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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 1, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. one of the biggest tv debates of the general election campaign has seen the main parties clash on brexit, the economy and immigration. there is no payment you don't want to add to, no tax you don't want to rise, but the fact is, we have to concentrate resources on the people who need it most. have you been to a food bank? have you seen people sleeping around our stations? have you seen. . . with you seen. . . with just a week to go before voting, the conservatives will put brexit at the heart of their campaign, while labour promise a cap on railfares. good morning, also coming up:
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donald trump will announce today if he's pulling america out also coming up: pulling america out of the paris climate change agreement, but chinese and eu leaders are preparing to pledge their support for the deal. i'm at the biggest ago cultural show in england where farmers like will gather to show off their animals and talk about the biggest issues ahead of next week in their industry. england get their campaign started against bangladesh at the oval in a couple of hours' time. carol is going wild with the weather looking at nature on our door steps. good morning. good morning from camley street a stone's throw from kings cross. it's a haven of tranquility. the wildlife trust launches its 30—days wild today, encouraging us in the cities to really engage with wildlife on our doorsteps. the weather's not looking too bad either. for most, it will be dry and sunny, however there's some rain
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coming in from the west. more on all of that in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will again put brexit at the heart of the conservative campaign today as she faces continued criticism for failing to take part in last night's television debate with other party leaders. the conservatives were represented by the home secretary, amber rudd in an event which saw heated exchanges on a range of issues, as our political correspondent vicki young reports. with a week to go, this was a chance foreall the parties to pitch their offer to voters and, at the last minute, jeremy corbyn decided it was worth turning up for. theresa may was ridiculed for staying away and it was left to her home secretary to fend off the attacks on cuts to public services, including disability benefits. public services, including disability benefitslj public services, including disability benefits. i know there is no extra payment you don't want to add to, no tax you don't want to rise, but the fact is, we have to concentrate our resources on the people who need it most and we have to stop thinking, as you do, that
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there's a magic money tree.|j to stop thinking, as you do, that there's a magic money tree. i would just say this, since amber rudd seems so just say this, since amber rudd seems so confident this is a country at ease with itself. have you been toa at ease with itself. have you been to a food bank? have you seen people sleeping around our stations? have you seen. . . cheering and applause. for amber to say this is a government that cares for the most vulnerable i think is downright insulting to the kind of people that i see insulting to the kind of people that isee in insulting to the kind of people that i see in my constituency surgery. tim farron was keen to make the liberal democrats case for staying in the single market after brexit. the liberal democrats have got a fully costed manifesto, i'll tell you what though there is a long—term economic plan underlying the whole of the liberal democrat manifesto, and that is don't leave the european single market and throw away £15 billion every single year in revenue. while others clashed over immigration, ukip suggesting britain would struggle to cope with rising numbers. we have to get the population under control, because if we carry on i the road we
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this debate shames no, no. i think this debate shames and demeans us all. i don't think there's anyone in this room or anybody watching this debate from cornwall to caithness who does not understand the positive contribution that people have made to this land who've come from the rest of europe and the rest of the world and demonising those people is totally unacceptable. applause. this was a crowded field with seven parties all desperate to have their say. as the party in government, it wasn't surprising that the conservatives came under sustained attack over their record. their response was to say that being in power requires difficult decisions. there were no clear winners in this debate but there was plenty of passion. vicki young, bbc news, cambridge. let's speak to our political correspondent leila nathoo, who's in westminster.
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exactly a week until polling day and the conservatives are trying to put brexit top of the agenda again. absolutely. i think theresa may will be keen to move on from last night's debate. she was repeatedly attacked for failing debate. she was repeatedly attacked forfailing to show debate. she was repeatedly attacked for failing to show up. her rivals saying that she was holding voters in contempt, it showed her complacency. amber rudd defending the decision saying it's about having a strong team and she was saying the other parties are squabbling. i think theresa may will havejudged squabbling. i think theresa may will have judged that it was right for her to appear above the fray and not ta ke her to appear above the fray and not take part. today, seven days to go, we have the two main parties returning to safe ground. theresa may will talk about brexit. she's saying this is a great national mission, it's an opportunity to transform the country's‘ and labour talking about rail fares, promising to cap the increase in railfares,
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talking um their policy on taking the railways back into public ownership as franchises expire. i think we see a return to the kind of key m essa g es think we see a return to the kind of key messages and with just seven days to go, the parties will be using every opportunity they can to get those through. later we'll be speaking to labour about their plans to renationalise the railways. that's at 0640. there has been widespread condemnation of a bomb blast in the afghan capital, kabul, which killed at least 90 people and injured more than 400 others. afghanistan's president, ashraf ghani, called the attack inhuman and cowardly, while the white house described it as atrocious. president trump is due to announce later today whether he'll pull the united states out of the paris climate agreement. china and the european union have been working on a statement in support of the deal, which pledges to cut global
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greenhouse emissions. mr trump has previously described climate change a chinese hoax and an american job—killer, as david willis reports from washington. the trump white house is said to be deeply divided on the issue of global warming. the president's daughter favours america remaining pa rt daughter favours america remaining part of the paris accord. as does the g7 whose leaders, angela merkel among them, took time out from last week's summit in sicily to lobby mr trump on the issue. even pope francis rallied to the defence of the historic accord when he welcomed the historic accord when he welcomed the president to the vatican. we are going to cancel the paris climate agreement. but having made that pledge on the campaign trail, it seems the president intends to stick to it, dealing what environmentalists say would be a shattering blow to the most comprehensive agreement on global warming ever reached. people announce his verdict, the president told his followers on twitter; in
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the rose garden of the white house. opponents fear it could prompt other members of the accord to ponder whether they too should think about withdrawing. america produces more in the way of greenhouse gases than any other country on the planet, apart from china. but president trump is keeping faith with fossil fuels in the hope of creating jobs. his critics say such a policy will never work and that by holding true to his pledge to put america first, he's faving isolationism over cooperation on one of the biggest challenges facing the planet. david willis, bbc news, washington. police investigating the manchester arena bombing have released a 21—year—old man from nuneaton without charge. ten people remain in custody as detectives try to establish whether the bomber, salman abedi, had any help. meanwhile, tickets for a benefit concert in aid of the victims of last week's attack will go on sale later this morning. artists including katie perry, take that, justin bieber and coldplay will all perform alongside ariana grande at the event on sunday.
