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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 27, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. three more arrests are made by detectives in manchester investigating monday's terror attack. this as police across the uk mount a major operation to protect the public over the bank holiday weekend. arrangements for 1300 events have been re—assessed. all 22 victims have now been named. most recently tributes have been paid to 15—year—old megan hurley from merseyside. ariana grande has announced she'll return to the city for a benefit gig telling her fans, "we won't let hate win." good morning. it's saturday 27 may. also ahead, a desperate attempt by world leaders to keep america involved in talks on climate change. and good morning from wembley, where
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we are settling in for the cup. we have the red sofa and the fa cup. for the two managers here later todayit for the two managers here later today it is double or quits. amid tight security, you have ctone‘s chelsea are trying to lift the cup toa chelsea are trying to lift the cup to a double against arsene wenger‘s arsenal. in scotland, celtic are going for the domestic travel. i will see you again at 730 a.m. . and the age of the great adventurers revealed. we take a look of the rediscovered footage filmed by explorers in the early decades of the 20th century. and darren has the weather for the bank holiday weekend. good morning. many of us have been kept awake by the heat and perhaps the thunderstorms as well. these storms are going to push north today. still got high temperatures around, and still the chance of more rain over the rest of the weekend. join me laterfor more details. good morning. first, our main story. police investigating the manchester suicide bombing have arrested three more men in the last 12 hours during raids in the city. 11 people are now in custody.
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across the country security arrangements for events planned for the bank holiday weekend have been reassessed. extra officers are expected to be on duty at football cup finals in england and scotland and the great manchester run. sarah smith reports. armed police on the streets of hull. the security at the festival taking place here this bank holiday weekend has been reassessed, as it has been at hundreds of other events. the operation in manchester may be making good progress according to counterterrorism detectives, but the threat level remains at its highest. as well as radio 1's big weekend in hull, extra security will be in force at the cup final in wembley, the scottish cup at hampton park, and sporting events in both liverpool and manchester. in the city centre, the floral tributes keep coming. police have praised the spirit of the people here, and want to reassure everyone that progress is being made. so much has been achieved
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in that period of time. it's going at a huge pace. we have made huge advances in terms of the investigation, but there is still a lot of work to do. officers are working 24/7 around the clock to make sure we do that. the arrests keep coming. three more in the city overnight. locations being searched around manchester include a flat in this block, rented by salman abedi several months ago, which may have been a bomb factory. another flat here in central manchester is where he is understood to have put the bomb together in the hours before the attack. his 22 victims have now all been named, most recently 15—year—old megan hurley, from halewood in merseyside. the principal at her school described her death as a huge loss to them all. last night pink balloons were released in memory of all who lost their lives, and while the threat level remains
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critical, the message was, go out and enjoy the weekend, but remain vigilant. 0ur reporter catriona renton is in st ann's square in manchester this morning. i was passing by yesterday and the atmosphere is quite remarkable, as people are still paying their respects and adding their thoughts and sympathies with all those tributes to people who were picked them is of the attack on monday. —— who were victims of the attack. that is right. you can already see people here this morning looking at the tributes and flowers and balloons that have been left here, and ever growing number of tributes. there is a tribute here to the youngest victim. people have also come across the uk, from all over. there is an
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everton shirt here, and a liverpool football clu b everton shirt here, and a liverpool football club shirt, saying "you will never walk alone", standing together with the people of manchester who have suffered this terrible tragedy. as people were saying that report, the police are telling people to go out and enjoy themselves, but be vigilant and be aware. there will be a heightened police presence increased security checks. the great city games got under way yesterday, beginning with a moment's silence, but that will continue over the weekend as planned. the great manchester run, over 30,000 runners are registered to ta ke over 30,000 runners are registered to take part in that. that is going ahead as well. and there is a big rock concert tonight at old trafford. ariana grande, after whose concert this attack happened, has been tweeting. she is going to come back here to do a benefit gig for the victims, in memory of the victims. she says, "music is meant to heal us, bring us together, make
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us to heal us, bring us together, make us happy", and she says she will continue to do that by coming back here in honour of the victims. and of course there are so many events planned this weekend. police say be vigilant, but go out and enjoy yourself, as the city tries to get to normal. thank you. katrina renton at saint hans square in manchester, where tributes are being paid to victims of monday ‘s attack. —— st ann's square. and in a few moments, we'll be speaking to two doctors who were working at manchester's main trauma centre on the night of the attack. they have been looking after a number of patients this week, so we will be hearing their thoughts and reflections in just 80 will be hearing their thoughts and reflections injust 80 minutes. —— a view minutes. —— a few. leaders of the world's leading industrial nations, the g7, have failed to reach agreement on climate change at a summit in italy. members had hoped donald trump would join the rest of the world in combating climate change but differences remain
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between the us president and other countries. 0ur rome correspondent james reynolds is in sicily for us. we will come onto climate change and just a moment, but first, we will come onto climate change and justa moment, but first, even we will come onto climate change and just a moment, but first, even fear in the wake of the terror attack in manchester are dominating the early pa rt manchester are dominating the early part of the seedings. what came out of it? —— proceedings. part of the seedings. what came out of it? -- proceedings. there was a commitment to fight terrorism, to really focus on that fight. i think there was a realisation amongst the leaders present that because attackers, not just in leaders present that because attackers, notjust in manchester but other attacks across borders, so intelligence sharing should cross borders. but remember the awful ke rfuffle borders. but remember the awful kerfuffle in the week that we the us and uk about intelligence and intelligence leaking, i think this was a chance for donald trump and theresa may to repair that relationship a bit. more than that, i think theresa may wants to begin a conversation about greater powers and regulation of the internet and
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social media. so social media websites can block threatening behaviour and also reported. by way of contrast, of course, there are other issues weather has been much less agreement on climate change, for example. talk us through what has emerged? we are still waiting for the final communique, so we do not know what has yet emerged. but the argument lines are clear. lots of the leaders want to make sure that the united nations' climate change agreement, agreed in paris in 2015, is preserved. they want it to stay in place, committing all countries to reducing carbon emissions. during the campaign donald trump said global warming was a hoax and he has threatened to withdraw the us from the agreement. lots of the leaders here will try to persuade him to stick with the agreement. 0ne us official has said that his position is evolving. james connor thank you. a couple, believed to be in their 805, have been murdered in county armagh. a relative found their bodies at their home in portadown yesterday afternoon.
