning disabilities. people in wheelchairs, everybody. notjust myself. that is what we want to ensure, when we are looking at the help we are giving to people with any disability, we focus on those most in need. i think i am, any disability, we focus on those most in need. ithinki am, i am vulnerable to everything. i don't get nothing. you had better help me,
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please. theresa may promising the biggest expansion of workers' rights by any conservative government — if her party wins the general election. the tory manifesto will include commitments on protecting pensions, giving workers more say in the boardroom, and giving people the right to a year's unpaid leave to care for a relative. here's our political correspondent, iain watson: up the workers, power to the people. not phrases you would think would fall easily from theresa may's lips. but listen to this. today we are announcing the biggest ever enhancement of workers' rights by a conservative government. she chose to announce this at a company that helps women get back into work, and she set out some of the detail. the national living wage will continue to rise in line with median earnings. people will be able to request time off to care for a relative. and we want to support and encourage returnships. today, i was at a fantastic organisation that helps women
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who have taken time out of work to look after children to get the skills to get back into the workplace. so employees would be able to take time off to look after relatives, but it would be unpaid. she would also introduce a right for bereaved parents to take leave and, after brexit, she is pledging to protect the rights workers currently enjoy as part of the eu. she is also signalling she will help people who are not in secure employment, but specific proposals will have to wait the result of review. some small businesses say they are worried about the effect of the new rights and regulations on them. a bigger company might be able to absorb people going off for a year if they need to, but for smaller companies, that is a significant chunk of their workforce in that one person. there's notjust the cost of that but they may be quite specialised, and it might be difficult to get someone in to replace them on a temporary contract. theresa may is making a land grab forformer labour voters who have gone over to ukip.
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so getting criticism from business might not be entirely a bad thing. she is also subtly rebranding her party, no longer led by an old etonian. she's claiming they can address the concerns of people right across the country. labour's manifesto will include a 20—point plan for workers' rights, from a higher minimum wage to banning zero hours contracts. and some trade unions argue that theresa may's record on this suggests she cannot be trusted. let's judge the tory party and theresa may on her record. zero—hour contracts, employment tribunal fees, and the trade union act, the most pernicious anti—worker legislation in the last century. leopards don't change their spots. at best this is vacuous. at worst, it is more tory lies. she might need that. while she can expect criticism from the unions, privately some of her own mps say they are worried she is shifting too far in labour's direction. labour is promising to inject
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an extra 37 billion pounds into the health service and take 1 million patients off hospital waiting lists. under pressure, with waiting targets slipping and a&e struggling, jeremy corbyn says the nhs is now in crisis. it is a familiar labour warning, come election time. but they are convinced that the health service remains a big vote winner for them. a warm welcome for mr corbyn today from the nurses union, and no wonder, with labour promising and no wonder, with labour promising an extra £37 billion, money to take 1 million patients off waiting lists. our health service is actually being dismantled by
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stealth. 0ver actually being dismantled by stealth. over the past seven years, oui’ stealth. over the past seven years, our national health service has been driven into crisis after crisis. a&e departments, struggling to cope. waiting lists, soaring. we saw last week the tory cuts have exposed patient services to cyber attack. labour also to set more targets for hospitals. a&e departments will have to see most serious cases within an hour. cancer patients will have to be seen within four weeks and labour will reintroduce a strict 18 week limit for waiting times. 0ur nurses confident labour can deliver? he has made some really important commitments to the nhs which we have been waiting a long time to hear. he promised to legislate for safe staffing, he promised to dedicate a minister to mental health. these are all important pledges that we look forward to seeing if he is prime
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minister. i'm not sure whether or not it can be done, to be honest. i would like to see what he says tomorrow when the manifesto comes through and then i will make a decision on howl through and then i will make a decision on how i am going to vote. the liberal democrats also unveiled plans today to end the pay cap on nhs staff. if you undervalue nurses and midwives, and professionals of any kind whatsoever, do not be surprised if they leave the profession, don't be surprised if they find themselves, as we discovered only a few weeks ago, members of the nursing profession, accessing food banks, and you find a prime minister who thinks somehow thatis prime minister who thinks somehow that is not an issue. it feeds into a narrative of this conservative government treating nurses like dirt. despite the extra cash on offer from the dirt. despite the extra cash on offerfrom the opposition dirt. despite the extra cash on offer from the opposition parties, with an ageing population there is still massive pressure from the nhs, and that will not end, whoever wins this election, with the government's