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a prisoner who overpowered his guards to escape from hospital has been recaptured in wiltshire. michal kisiel who police described as dangerous was spotted by a member of the public yesterday evening. a number of ba board members are pushing for an independent inquiry into the it failure that meant to the cancellation of flights over the weekend. 75,000 people were affected by the disruption which ba blamed on a powerfailure. three quarters of primary school children in the uk are enjoying reading, the highest numbers on record, according to a survey by the national literacy trust. but keeping children reading into their teenage years is a different matter. the number of boys who said they enjoyed reading fell from 70 percent amongst those aged eight to eleven, to just a third amongst 14 to 16 year olds. rast night in a post, donald trump
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calls the internet to go into a frenzy. there was a message which said: not sure that word covfefe reacts. hillary clinton said people in covfefe houses shouldn't throw covfefe houses shouldn't throw covfefe stones. the tweet was deleted after six hours. a cup of covfefe. sets you up for the morning! with temperatures hitting 32 degrees in florida at the moment, you might be tempted to go for a dip to cool down. until, that is, you see something like this. a seven foot long alligator was removed from a family's swimming pool. it seems to be going quietly at first but then reacts with a death roll, normally used to kill prey. sarasota county sheriff's department said the unwelcome guest was eventually removed unharmed.
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it's now been moved to what they've described as a more ‘appropriate location'. not surpriseded he was doing that role being ta ken not surpriseded he was doing that role being taken out of the pool, just wanted a nice dip! kat is here now. imagine seeing that in your pool and thinking, i'll just now. imagine seeing that in your pool and thinking, i'lljust dive m, pool and thinking, i'lljust dive in, hang on a second what's that in the pool. i would be running away! i wouldn't do anywhere near that. that is terrifying. the champions trophy is the biggest global 50—overs cricket tournament outside of the world cup — and it starts in a few hours time with england as favourites. ben stokes has a breakfast fitness today to see if he can take part. what is the difference with that brea kfast test what is the difference with that breakfast test or an afternoon? because the match starts in a couple of hours' time, he's up early to go through the test to see if he can ta ke
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through the test to see if he can take part. there's no actual brea kfast. take part. there's no actual breakfast. i was being facetious, sorry. not like you at all. eoin morgan's men start the competition against bangladesh at the oval this morning — they have never won any major 50—over global tournament. sam warburton will captain the british and irish lions for the first warm—up match on their tour of new zealand on saturday. the flanker's set to play for the first time since suffering a knee injury in april. arsene wenger says he's got his sights set on the premier league title next season after arsenal finally confirmed yesterday that he's staying as manager for another two years. and the defending champion novak djokovic marches on in paris. the world number two is into the third round, along with nine—time champion rafael nadal. world number one andy murray is in second round action later today. 7? newsub 7 7 newsub plenty ? ? newsub plenty of early sport today. andy murray is on court in paris at 10 o'clock, straight after the programme, straight into the
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sport. carol is out for us this morning at a nature reserve that's a bit of a hidden gem in the king's cross area of london. good morning, carol. look at that! that's lovely. isn't it? ! look at this lovely pond, it's a beautiful natural park and you can see lots of lovely flowers, the trees are in blossom and you can probably hear the bird singing as well. the reason that we are here this morning is because the wildlife trust today launches its 30—day wild challenge. that is to encourage people that live in cities to get out and experience wildlife on their doorstep. you can find out more about that by going on to the wildlife trust website and it will tell you how to get involved. it will send you stickers and tell you what kind of activities you can get involved with as well. it's a beautiful start to the day here in london though. notjust in london but other areas too. it's also a
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mild start. temperatures are already in double figures. a bit of mist and fog around this morning but it will readily clear and won't last. for most, it's a dry start. you can see we have rain coming in initially across northern ireland where at times it will be heavy. it will drift eastwards, getting into scotla nd drift eastwards, getting into scotland and north—west england later, north—west wales and later again south—west england. so as we head through the course of the afternoon, we've got that rain across parts of scotland. again making good progress from the west, slowly moving east. a bit of cloud building ahead of it. we've also got it coming in across north—west england, but for eastern parts, it's dry and it will remain so. in fact, it will be a very warm day across parts of east anglia and the south—east. temperatures easily getting up to 2a, 25, possibly even 26. through the midlands towards hampshire, the isle of wight, dry and sunny weather. towards the south—west, the cloud will build as the rain starts to show its hand.