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they are reported to have been stabbed. a a0 year—old man has been arrested. president trump's son—in—law and close adviserjared kushner discussed opening a secret communications channel with the kremlin, according to us media reports. he made the proposal in a meeting in december, the new york times and washington post said. mr kushner is thought to be under investigation by the fbi over alleged russian meddling in the us election. according to these latest reports, jared kushner, who as well as being the president's son—in—law is also one of his closest advisers, discussed establishing a secret communications channel between the trouble transition team and moscow in order to discuss syria and other policy issues. he is alleged to have met last december at trump tower in new york with the russian ambassador to the us, sir backs iliac, and mr trump's former national security adviser, michael flynn, to discuss the matter. russian ambassador to
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the matter. russian ambassador to the us, sir guy conciliate. mr flynn was forced to resign after it was found he had misled officials over the extent of his clinic and is with the extent of his clinic and is with the russian ambassador. in the end, beacon indications channel was not set up. it was reported yesterday that the russian ambassador had a set —— that jared kushner had that the russian ambassador had a set —— thatjared kushner had a meeting with a russian bank which is the subject of sanctions imposed by the subject of sanctions imposed by the 0bama administration. reuters says he also had several telephone conversations with the russian ambassador. jared kushner is reportedly being investigated by the fbi is part of their enquiry, but this does not necessarily mean he is suspected of a crime. theresa may has accused jeremy corbyn of making excuses for terrorists after the labour leader said that british interventions overseas could encourage terrorism at home. 0ur political correspondent ellie pricejoins us now from our london newsroom.
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even though campaigning is under way, the focus is very much on the aftermath of these attacks and national security now? that's right. the election campaign was postponed this week amid the tragic events in manchester, but of course terrorism and security is going to play a key role in this campaign. last night we had jeremy corbyn, who was interviewed by andrew neal on bbc 0ne, he was unable to give his personal backing to the renewal of the trident nuclear weapons system. that is no surprise. he has made his views clear over the years. but of course it is in the labour manifesto and he is the leader. it comesjust hours after he made a controversial speech in which he said foreign policy under him would be one that would reduce rather than increase the threat to the country. he said that like many experts, there were links between military intervention abroad and terror threats back home. he said that does not in any way excuse terrorists, at that it is
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about looking at the causes of terrorism. as you say, the tories have seized on that, both the timing of it and the content of it. theresa may said thatjeremy corbyn sibley wasn't up to being prime minister. for her part, she came back from a g7 meeting of world leaders, and as jane said, one of the focus is that meeting on terrorism. —— james. jane said, one of the focus is that meeting on terrorism. ——james. her particular focus was on tackling online extremism. she will be back online extremism. she will be back on government business today, but we understand she will be meeting with her election team. the election campaign is under way again now. labour, the tories, the s&p, the greens and ukip are all on the campaign trail for greens and ukip are all on the campaign trailforan greens and ukip are all on the campaign trail for an election that is in less than two weeks time. terrorism and security very much a keyissue terrorism and security very much a key issue now. the national autistic society says it's deeply concerned about proposals by nhs bosses in south west london to reduce the number of children diagnosed with autism. health commissioners want to focus on the most severe cases. they say it will relieve pressure on their teams. construction has started on the world's largest telescope,
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at the top of a 3,000 metre—high mountain in the middle of the chilean desert. when completed, the european extremely large telescope" — or elt — will be five times larger than the biggest instruments in use today, and its backers say it has the potential to transform our understanding of the universe. so when you come up with a name for telescope, and you think, let's be creative, the european extremely large crack telescope is the best they could do? it does what it says on the tin. —— large telescope. you won't forget its name, will you? we will have all the sport soon, and all the weather for the bank holiday weekend coming up later. in the past few days we have heard some extraordinary accounts of how the emergency services and hospital staff ‘pulled together‘ to provide
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care for those injured in the manchester arena attack. paramedic adam williams was one of the first on the scene. he has spoken to the bbc about his experiences that night. my my heart was just racing. i could feel it pounding in my chest. but i knew we were there to do a job. that fear was in the back of my mind and my colleagues' minds, that this might not be over, but some in else could happen. —— something else. we put that to the back of our minds and got on with the job we had to do. i think it affected all of us in the sense that, although deaf ears, like you say, a natural part of life, and it is there much a part of oui’ life, and it is there much a part of ourjob at times, the nature of the incidents had a different effect on us. “— incidents had a different effect on us. —— although death is, like you
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say. this was not accidental. are are an account there is somebody who was first on the scene. a tireless effort of first responders such as adam, one supported by hospitals all over england. the main trauma centre took in some of the most critically injured. with us now is doctor richard and surgeon jonathan vickers. thank you for coming in. i imagine, you are so busy and it has been an extraordinary week. can you tell us how you have been working, how you reacted, your part in the events ? how you reacted, your part in the events? starting on monday it began with my normal monday working in the theatre, getting home late, then in theatre, getting home late, then in the evening. having a quick snack and about to get into bed and
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getting the phone call. i returned back to hospital. initially i went to intensive care where i normally work but coming straight down to emergency department to start receiving patients. it is worth explaining to people that department you working. you are in critical care. intensive care. and intensive ca re care. intensive care. and intensive care doctor. so initially you help people as they arrived in a&e departments and the new moved back to your normal department. can you give us an idea of the injuries you are dealing with? from this sort of event there are four or five different mechanisms by which people become injured. there is a huge pressure wave that comes up from the explosion which can cause problems for people. so difficulty with breathing. moving through to hit that can cause burns, the shrapnel that can cause burns, the shrapnel thatis that can cause burns, the shrapnel that is thrown around which will impact on tissue and pass through people. all that causes injury and