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own spending watchdog warning that the health service faces a £56 billion black hole by 2020. normanjoins us norman joins us now. normanjoins us now. we get norman joins us now. we get the labour manifesto launch tomorrow, the smallest surprise of this campaign? and in it will be a lot of spending promises. top of the pile, the £37 billion whichjeremy corbyn has promised for the nhs if labour win the election. it is worth saying liberal democrat leader tim farron was also promising a lot of additional money for the nhs, £7.5 billion a yearfor the nhs additional money for the nhs, £7.5 billion a year for the nhs and social care. this, as nurses are threatening a son of protest, possibly even balloting for industrial action. that has never happened before. that would be unprecedented. i am joined happened before. that would be unprecedented. iam joined by happened before. that would be unprecedented. i am joined by the chief executive of the rcn, janet davies. given what you have heard
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today, a lot of extra money, what is the priority for you in terms of where that money goes? yes, what we have heard this week, actually for the whole week, is all about getting safe and effective care for patients and population. a number of things, first of all, having the right level of service, and for nurses, making sure we have safe staffing levels, that we have the future of students funded, how we fund future nurses, and also scrapping that pay cap which is creating so much difficulty for nurses, and preventing what they believe is doing the job as best they can. a lot of promises today, politicians often make promises. how confident are you that anybody will actually deliver the sort of change you seem to want? that is what we heard from our members. we were asking questions to both today. we always hear promises before an election. we are asking for a guarantee that we will see an end to
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the sort of restraint we have at the moment that makes it hard to deliver the very best in patient care. you are threatening to possibly ballot for industrial action. is that a realistic possibility, that nurses could walk out of wards? they would not walk out awards. the first thing we need to reassure people on is that whatever nurses do, and they made it clear in the debate we had here, we would not harm patients. the prospect of all nurses walking off a ward and leaving patients and cared for is not what we're talking about. we are talking about industrial action. we have never taken industrial action or strike, so we taken industrial action or strike, so we would have to work out how we could do that without damaging patients. nurses do lots of other things, lots of things that perhaps they shouldn't be doing, and a lot of things through goodwill. that goodwill is running thin at the moment. we were hearing members very regretfully, we had some members in tears talking about this. we believe we have talked and talked, negotiated, we have put our case and nothing has changed, they don't know
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what else to do. given what happened to thejunior doctors, what else to do. given what happened to the junior doctors, who what else to do. given what happened to thejunior doctors, who had their own campaign of industrial action, in the end, the new contracts were imposed on them, is there not a danger that the same sort of defeat could face you if you embarked on industrial action? we are not in negotiation. the 1% cap is an economic decision that nurses will have a cap on their salary because of problems in the economy. we say thatis of problems in the economy. we say that is not fair, that nurses should be paying for the problems in the economy or paying for the lack of investment in the nhs. we're not in a period of negotiation. what we haveis a period of negotiation. what we have is an imposition and nurses do not know what else to do, they are just expressing their total dissatisfaction and wanting to work with whichever government comes in to say this is damaging to patient ca re to say this is damaging to patient care now, to say this is damaging to patient ca re now, nurses to say this is damaging to patient care now, nurses are leaving, we are sure to so many care now, nurses are leaving, we are sure to so many nurses, we need care now, nurses are leaving, we are sure to so many nurses, we need to do something to rectify it. thank you very much for your time. tomorrow will be one of those days where we have to get our calculators out and start going through the
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numbers when we get the labour ma nifesto. numbers when we get the labour manifesto. there are huge numbers being tossed around, notjust 37 billion for the nhs. i thinkjeremy corbyn has also talked about 8 billion for social care, 11 billion for tuition fees. we know various benefits cuts are going to be reversed, changes to personal independence payments could be reversed. it is a lot of money, and we will have to see the fine detail about where the funds are going to come from to pay for this. the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon has said that a vote for the snp would strengthen scotland's hand over brexit and allow her to argue for a seat at the negotiating table. the scottish government wants scotland to remain in the eu — and in particular the single market. well, if people vote snp it gives me a mandate to demand that scotland is represented in the uk negotiating teamment that our interests are central to the negotiations and that matters because jobs and living standards and investment will be affected by the outcome of the
