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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 20, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. in the last few minutes, president trump has arrived in saudi arabia on his first foreign trip since taking office — amid growing controversy back in washington. his plane has just touched his plane hasjust touched down in riyadh. as he left there were reports in the us that he had described the fbi director he'd just sacked as a "nutjob" to russian officials. good morning it's saturday, the 20th of may. tighter restrictions on tobacco come into force this morning with plain packaging and smaller packets no longer on sale. the world's media gathers ahead of pippa middleton's wedding in berkshire today. in sport, a power struggle at arsenal. arsene wenger‘s biggest backer, rejects a £1 billion bid for control of the north london club. it's fast and furious — and i found it a bit of a struggle.
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i've been trying out wpter polo ahead of the british championships. and philip has the weather. good morning to you. for some, the weekend is starting looking like this, but at the same time, others are looking at this. i'll tell you who gets what, where and why in a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story. in the last few moments, president trump has landed in saudi arabia on his first officialforeign trip since taking office. but he leaves behind more controversy in washington. we can see some of the live images right now, coming from saudi arabia. can you see the flags of the official preparations, as the plane landed; three or four minutes ago. they've been rolling out the red carpet, the steps are prepared. we're expecting donald trump to emerge any minute for what is a very important trip for him. they weren't quite ready with the
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aircraft steps because air force one touched down a tiny bit early, ten minutes earlier than expected. the us media is reporting that he told senior russian officials that the fbi director, james comey, was a "nutjob" whose sacking had "relieved great pressure" on him. our washington correspondent, laura bicker, reports. president trump is off on his first foreign trip. he might be glad to leave washington behind for a while. he tweeted that he'll be strongly protecting american interests, that's what i like to do. but the president has had one of his most tumultuous weeks in the white house yet. it started with the accusation he leaked classified information to the russians. then reports of a memo which claimed president trump asked the fbi director to drop an investigation into his former national security adviser. the next day, it was announced that a special council will lead an inquiry into russian meddling in the us
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presidential election and look at possible links between moscow and the trump campaign. the washington post is reporting that someone close to the president is of interest in that investigation and just as air force one took off, the new york times published this: not only did mrtrump call times published this: not only did mr trump call the fbi directorjames comey, a nutjob, he said with him gone it would relieve the pressure over the fbi's investigation. it seems like we are learning disturbing new allegations about president trump not just disturbing new allegations about president trump notjust every day but, ladies and gentleman, every hour. the white house said mr trump was acting in the nation's interests infiringjames was acting in the nation's interests in firing james comey. earlier this week, mr trump described the russian inquiry asa week, mr trump described the russian inquiry as a witch—hunt. james comey has agreed to give his account of events in public, in around ten days‘ time. donald trump is embarking on an eight—day, ambitious, foreign trip. it may be
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overshadowed by the prospect of more trouble when he gets home. straight to riyadh now. well, in the last few minutes, president trump has arrived in saudi arabia. we're joined by security correspondent, frank gardner, who is in riyadh this morning. frank, he's just touched frank, he'sjust touched down. what are the expectations of his visit though? they are quite frankly sky high. the whole of this city is extremely excited about this trip. not everybody approves of donald trump or us policy, but the saudis are immensely proud that their country has been chosen as the first leg of this trip. in the last few seconds, you can leg of this trip. in the last few seconds, you can see leg of this trip. in the last few seconds, you can see probable i behind me —— probably behind me there, the king, in his early 805, has just greeted president trump and the first lady on the red carpet at
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airport here. saudis are hoping this will reset their whole relationship with washington not just will reset their whole relationship with washington notjust between their country but the islamic world a5 their country but the islamic world as well. they didn't like president barack obama. as well. they didn't like president ba rack obama. they as well. they didn't like president barack obama. they felt he was too co5y barack obama. they felt he was too cosy with iran. they didn't like the fa ct cosy with iran. they didn't like the fact he didn't go ahead and strike syria in response to the gas attacks. so there's a lot of excitement about this visit. there are huge bu5ine55 excitement about this visit. there are huge business deals in the offing. a5 are huge business deals in the offing. as well as particularly arm5 deals, defence contracts, $100 billion talked about. so there's great expectation abouts this visit. thank you very much. i'm afraid we have to leave it there for now. we will come back to you very soon, though. frank gardner our security correspondent in riyadh for us, as donald trump ju5t touche5 correspondent in riyadh for us, as donald trump ju5t touches down in the last few moments. new rules for cigarette packaging come into force this weekend. all packs must be greenish—brown withju5t a small space for the brand name and include a graphic warning of the dangers of smoking. the measures, aimed at discouraging
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young people from taking up the habit, also include a ban on selling packs of ten. tom burridge reports. persuading young people not to smoke. that's what the government hopes these new rules will do. from today, all cigarette packet5 have to be a standard green de5ign, similar to this. health warnings must cover two thirds of the front and back of the packets. and you can no longer buy packets of ten. there will also be restrictions on e—cigarette5 and on rolling tobacco too. public health campaigners say the number of people smoking in britain continues to fall and this is another positive step. it's too early to say how many will avoid taking up, but even if it's just a few percent that will have a big benefit in 20 or 30 years' time. but the tobacco industry says greater restrictions will only pu5h people to buy cigarettes elsewhere. we are seeing people actually not quitting or giving up smoking, but basically buying cheap tobacco from the black market.