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illness and problems. to move a stage where we get to now where there has been stuff from outside transmitted into people which could easily calls infection problems that we are expecting the next few days and weeks. as a surgeon, the injuries, again... something that we are not used to seeing. that is quite right. terrible injuries that we are trained to deal with but, of course, we are trained to deal with but, of course , we we are trained to deal with but, of course, we all hope that we will not be in that situation. we have many patients coming through, more or less at the same time. there was a very busy night. i work predominantly in the abdomen and a chest but injuries like that with many small pieces of shrapnel, they are random and indiscriminate so the injuries that can occur are not just a nominal or in the chest, they are in many other parts of peoples
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bodies and therefore many other surgeons with different skills would also need to be involved. bones, hedging is full example. and these are life changing injuries? the road to recovery is being focused on now? we we re to recovery is being focused on now? we were focused on the initial hours throughout that night but there is so throughout that night but there is so much more than that for the families of the casualties and for the casualties themselves who, of course, have days going in weeks of further procedures which my colleagues have been undertaking in off the week. prolonged stays on intensive care and returns back for further operations. i'm sure for these poor people will go on for weeks, months possibly years. don't talk through the statistics but what we hear from the talk through the statistics but what we hearfrom the hospital, both senior and old there are still many people in very poor condition. some of them will be quite poorly for
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some time. we are continuing to help them and their families. some time. we are continuing to help them and theirfamilies. we are moving into a phase of looking at weeks and possibly years ahead. this is not only just weeks and possibly years ahead. this is not onlyjust about weeks and possibly years ahead. this is not only just about the weeks and possibly years ahead. this is not onlyjust about the injury. this is about psychological impact that that is going to happen. it will be on these patients and their families. the magnitude of this incident is. an unimaginable terror that these people have been through. the psychological issues will be huge. notjust from the psychological issues will be huge. not just from their the psychological issues will be huge. notjust from their injuries but also from the treatment and intensive care that they go through. we use drugs to help support them but that can also change their memories so their memories are quite strange. how does that reflected in staff dealing with these people? you smile but we have to care for you just as much as we care for these people who were so horrifically injured. all of the staff, of whom
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we are immensely proud, they will go through very traumatic and difficult times. many of them, including ourselves, may be struggling for a while. we smile because i think we learn as we go along ourselves. there are many experiences that we have been through commonly and i think the aftermath for as is difficult first to deal with and it is not something we are used to. so we are also dealing as we go along and trying to support each other which is important. our people able... i mean, i can only imagine the scenes in the immediate aftermath of the pressures continue for you. people able to step aside at any point? if you see colleague who was clearly struggling on everyone, presumably, and we have spoken to many hills professionals like yourselves, we know that their professionalism kicks in and you do thejob. and you must occasionally see people working alongside
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anything, a person possibly needs a moment. has been happening?m anything, a person possibly needs a moment. has been happening? it has. you are right. at the time it is very much doing the job that we have been trained to do. it was on a personal level and i am sure i am not the only one, thinking about things afterwards in the days afterwards and the humid element and the consequences of the injuries that our patients had experienced. that is quite new to some of us. i know i have had many conversations with colleagues over the last few days are exactly along those lines because it has taken us, to a degree, i surprise. we are trained to deal with these situations but living through it is quite different. has this changed you? i know you have dealt with and you have dealt with critical patients before but something like this, to this extent, something that you are trained for but you can prepare for. to an extent, in the short term it certainly does change. having been through major events in the past,
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yes, you look back and you are never quite the same. something has changed. usually in the way that helps you the next time. i do to get through it or to move the process forward so you can behave and work ina forward so you can behave and work in a better capacity. the next time around. we should thank your behalf of everybody watching the sun on behalf the families. a huge thank you to you and your teams. i know you to you and your teams. i know you both have a little time. one day after today. and then you will be back into work thank you so much. very emotional and we can see that here with you now. thank you so much for sharing with us we would she w0 re for sharing with us we would she wore the best. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. —— we wish you all the best. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. police make three more arrests overnight as the investigation into monday's terror attack in manchester continues. authorities across the uk are stepping up security to over the bank holiday weekend. armed police are deployed to a number of high—profile events. and coming up on the programme,
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we're live at wembley stadium ahead of the fa cup final. can chelsea do the double with a victory over arsenal? or will arsene wenger‘s men finish a troubled season with some silverware? a beautiful image their live from wembley. we will be there a little later on. that's talk to darren now about the weather. it promises to be sunny, doesn't it? but there are storms in the air. it is changing. we have had a few days of hot sunny weather things are changing now. the and humidity gives rise to storms. let's look at those from earlier today. they have been dancing away, pushing up they have been dancing away, pushing up from the south—west together with this line of rain. more recently the number of storms has reduced in the rain is easing off a little bit. that band of wet weather, still with
