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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  May 22, 2017 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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donald trump is in israel, greeted by benjamin netanyahu and have this message. we have before us a rare opportunity to bring security and stability and peace to this region and to its people. later he became the first sitting us president to visit the western wall and a little later he had this warning for iran. iran must never be allowed to possess a nuclear weapon, never ever. and must cease its deadly funding, training and equipping of terrorists. list is debt is in jerusalem, we will hear about his tour so far that would lyse doucet is injerusalem. tour so far that would lyse doucet is in jerusalem. we tour so far that would lyse doucet is injerusalem. we also live in washington for the latest on reports that michael flynn will refuse to give evidence to the us senate added investigate the trump rocher allegation, and leaked documents are showing us how facebook decides what we can and cannot publish. donald trump is continuing his first
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foreign tour as us president. he spent the weekend in saudi arabia where he met king salman and gave a speech to leaders from muslim nations. he said the world needs to do more to tackle islamist extremism. earlier today he arrived in israel. prime minister benjamin netanyahu told him, "welcome my good friend". mr trump visited the western wall which isjudaism's holiest site. he's the first sitting us president to do so. he also visited the church of the holy sepulchre which is one of christianity‘s holiest sites.
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a short time ago, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu spoke alongside mr trump. i also look forward to working closely with you to advance peace in our region because you have noted so succinctly the common dangers are telling former enemies into partners and that is where we see something new and potentially something very promising. it would be simple but for the first time in many years, and mr president for the first time in my lifetime, i see a real hope for change. the arab leaders who you met yesterday could help change the atmosphere and they could help create the conditions for a realistic peace. some very
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optimistic words from prime minister netanyahu. earlier i spoke with our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet. observers are commenting that never have they seem prime minister letter night you so comfortable in the presence of an american president —— prime minister nick knight you. we all remember the body language and interaction when he was visited by president obama a few years ago, it was nothing like we are seeing today. resident, got off the plane and he told israelis, i love israel, and he told israelis, i love israel, and that goes down a storm here. the pipe tilley chemistry is there for all to see. president trump make a joke that they are quoting each other and they are saying the same things when it comes to iran and their wives are also getting along well. this seems to be so much more
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warm and friendly than when president trump was in riyadh where it was more formal and there were a more possibility here for him to speak his mind. as we will talk about iran but what is the occasion behind you, i can hearfireworks? about iran but what is the occasion behind you, i can hear fireworks7m is not actually for president trump although he might want to say that it is! it is an award ceremony that was organised by the late irving moskowitz, a very wealthy american philanthropist who is mostly remembered for buying properties and giving them tojewish families to give ajewish giving them tojewish families to give a jewish majority in arab neighbourhoods and mostly in old jerusalem so they were celebrating tonight with those fireworks. jerusalem so they were celebrating tonight with those fireworkslj jerusalem so they were celebrating tonight with those fireworks. i want tonight with those fireworks. i want to talk about iran in a moment. a few days ago the us extended a deal with iran that provides sanctions relief in return for limits on its nuclear programme. now, despite that we know that donald trump is a fierce critic of the iran nuclear deal.
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as is israel. here's president trump earlier. most importantly, the united states and israel can declare with one voice that iran must never be allowed to possess nuclear weapons, never ever. and must cease its deadly funding, training and equipping of terrorist and militias. and must cease immediately. as i'm sure you have seen, and must cease immediately. as i'm sure you have seen, the iranian president hasjust been sure you have seen, the iranian president has just been active for a second term and it was him talking on the issue. translation: our missiles are for our defence and for peace, they are not offensive. while there is a technical need to conduct missile tests, we will do so and we will ask the permission of no one. you have guided us through every
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twist and turn of this deal, how do you read the shift in the tone from the americans? it is a very important shift, he is speaking the same language as the israeli prime minister who was very frustrated that president obama did not share the same aversion to iran and suspicion of it. barack obama, his signature policy was that nuclear deal. when you hear president trump saying that iran must never have a nuclear deal, as i think if barack obama is listening and the others who made the deal, because it was an international agreement, they will say exactly right, that was why week included the deal with iran and the iea has confirmed that iran is keeping it part of the bargain. it is another thing about their policies in the region which both israel and the us and many arab countries believe are destabilising but with the nuclear deal it a different matter. thank you. and
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third issue, because the arrival of donald trump is coinciding with protests by palestinians on the west bank. these are pictures we have of hundreds of protesters clashing with the israeli police. organisers wanted to highlight conditions experienced by palestinians in israeli prisons. several people were taken to hospital, and police used tear gas. mrtrump is not mr trump is not just mr trump is notjust meeting the most senior israelis but the most senior palestinians as well. what is his approach to those discussions? he will need mark wood abbas in bethlehem, they figured that was an easier place to get to —— mahmoud abbas. that is another surprising thing about donald trump since coming to power, and some israelis have been taken aback and his standing in the polls has dropped because he has had a meeting in the
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white house with president abbas. i spoke to people who are part of the delegation and they were surprised by how warm president trump was and how he has moderated some of his statement about settlements, but example used to say they are not an obstacle example used to say they are not an o bsta cle to example used to say they are not an obstacle to peace but made it clear to be israelis he would like to see at least a pause in the settlement building. the fact he will not announced in this visit the move of the embassy from tel aviv to jerusalem, that also came after talks with thejordanian king. he is listening to the palestinians even though he is sending a message today that he is strong friend of israel. if we imagine this trip goes as well as it could for mr trump in terms of his relations with the israelis and palestinians, what would be the next steps ? palestinians, what would be the next steps? what will his administration like to set up to further this process ? like to set up to further this process? in this peace process symbols matter. and personal chemistry matters. as far as the