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for wales, north—west wales starting to see some rain, the cloud building ahead of it. further east you travel, the brighter and drier the conditions. for northern ireland, as we go through the course of the day, the rain will start to ease from the west. heading in through the evening and overnight, that rain will continue to journey. steadily eastwards. you can see the line of it through scotland, northern england, wales, south—west england. behind it, a few showers, ahead of it, clear skies and also some mist and fog patches forming as well. it will be a sultry night in the south—east, temperature range generally between 11 and 15. we pick up generally between 11 and 15. we pick up the rain again tomorrow moving eastwards, fragmenting and turning showery. behind it, sunny spells. ahead of it, we are pumping up some hotair ahead of it, we are pumping up some hot airfrom the ahead of it, we are pumping up some hot air from the near continent. that could spark off some thunder storms and more likely across east anglia and the south—east, but temperatures 26 or indeed 27. it depends on the progress of that
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weather front moving east. depends on the progress of that weatherfront moving east. on saturday, it will be clearing away all together. behind that for saturday and for sunday, we are looking at a day of sunshine and showers. it will feel fresher than today and tomorrow. we'll find that temperatures will be closer to where they should be at this time of year. so we are having a ball down here this morning, it really is a very pretty place to visit. i'm sure you are going to have lots of fun there and we are going to ask our viewers as well to send some pictures of hidden beauty spots on your doorstep. although it would no longer be hidden if you share it. little oasis of calm that one. kat has stayed with us to have a look at the papers. prince philip celebrating the 130th anniversary of the charity london youth. he's been a patron. it puts
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it inperspective, this, he's been a patron since 19117. the main story, have faith in me, may fighting back. you will be aware that she wasn't involved in the leaders debate last night and came in for some criticism for that. the message today, right back on brexit, we'll talk more about that later on and we'll be speaking to, amongst others, boris johnson. the person that did represent the conservatives was amber rudd. she's on the daily telegraph. a record number of people being hit by the 45p top rate of tax. it's saying because of wage inflation it's sent incomes above the threshold of £150,000 a year, there's been a reduction in pension tax relief as well. so by the end of this year, hmrc expects more than 350,000 people to be paying in that top rate of income tax. on the front—page of the daily mirror going back to election issues, the main story in connection with the nhs,
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this is stories about financing the nhs. it's been such a hot topic throughout the election debate. the bma quoting dr mark porter, the nhs is in bma quoting dr mark porter, the nhs isina bma quoting dr mark porter, the nhs is in a position where it has to put off spending because the money's run out leaving patients waiting in pain and uncertainty. you have been talking a lot about arsenal lately. that's done and dusted now, butjust when you think that football is over, here we are into transfer season, so over, here we are into transfer season, so there's lots of rumours on the back of the sun, a lot of other papers talking about this double deal for real madrid coming in for hazard from chelsea and david de gea. all the reporters in the bbc say that's nonsense and de gea is not going anywhere. this was an interesting one. this is a horse that's been entered into the derby ah real no—hoper but the owners are saying if it did come in the top six
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places, any money that it won would be donated to great ormond street hospital. the girl that rides it is a novice, she's had her licence for a novice, she's had her licence for a long time but hasn't ridden in many races. the british horseracing authority has said she's not good enough, she doesn't have the expaoenks, she's held her licence for years but only has one winner to her name. never ridden at epsom, never her name. never ridden at epsom, never ridden in the scale of the derby so they say she can't ride. it seems a little bit funny since they let victoria pendleton ride round the jumps at pendleton and she'd never the jumps at pendleton and she'd never ridden before in her life. there are always two sides to every story. it's the derby, one of the biggest races in the british racing calendar and she was unplaced on her one ride at kempton last night and incurred a four—day careless riding ban. who knows, maybe she is careless. i thought it was an interesting story, given victoria
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pendleton was given the chance to ride. this one is on the flat. ever wondered if you can tell how a sheep is happy or sad? i have. off snn we have sheep in my field in yorkshire. do you think you know? well, they just look cheerful, who knows. that is too vague. this is a survey into how a farmer is too vague. this is a survey into howa farmercan is too vague. this is a survey into how a farmer can step if the sheep are sad. contented sheep have their ears back and a ewe—shaped nose. that's the one on the left there. a u—shaped nose. the one on the right is different all together, ears forward and a v—shaped nose. is different all together, ears forward and a v-shaped nose. doesn't it depend on the... the nose changes shape. do you mean the nostrils? no, who knows. a v-shaped nose. i wonder if that works with humans. cardiff is preparing
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to host the biggest game in european football. tens of thousands ofjuventus and real madrid fans are expected to descend on the city for the champions league final this weekend. in the wake of the manchester arena attack, south wales police say they'll deploy their largest ever football security operation, as wyre davies has been finding out. this stadium has seen a rugby world cup final, several fa cup finals and played host to countless rock concerts. but this weekend's headliners are perhaps the biggest yet. certainly in terms of economic impact and the level of security. by the time the multi—million pound stars from real madrid and juventus emerge from the tunnel, the stadium will have been scoured, scanned and searched many times over. police teams have been drafted in from across the country. this is the biggest club football match in the world, but the security operation here in cardiff is almost unprecedented. 6500 police officers on duty. 600 of those will be armed
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and a complete vehicle lockdown around the welsh capital for three days. but a lot has changed in the world since cardiff was chosen as the venue for this final. attacks in paris, nice, berlin, westminster and only last week in manchester have shown how vulnerable big cities and big events can be. that made us look at the way in which those atrocities were carried out, so we've looked at different methods, such as we've had lone actors with vehicles. nice was a lorry, we've had the westminster attack which was a vehicle and stabbing. we are well aware of terrorist firearms attacks from previous occasions, so we've tried to look at all ways in which we can mitigate and prevent those attacks. hundreds of armed police on the streets of cardiff are deliberately visible deterrent, especially in the wake of manchester. but the decision to throw up such a wide cordon of concrete barriers, fences and to exclude traffic from today, will enclose the city centre in a virtual ring of steel. not that too many locals seem to be
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put out by the inconvenience. very, very glad it's here, it's great for the city. going to bring in business, is it? it should do, definitely. you've got the spanish and the italians, so hopefully they'll spend all their money. but there's certainly anxiety, definitely about any large gatherings, really. brings some money into cardiff and show where we are on the map for a change. every inch of cardiff real estate seems to have been draped with images of real madrid's local galactico, gareth bale. and while the economic impact is difficult to assess, some local businesses will benefit, others will feel squeezed out as the giants of the corporate world descend on cardiff. other cities would give their right arm to actually hold the champions league final and we've got to maximise this opportunity. i hope that the welsh and the uk governments are squeezing every hand of every businessman that comes in here and say, why don't you come here again?