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a couple of thunderstorms will move northwards and continue to weaken. at the same time it becomes what across northern ireland and then we get a second batch of storms heading towards northern england during the afternoon. a couple arriving in the western fringes of scotland later as well. we still have some real warmth in the north—east of scotland around the murray serve stock 30 degrees and will be quite hot here because we do not see the rain. we do this in storms in some very heavy rain across northern england during the afternoon and some warmth is all. much cooler as it turns weather in northern ireland, a bit more of a breeze and cloud for western parts of wales, south—west england but warmer further east. 20 of wales, south—west england but warmerfurther east. 20 degrees possible north of london towards the fence. some sunshine hid and the davidson storms and a day from northern england. drifting further into scotland, central southern scotla nd into scotland, central southern scotland western scotland for awhile before they ease overnight in most places to become dry but probably fairly cloudy as well. another warm night, not quite as muddy, perhaps. lows of 12 or 13 degrees. many of us are cloudy tomorrow. the rain has petered out by the mornings are the
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most part. as the sun comes out across england and wales we will also imports are more storms. edging up also imports are more storms. edging up from the south—west. a little bit hit and miss but that would be heavy rain later in the day. still warm for much of england and wales but considerably cooler further north in scotland. forget about 30 degrees. those that showers and potential storms continue to work their way northwards sunday night into bank holiday monday, heading up towards the northern half of the uk, further south may well become dry not as hot. the heat is slowly ebbing away over the next few days. we start with the humidity. that is going to trigger some storms over the coming few days. but it is not a complete washout at all. there will be some spells of warm sunshine. that it from me. thanks very much and we will see you later. a five—minute pa rt will see you later. a five—minute part seven now and we will turn our attention to the general election. in his election takeaway, the bbc‘s former political editor nick robinson has been meeting groups of voters to share a meal and chew over politics. this week, it's fish and chips in eltham, south—east london. in the third and final instalment, nick meets seven people chosen
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by the pollsters ipsos mori to represent the so—called jams, those who arejust about managing. here is dinner. here we are. now i hope you like fish and chips because this is what you are getting. well, it isa this is what you are getting. well, it is a fish and chips are the of my election takeaway. we are hearing from with a group of voters who are going to tell us how they are making up going to tell us how they are making up their minds. i did specify there had to be mushy peas. if you had to describe how you were, how you are doing in your family, describe how you were, how you are doing in yourfamily, does it feel like it is pretty easy at the moment and things are good and comfortable orare and things are good and comfortable or are you straight at shaking your head? struggling. every month you are wondering if you can afford £20 on this car compound on the card.
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it's not even come in a come at month by month. it is day by day. you look at how can i afford the next thing i need. i have been struggling. i have three children, three girls. i can not give them 100% of what they need. three girls. i can not give them 10096 of what they need. everything has gotten more expensive. the salary and that he is not balanced itself out. sometimes i wonder how is so hard and people withjobs like as should not be struggling as much as should not be struggling as much as we are. we are working families. i will let you into a secret. we chose you because you alljust about managing. notjust coincidence. have you heard anything from any party? that might help you, that may make a difference? i could not see myself eating fish and chips with theresa may. not in a month of sundays. what see myself eating withjeremy corbyn. i think he has a better levelheaded judgement on what us
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people, where we sit in work. and i don't think he has leadership credentials. there is just don't think he has leadership credentials. there isjust something about himl credentials. there isjust something about him i cannot put my finger on. i felt a little let down when the brexit singh got her. he just seemed to disappear. he takes in messages as well as give them out. theresa may seems only ever give out messages. she does not listen to anything coming back. how about the promises the tories have made question might have you heard any? something she says puts me off reading further and further. i've experienced both and i know when liberal is in power, i am better off. i don't want to vote for a person rather than a party. i would rather look at the manifesto in as much detail as my brain can take and wonder if that is right for me and my family wonder if that is right for me and myfamily and wonder if that is right for me and my family and my community. whether
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it isa my family and my community. whether it is a man or my family and my community. whether it isa man ora my family and my community. whether it is a man or a woman... just the man or woman, purely. when she first came in and had that girl power, thatis came in and had that girl power, that is what i'm talking about. she is different. but for me now it is a trust issue. can i trust her? she has done a lot of backtracking. thank you all of you, very much indeed. time for a pickled egg. now you have to decide. and you can watch a longer version of nick's election takeaway on the bbc news channel at 2.30pm today and again at 10.30am tomorrow. is it wrong but i want fish and chips now? the thing is that other peoples are always better than your own. if i were in outline, i would just be taking off other people ‘s plates all the hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up shortly darren will have the weather. but first at 7:30, a summary of this morning's main news. police investigating the manchester suicide bombing have arrested three
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more men in the last twelve hours. 0vernight police raided a house in the cheetham hill area of the city. 11 people are now in custody. across the country security arrangements for events planned for the bank holiday weekend have been reassessed. extra officers are expected to be on duty at football cup finals in england and scotland and the great manchester run. and police have now released the name of the final victim of monday's attack. megan hurley was 15 and from liverpool. her brother was seriously injured. leaders of the world's leading industrial nations, the g7, have agreed on new action to counter terrorism at a summit in sicily. they have agreed that internet companies need to do more to tackle the spread of extremist content online. but the leaders were unable to reach an agreement on climate change with differences remaining between us president donald trump and the rest of the group. a couple, believed to be in their 805, have been murdered in county armagh.