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israelis go, he has done really well today and he has ticked all the boxes. he won't have the same opportunities tomorrow, he does not have the same relationship with president abbas that he seems to be developing with prime minister netanyahu developing with prime minister neta nyahu and he developing with prime minister netanyahu and he does not have as much time with him, but he will have to ask both sides, he has asked the israelis for confidence building measures on the economic side with the palestinians and is being carried out and he will add to ask the palestinians to do something as well to inspire confidence but from then on it gets difficult. you have a new president, new gestures, new chemistry but very old and very intractable problems. and the last question, i was interested to hear prime minister netanyahu saying the regional situation offers opportunities that perhaps have not been there before and some conflicts have offered relationships, better relationships than have existed before. do you think that is different this time and be prime
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minister's analysis is correct? there is something to that. we do know that arab gulf states like saudi arabia, the uae, have been drawing upa saudi arabia, the uae, have been drawing up a document in which, to use a phrase of the ministers, they wa nt to use a phrase of the ministers, they want to start bringing down the walls of hatred for israel and one said to me, why should there be such a ferrari when an israeli tennis player wants to play against arabs in an international tournament —— such a fuss. they want to normalise the relationship with israel in some limited technical and economic and cultural ways even before there is a successful peace process with the palestinians. that is very important. there have already been secret and not so secret contacts between senior saudi officials and israelis. they will make common cause when it comes to their shared animosity against iran and the battle against extremist forces and they are now ready to be part of a
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broader arab israeli peace deal and thatis broader arab israeli peace deal and that is one thing the palestinians and the arabs can give to israel in the give and take in any process. thank you and we will cover president trump's trip every step of the way through the week. that is now turned to a story i'm sure he is following from afar. —— let's now turn. this is michael flynn. he was president trump's national security advisor before he resigned after failing to declare contacts with the russian ambassador. today it's being reported that he will refuse to hand over documents to a senate panel which is investigating the alleged russian meddling in the us election. we can bring in nick briant in washington. first of all, can you help us place this in the context of the bewildering array of different investigations. last week a special counsel was appointed by the justice department, robert muller, the former fbi director, but this has
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nothing to do with his investigation. it is today with an investigation. it is today with an investigation that is being mounted by the senate intelligence on capitol hill and they have been seeking documents from michael flynn, the former national security adviser, and are looking into allegations of russian meddling and possible collusion between trump and the kremlin and they wanted to get hold of documents, perhaps e—mails he had that might show some sort of connection with russians. he has invoked the fifth amendment, we have seen invoked the fifth amendment, we have seen it in the movies and on tv, it is where you don't have to answer questions that you believe might incriminate you for some future prosecution but he is using it here to deny and defy their request to hand over the documents. one of the interesting details is the reason mr flynn lost hisjob interesting details is the reason mr flynn lost his job was about not declaring certain meetings with the russian ambassador in the us but there is no dispute those meetings took place now. there isn't and the
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reason he lost his job, took place now. there isn't and the reason he lost hisjob, he took place now. there isn't and the reason he lost his job, he was forced to resign by donald trump, was because he misled white house officials about the nature of those discussions and one of those officials he misled it was the vice president, mike pence. donald trump had received warnings from president obama after he won the election, saying not to appoint michael flynn, possibly because of these connections that the obama administration believed he had with the kremlin. he was also on the payroll of the turkish government as well, offering them consultancy. before even donald trump took office there were warnings about michael flynn and of course when he was appointed the national security adviser he did not last a single month in thejob. adviser he did not last a single month in the job. and one bit of context to discuss, sean spicer, the press secretary, saying in 2013, not when he was in thatjob, why would you take the fifth if you done
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nothing wrong and have nothing to hide? that was a different case, but as we have discussed, there is a long trail of criticisms of people taking the fifth from mr trump and his colleagues. sean spicer was talking about hillary clinton's aids, five of them who took the fifth amendment in that investigation about her use of a private e—mail server. sean spicer was critical at the time and so was donald trump and most importantly, so was donald trump and most importantly, so was michael flynn. he said, if you are innocent, why are you taking the fifth. he said it was a legal protection usually used by you. -- usually used by mobsters. stay with us on outside source, still to come. how facebook decides what can and can't be published by its users. you may have seen a newspaper here with leaked documents helping us understand what facebook does. here in the general election
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campaign, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has accused the government of chaos and confusion after theresa may announced a rethink on her pa rty‘s plans may announced a rethink on her party's plans for social care in england. labels it will bring forward its pledge to scrap tuition fees to include students starting university this autumn if mr corbyn becomes prime minister. since the fees have gone up to 9000 under the coalition government the numbers of working—class youngsters going to university has declined, the number of university applications have started to go down, surely we should be investing in ourfuture. somebody who does not achieve the profession they want, nursing, teaching, medicine in some other form, engineering, whatever it happens to be, they lose out but we as a
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society lose out because we have lost a qualified person who can help improve our industries and services. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom and our lead story is that donald trump is visiting israel and demanding that iran immediately ceases supporting what he calls terrorists and militias and he also expressed hope and optimism for the middle east peace process. documents detailing how facebook decides what can and can't be published by its users have been leaked. it's the guardian's story and it raises a whole range of issues from ‘revenge porn' to the threats of violence. we also found out more about its policy on threats of violence. threats against donald trump must be deleted, generic threats are ok. this is a statement from facebook.