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we can look what we can do for your business in this great country of ours. with 170,000 visiting fans, and another 200 million television viewers worldwide, this is an opportunity too good to miss. but nor can the city's security be taken for granted. wyre davies, bbc news, cardiff. farmers from all over the country are gathering at england's biggest agricultural show. sean's there for us this morning. this is a huge event isn't it, sean? that's sean the sheep. it's massive. that's not sean the sheep, we don't know the name yet. that sheep is not sean. not sure if it's happy or sad, we'll also figure that out during the morning. big day for these guys, it's a huge show. we are here to talk about the wider industry. looking after the sheep
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and cows here. over half a million people work in farming. that runs into the millions if you look at the wider supply chain. farms are really important for all of us. uk farmers produce over 60% of the food that is consumed in the uk. but it's also a big business. agricultural exports including things like livestock and grain amount to over £18 billion annually. any changes to the industry will be pretty big. that is what we are going to look at today. the main issue today at hand, william, good morning, happy birthday as well by the way. 16 well done. thank you. up early for your birthday. what is it you are doing here? trimming her up to make her look meatier. how do you get meaty, what is the thing you do to make her look meaty? slimming down there and strong back legs, a nice flat line across the top. is it
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six sheep you've got? six here. who is your best chance? this one, i reckon. we'll let you get on and catch up with you later in the morning. a big job for william here today. we have got the election next week as well. we'll talk about the issues for the industry over the next couple of hours. it's notjust brexit, it's relationships with suppliers, all that kind of stuff. we'll catch a bit more of the sheep as well, of course, they're the stars, but first the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. police investigating the fatal shooting of montana abdhou in kilburn have arrested two people in connection with her murder. a 19—year—old man and a 20—year—old man were arrested in west london on suspicion of murder in the early hours of this morning. they remain in custody at north london police stations. londoners are racking up credit card debt to cover the cost of living in the capital,
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according to a new report. renters in liverpool street, clapham junction, and putney are said to be most at risk of falling into persistent debt — as the report from experian found that people who live in those areas tend to be young and employed — but not saving. naturists are campaigning to be able to sunbathe on hampstead heath this summer. supporters of the naturist action group will be carrying out informal polls to gauge public opinion. the city of london corporation, which manages hampstead heath, said public nudity was prohibited by its bylaws and could lead to prosecution as a criminal offence. final preparations are underway to open up an underground train network that most londoners will never even have heard of. the london post office railway, also known as mail rail, stretched from whitechapel in east london to paddington in the west and ran for 22 hours a day. it closed in 2003. the new postal museum will open to the public injuly and will include the opportunity to ride through part of the tunnels on the modern
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equivalent of a mail train. a group of historians have started a petition to move a statue back to its resting place. it's george palmer's statue who was important in the biscuit industry. his statue was erected but it was then monthed. there are calls for it to be moved toa there are calls for it to be moved to a pedestrian part of the town. the factory hands were looked after. there was a sick fund and all sorts of fringe benefits that you wouldn't often find in the victorian factory. so he was a very concerned man for his workers and i think he was held in great esteem. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good service on most lines on the
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tube. minor delays on the overground. on tube. minor delays on the overg round. on the tube. minor delays on the overground. on the roads, the blackwall tunnel approach is slow. the m11, queues at harlow following an accident. lights not working on euston road. let's take a look at the weather. we have a technical problem so i'll tell you about the weather. : most early fog and mist patches will clear. a dry, bright warm day across all parts with increasing amounts of sunshine, light wind and a maximum temperature of 2a degrees. a fine end to the day in london with some evening sunshine for us. it will be a warm muggy night and remain dry with clear spells, minimum temperature or 13. that is it, we are back with a full bulletin in half an hour. bye. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. as breast surgeon, ian paterson, begins a 15—year prison sentence for carrying out unnecessary operations on patients, we'll hear from one woman who needlessly underwent a double mastectomy on his recommendation. jeff brazier has experienced bereavement in many forms, including helping his sons come to terms with the death of their mother, jade goody. he is now helping other people navigate their way through grief. and, their work takes them quite literally out of this world, but we'll meet the 13—year—old boy chosen by the uk space agency to help improve life right here on earth. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may will again put brexit at the heart of the conservative campaign today as she faces continued criticism for failing to take part in last night's television debate
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with other party leaders. let's speak to our political correspondent leila nathoo, who's in westminster. with exactly a week until polling day, the tories are trying to put brexit top of the agenda again aren't they? i don't think there were any knockout blows or any big stumbles for any of the parties to capitalise on or exploit this morning, but what did stand out was the reason may‘s absence. she was attacked by all the opposition parties forfailing absence. she was attacked by all the opposition parties for failing to show up. they said it showed co nte m pt show up. they said it showed contempt for voters, they said it was complacent and she couldn't be bothered to turn up and put her policies forward. there were various heated exchanges, welfare, food banks and security. but i think her decision not to show, it was a
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calculated decision. amber rudd, who was in her place was trying to present the opposition parties squabbling amongst themselves saying we are the only realistic party, you are fighting amongst yourselves and this is what will be happening if labour is in power propped up by a coalition of chaos. but we are seeing a return to the key messages, i returned to save political grounds, if you like from both main parties. the conservatives talking about brexit. theresa may will say she can only get brexit right and it is time to come together and make the most of the opportunities that brexit offers. while labour will be talking about rail fares. they are promising to cap railfares and renationalise the railways as franchises expire. with just a week to go, there is a return to these key m essa g es to go, there is a return to these key messages seeing as there was no killer blows from the debate last night. thank you.