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a relative found their bodies at their home in portadown yesterday afternoon. they are reported to have been stabbed. a ao—year—old man has been arrested. president trump's son—in—law and senior advisorjared kushner discussed opening a secret communications channel with the kremlin, according to us media reports. he made the proposal in a meeting in december, the new york times and washington post said. mr kushner is thought to be under investigation by the fbi over alleged russian meddling in the us election. the national autistic society says it's deeply concerned about proposals by nhs bosses in south—west london to reduce the number of children diagnosed with autism. health commissioners want to focus on the most severe cases. they say it will relieve pressure on their teams. a record amount of solar power was generated in the uk on friday thanks to the clear and sunny weather. the national grid said 8.7 gigawatts of electricity was produced by solar panels at their peak, that's the equivalent of nearly a quarter of the country's
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electricity supplies. a spokesperson for the network said it represented a "new era" for british power generation. presumably that will last for a bit, although the weather is changing a bit. it was a beautiful sunrise this morning, which would have been very good. yes, that made us all go to the windows to watch it. very enjoyable. those are the main stories. it is 7:33am. it is fa cup final day, and we have sent mike to wembley. he has the cup and the sofa and some flags, too. good morning. yes, good morning. iam in the back of the net, they still have to put the goalposts up later on. just yards away, on the beautifully manicured carpet of the pitch. the cow manicured carpet of the pitch. the cow green it is. i have the flags and the scarves because i am at the chelsea and. —— and. on every seat
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there is the chelsea scarf and the chelsea flat and halfway down it starts, all the red scarves and flags. just imagine how long that must take to decorate every seat here. so, arsenal versus chelsea. they repeat of the 2002 fa cup final when arsenal were more dominant favourites and 12— zero. john interestingly, was a saab. —— substitute. arsene wenger is a regular here, he has won the fa cup six times in his reign. don't let this is going to be his last season. antonio conte is going for the double in his first season. what an incredible achievement for him. there will be extra emotion here today because of what happened in manchester on monday. there will be extra security at all the sporting venues today, with over 1000 extra armed officers around here. extra armed officers around here. extra armed officers around here. extra armed officers on the vehicles leading up to wembley as well. but
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all the sporting venues, players will be paying tribute to the vic dems of the horrors that took place in manchester on monday. —— victims. very different seasons for both arsenal and chelsea. chelsea are going for the double, arsenal finished outside the champions league basis for the first time in 20 years, finishing fifth. having said that, if arsene wenger was to win this race seven time today, it would make him the most successful manager in fa cup history. that is a real incentive to him, but he says that today isn't about him. i don't care about me, i care about us winning the game on saturday. when you go in the game you can accept that in a cup final, you can accept the challenge, you just want to win it. the last worry i have is my personal story in a game like that. you have to forget for this moment that we won the league, and concentrate on this target. because don't forget, this is a fantastic target, and we don't know if in the future,
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uh, we will have another possibility to win this trophy. there's a huge game at hampden too, where aberdeen take on celtic in the scottish cup final. celtic are unbeaten in every domestic match this season and are on for the treble having won the scottish premiership and beaten aberdeen in the league cup final. they have certainly exceeded what i thought they could achieve. myjob is to lead the team, to push, to demand. the players have been able to cope with that. you would do well to see a season again like it, you know, to go through
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a season unbeaten. and winning both domestic cups. that is our plan, that is our aim, and we will do our very best to do that. i think more celtic teams should have won the treble over the past few years, but for whatever reasons they haven't. but the celtic team this year have been very sharp, very focused and very confident in their work. they do not give much encouragement to their opponents. we have got to try to find a way to put them down. it's a packed weekend of rugby union and last night northampton staged a dramatic comeback to qualify for next season's european champions cup beating stade francais. harry mallinder‘s conversion ensured the win for the saints by 23—22. they had trailed 22—9 at half time and had a man sent off before a late try followed by that kick gave them the win. a sell out crowd of 82,000 people will pack into twickenham this
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afternoon for the showpiece event of rugby union's premiership season, the play—off final. and it's being called potentially the best ever, featuring wasps vs exeter, who finished first and second. it didn't feel like we had achieved everything we wanted to this season by getting to the final, but that said, that is only a feeling, and feelings have to be backed up actual actions. the key for me is that we go out and perform at the level can asa go out and perform at the level can as a club. now, scotland's scott jamieson has a 1—stroke lead going into day three of the pga championship at wentworth, alongside elton's thomas pieters. jamieson's round of 2—under—par 70 left him top of the leaderboard on 7—under.