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it's never been so expensive to smoke. the government wants to emphasise the possible health costs and persuade more to stub the habit out. it's been a busy week in politics, as we gear up forjune'5 general election. we've had manife5to5 from the major parties and the first tv leaders' debate. our political correspondent, mark lobel, is in our london newsroom. give us your5umming give us your summing up of where we are right now. first of all, today, there are a couple of outstanding issues because we've been served up a feast of friendly fire on both sides of the political spectrum. there's been red on red as the shadow defence secretary insisted that she was the shadow defence secretary and not the shadow foreign secretary, after the two contradicted one another over whether the renewal of the trident nuclear deterrent would be on the
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table if the labour party got into power and had a strategic defence review — one said yes, the other, no. there's been blue on blue attacks, as the former chancellor, george osborne, wrote a stinging editorial in his paper, the evening standard, that his former party hasn't got a clue how they're going to get the immigration target down to get the immigration target down to the tens of thousands. the party themselves insist that it's right not to have a deadline on that. mark, it's been curious in some ways. we're well into the campaign. we've got some of the manifestos, but even now, not all. that's right. we're waiting for a couple to come next week, but of the ones we've got, well, we've seen the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell‘s swapping of his little, chairman mao's red book, for his little black book of costings, the first fully costed labour manifesto, he says proving they can cost things and they're ready for government. the lib dems thinking that it's still worth throwing the voters a life
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line, if they want one, to escape brexit. and the conservatives so confident that they're asking the elderly to dip into their pockets ( thank you. wikileaks founder, julian assange, remains in the ecuardorian embassy in london this morning, despite sweden dropping a rape investigation against him without charge. mr assange is avoiding extradition to the us, where he's wanted over the leaking of military and diplomatic documents. scotland yard also says he will be arrested if he leaves the embassy, for failing to attend court in 2012. home ownership among younger families has fallen by nearly two—thirds in some parts of the uk since 1994, according to new research. the resolution foundation, a think—tank focussing on living standards, says outer london, the north west and parts of yorkshire were most affected. our business correspondent, joe lynam, has the details. it's usually assumed that soaring house prices in central london would have the greatest impact on affordability for younger households.
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but the resolution foundation says the north of england and outer london have been affected the most. it says home ownership among young families has fallen 63% in outer london towns, such as harrow and croydon. in west yorkshire, ownership fell by 52% among families with adults between 25 and 34. while the fall in greater manchester was 51% between 1994 and last year. a lot more families are living in the private rental sector, which is expensive, insecure and often not a very nice place to live. but it also matters longer term. we've seen in the debate around social care this week that having a home is a key way that many people build up an asset over their lifetime. it really matters when you get old whether you own a house. they also say pledges by labour and the conservatives to build 1 million new homes lacked the required detail on how that might be achieved within five years. prince george and princess charlotte
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will act as page boy and bridesmaid, when their aunt, pippa middleton, marries james matthews today. the event is being dubbed the society wedding of the year. there's been speculation over whether prince harry will bring his girlfriend, the american actress meghan markle. alexandra mackenzie is in englefield, where the ceremony will take place a little later this morning. morning to you. it looks reasonably quiet now. i imagine there's a fair few satellite trucks up the road near the church. well, yes. some people have been gathering here in a sunny englefield this morning, from quite early. it has been mostly security people. there's a lot of security people. there's a lot of security around here, roads around the church and around the middleton home have been closed. there's a lot of media here as well. there's a lot of media here as well. there's a lot of media here as well. there's a lot of media interest in the marriage of pippa middleton to herfiance, james matthews. that will take place in
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the church. if you can see the lane behind me, the church isjust at the end of that lane. it's a small, 12th century church, st marcs, which holds just over 100 people. century church, st marcs, which holdsjust over 100 people. now there's been a lot of speculation about the guests here, as you say. we are expecting the duke and duchess of cambridge. their children will play a role in the service. we're hoping to see photographs of them later. we are hoping that the sunshine will continue for them. thank you very much. we will be back in that village later on this morning. talk being about the world wide interest, particularly in the united states on that one. back to our main story. we showed you the arrival pictures. president trump has arrived in saudi arabia. we saw the plane arrive a few minutes ago. they've moved indoors. these are just the images we're
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seeing right now. the first few introductions being made. president trump is hugely important meeting this, for many reasons. some to do with things that president trump said during the campaign. and others to do with the important strategic importance of being in saudi arabia at this time, a number of key, both political and financial, meetings will be taking place. one of the things he is due to do is he's due to make a speech to representatives of more than 40 muslim countries at a summit expected to be dominated by the fight against extremist groups. we we re fight against extremist groups. we were talking to our security correspondent earlier and he was saying that is the spirit is a huge pa rt saying that is the spirit is a huge part of —— that is a huge part of this trip. there's deal to be done. he's particularly interested in oil and arms too. we will expect announcements of deals while he's