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sarah t roberts is assistant professor in the department of information studies at ucla. thank you forjoining us, we appreciate your time. do you agree with facebook, is it not reasonable to say it is impossible for them to get this precisely right?|j to say it is impossible for them to get this precisely right? i think they certainly do have a rubber serious kettle of fish to deal with although their statement takes out of the picture the fact that they thrive on this user generated content would they solicit and which underpins the entire economy of their platform. so what would you have them do to moderate better?” think the guardian and its articles
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around this is one move in the right direction and that is into the direction and that is into the direction of transparency. it is certainly true that facebook will have to content with all types of content from all over the world for the foreseeable future but the issue is not whether or not it should have to co nte nt is not whether or not it should have to content with it but how it does and that is what it has been relu cta nt to and that is what it has been reluctant to discuss with the public. it is down to these sorts of lea ks public. it is down to these sorts of leaks where the public can see what the policies are that govern what our editorial practices in essence within facebook. why do they have an obligation to share that? it is a company, a platform, but not a public service. it's not, but it is certainly sometimes straddling the line about that. in places like the united states we have seen such a foreclosure on the public sphere and other sites for self expression and
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facebook as an early step in and encourage that self—expression on its platform, not just encourage that self—expression on its platform, notjust for leisure activities but business and even the business of participatory democracy. i think the public needs to note when there are 2 billion people worldwide on it how bad social media sausage is made. did you agree with their point that different countries and societies have different expectations of what is acceptable? do you think they have to produced a number of different guidelines per region or society? indeed they do and we are seeing evidence of that in various court rulings within the eu and places like germany and austria. but that speaks to the tangible, invisible policies available to the public the truth is they make all kinds of other deals with various governments and regimes around the world in order to be in those marketplaces and all of those positions and deals are opaque. you are right that it is private company
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but its power is quite outsized and u nless but its power is quite outsized and unless the public can actually gauge what practices based but engages in itself, i don't think they can make an informed decision about whether it wants to participate. we have heard a lot from mark zuckerberg since the us election about how he wa nts to since the us election about how he wants to be a force for good and his company as well, have these leaks helped convince you they are at least trying? i'm certain facebook is made up of many well—meaning people, that is not in doubt, but it isa people, that is not in doubt, but it is a company, a global concern with immense power and it has immense power to influence and even determine the political will in some places. i think it must acknowledge that power to be really taken seriously at this point. thank you very much for your time, please come back on again soon. time for outside source business. there's a major reshuffle going on at the us car giant ford. it's chief executive mark fields is to leave and will be replaced by colleaguejim hackett.