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england's lee westwood is also in contention two shots back after a round of 69. returning to rugby union, iforgot to mention that in dublin, the pro12 final sees wales' team scarlets up against munster. manchester city centre held its first major sporting event since the terrorist attack on monday as the great city games took place. there was a minute's silence before the event started to remember the 22 people who lost their lives. in the pole vault, britain's holly bradshaw set a new national outdoor record of 4.80 metres. she later posted on social media: "what a day! manchester, that was for you!" also taking part was the london 2012 0lympic long jump champion greg rutherford. he won his event in front of a large crowd at albert square, with a season's best 8.18
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metres in his finaljump. back here at wembley i am joined by two chaps who have already lifted and fa cup. well, they haven't got it yet, but they have already won an fa cup this season. i'm talking about the fa people's cup. let me introduce my cabrini, the founder and manager of working you be 50, and manager of working you be 50, and also graham canning, who is the goalkeeper. we will talk about your arm ina goalkeeper. we will talk about your arm in a moment. but you have won the fa people's cup in the walking football category. what did it mean to beat the leeds team at birmingham and actually win the fa people's up? it was absolutely amazing achievement. we got to the finals last year, and you know, we were disappointed we didn't win in the finals last year, but to get to the finals last year, but to get to the finals this year and actually win the cup, it was an incredible feeling. and your brother, who plays
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in the team, will be lifting it live on the bbc at half—time during the fa cup final here on the pitch today? that's correct. my brother paul will be lifting the cup at half—time. i'm looking forward to seeing him pick up the cup. as your injury might suggest, graham, walking football is perhaps a far cry from the image we may have, we may have seen it as part of that tv aduu may have seen it as part of that tv adult dog real chaps and ladies going around, walking around the football pitch chasing a ball. —— doddery old chaps and ladies. football pitch chasing a ball. —— doddery old chaps and ladiesm football pitch chasing a ball. —— doddery old chaps and ladies. it is very competitive, very competitive indeed. my injury was a goalkeeping injury. the problem that i encountered was a penalty save, which ended up snapping my tendon in my bicep. football itself, walking football, i have to say it is very competitive. it is certainly something that anybody over 50 can be very competitive with.|j something that anybody over 50 can be very competitive with. i have had a couple of goes at it myself, and
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the hard thing, ifound, was actually not running. it is all about the control, the passing, the thinking, and actually not running was incredibly difficult, to stop yourself. i think that is the problem the referees have, trying to distinguish between a very fast walk ora distinguish between a very fast walk or a shuffle, actual running. we like to think that that will change as the referees perhaps get more involved in walking football. you area involved in walking football. you are a chelsea fan. i cannot imagine what your thoughts are. you must be confident. i suppose it depends which end arsenal turns up at. how are you feeling about it?|j which end arsenal turns up at. how are you feeling about it? i think it isa are you feeling about it? i think it is a good time to be playing arsenal. i have to be honest, the injuries they have got, i have seen chelsea a number of times during the season and they are playing great football. for me to be here today, and if they are successful and win the cup, when the double, that would eat fantastic. quick prediction? 3-1, eat fantastic. quick prediction? 3—1, chelsea. eat fantastic. quick prediction? 3-1, chelsea. mike, you are a liverpool fan but he will still be watching today. you are obviously
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looking forward to your brother as well lifting the fa people's cup for walking football at half—time. what are your thoughts on today's much.|j think it will be a good game. i do hope that, you know, it is quite close. i think chelsea will probably have the edge as well. just, you know, better form and have the edge as well. just, you know, betterform and better have the edge as well. just, you know, better form and better plan all season, really, yeah. it is amazing to think you have already won an fa cup, albeit the fa people's cup in walking football. what do you think walking football can do to somebody, how is it transformed your life? well, i think, i mean... so, when you have sustained a lot of injuries, and you know, you cannot play competitive football, it gives you the opportunity to continue playing football and, you know, stay involved with the team. the camaraderie that you used to get, when you are actually playing competitive football. excellent. well, enjoy the day. it will be a special moment when your brother
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lift the trophy. i'm going to sit by the trophy again. we spoke earlier about how this is the third edition. there was one from 1911 to 1992, one from 1992 to 2014, because there is damage that comes from players celebrating with them. we were talking about what happens to the old trophies. this one was made in 2014. apparently the first trophy, naga, is at a football museum. but not here. it is at a football museum in manchester. don't forget, all the fa cup coverage today begins with football focus, and dan walker will be here at 12 o'clock, and there is a break for the news, be here at 12 o'clock, and there is a breakfor the news, then we have salinity pointless to do with football, and in the fa cup show at two o'clock. —— celebrity pointless. the time isjust the time is just coming up to 7:45am. police make three more arrests overnight as the investigation into monday's terror attack in manchester continues. authorities across the uk are stepping up security to over the bank holiday weekend.