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there. we'll stay on these images. have a chat now with jacob parakilas. we're watching some of those pictures. they have emerged this morning as the president arrives in sowedament it's a significant —— saudi arabia, it's a significant —— saudi arabia, it's a significant moment. yes, it is. . it's trump's first visit overseas since becoming president of the united states. it marks a particularly interesting moment in us—middle east policy. because the saudis and the other gcc countries had a lot of frustrations with barack obama. had a lot of frustrations with ba rack obama. they had a lot of frustrations with barack obama. they were frustrated with the iran deal, the perceived us willingness under obama to strike a deal with iran over nuclear weapons and take steps towards a broader reproachment. the meeting here will probably be a sign that the us is
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rebalancing towards its traditional allies in saudi arabia and the other gulf states. yes, nowjust on the personal politics of this. during the election campaign, president trump as he is now, said a number of things, possibly that might feel awkward now. just talk us through that. trump very famously called for a ban on muslims entering the united states. he employed various people in his orbit who have, sort of, criticised not only extremism within islam, but in broader terms the religion itself. that's not really going to go down particularly well. but if the saudis can keep the conversation on geopolitics, on the opposition to iran, on regional strategies, on containing isis and depending very much on what trump saysin depending very much on what trump says in his big speech to the summit, ithink says in his big speech to the summit, i think those differences will largely be baperred over here. —— papered over here. because of the
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significance of this meeting, we we re significance of this meeting, we were speaking to our correspondents earlier, saying very little access to the press. there's limited amount of those scenarios that you often see on foreign trips, where the press get a chance to ask questions. this is going to be very carefully managed. yes, it is. we'll see which trump shows up. there is the restrained trump that we've seen in previous meetings with foreign leaders, even foreign leaders that he's harshly criticised in the past. or there's the trump who says sort of uncomfortable things and says things that are inappropriate or awkward to various audiences. i think in the circumstance, where he's giving a set—piece speech, reading words that have been written for him, i think he'll probably stay more to the first of those two options. it does remain to be seen. alongside all of the political issues and the resetting, as you describe, it of possibly relations between the countries, so important. there are financial elements to this trip as well, which presumably
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donald trump would love to focus on. yes. the major one of which is an arms deal to be concluded with the saudis. of course, barack obama made major arms deals with the saudis, as did george bush before him. you can go back through history and find an unbroken stream of american arms sales to the kingdom of saudi arabia. trump isn't providing anything new in that sense. i think he will sell this and his press office will sell this as renewed support not only in terms ofjust arming the saudi arabians, but rebuilding the political relationship. thank you very much this morning. we will be talking to our security correspondent again later in the programme. 8. 17. let's go to programme. 8.17. let's go to phil now for programme. 8. 17. let's go to phil now for the weather. programme. 8. 17. let's go to phil now for the weather. thank programme. 8. 17. let's go to phil now for the
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weather. thank you programme. 8. 17. let's go to phil now for the weather. thank you very programme. 8. 17. let's go to phil now for the weather. thank you very much programme. 8. 17. let's go to phil now for the weather. thank you very much indeed. let's come back from the complexities of geopolitics to the british weather. it isn't straightforward today. it's glorious enough through central and eastern parts and sally and charlie have been showing us how glorious it is outside the front door at the moment. if there's anyjustice, they will walk into something like that. there's showers out west at the moment. across the greater part of scotland, the skies look like that. it's wetter than that. further north and east, my word,ure got an awful lot of cloud and rain to come for the greater part of the day. i'm afraid it is one of those. those are the three elements that we've got to juggle the three elements that we've got to juggle now to get the forecast right today. that area of cloud and rain, gradually drifting further north, allowing the showers out of northern ireland to sweep in across southern scotland, primarily for later this morning, on into this afternoon. the showers that we've already seen to the western side of the british isles, they'll trundle their way further east. so after a bright
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enough start with one or two showers in the mix across eastern areas, that isn't going to last. if you're stepping out for the rest of the morning, shopping perhaps, there's that progression of showers from west to east. bear that one in mind. come the afternoon, some of those are sharp, hail in there, a rumble of thunder. not an overly cold day for the north—eastern quarter of scotla nd for the north—eastern quarter of scotland under the cloud and rain. so dank affairs for the scottish premiership. furthersouth, the showers tending to diminish and forming these little streets here. you can pick those out on the big picture, before they give up the ghost all together, some time overnight. that leads us into a decent day on sunday, with the notable exception for parts of northern ireland, western scotland. cloud and rain there. elsewhere, that's a lovely sort of day. feeling very pleasantly warm as well. somebody up to 21,22. very pleasantly warm as well. somebody up to 21, 22. that's going to be warm work in the premier league. some notable fixtures here.