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the company has been facing weak sales, falling profits and a steep decline in its share price — just look at this from bloomberg — its value has dropped by almost 40% since he took over. samira hussain has the details. but first he is a report she has made on it. mark fields, seen here just weeks ago at the new york auto show, is out as ceo of ford. the company claims that at 56 years old he has decided to retire. to be clear, i did not fire mark field. despite seeing ford through a era of record profits of $10.8 billion, irresponsibility of the company's pranking share price them almost 40% in the last three years, is landing at the feet of mr fields. when asked why the stock was falling, the chairman said it was a question of
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messaging. the traditional auto a nalysts messaging. the traditional auto analysts look at us and say, we feel there is not a lot of upside in the market left and i think the people who are looking at the future are saying, you're messaging needs to be clear in terms of where you're going and how you're going to get there. the head of ford's mobility unit, the part of the company that deals with autonomous cars and ride sharing, is taking over. jim hackett has a reputation as a cost cutter, something ford needs, but his corporate experience is not in cars but furniture and university football. the biggest challenge i had there and we will have here is to have everybody seeing the future, that they can see their opportunity in that. and secondly that it is our right to win there, that we don't have to seed that is to anybody, tesla or any of them. ford has been
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a standard—bearer of the american car market for over a hundred years but last month tesla, an electric car u psta rt but last month tesla, an electric car upstart that has never made a profit, overtook ford in market value. it forced the legacy car—maker to figure out how to keep up car—maker to figure out how to keep up with the times. we have a problem to the line and new york which we are trying to fix but before we go back that talk about greece and the eurozone. countries which use the euro are trying to cut a deal with greece before the latest tranche of money from greece's bailout is released. july is the deadline. greece needs to repay close to $8 billion. that's not the half of it. its debt is close to $350 billion, that's more than 180% of the country's gdp. the international monetary fund argues without that debt relief greece is far less attractive to investors. that then damages their economy.
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but there is a counter argument. andrew walker explains. greece has actually had debt relief already in the form of extending repayment periods, interest rate caps and reductions. germany is relu cta nt to caps and reductions. germany is reluctant to go further up front because i think they would like to maintain some sort of incentive on the greek government to continue doing the things that germany and the others think they ought to do. it is striking that this is a fairly firm line that the finance minister has maintained that there are signs of divisions within the german government coalition with the foreign minister suggesting that maybe they should be doing more and sooner. we'll keep an eye on if the deal is done. we have fixed that line to new york. we only have a minute so one question, you can change the man at the top but what does ford need to switch fundamentally to reverse this trend?
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fundamentally it needs to address a few things, it needs some cost—cutting measures to make it a leaner machine. it also needs to find ways to get into some of that new technology so it will help investors feel a lot more confident about the direction and future of the company therefore lifting the share price. those are the to—do list for ford and their new ceo. very to the point, sorry we do not have longer! thank you for watching this first half of outside source, i will be back with you in a couple of minutes and we will have some of an interview that prime minister theresa may has done with the bbc‘s andrew neill today. that is coming up. hello, taking a look at what is happening across the globe with the
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weather, relating to extreme heat and also extreme heavy rain. that will be the story started in north america where we are dragging up warm airfrom the gulf america where we are dragging up warm air from the gulf of mexico, colliding with drier air from the north which is sparking these dramatic thunderstorms. some very significant rainfall is in these downpours with potential for further fanatic activity as well. —— tornado activity. anywhere from is used over into georgia. at the centre on the west coast, extreme heat could be a feature and the could have temperature into the 80s in aaron hunt, the first time that has happened since last august. across the caribbean, things are quieter than this time last week, the heaviest rains in costa rica and panama and you can see heaviest rains in costa rica and panama and you can see across heaviest rains in costa rica and panama and you can see across the pacific we are likely to see the potential close to the west coast of some storms developing. we will keep an eye on them if they come ashore.
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in south america, things are quieter in the south of chile can bet the last week, still breezy and showers with some snow in the mountains but the heaviest rain is likely in uruguay and paraguay through the next few days. with the onset of the south—westerly monsoon we have seen some enhanced rainfall across myanmar and part of thailand and malaysia and indonesia have seen the heaviest rainfall in the next few days. we still have the extreme heat in the north and west of india and pakistan although a few showers have eased things a little will stop just to point out this bright area in the bay of bengal with the potential of a storm system developing and also this one in the western half of the arabian sea which might develop into a storm affecting yemen and obama. staying with heat —— yemen and oman. plenty of heat with temperatures in seville up to 35 degrees and similar
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in lisbon and that will extend right across spain and portugal, over the pyrenees into france. we will see the temperatures in the mid—20s across france and the low countries and the uk as well. it stayed gloriously hot and sunny if that is what you like for the next few days. finally a brief outlook for the uk. if you are heading towards the shores you will be greeted by lots of sunshine, particularly in the south—east, a bit more cloud further in the south—west but warm with it as well and temperatures will respond with a good deal of dry weather over the next few days. perhaps mid—20s in the south—east corner and we could see 30 degrees as we move to the weekend. take care. i'm ros atkins with outside source. donald trump is in israel, he was greeted by benjamin netanyahu and he had this message. we have before us a rare opportunity to bring security
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and stability and peace to this region, and to its people so bike mr trump became the first sitting us president of us at the western wall stop white he also had this warning. iran must never be allowed to possess a nuclear weapon, never, ever. and must cease its deadly funding, training and equipping of terrorists. the uk general election is two weeks on thursday. those are pictures of donald trump, apologies, ididn't mean pictures of donald trump, apologies, i didn't mean you to see those as i was talking about the election!
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