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armed police are deployed to a number of high—profile events. and coming up on the programme — three darren, we hear that things are changing. yes, they are. we see storms around already. good morning. those storms are moving to the north and for the fa cup final at wembley it is typical cup final weather for very warm and sunny. so the scottish fa cup final, however, it will be warm but it may not be as sunny. we could start the season showery rain arriving in glasgow through the latter pa rt arriving in glasgow through the latter part of the afternoon. these are the storms we have had today dancing away on this band of rain here. a number of the storms are becoming fewer and the rain is beginning to ease off as well. it makes its way northwards and peters out. we can see a lot wet weather developing in northern ireland is the day goes on in another batch of
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storms later on through north wales heading northwards into northern england. much of scotland in the north—east will remain dry and sunny and particularly hot here again. about 30 degrees as possible. some heavy showers and thunderstorms across the western fringes of scotland. northern england, however, very scotland. northern england, however, very warm scotland. northern england, however, very warm but storms developing through the afternoon. cooler in northern ireland and turning whether you through the day. a cool breeze across wales and the south—west and fair bit of cloud sunning the skies east north of london. temperatures up east north of london. temperatures up to around 28 degrees or so. some warm sunshine here to end the day. storms in northern england pushing through to southern and central scotla nd through to southern and central scotland for a while this evening. they will then fade away overnight. most they will then fade away overnight. m ost pla ces they will then fade away overnight. most places will become dry. the rain eases off in the north and a warm night, not as muddy as it has been with ted richards 12 or 13 degrees. starting off cloudy on sunday and it will stay that way for northern ireland and the scotland as well although the rain will have east of here. brightening up in england and wales were sunshine but we could import some late storms
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from the south—west that will drift away northwards into the evening. much cooler day in scotland, not 30 degrees. 17 about at best. some warmth still less at left for eastern parts of england. the showers and storms move northwards overnight to head further north into scotla nd overnight to head further north into scotland by the time we get to the bank holiday monday the rain will ease off later on. some sunshine to the south, perhaps, any warmth is just lingering in the south—east because the heat will be ebbing away. a humid start to the bank holiday weekend. there will be warm sunshine around but watch out for some heavy rain and more thunderstorms. now it's time for newswatch, with samira ahmed. this week, reactions to the bbc‘s coverage of the terror attacks in manchester. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. after the manchester arena bombing, we discuss how news should report the horror of a terrorist attack, without giving the perpetrators the publicity they crave. and we look at how newsround cover that news for its young audience.
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it was shortly after half past ten on monday night when the news came through of what would turn out to be the worst terrorist attack in the uk for almost 12 years. let's break away from the election campaign for a moment, we've got some news coming into us from out of the north—west, greater manchester police have warned people to stay away from manchester arena, as officers respond to what they are describing as an incident, amid reports on social media of some kind of explosion. by the following morning, the scale of the violence had become clear. breakfast invited three of those who had been at the ariana grande concert into the studio. i'm still processing it myself. i really admire you for coming on this morning and talking with such honesty about this, because there are all sorts of quotes that people have come out with, we will fight back, we will go on and we will continue,
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but at a time like this, ciaran, it is devastating to be involved in that and be part of what happened last night. yes, no, it is definitely devastating. that discussion divided newswatch viewers with anne williams one of a number concerned that the three young people were clearly traumatised. ifeel that at their age and so soon after the event, they should have been speaking to a trained counsellor, not the bbc. but adrian clark was also not alone in writing, i would like to commend the breakfast team for the sensitive and compassionate reporting this morning. in particular, i think dan walker did an exceptional job. he seemed to be empathising with the pain, showing compassion but also authority when it was needed. over the days that followed, though, there were further complaints about other eyewitness interviews and some of the images shown on television. on wednesday, the diplomatic row with the united states developed after the new york times printed close—up photographs of fragments
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of the bomb used and the apparent tattered remains of the backpack that held it. those photographs were also shown on bbc news, prompting craig rolfe to beg, please stop showing the pictures of the bombing evidence. you know that they can cause distress to the families of those concerned as you yourself have stated on television. it's time to stop pointing out the errors made by others and using it as an excuse to then do the same yourselves. the point was made by others as well, as in this anonymous telephone call. i am absolutely disgusted. the government was completely outraged by america showing pictures of the manchester bombing and the aftermath. and then the bbc showed a photo. i thought that we were better than that. there were more general concerns about the quantity of the coverage, playing into the hands of those responsible for the atrocity with mark dunsford wondering, is repeated analysis over every little detail really necessary or just
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counter—productive sensationalism ? by focusing on this one story to the virtual exclusion of all others, are you in effect aiding the terrorists by providing them with the oxygen of publicity? 0ther viewers objected to the repeated use of video showing panicked concertgoers fleeing the scene with jane mitchell recording this video for us. what i don't understand is why the bbc keeps playing this footage when there is one of these terrorist atrocities. of the people screaming as it is happening. what is the purpose of it? 0ur natural human reaction if we hear something like that, if we hear somebody else suffering and terrified, people being murdered, is to put our hands over our ears. it is dehumanising, weird and intrusive to have to keep listening to this and having it forced upon us. well, we put some of those points to bbc news and they told us... we know that the attack in manchester will be a source of upset and concern for our audience and so we always think very carefully
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about the images and footage we use to tell the stories. this was the biggest terrorist attack in the uk in ten years so it is clearly in the public interest to tell the story as it unfolds. we have provided our audience with a reliable source of news throughout the week, whilst remaining sensitive to the emotions of our audience. much of the revulsion at the attacks stems from it being directed largely at children and young people. one of the victims was just eight years old. that presents a particular journalistic challenge to the bbc programme and website specifically for children, newsround. how to report on a shocking event which is of special interest to its audience, without scaring them unnecessarily or sugar—coating the horrific events of monday night. here are some examples of how the programme makers answered that question. hello, lam ricky, welcome to a special newsround from manchester city centre. you're joining us here because late last night there was a terror attack at a ariana grande concert.