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brexit negotiations. we have seen before this election theresa may dismiss out of hand sensible compromise proposals that the scottish government put forward to protect our place in the single market, but this election gives people the opportunity to give these proposals democraticallyjit massey. that was the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon. now the weather. simon, it's all about the rain at the moment! the rain is still falling across parts of southern scotla nd falling across parts of southern scotland and north wention gland and into the west of wales. there will be some that stay dry through the night. the cloud is low, southern and western parts of the uk. that means hill fog. last week chilly nights. at the moment our nights are milder. tomorrow will ta ke
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nights are milder. tomorrow will take a little bit of showery rain for a time across northern ireland and scotland. in the afternoon it will turn drier and brighter. this band of rain gradually moving through more of england and wales. it means drier in north—west england to end the day and dry and bright for east anglia and south—east england. just watching into wednesday, sunshine, showers, into scotland and northern ireland. mainly dry for some of us. the further north you are in northern england. this band of rain could turn heavy and thundery in places. we'll keep you up—to—dated. —— updated. hello. this is bbc news with simon mccoy and reeta chakra barti. the headlines at a.32pm: eleven hospital trusts in england still have problems following friday's cyber attack but fears of a second wave, appear not to have materialised. patients have been urged to use
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the nhs "wisely" until the full impact of attack comes to light. jeremy corbyn pledges the nhs will receive an extra £37 billion by 2022 if labour wins the election. it will be paid for by higher corporation tax and raising income tax for those earning £80,000 a year or more. theresa may promises a big expansion of workers' rights if the conservatives stay in power. proposals include a statutory right to a year's unpaid leave to care for a relative. the centre—right mayor of the north—western port of le havre, edouard philippe, has been named as the prime minister of france. he is the first government appointment by new president emmanuel macron. it's time for the sport. hello. david moyes insists his reputation isn't in "tatters" despite sunderland's relegation from the premier league, but he has claimed that some of his players haven't pulled their weight this season.
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sunderland went down with four games still remaining and have now been joined by middlesbrough as well as hull. moyes is intending to stay on at the stadium of light. sunderland have their penultimate match at arsenal tomorrow night. i think the players have sto stand up. ithink i think the players have sto stand up. i think they need to show are they capable of playing at this level. for most of the season you would have to say it's not shown that way, but they've got a chance against two really good teams. a chance to show that they see themselves as premier league players and fit to be at that level. i think many of them probably believe they have got futures elsewhere. i think that you need to perform on the pitch to do that. so sunderland travel to the emirates tomorrow night, with arsene wenger asking fans to attend the match rather than take part in a planned boycott aimed at removing him as manager. he still hasn't announced what his future holds. arsenal to win their final two matches of the season to have any chance of qualifying for the champions league as they have done every year wenger has been in charge. liverpool could also deny them
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with a victory in their final game, but the frenchman believes form is on arsenal's side. we won six of the last seven games and we have created the momentum again after having a period. away from home they were not stable. we won our last three away games. so it's positive. premier league champions chelsea will get the chance to celebrate with their home fans tonight when they play watford at stamford bridge. they'll have to wait a little longer to catch a glimpse of the premier league trophy though. they won't get that until after they've played sunderland at home on sunday. chelsea secured the sixth title in their history by beating west brom on friday night. tottenham hotspur chairman daniel levy handed over the keys to white hart lane today after the final game at the stadium yesterday. they haven't wasted any time digging up the old pitch either. these are aerial shots taken this morning. 0n handing over the keys, levy said, "it is a sombre occasion
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upon which the club formally hands over its home of 118 years, one filled with so many special memories." contractors have already started work on the new site which will seat around 61,000 people. that ground will be ready for august 2018. maria sharapova has guaranteed a place in the qualifying competition for wimbledon after winning herfirst round match at the italian 0pen. a straight sets win over christine mchale means she'll have enough ranking points to attempt to qualify for this year's tournament at the all england club and if she reaches the semi—finals in rome. the five time grand slam champion — who's returning from a 15 month doping ban — will qualify for the wimbledon main draw. british men's number three aljaz bedene has set up a second round meeting with novak djokovic at the italian 0pen. he received a walk over from his match against gianluca mager after the italian was forced to retire injured. bedene lost the first set on the tie—break before mager suffered an injury to his left leg. the match resumed and mager swiftly lost the second set before calling it a day in the third.