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still european places up for grabs for some of the teams. that leads us into a steamy monday in the east. something more unsettled in the west. imagine if you could unlock doors or control your phone using a tiny chip implanted in your hand. it sounds like something out of a sci—fi thriller, but for a growing number of people in the uk it's becoming a reality. so called "bio—hackers" are installing microchips into their bodies and programming them to perform everyday tasks. but will it catch on? danny savage went to meet some of them. this is a hack space where people into their tech build stuff or take things apart and start again. er a few of them, though, have technology implanted inside them. er they have been chipped, fitted with near—field communication. buried in their hand, it can do tasks for them. this one is a key. it will open the door
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for me so i can get in. it is the same technology we have been chipping cats and dogs with for the past 30 years. it is entirely benign. if anyone wanted to change it, they would have to be within one centimetre of me and i have a password on it as well. it cannot be turned into a cyborg assassin? nothing that exciting. my chip goes to my facebook outpage as a digital business card. the chip in holly's hand directs people to her webpage. she sees a medical use as well. it could be a hospital nametag. it could help of someone is passed out on the floor and you have no idea of their medical history. scan their hand and you have their
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history and details. something like that is where this technology go. and this is the size of the chip that hackers have inside them. would you want one? i have sent you a text message. tanya does. she's a tech expert at a university, and believes it is important to be a pioneer human with a chip. in the future they could be more person related and versatile. we don't know what it can hold. that's what we're trying toe explore now. there are only 200 in the uk at the moment with a chip. we think nothing of them in cats and dogs. is putting them in people the next logical step? danny savage, bbc news. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's 8. 23. time for the
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papers this morning. nazir afzal, former chief prosecutor for north west crown prosecution service is here to tell us what's caught his eye. let's look at front pages this morning. the front of the daily telegraph. it's focussing on the winter fuel allowa nce. it's focussing on the winter fuel allowance. scottish pensioners we now know, under tory plans in scotland, would keep the universal winter fuel payments, scotland, would keep the universal winterfuel payments, even scotland, would keep the universal winter fuel payments, even though people south of the border would not. that's according to the scottish conservatives. front page of the times has a tory story, they're saying that britain, theresa may, the prime minister, is saying that britain is to lead the way in internet policing, giving customers more power over owning their own datament the guardian — that glimpse ofjulian assange datament the guardian — that glimpse of julian assange yesterday, datament the guardian — that glimpse ofjulian assange yesterday, a defiant salute is what they're
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saying. we found out that the charges from swedish prosecutors are dropping the charges against him. the headline is alzheimer's cure hopein the headline is alzheimer's cure hope in the daily express. they suggest that it may one day lead to work on a cure. we're going back to the story in connection with the winter fuel allowa nce connection with the winter fuel allowance first, is that right? not particularly. my mistake. the first story i chose was the — i've tried to keep away from the election. i've chosen a story in relation to women now dominate eu defence posts. right. women in power. absolutely right. not many british ones. none in fact. last week, there was a meeting of the eu and nato leaders. what was noticeable was that france, the new president, has appointed a female defence secretary. holland have one, germany, spain, italy, and
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get what? we don't. we've never had one. the question asked there is — has it changed ? one. the question asked there is — has it changed? is the world changing? have the threats changed, because of cyber and the need to deal withes with the new threats, women are better at this, and women are better at multitasking a p pa re ntly are better at multitasking apparently and it makes that plain that the skill set seems to be changing. my personal view is there shouldn't be any reason why a woman could do anyjob and i think there is suggestion of that room, and the dynamic in that room has changed when you're talking about building alliances, the women are better at doing that than men are. warfare, as we know, it has changed a lot more, as we've seen we know, it has changed a lot more, as we've seen over we know, it has changed a lot more, as we've seen over the last few weeks, about cyber security in intelligence as well. absolutely. the world is probably, i mean, certainly half of all crime is now online. the threats of cyber hacking and the like are so great now that actually we probably need a different skill set. it's
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interesting though. a5 different skill set. it's interesting though. as soon as you say that, some people immediately, the response would be, the more important the job, the the response would be, the more important thejob, the more it has to be on merit. on merit alone. that's the balance that has to be played out. totally understand that. the point is that we need to do some work in the education system about telling people that there are no ceilings. it's there that we tell people, actually you should work in the caring professions, for example, rather than working in the scientific professions. i think the conversation needs to happen earlier than when we get to the appointment of senior posts. your next story in the times, it's about a drug that's used to treat many people's pets. absolutely. as a pa rent of many people's pets. absolutely. as a parent of multiple pets, this is of serious concern to — we're a nation of dog owners, certainly cat owners as well, the price of drugs for pets is going up. in this example, a drug for adrenal glands has gone up by
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2,000% in cost. there are examples of people who are now putting down their pets rather than paying for their pets rather than paying for the drugs that are required. is it a common problem? it seems to be. obviously medical science is a sophisticated thing and carries a cost. the view is that people are now giving up food in order to buy these pills for their animals. at these pills for their animals. at the same time, there is a concern here that maybe they're being ripped off in some way, shape or form. here that maybe they're being ripped off in some way, shape orform. in fa ct, off in some way, shape orform. in fact, the insurance policies don't coverfor fact, the insurance policies don't cover for example many of these conditions, which means that people are having to pay for it. when the reality is, you're a pet lover yourself, people will pay. that's the thing. they will pay. you put your pets before your children sometimes. no! that's what i've heard. people will pay, because they value it so much. on trains and buses, this is about what food is available. we all go on