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there has been widespread condemnation of a bomb in the diplomatic area of the afghan capital, kabul. yesterday's attack, which killed at least 90 people and has left more than 400 injured, has been described by the country's president, ashraf ghani, as inhuman and cowardly. a further explosion hit jalalabad airport this morning killing one person and injuring six others. president trump is due to announce later today whether he'll pull the united states out of the paris climate agreement. china and the european union have been working on a statement in support of the deal, which pledges to cut global greenhouse emissions. mr trump has previously described climate change as a chinese hoax and an american job—killer. police investigating the manchester arena bombing have released a 21—year—old man from nuneaton without charge. 10 people remain in custody as detectives try to establish whether the bomber, salman abedi, had any help. meanwhile, tickets for a benefit concert in aid of the victims of last week's attack will go on sale later this morning. artists including katie perry, take that, justin bieber and coldplay will all perform
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alongside ariana grande at the event on sunday. a prisoner who overpowered his guards to escape from hospital has been recaptured in wiltshire. michal kisiel, who police described as dangerous, was spotted by a member of the public yesterday evening. a number of british airways' board members are pushing for an independent inquiry into the it failure, which caused the cancellation of hundreds of flights over the weekend. up to 75,000 people were affected by the disruption, which ba has blamed on a powerfailure. the airline says all the baggage has now left heathrow. police in florida have a leech footage of tiger woods struggling to walk after being found asleep at the wheel of his car. he blamed his state and an unexpected reaction to
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prescription medicine following back surgery. scientists have poured cold water on the theory that we need to wash our hands with hot water to kill germs. a new study has found that cool water removes the same amount of harmful bacteria as warm or hot water. researchers from rutjers university in newjersey also found that antibacterial soap is no better than normal soap, but they do recommend scrubbing your hands for at least 10 seconds. do you ever think about washing your hands? i don't bother. that is my real, just don't bother. you are supposed to do it for ages, go up to your elbows. only if you are going into surgery! but there are proper ways of doing it. shall we talk about the cricket? the
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champions trophy starts this morning. lots to look forward to this morning. the cricket is the biggest global event in 50 overs cricket outside the world cup. it is like the atp world tour finals, the top eight players go to london at the end of the season. this is the same for cricket, at the top eight teams in the world and it is taking place in england and wales. good morning everyone. england will begin the champions trophy later this morning as favourites. it's the biggest 50—over global event outside of the world cup with just the world's top eight sides taking part. they begin their tournament against bangladesh at the oval, with their star all—rounder ben stokes expected to play despite a persistent knee injury. england's captain believes his side has a big chance of making history. we have a huge amount of talent. we have put ourselves in pressure situations before. the consistency of the site has been impressive over the last two years. we knew there
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would be ups and downs, but there hasn't been as many as i thought there would be. we are well ahead of our progression. i think we are coming into the tournament as one of the favourites and it is pretty flattering. sam warburton will captain the british and irish lions in their opening match against the provincial barbarians on sunday. the flanker will play his first game since suffering a knee injury in april, lining up in an all—welsh back—row. the scottish trio of greig laidlaw, tommy seymour and stuart hogg all start, as does kyle sinckler, who has yet to start a test for england. i was constantly panicking four yea rs i was constantly panicking four years ago when i was going to get a game and whether i was going to pull through. seeing other guys playing for the first time for the lions. umb that because you worked so hard to achieve it. now the ball is rolling and hopefully i can stay fit and geta rolling and hopefully i can stay fit and get a good view fixtures under my belt. and it's been confirmed this morning that warren gatland' son bryn will be in the provincial barbarians side against his dad's
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lions on saturday. bit of family rivalry going on. as if it wouldn't be fiercely fought enough! we brought you the news yesterday that arsene wenger was set to sign a new contract, well that deal has now been signed with the premier league title in wenger‘s sights. the frenchman joined the club back in 1996 and has extended his stay to 23 years after agreeing a new two—year deal. there was speculation about his future throughout the season, but after a disappointing fifth place finish the campaign ended with lifting the fa cup. the defending champion novak djokovic is into the third round at the french open. the world number two beat portuguese joao sousa in straight sets. eight—time grand slam champion andre agassi watched djokovic once again, having taken over as his coach on a temporary basis. also through is the nine—time champion rafael nadal. he won in straight sets
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as well — outclassing the dutchman robin haaser. petra kvitova's return to action came to an end in the second round of the women's singles. the two—times wimbledon champion only returned to full—practice last month after being stabbed at her home in december but lost in straight sets to bethanie mattek—sands. and finally with tennis, do you remember this? britain's davis cup tie in february against canada, the match was settled when the canadian player denis shapalov hit umpire arnaud gabas in the eye with a wild swing in anger. poor gabas had to undergo surgery for a fractured eye socket. all kinds of penalties for the player there. and gabas was making his comeback and history almost
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repeated itself. almost hit him in the high again. everyone is laughing, but he does look concerned. if you had undergone surgery and a tennis ball came flying toward the eye, i think the reaction was appropriate. thanks very much, we will see you later ordering. with exactly one week until the general election, the political parties are back on the campaign trail after last night's television debate. this morning, labour is promising to save rail commuters more than £1000 on a season ticket over the next five years. it's part of plans to renationalise the railways. let's speak to the shadow transport secretary, andy mcdonald. thank you forjoining us. how will this work, the renationalisation of the railways? yellow —— as the franchises reach their natural end, we will bring them back into the
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public railway. there are significant savings to have and there will be no pay—out to shareholders. some of those duplication costs throughout the injury will be avoided as well as costs by contractors as well. we can put a lid on fares. how can you put a lid on fares? by making sure fares are limited. there will be a cap placed on by a labour government, and the tory government have raised fa res by and the tory government have raised fares by 27% since 2010 and they have risen at rpi plus one and then rpi itself. it has a huge impact on fa res, rpi itself. it has a huge impact on fares, so we can do that by changing
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that index that applies to rail fa res, that index that applies to rail fares, regulating them in the first instance, but as more franchises come back into the system, expanding it to the other fares as well. they are still going to rise? yes, but there will be a cap put on them so they will become more and more affordable. as more and more franchises come back into the system, there is more opportunities to not only cap those fares, but explore a reduction in those fares as well. that has got to be the objective because they are the most expensive rail fares objective because they are the most expensive railfares in europe, which is unsustainable. will we see an improvement in service because rarely use is at a record, punctuality has significantly improved, so how will i see a difference when i take the train? punctuality and reliability has gone back over recent times. we have to