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world number one andy murray will be hoping for a return to form as he defends his italian open title in rome this week. he turns 30 today, but says he is "not massively into birthdays". murray comes into the tournament on the back of a third—round loss to world number 59 borna coric of croatia in madrid last week. he beat novak djokovic in the 2016 italian 0pen final and will face local favourite fabio fognini in the second round this year. it's tough to analyse losses in a couple of days when you're loose looking, you know, to the next tournament, but that's also sometimes a positive thing that you have another event to look forward to. immediately you get a chance to play better only four or five days after a tough match. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. in his first full day in office
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the new french president, emmanuel macron, has named edouard philippe as his prime minister. 46—year—old mr philippe is not from the president's new centrist party but from the centre—right republicans. 0ur correspondent mark lowen has this report. the new prime minister is on the centrist wing of the right. mayor of the city of le havre, he was at mr macron's university and was originally a socialist. his immediate challenge, to get mr macron's newborn political party a majority in elections next month. france's youngest ever president was inaugurated yesterday in centuries—old tradition. all the pomp and style you would expect here accompanied the transfer of power from francois hollande to emmanuel macron. he inherits a profoundly troubled france with unemployment at 10%, weak growth and millions who voted for political extremes. there is an aching for renewal here, for something to change in french politics and that could be macron.
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some are optimistic, others hold their breath. translation: well, i'm delighted, because he is young and we have to make way for the young. and i'm expecting there to be change because we have always had right or left wing presidents. translation: i think it is good that marine le pen was not elected. personally, i think it is the continuation of hollande's presidency and we will see. good luck to him, but i think it will not change much in my opinion. later today, emmanuel macron will visit berlin for talks with angela merkel, a sign of a passionately pro—european president, hoping to reinvigorate europe's most important political relationship, but stressing that the eu needs reform. with his prime minister now in place and the rest of the government formed this week, the tough work for emmanuel macron now begins. he has vowed to loosen the labour markets, reduce unemployment and reform the public sector.
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his honeymoon period will last only as long as he gives france the hope it so badly needs. let's cross to berlin where president macron is meeting chancellor merkel. this is in keeping with the french tradition of berlin being the first foreign port of call. this, of course, is emmanuel macron's first full day in office as french president. angela merkel is saying she will approach talks with the new french president with openness. in his inauguration speech emmanuel macron said he'd push for reforms in the european union and it is expected he'll use his discussions in berlin later to persuade angela merkel to
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create the position of a eurozone finance minister and therefore deepen european integration. mrs merkel said she would conduct the talks in a positive atmosphere. she said, "i want to speak to him first and see where his priorities lie. it is about very much giving the french people the hope for more job opportunities and more chances for young people." opportunities and more chances for young people. " the opportunities and more chances for young people." the meeting is due shortly and we will, of course, bring it to you live as soon as it happens. there's a new warning that a significant proportion of workers could see their living standards fall this year, as wages fail to keep pace with inflation. the prediction by the chartered institute for personnel and development echoes a similar warning from the bank of england last week. today we've been taking a look at the group suffering from the "living standards squeeze" — that's voters who, despite being in work, are not feeling any better off. our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz has been to meet a middle income family in kent to find out how they are coping. one family at breakfast,
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near london in kent, middle income yet struggling. food prices, energy, the house, getting to work, and childcare. for mum kathryn, this is financial survival in britain today. so, how tricky is it, making ends meet, how much do you have leftover? we have nothing left over. nothing. after food and bills and our mortgage, we don't have really anything left over. the average wage of a single person is £26,500. this family brings in £45,000, but that's two earners — one full—time, and kathryn — a fitness instructor — part—time. it means second—hand clothes and toys, selling old things on ebay like so many households, looking after the pennies. if you look at your incomes, people around the country will say, well, you're lucky? yeah. i think it depends where you live, though, doesn't it? on paper, we should be absolutely fine, but then once you start listing all the things you have to pay for, all the bills, all
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the expenses, it'sjust...endless. first, there was the squeezed middle, then alarm clock britain, now, those just about managing. however you describe it, it's people who are doing the right thing, but their incomejust isn't quite enough. these are kathryn's big bills: £660 a month for the mortgage in expensive kent, £580 for the car and train fares, nearly £200 for childcare. can you come and put your coat on, please? leaving zero for holidays, and a feeling that things aren't about to change. good girl. there's an election coming. do you think anything will actually change with that? i'm sceptical. it would be lovely if it did, but i think we're always going to fall into the forgotten category of people that are not struggling too much, they can make ends meet, but they have no extra money.