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behind me at the manchester arena. what is important to remember is that although events like this are very sad, they are also very rare. worrying stories are often in the news because they do not happen very often. so what should you do if you're feeling sad or anxious? talk about it. amongst the confusion last night, lots of people in manchester were helping each other out and hotels like this one in the city centre were also helping people caught up in the attack. ijust want to thank the people who helped them. does it put you off from maybe going into the city centre? i don't think it should put me off, but i am a little bit put off because i think, if they are trying to scare us, we should show them that we are not scared and we should not let them. newsround has been widely praised on social media for the approach it has taken this week, with tamal ray tweeting this; fantastic work by newsround, they should just take over the rolling coverage.
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and richard bourton echoed that. they never talked down to their audience and even as a young child, i respected the honest, clear way they told the news, explaining things carefully and completely. well, the editor of newsround is lewis james and hejoins us now from a studio in salford. lewis, how did you decide to cover the manchester bomb attack? hi, samira. as you said in your introduction, this was probably the most challenging event that any of us have had to cover on newsround, particularly because it appears that the attack was targeted specifically at children and young people at a pop concert. and we were aware right from the beginning, both from the scale of the story and the horrendous nature of it, but also the need for calm information in order for children to be able to put it in some kind of context and to help process it. where there images that you would not show, that other news outlets would? notjust explicit images, but for example, even in the arena in the aftermath?
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we chose not to show any pictures in the arena. i think, it is always a judgment call really that we have to make on how much we can show in order to properly tell a story, but also whether we are going to cause additional distress to children and we want to avoid that. we did not show anything from in the arena. we did not show injured people on stretchers. we did show emergency vehicles arriving and leaving. and we did show people talking about it. we did not show very distressed people. we used animation in particular, because that really helps us, because they can convey things through animation in a way that is reassuring to children and in a way that does not distress them and we also went out and spoke to children as well in the immediate aftermath. we spoke to children in manchester. they had already heard about it. they were already discussing it. they were fantastic, actually. they were able to contextualise it for the children and were able to provide reassurance by the way that they were dealing
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with it themselves. your coverage also focused on the positive offers of support, such as from the hotels and the taxi drivers. was that again, a deliberate decision to emphasise that aspect? yes, very much so. we emphasised the help that was given, i think, this is such a bleak story, in many ways, but one of the things and not just newsround, but other news organisations, as well as the bbc, because that night and afterwards, people rallied together, getting taxi rides for free, hotels opened their doors, people opened their doors to strangers on that evening and it was that kind of support. i think in the middle of something that is so horrendous, it is important, we feel, to tell our audience that lots of people are helping and coming together in order to help the people affected. you will know that adults really worry about how to explain a terrorist attack to a child. do you have a deliberate policy?
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from what you have told me, it sounds like you do. of trying to provide support for your audience? yes, we do. i think there is a realisation that there is a limit to what we can do and the best thing really for parents is to talk to their children and we direct children to their parents or other trusted adults, people like teachers, so that they can have that conversation, because we cannot have that conversation one on one with children. it is a conscious decision for us to do it and i think this week, the feedback we have had from the audience is that they appreciate that advice and that parents have appreciated it and have been referring to it on social media and so on. yes, it is a deliberate policy and we hope it is useful when things like this happen. are there any news events or stories that you feel you just would not cover for a newsround audience? no. i don't think there is anything we would not cover. i think we think very carefully about a number of things before we decide whether to cover it.
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in the case of these attacks, unfortunately, the scale of them and the revulsion at what happened was so large that we felt children would hear about it, potentially very quickly after the attack and that is why we made the decision to run with the events quite quickly on newsround. there is not anything that is off—limits but we do think, long and hard about whether we have the tools to do it and sometimes we will wait a little while until things are clear before we report things, because it is important to get things right for our audience. lewis james, thank you so much. thank you. finally, by the end of the week, the general election campaign had resumed, but when it was still suspended on wednesday, arthur gould wrote to us with this concern. while i accept that out of respect for those affected by the bombing, all election campaigning and coverage should cease, the bbc has introduced an element of bias that could have unfortunate effects. disproportionate time is being given to the government's voice on dealing with terrorism. 0pposition politicians are deemed to have no voice, no point of view.
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the conservatives are seen to be doing something while other parties seem to be entirely passive. the tory campaign is being waged indirectly. thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs or even appear on the programme, you can call us or e—mail us. you can find us on twitter and do have a look at previous interviews and discussions on our website. that is all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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three more arrests are made by detectives in manchester investigating monday's terror attack. two men in their 20s have been detained in the early hours on suspicion of terrorism offences. police across the uk mount a major operation to protect the public on the bank holiday weekend. arrangements for 1300 events have been reassessed. all 22 victims have now been named — most recently, tributes have been paid to 15—year—old megan hurley from merseyside.
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