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look no further than the debacle of southern rail, the worst performing franchise in the country. we will see an improvement because there isn't the drive to extract value out of the system. we can make sure the services run for who they do run for which is the passengers. at the moment the whole thing is skewed towards different objectives. we have to focus on the passengers and make sure the service works for them and we get the best value from it. but you will be losing money from the franchise, not from renationalise in the franchises because that brings money into government? no, we will be saving a fortune. how can you quantify that? ican fortune. how can you quantify that? i can quantify it, by the service i have identified, the cost of running the franchise system itself cost hundreds of millions of pounds. the shareholder dividends going out to the state owned companies, owned by
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european national governments, those costs will be avoided. the costs of duplication, you have marketing by many, duplication, you have marketing by any duplication, you have marketing by many, many companies. management systems for many, many companies where you could bring those together and avoid those costs. and the subcontractors, these are huge items of costs that are unnecessarily incurred. we could stop that and bring it back into the system and deliver a better service and cap fa res deliver a better service and cap fares that are affordable. can we talk about last night's debate? jeremy corbyn was told he doesn't have a plan for brexit. the conservatives are putting this back to the top of the agenda and there has been criticism butjeremy corbyn didn't capitalise that theresa may wasn't there. did he perform well
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enough? he turned up, theresa may did not. she demonstrated her co nte m pt did not. she demonstrated her contempt for the british public and she is frightened in engaging in sensible debate. i think we got our message across well. it is difficult when there are seven participants, but now people are seeing jeremy corbyn much more often and people are warming to the message that he is presenting on behalf of the labour party. i think it was a success , labour party. i think it was a success, as have been other appearances and that is reflected in appearances and that is reflected in a narrowing in the polls. is he convincing the public he can take this country through brexit negotiations are effectively? the criticism is, that he can't?|j negotiations are effectively? the criticism is, that he can't? i have never known a more resilient character in my life. he has been co nsta ntly character in my life. he has been constantly vilified. he doesn't let any of it wear him down. he keeps going, he is the most determined individual and his principles are soundly based. i have every
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confidence injeremy corbyn and keir starmer leading our negotiations with the european union. i am looking upon them as partners, rather than this condescending attitude that some of our representatives have towards our european partners, which is not serving as well as a nation. thank you forjoining us on breakfast. good morning carol. we are in camberley street natural park. we are in the centre of london, just a stone's throw from king's cross and saint pancras station. lovely day in london at the moment. if you are just stepping out and you
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have an allergy to grass pollen, the levels are high across most of england and wales except northern england and wales except northern england where they are moderate and they are low across scotland and northern ireland. temperatures will continue to rise quickly. the mist and fog we have will live by eight or nine and there will be a fair bit of sunshine. exception is in the west where we have a band of rain and it will be heavy crossing northern ireland and it will make its way into western scotland. by 4pm this afternoon we will have the rain ensconced across western scotla nd rain ensconced across western scotland moving through central part as well. eastern scotland, at this stage, clouding over but still drive. further south into northern england, it will be fringing into the far north—west. the north—east of england staying dry with some sunshine. in the midlands and east anglia, essex, kent, the isle of wight, we are back into sunny skies. it will feel warm. temperatures
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around london getting up to 26 degrees through the course of the day and not too far away from that in the home counties. there will be a little bit more cloud in the south—west, but dry at this stage in the afternoon. in wales, a lot of dry weather, sunshine but starting to cloud over from the north—west as the weather from producing the rain shows its hand. as we head into northern ireland we are looking at the rain continuing to push away towards the east, brightening up in the day in the west. the band of rain will continue overnight to get steadily south eastwards, but you can see the progress it is making, it is not particularly fast. ahead of it in the south east it will be a sultry nights, with temperatures not getting any lower than 15 celsius. behind it there will be showers and a fresher feel to the night but the mist and fog that forms overnight will quickly lift in the morning and the band of rain will edge in the direction of the south east,
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fragmenting and turning showery. there will be warm or hot air from the near continent tomorrow. across eastern part of england. that could spark a few showers and possibly a few thunderstorms across east anglia and the south—east of england. on the other side of the weather front, we are back in the sunshine. saturday, we lose the weather front from the south—east and as it clears fresher air will follow in behind. for saturday and sunday we're looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers with temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage. and that means, today is the first day of summer. but only in meteorological terms. ididn't meteorological terms. i didn't know that, thank you carol. the weather looks very summary. send usa the weather looks very summary. send us a picture of hidden beauty spots on your doorstep if you don't mind sharing them. obr shoulder, i can see pigs‘
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bottoms. these guys were only born injanuary and they will be on show later. they use commercial baby oil to make them look more pristine. martin, everything going to plan so far? so far, they have been for walk this morning, they are now eating. we will look at you or leaving them later. all morning we are talking about the industry, so we have brexit, the election next week and be odd two big things on the
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horizon. £18 billion we exported. any small changes could affect the business a lot. let‘s chat to a couple of people. james, b farmer and melanie from the national farmers‘ union. we‘ll start would thursday, is there one thing that you wish you‘d seen the parties come up you wish you‘d seen the parties come up with that you haven‘t seen yet? as ever, we want to see more commitment to british farming and food production. the manifestos have given more of an indication than others. ourjob is to talk to as many prospective candidates as we can about what is important for farmers and growers across this region and beyond. are you happy with say theresa may and jeremy corbyn and what their plans are for the farming industry after the election and the brexit negotiations? we always want more. we have seen a commitment in the conservative manifesto that talks
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about continuing means of support until the end of the parliament, which is good news as we go into brexit. that will have challenges and opportunities and we need commitment in the shorter term in transition to ensure farmers can respond. the labour party said they will prioritise access to the european market for farmers. how important is that for the british industry? critical, any access from a trade point of view is the most critical thing to this election and beyond to brexit. it affects everything, we are an exporter, import driven industry and it affects the price of everything we produce in terms of how we deal with competitors and everything else. produce in terms of how we deal with competitors and everything elsem terms of what the world might look like for the farming industry after an election, does it make too much difference who get in or is it all about the negotiations? looking at the manifestos, it is critical to the manifestos, it is critical to the industry who does it get in and