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nothing special here, just another family getting on with it, but it's an uphill struggle. the first meeting of angela merkel with emmanuel macron, the new president of france. following tradition that the new president goes first to berlin and makes germany theirfirst goes first to berlin and makes germany their first port of call. this is emmanuel macron's first day, first full day as the president of france and along with naming his new prime minister, this is his first priority. this is the chancellor's fourth french counterpart since she took office in 2005. the others being jacques chirac. since then the freshly elected conservative, nicolas sarkozy in 2007 and francois hollande in 2012 and now, of course, the independent centrist, emmanuel macron and they all chose to make
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angela merkel their first foreign dignitary to visit after their appointment. this couldn't be quicker. just 2a hours after his inauguration in paris yesterday. yes, this of course, will be a key relationship within the eu and mrs merkel has already said that she is going to approach talks with emmanuel macron in the spirit of openness. emmanuel macron is known asa openness. emmanuel macron is known as a very passionate europhile, and very pro the eu and he spoke during his inauguration speech at the weekend about wanting to deepen european integration. well, emmanuel macron's campaign platform included calls for a eurozone budget as well as a finance and economy minister for the sub—set of eu countries that use the euro. he has campaigned for a buy european act and for more european integration on defence and security
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supporters at his rallies could be seen supporters at his rallies could be seen waving blue and yellow eu flags alongside the french tricolour and of course, those images ones of angela merkel will have beamed when she saw them. mrs merkel earlier today spoke about what she hoped for in her talks with mr macron, shying she would conduct the talks in a positive atmosphere. she said she wa nted positive atmosphere. she said she wanted to speak to him and see where his priorities lie and it was very much about giving the french people the hope for more job opportunities and more chances for young people and more chances for young people and she said as far as the situation with the eurozone was concerned, there were many proposals which had on the table for years and she wa nted on the table for years and she wanted to talk to him and say she could achieve things together. a popular visit by the new french president as he and angela merkel await the national anthems. we'll
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stay for those. clearly full military honours being provided at this first meeting between the german chancellor and the french president and here are the french president and here are the national anthems. german national anthem german national anthem national anthem
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national anthem applause
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so emmanuel macron getting used to the international stage. his first foreign visit as french president. later this month he will be holding talks with donald trump when the us president visits brussels for a nato summit, but for today, president visits brussels for a nato summit, but fortoday, it's president visits brussels for a nato summit, but for today, it's germany and the eu that top the agenda. we'll bring you more from berlin later on. in a moment a look at how the financial markets in europe closed the day, but first the headlines on bbc news: eleven hospital trusts in england still have problems following friday's cyber attack, but fears of an escalation today appear not to have materialised. jeremy corbyn pledges the nhs will receive an extra £37 billion by 2022 if labour wins the election. theresa may promises a big expansion of workers' rights if the conservatives win injune. hello. i'm jamie robertson.
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now a look at how the markets in europe have ended the trading session. the london market actually reached an all time high this morning, but only briefly. investors were uneasy for two reasons — first some weak numbers coming out of china and second, the as yet unknown fall out from the cyber attack at the weekend. of course one man's meat is another man's poison and cyber—security companies which fight cyber crime did very well. star of the show was sophos whose shares rose around 7%. tui was down nearly 4%. shares in online gambling company 888 holdings fell 8% after it said it was under investigation by the uk gambling commission because of the way it deals with "problem gambling".