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trains and buses and the like. the question here is, for me the concern around burgers is the smell. if you're ina around burgers is the smell. if you're in a confined space. on a train? on a train or a bus. the proposal here is if you ban them actually you will tackle obesity, in the way that you ban cigarettes in places of, in confined places or simply banning alcohol as they've done on london transport, that's a p pa re ntly done on london transport, that's apparently reducing the use of alcohol and cigarettes. they say that with burgers that will work. i'm not entirely convinced. there is a proposal that would be rolled out across the country. how would you enforce it? i have no idea. as somebody who has been involved in enforcement for 25 years, you are creating a problem. we travel on trains a lot. if someone could fix the smell of a train that would be a great thing. generally? yeah. i
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totally get that. you're coming back in the next hour and talk us through a couple of the other ones including all—inclusive holiday deals. people are always fascinated by the cost of holidays. very much much so, me too. do stay with us. we have a summary of the news in a moment. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. coming up before nine, philip has the weather. but first, a summary of this
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morning's main news. president trump will arrive in saudi arabia this morning, but he leaves behind more controversy in washington. the us media is reporting he told senior russian officials that the fbi directorjames comey was a "nutjob" whose sacking had "relieved great pressure" on him. the claim — not denied by the white house — emerged as he set off for his first foreign trip since taking office. those images that you can see our president, arriving in the last 20 minutes in saudi arabia. you can see the red carpet and officials welcoming him as he arrives. it was fascinating watching those moments. the plane arriving. it is such an important visit and a lot riding on it. yes, i think for both countries. donald trump will be very happy to
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have left his country is behind in washington. this is a huge step for him. the back tears chosen saudi arabia as the first stop on this six nation trip. a gruelling trip for anyone let alone a 70—year—old president. a lot riding on it. the saudi people are hoping to reset their relationship with washington. they did not like president obama here. they felt he was not interested in that part of the world and they never really forgave him for failing and they never really forgave him forfailing to carry and they never really forgave him for failing to carry out missile strikes on the syrian regime after the gas attacks of 2013 survey like donald trump and they are very proud that their country has been chosen for this. quite a few people are critical of us policy but they're giving him the benefit of the doubt. they seem to be forgiving him for some of his earlier comments suggesting that saudi arabia as a country was behind the 911 attacks
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and for his attempts to ban visitors from muslim majority countries. a lot of optimism and excitement here. sta rs & lot of optimism and excitement here. stars & stripes flags up on the boulevards and people really very happy that he is here. it is a weird world here. iam world here. i am curious about a lot of reporters following the trip might you know what kind of access you might get in terms of press conferences? tell us a bit more about 40 will be doing in the region. that's back what he will be doing. a5 that's back what he will be doing. as you can imagine, security is tight. you will have seen the pictures of secret service men all over the arrivals terminal for he is. they have been here for some weeks in advance checking out every single step of the journey that he is going to be taking around this capital. he is going to hold three summers here. —— summits. he is also holding a summit with gulf arab
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leaders and he will be addressing over 40 leaders of islamic countries on the need to confront religious extremism. and the preview we have that he will not like show them, he will talk about us all being in this together except. it is controversial because a us president coming to this part of the world. people about religious extremism, some people will not be too happy about that so the wording of its undertone will be very important. he then on to israel and to vatican city adventure europe he will be in brussels for the nato summitand onto he will be in brussels for the nato summit and onto the g seven in sicily. thank you very much. new rules for cigarette packaging come into force this weekend. all packs must be greenish—brown withjust a small space for the brand name and include a graphic warning of the dangers of smoking. a ban on selling packs of ten will also come into force. but the tobacco manufacturers association says greater restrictions will push people to buy cigarettes on the black market. back on the election campaign, two members of the labour shadow
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cabinet have had a public disagreement over the party's policy on renewing the trident nuclear weapons system. the shadow foreign secretary emily thornberry suggested the outcome of a defence review — promised in the party's manifesto — could result in support for trident being dropped. but labour's shadow defence secretary nia griffith told the bbc‘s newsnight programme that her colleague was wrong. it has been said the conservatives are right not to set a timetable for their ambition of reducing annual net migration. the number of people moving to the uk with very every time depending on employment prospects. the commitment was announced in the manifesto on thursday. wikileaks founder, julian assange remains in the ecuardorian embassy in london this morning, despite sweden dropping a rape investigation against him without charge. mr assange is trying to avoid extradition to the us where he's wanted over the leaking of military and diplomatic documents. scotland yard also says he will be
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arrested if he leaves the embassy, for failing to attend court in 2012. home ownership among younger families has fallen by nearly two—thirds in some parts of the uk since 1994, according to new research. the resolution foundation, a think—tank focussing on living standards, says outer london, the north west and parts of yorkshire were most affected. prince george and princess charlotte will act as page boy and bridesmaid when their aunt pippa middleton marries james matthews today. the event is being dubbed the society wedding of the year. there's been speculation over whether prince harry will bring his girlfriend, the american actress meghan markle. we asked you for stories if you are getting married today. other weddings are available and everybody‘s wedding is special. that is the truth, isn't it? this is from simon. christine and i
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are getting married today in brighton. i'm 55 and just as my first time. christine is the best thing that has ever happened to me andi thing that has ever happened to me and i love her with all my heart. good luck to you both. my good luck to you both. my favourite wedding story has to be the robin hood themes. it is one of these legendary stories where the couple asked for the theme from robin hood, everything i do i do it for you. instead it was... i think do it for you. instead it was... ithinki do it for you. instead it was... i think i prefer that one. morella gm pays, wouldn't it? —— more energy and pace. the fa cup final will be next weekend. the relegation spot is sorted out.