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how they looked after us as a sector and the wider economy. i think we need to enter brexit with the strongest negotiating position and the strongest government possible. immigration has been a big topic, whether it is people coming from inside the european union are outside the european union. if there was more restrictive labour for a labour force around the uk, put that impact the farmers here? yes, i was talking to a strawberry grower from a farm just outside bridgwater. he was talking about the fact he has a labour force who have stuck with him for 14 years, 70 to 150 foreign labour that he is reliant on to do hisjob for the retailers labour that he is reliant on to do his job for the retailers and to continue to provide british strawberries at this time of the year and beyond. clearly, strawberries at this time of the yearand beyond. clearly, our strawberries at this time of the year and beyond. clearly, our access to labour will be crucial. notjust within the core farming sectors but within the core farming sectors but within the core farming sectors but
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within the abattoir, the food and manufacturing trade which is 108 billion to the economy in this country, it all relies on a proportion of foreign labour. james, lots of people want to see immigration reduced, is it possible to have that and have the farming industry have the workers it needs? that, i'm not so sure about. the uk economy is close to full employment so economy is close to full employment so there is a massive need for the level of unskilled labour. i am not sure level of unskilled labour. i am not sure it will be easily settled within the uk. we have an ageing population and that is not going to change our democratic demi moore. —— any more. we need some level of management of immigration. thank you very much. over the morning i am here, look at these guys. what more do you need to see in the morning when you are getting ready for a
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show. i am when you are getting ready for a show. iam not when you are getting ready for a show. i am not sure if these piglets are upfora show. i am not sure if these piglets are up for a prize today, the mother might be. but all over the morning we will be having a look at all these animals on display. there are thousands of livestock. it is getting noisy. although it has quietened down as they are eating their breakfast. but that is what you want to see, election next week, never mind that! bunch of piglets is all you need. look at that! something relaxing looking at that. there is. little wonder round, chat. shall wejust there is. little wonder round, chat. shall we just leave it on them for a while. we will go back to them later on. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning... as cardiff prepares to host the biggest game in european football, we‘ll find out about the massive security operation that‘s being put in place for the champions league final. time to get the news, travel and
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weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m victoria hollins. two people are still being questioned over the fatal shooting ofa questioned over the fatal shooting of a woman yesterday in london. she was killed outside a block of flats. londoners are racking up credit card debt to cover the cost of living in the capital, according to a new report. renters in liverpool street, clapham junction, and putney are said to be most at risk of falling into persistent debt — as the report from experian found that people who live in those areas tend to be young and employed — but not saving. naturists are campaigning to be able to sunbathe on hampstead heath this summer. supporters of the naturist action group will be carrying out informal polls to gauge public opinion. the city of london corporation, which manages hampstead heath, said public nudity was prohibited by its bylaws and could lead to prosecution as a criminal offence.
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final preparations are underway to open up an underground train network that most londoners will never even have heard of. the london post office railway, also known as mail rail, stretched from whitechapel in east london to paddington in the west and ran for 22 hours a day. it closed in 2003. the new postal museum will open to the public injuly and will include the opportunity to ride through part of the tunnels on the modern equivalent of a mail train. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. let‘s take a look at the weather. welcome to the start of the
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meteorological summer. more sunshine around and sunny spells into the afternoon and we are into the warm and humid air. i‘ll start to the day. mist and fog patches lifting nicely through the morning. sunny spells with a bit more cloud building the afternoon. a light, southerly breeze and top temperatures 23 and 26. plenty of late sunshine to enjoy. overnight it is looking dry and mild. mist patches into tomorrow morning and we start the day on 14 or 15 celsius. tomorrow, this is the weather front that will change the weather in time for the weekend. temperatures will be even higher, 26 or 27 celsius,
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plenty of sunshine to the morning and maybe scattered showers to end the day. feeling pressure to end the weekend. temperatures back down to where they should be at this time of year. showers about but also spells of sunshine. iam back of sunshine. i am back with the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a leaders debate with one missing. the prime minister came under repeated attack for not taking part, and there were heated exchanges over immigration and cuts to public services. there is no payment you don‘t want
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to add to, no tax you don‘t want to rise, but we have to concentrate resources on people who need it most. have you been to a food bank? have you seen people sleeping around our stations? have you seen it? with just a week to go before voting, the conservatives will put brexit back at the heart of their campaign, while labour are promising a cap on railfares. good morning it‘s thursday 1stjune. donald trump will announce today if he‘s pulling america out of the paris climate change agreement, but chinese and eu leaders are preparing to pledge their support for the deal. as the disgraced breast surgeon ian paterson begins a 15 year prison sentence, we‘ll talk to one patient who learnt her double mastectomy was completely unnecessary. good morning, i‘m at the biggest ago
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cultural show in england where animals are being shown off. we are also talking about the big issues affecting the farming industry ahead of the election next week. in sport — they‘re favourites to win the champions trophy. and england get their campaign started against against bangladesh at the oval in just a couple of hours‘ time. and carol‘s going wild with the weather, looking at the nature on our doorsteps. good morning from camley park, a stone‘s throw from kings cross. it‘s a beautiful start to the day. we are here because today the wildlife trust launches its 30 days wild campaign which is encouraging people, particularly those that live in cities, to get out and experience the natural world we live in. the forecast today is a good one for most. dry with sunshine, however, there is rain coming in for scotland and northern ireland. we‘ll have more in about 15 minutes.
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first, our main story. theresa may will again put brexit at the heart of the conservative campaign today as she faces continued criticism for failing to take part in last night‘s television debate with other party leaders. the conservatives were represented by the home secretary, amber rudd in an event which saw heated exchanges on a range of issues, as our political correspondent vicki young reports. with a week to go, this was a chance for all the parties to pitch their offer to voters and, at the last minute, jeremy corbyn decided it was worth turning up for. theresa may was ridiculed for staying away and it was left to her home secretary to fend off the attacks on cuts to public services, including disability benefits. the prime minister can't be bothered. i'm not afraid to defend my principles and values. it's the most important election in her lifetime and then not even be bothered to come and debate the issues at stake. it was left to her home secretary to fend off the attacks in cuts to public services, including disability benefits.