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the price of oil has risen after russia and saudi said they were going to keep a lid on oil production well into next year. and the there are two stories around about jobs and wages. one survey from the chartered institute of personnel and development says that median wages will rise by around 1% over the next year while the forecasting group the ey item club says unemployment is going to start rising this year for the first time since 2009. let's get detailed analysis of all these stories from james bevan, chief investment officer at ccla investment management. this thing about wages and jobs, how painful is that going to be, do you think in the coming year? it's not really a n think in the coming year? it's not really an election issue at the moment. do you think it could be?” think the election will come too soon think the election will come too soon for it to begin to colour the
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minds of investors. it is however, very clear that households are finding it very difficult to expand their standards of living, let alone have an expectation of the materially better tomorrow. and this obviously all comes back to the premise that the one—off benefit of the currency devaluation is now beginning to show up in higher prices and that's going to be a real hit. do you think anyone will be able to do anything about it? it is all to do with productivity, isn't it and companies being able to make enough money to pay people more? yes and there is a disturbing trend for people with jobs that machines and robots are taking over and there is less job creation than in robots are taking over and there is lessjob creation than in prior big expansions. let's talk about 888. this is part of a wider trend. there has been this great movement within government really to try and clach down on problem gambling, to stop companies taking advantage of addicted gamblers, but is that having an effect on profits? are companies really under pressure
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because of that, do you think? there is no pressure yet for 888. it is a well capitalised company and been making profits and the share price up making profits and the share price up until today was strong on the premise that it would do well, there is this uncertainty so investors determining that it would be smart to ta ke determining that it would be smart to take chips off the table rather than assume that the government will deal with the relicensing amicably. and what about the oil price? we have this sort of contradiction on one side we've got saudi and we've got russia saying that they're going to hold back and then we have got the shale producers in the us pouring into the market. so one force pushing the oil price. and the other taking it back down again. who will win? it will be difficult to determine who will be the winner. it looks like sentiment is in favour of saudi and russia coming together to produce a deal at the opec meeting on 25th may. however, as you rightly identified the us, which is the big
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shale margin producer absolute lin ceases production every time the price rises so it is very hard to see how wide the oil price can be sustained at a higher level than it is today. of course, it is notjust russia and saudi, we have got the other producers within opec, how disciplined are they following audi's line and keeping production down? well, they all know they want to get revenue because they have all got bills to pay and to be the one that has restraint in order that there is a higher price for everyone else is a deeply unpopular political problem to face up to and therefore, i don't think that discipline can last. james, thank you very much indeed. thank you. the most important aspect was probably the oil price. the moving up probably the oil price. the moving up because of a determination of russia and saudi arabia to keep production down in the coming year. the oil companies shares doing very well today. amongst the fallers tui. that was the big one. down 4% after the travel operator reported a loss of
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300 million euros. that's all from me. there is a roundup of all the other top business stories on our website — bbc.co.uk/business we'll keep you up—to—date tomorrow as well. god willing, jamie. i think it is the weather now.” as well. god willing, jamie. i think it is the weather now. i think you're right. with nick miller. at some stage of the day most places have seen some rain. this is how it looks. the heaviest rainfall has beenin looks. the heaviest rainfall has been in northern ireland and south—west scotland and into wales. these are some of the rainfall totals from today. just 0.6 mill meet nears london, but that could change as we go through the week, we will see why in a moment. weather
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fronts indicates there will be more wet weather tonight and into tomorrow. overnight it is across parts of southern scotland and north—west england and into wales. plenty of cloud around and there will be low cloud to the south and the west of the uk. what does that mean? there is fog on the hills and it is mild and muggy too. last week chilly nights and not tonight with temperatures into the mid—teens. so a mild start to tuesday. a dry one for northern ireland and scotland, but we have this little weather feature set to move through during the morning with outbreaks of rain for a time. but then it will turn drier and brighter. so wet weather to begin with for north—west england and into south—west england, there will be standing water and spray and difficult driving conditions on the roads as you can imagine. there will bea roads as you can imagine. there will be a few showers into the midlands, but for much of east anglia and saongs gland the day will start to dry. for many it will continue to be dry. for many it will continue to be dry here. some brighter breaks. some bursts of sunshine and some into eastern scotland and later in the day, more widely into scotland and northern ireland, will begin to
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brighten up once the showers have moved through. it will feel fresher. some outbreaks of rain slipping further southwards through england and wales, not into east anglia and south—east england where temperatures end up in the range of 20 to 22 celsius given the sunny breaks. just want to zip through tuesday night and into wednesday, sunshine and showers on wednesday in scotla nd sunshine and showers on wednesday in scotland and northern ireland. after a chillier start here, but it is this weather front affecting england and wales as you can see which really gets going during wednesday with heavy and possibly thundery bursts on this as well and temperatures well just to the east of that will be on the warm side, fresher behind it and we will end the week with fresher weather across the week with fresher weather across the uk. so a coolerfeel to things. there will be some sunshine around, but there will be some showers. if you catch one it could be heavy and thundery and a risk of hail as well. outbreaks of rain giving way to sunnier, showery weather later in the week and more details as ever online. today at 5:
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the cabinet's emergency committee is meeting to discuss the global cyber—attack which affected the nhs. routine surgery and gp appointments have been cancelled in some areas, as the nhs in england and scotland recovers from the attack last friday. although we've never seen anything on this scale when it comes to ransomware attacks, they are relatively common, and there are things that you can do, everyone can do, all of us can do to protect ourselves against them. we'll have the latest from a hospital in york on how they're coping. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. on the campaign trail, as theresa may promises more workers' rights — a voter confronts her about cuts in welfare benefits. i want you to do something for us. you know what i want? i want my...
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