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and it is all about who is going to finish in the top four. winner chelsea and spurs are there and it is basically two from liverpool, manchester city and arsenal. they all play tomorrow. there is potential of a play—off. we have a talking about this. i still have two win1—0 or something. it is very complicated. there are three games going on at the same time added as goal difference and goal—scorer. it is a scenario for you could end up with her play—off between two sides and all the money that brings. chelsea are going for the double and arsenal are going for the double and arsenal are going for the double and arsenal are going for the seventh fa cup. there is a story about buyouts. the majority shareholder at arsenal said no. agm after the fa cup final. that board struggle does affect
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arsen wenger‘s position. we are discussing all that today. also we got a lovely interview talking about chelsea's success this season. talking about swansea and how important paul clement has been. next week manchester united take on another team. we're spoken to someone another team. we're spoken to someone who won the champions league with both teams. this is what he said. you have got a couple of great experiences arrive. your family, your wife, your children. getting married in those kind of things and of course your footballing career and i've played forfour clubs of course your footballing career and i've played for four clubs and the two clubs who are close to my heart. i want similar trophies with
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them. one 24th there is only one winner. we'll be looking at celtic as well who won this incredible run. if they win tomorrow, and other results go their way, they could finish on 33 points ahead of the next team which would be a european record for the difference between first and second. they have been defeated the whole season and it could be breaking goals record, points records, all sorts of records could be broken by celtic. we will have a look at that as well and we are on at midday on bbc one. forget that wedding business. a year after, they were relegated from the scottish premiership, dundee united will have the chance to bounce back at the first attempt. they won their championship. promotion playoff against falkirk 4—3 on aggregate... paul dixon was their hero, scoring the winner with three minutes to go — his first goal, for five years.
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they'll play off, for promotion against the side, that finishes, next to bottom of the premiership. talking of play offs, bradford and millwall meet in the league one final at wembley later today. there is full commentary on radio 5live. you've heard this before — an england team has gone out of a tournament on penalties. this time it was the under 175, at the european championship. they were just seconds away, from a record third title, when spain equalised in stoppage time. england missed two of their three penalties, and spain didn't miss any, so they took the trophy from the young lions‘ grasp. meanwhile cardiff blues, won'tjoin scarlets in european rugby's, elite club competition next season. they hold out. they play their semifinal later. meanwhile cardiff blues, won'tjoin scarlets in european rugby's, elite club competition next season.
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they lost their champions cup qualification playoff, semi final, to stade francais. the french side will play either, connort, or northampton for a spot in the competition. it's playoff time in the english premiership too. a week after retaining the champions cup, saracens face exeter, hoping to move a step closer, to the, ‘double double", while league leaders wasps host leicester tigers. they've got the home advantage and that's huge in the semi—final of knockout rugby. they were the best across the 22 rounds and they deserve that privilege. we'll have to go and make sure we're accurate early in the game and we keep the creators as quiet as we can and we do the things that keep us good as a team. if leicester come out with a fantastic performance and are better than us on the day, you have to put your hand up sometimes. but we believe if we play to our potential and play like we have most of the season, the result should be ours. but anything can happen on the day. we've worked hard to play top of the table and to get a home draw, so we're determined to go and put in a performance that we believe
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will be good enough to get the result. newcastle's st james' park has seen its goal posts replaced by rugby ones, because it's rugby league's magic weekend. this is when all the super league teams play over the same weekend, so today, widnes face wakefield, hull in second play st helens, and its wigan against warrington. rafael nadal has been beaten on clay, and knocked out of the rome masters. austria's, dominic teem, was the first this year, to beat the spaniard on his favourite surface. nadal had won 17 straight matches and had been going, for an eighth title, in the italian capital. thiem will play either novak djokovic, or huan martin del potro, in the semi—finals after their match was delayed by rain. maria sharapova won't ask for a wildcard to play at wimbledon, and will attempt to earn her place via qualifying. the former champion has relied on invitations to tournaments since she returned to competition last month, after a 15 month doping ban.
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the french open turned her down for a wildcard this week, but her world ranking is now high enough to get into wimbledon qualifying. it's fast, furious and if the ref doesn't see it — it's allowed. yes i'm talking about water polo, where two teams face off in a swimming pool to score the most goals. ahead of the british championships, which is like the fa cup of waterpolo, i've been to the home of the defending champions, cheltenham. on the surface all may look calm, but what lurks beneath can bring a tear to your eye. under attack from some of the most fearsome and physical predators known to sport, trying to drag you down in the deep. it's the water polo player. anything goes under the water. if the ref can't see it, it's all legal. a lot goes on under the water. above the water you're always
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being pulled, kicked, shoved. then there's the swimming as well. you're either wrestling or going up and down. there's no rest. for a floundering beginner it can be a bewildering experience, having no idea where the ball is in a whirlpool of water. we've got scotsman to thank for this sport and it drains every ounce of your energy, because in 1800 when it started in lakes and rivers, it was seen as rugby in the water. there's no weight—bearing, or smashing into people, so it's better for your bones. the fact that you can have the finesse of passing the ball so eloquently and then the physical aspect, where you're just wrestling in the water and getting the business done under it. i couldn't do the business even jumping on top of mike! he wouldn't go down! to get his level of fitness, endless hours at the gym and also perfecting the bucket challenge — holding a full one above your head on the surface while treading water takes some doing! atjunior level, as long as you can
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swim, you can start at seven or eight and play competitive matches. even at this level, contact is allowed. ina it's just the physicality. and also when we're playing you don't think about anything else. it's really physical, a good way of taking your anger out, possibly. you can sometimes get scratched so you have to be tough that way. they're following in the wake of some of britain's greatest olympians, who dominated the sport a century ago, winning gold after gold, including at london 1908. but those days have been left behind, even though competing as hosts at london 2012 did give the sport a boost at club level. there have been too many teams for the national league to cope with. but it's still a very small sport in the uk.
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it struggles to generate funds. swimming pool hire cost a lot and amongst small numbers of people it can be prohibited. but the team spirit of the defending champion, cheltenham, isn't held back by funding. most have played together since they were eight and they have a reputation for making sure their opponents have that sinking feeling. let the stuff put you off. if you do get kicked all punched underwater it is less of an impact because of the watchable. doesn't really hurt, to be honest. you had that treading water thing sorted out. doing all those interviews. they can tread water all week long, it's amazing. so the championships next weekend. your teams from across the country and vending champions, cheltenham. you're watching breakfast from bbc news.
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the main stories this morning. a5 president trump touches down in saudi arabia on his first foreign trip since taking office he leaves behind more controversy over his sacking of the fbi directorjames comey. tighter restrictions on cigarette packaging come into force this weekend aimed at discouraging young people from taking up the habit. here's philip with a look at this morning's weather. a big wedding this weekend. there is. i'm not sure where my invitation has gone. i will try to dry my highs. there is a bit of that, there is a bit of this. a few go too much further north and you will have two, it can get as bad as that. those are the three elements we're juggling today. they come thanks to some bright weather across eastern parts. a few are too close to this weather but you get the
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showers and many other locations. a few are too far north, you are close by toa few are too far north, you are close by to a new pressure centred of the eastern side of scotland. cloud and rain ever present for the northern half of scotland for a good part of the day. further south, we will bring some from the west and you will get those later this morning and this afternoon. the showers that you have crossed the west will populate their way ever further eastwards so if you're stepping out and you have a plan this morning, don't bank audience being dry because it may not be the case. as is the wane with showers, some get more than their fair share. some of the showers this afternoon quite sharp. quite gusty winds across the north—east of scotland were of it remains stubbornly cool. brighter spells down south. for the scottish premiership databases afternoon that's not great news. there was a lot going on. the rugby getting to a
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climax as well in exeter and coventry. showers there. they tend to fade with time to the extent that by sunday and were looking at a really decent day. much drier day for many of us. save the parts of northern ireland in the western side of scotla nd northern ireland in the western side of scotland but even here that may not particularly intense. it turns increasingly warm. that's going to be warm work for the final round premier league matches. lots of showers going on as well. that's exactly the sort of weather that you want. if you're plan extends as far ahead as monday low—pressure out towards the west, some things that require out towards the east and increasingly warm as well. that could be one of the themes of the week. those temperatures climbing away as we try things out towards the middle of the week. that's all for now. thousands of customers of lloyds bank are being paid compensation after they were sold complex investments which promised big returns and no risk of loss. in fact, many of them made nothing on their investment at all and the money would have been better left in a savings account.
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moneybox presenter paul lewis has been looking into this. good morning. how many people are affected by this? lloyds has written to over 7000 customers though far more than that actually bought these products. those are the ones lloyds is offering some compensation to you. the compensation between five and £10,000 each. we are not sure. there isa £10,000 each. we are not sure. there is a bit of controversy over that. it isa is a bit of controversy over that. it is a lot of people. how were the product is supposed to work? they were sold to people who had big cash deposits. so if you have a lot of cash in your account lloyds staff would say, we've got this great product for you and i will tell you how it works stop we invest on the stock market and if the stock market grows you gain and if it falls you don't lose. so it was a kind of one—way bet. but of course to make that that work it was hugely complicated and many people who
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thought they would get 40 or 60% growth from the stock market ended up growth from the stock market ended up with nothing or almost nothing. two years ago the financial conduct authority, the regulator, said these we re authority, the regulator, said these were spread bets on steroids or something. many people overestimated what they would get an of course they are now very disappointed that they are now very disappointed that they are now very disappointed that they are getting nothing and the money would have been better left in a cash account. what can those people do? the 7250 will get compensation from lloyds and have been written to but there are far more than that. this review only goes back to 2012 and they were sober probably ten years before that. if you got one of these products, they were caught structure products, they were caught structure products but they had lots of names, there seemed to guarantee growth that protects you against loss from lloyds or indeed any banks, because they were all selling them, and i should add on commission. at that time the sales staff could earn three forward and by selling you one
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of these things, then you should contact the bank and ask for compensation. if you don't get it go to deepen and shall ombudsman service because they were mis—sold with exaggerated marketing claims. what does lloyds say about this? with exaggerated marketing claims. what does lloyds say about thi57m put its hands up and said with some of robert structured investment products we did not provide a small number of customers with sufficient information. we apologise for these errors. those are the ones it is admitted to. it does admitted in the small number of cases. thank you very much indeed and we should say that you can hear more on money box from midday. great tie he was wearing there. it will be great. for audiences in america, australia and around the world, the wait to see the first photos of pippa middleton's
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wedding is almost over. after months of preparation, she walks down the aisle this morning. the duchess of cambridge's sister's marriage to james matthews may not be getting the fanatical coverage of a royal wedding over here but it has rarely been off the agenda abroad. a big weekend for the royals. six yea rs a big weekend for the royals. six years after she was made of honour in her sister's wedding, to prince william, she is set to tie the knot. getting married this weekend. i haven't heard. our correspondent is in englefield. you would expect decent champagne and beer? have you heard of no bring no bring
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restau ra nt have you heard of no bring no bring resta u ra nt i have you heard of no bring no bring restaurant i would never get to go. kate will be there. her niece and nephew will be there. you do get a sense of how much attention areas. if you were not nervous already i hope you're not watching. a lot of attention. a lot of attention. melanie bromley is covering the wedding for the american e! entertainment news network and joins us from englefield in berkshire where the big day is taking place. good morning to you. i know we're talking about it you're on british television but the coverage around the world has been staggering, hasn't it? it has been absolutely crazy. in america it is one of the biggest stories. i've actually been here from los angeles since wednesday rebuilding multiple lives am here because everybody wants to know about kate's sister's big day. this extravagant society wedding. it is a dream come true for a lot of people.
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is it lighter because... everyone is interested in her because of her connection to the royals and we want to see prince george of princess charlotte, performing their duties today, but is it because it is rumoured that prince harry's new american girlfriend might be there? people are interested in pippa middleton but you are right. the idea that harry will bring her to this family occasion and we had those pictures of them the other week kissing but we are all expecting that they may well get engaged. she is a really, really big deal. especially in the market for americans were our report on, the idea that there might be an american in the royal family is massive. idea that there might be an american in the royalfamily is massive. if there are photos today of kate and megan and paper in the same shots that will be huge story around the world. what are you been told about access to the event? how is that all being
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handled efficiently? it is difficulty. there are a select few media given some sort of access but as you probably know there is a no—fly zone in effect in this area. that means that there will be no helicopters. we would often see that other hollywood wedding trying to get voters. unless the family allow us get voters. unless the family allow us to see something, abide with us about that leads to the church which is covered by trees, then we're really not good to see very much. we can tell you that this morning there are maybe 60 or 70 press here. it is early but everybody is waiting in anticipation, hoping for those pictures. one of those things discussed at the those who is going to make pippa middleton's wedding dress? we have been told it is charles deacon and she has had multiple fittings for that stress. but i did
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get to yesterday that another designer, a british designer running it, that would also be a british designer. there are two outfits worn by the yesterday. the day outfit and the night outfit. there are a lot of options, obviously. you are servicing an american audience. what is the biggest fact they tend to get wrong about anything to do with the royals? are anything to do with the royals? are a lot of myths and misconceptions. what is the thing you have to continually correct? i will tell you nothing. continually correct? iwill tell you nothing. because continually correct? i will tell you nothing. because i'm in charge of our royal coverage. i hope nothing. the thing about the royals for americans is just the idea that it is this fairy tale. especially for kate, this ordinary girl was able to marry into the royal family. that is also what they love about it. the whole allure of
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the middleton ‘5. in america we adore the royals uncover the royals even more than you do here in england. my mother will sometimes say, what are you doing? over there they love it thing about this family. very best of luck today. i know it has got to be one of their busiest days of your year and it is lovely to talk to you. nice to see the sun shining. i totally it is for all the other people getting married today. weddings are really important. yours is the most important one. we bring bidding a couple of different messages. mark is marrying joe at the hotel in hampshire. we have our own fly—past tea m hampshire. we have our own fly—past team as the groom and best man at some guests are former red arrows. u nfortu nately we some guests are former red arrows. unfortunately we don't have any future king is coming but do you know what? have a lovely, lovely day. and another one here, starts
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off with forget pippa middleton! wedding of the year this year is taking place in melbourne in derbyshire. have a beautiful day, enjoy every moment. if it issued a today i hope the sun is shining and i hope it goes well. coming up, we will have an in—depth look at the newspapers in about 20 minutes time. just after the headlines, do stay with us.
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hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. president trump has arrived in saudi arabia on his first foreign trip since taking office — amid growing controversy back in washington. air force one cupped down in riyadh. —— touched down in riyadh. as he left there were reports in the us that he had described the fbi director he'd just sacked as a "nutjob" to russian officials. good morning it's saturday, the 20th of may. tighter restrictions on tobacco come into force this morning with plain e packaging and smaller packets no longer on sale. e the world's media gathers ahead of pippa middleton's wedding in berkshire today.

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