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i know there is no extra payment you don‘t want to add to, no tax you don‘t want to rise, but the fact is, we have to concentrate our resources on the people who need it most and we have to stop thinking, as you do, that there‘s a magic money tree. i would just say this, since amber rudd seems so confident this is a country at ease with itself. have you been to a food bank? have you seen people sleeping around our stations? have you seen... cheering and applause. for amber to say this is a government that cares for the most vulnerable i think is downright insulting to the kind of people that i see in my constituency surgery. tim farron was keen to make the liberal democrats case for staying in the single market after brexit. the liberal democrats have got a fully costed manifesto, i'll tell you what though there is a long—term economic plan underlying the whole of the liberal democrat manifesto, and that is don't leave the european single market and throw away £15 billion every single year in revenue. while others clashed over immigration, ukip suggesting britain would struggle to cope with rising numbers. we have to get the population under
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control, because if we carry on on the road we are on, we'll have a population of 80 million by the middle of the century. ukip keep using this issue, they want to whip up people‘s hatred, division and fear and that‘s why they talk about immigration. no, no, no. i think this debate shames and demeans us all. i don't think there's anyone in this room or anybody watching this debate from cornwall to caithness who does not understand the positive contribution that people have made to this land who've come from the rest of europe and the rest of the world and demonising those people is totally unacceptable. applause. this was a crowded field with seven parties all desperate to have their say. as the party in government, it wasn‘t surprising that the conservatives came under sustained attack over their record. their response was to say that being in power requires difficult decisions.
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there were no clear winners in this debate but there was plenty of passion. vicki young, bbc news, cambridge. our political correspondent is in westminster for us. the absence of theresa may clouded that somewhat. but today is another day, what are the big issues? because there was no fallout really from the debate last night, no gaffes, no knockout blows that were landed, no trump cards to try to exploit today, it‘s just about returning to key messaging today. jeremy corbyn benefitted from simply from turning up, because of theresa may‘s absence, rather than because of any punches that he landed particularly effectively. i think the audience were quite supportive of jeremy corbyn, think the audience were quite supportive ofjeremy corbyn, but of course, there were plenty of attacks from amber rudd about his economic policy, the home secretary who was standing infor policy, the home secretary who was standing in for theresa may. but i
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think the overwhelming take away from last night‘s debate will be theresa may‘s absence. it was a risk for her not to turn up. her opponents accuse her of holding voters in contempt and of complacency. i think she judged voters in contempt and of complacency. i think shejudged it was better to see above the fray. she‘ll return to one of the key m essa g es she‘ll return to one of the key messages today, brexit, she wants to say it‘s a great national mission, only she will have the power, she has the capacity to get brexit right on behalf of britain. labour though also returning to safe ground, talking about rail increases, promising to cap the rise in rail fa res promising to cap the rise in rail fares and talking up their policy to renationalise the railways as franchises expire. i think with just seven days to go, it‘s time to get back to basics for both main parties. thank you very much. in just over an hour, we‘ll be speaking to the foreign secretary, borisjohnson. president trump is due to announce later today whether he‘ll pull the united states out of the paris climate agreement. china and the european union have been working on a statement in support of the deal,
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which pledges to cut global greenhouse emissions. mr trump has previously described climate change a chinese hoax and an american job—killer, as david willis reports from washington. the trump white house is said to be deeply divided on the issue of global warming. the president‘s daughter favours america remaining part of the paris accord. as does the g7 whose leaders, angela merkel among them, took time out from last week‘s summit in sicily to lobby mr trump on the issue. even pope francis rallied to the defence of the historic accord when he welcomed the president to the vatican. we are going to cancel the paris climate agreement. but having made that pledge on the campaign trail, it seems the president intends to stick to it, dealing what environmentalists say would be a shattering blow to the most comprehensive agreement on global warming ever reached. people announce his verdict, the president told his followers he will announce his verdict,
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the president told his followers on twitter; in the rose garden of the white house. opponents fear it could prompt other members of the accord to ponder whether they too should think about withdrawing. america produces more in the way of greenhouse gases than any other country on the planet, apart from china. but president trump is keeping faith with fossil fuels in the hope of creating jobs. his critics say such a policy will never work and that by holding true to his pledge to put america first, he‘s favouring isolationism over cooperation on one of the biggest challenges facing the planet. there has been widespread condemnation of a bomb blast in the afghan capital, kabul, which killed at least 90 people and injured more than 400 others. afghanistan‘s president, ashraf ghani, called the attack inhuman and cowardly, while the white house described it as atrocious. police investigating
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the manchester arena bombing have released a 21—year—old man from nuneaton without charge. ten people remain in custody as detectives try to establish whether the bomber, salman abedi, had any help. meanwhile, tickets for a benefit concert in aid of the victims of last week‘s attack will go on sale later this morning. artists including katie perry, take that, justin bieber and coldplay will all perform alongside ariana grande at the event on sunday. a prisoner who overpowered his guards to escape from hospital has been recaptured in wiltshire. michal kisiel who police described as dangerous was spotted by a member of the public yesterday evening. president trump‘s tweet involving that word that we don‘t really know, was deleted after six hours. he does treat, by all accounts, late at night. that‘s the time he gets busy.
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sorry, i was just enjoying my covfefe. a disgraced surgeon who carried out unnecessary breast cancer operations on hundreds of patients is beginning a 15 yearjail sentence. yesterday, ian paterson was convicted at nottingham crown court of 20 charges against 10 former patients, but hundreds more underwent needless and invasive procedures following his advice. we‘ll discuss this in a moment with one of his former patients, but first let‘s have at look at the facts in more detail. yesterday ian paterson was sentenced to 15 years imprisonment. he was found guilty of 17 cowans of wounding with intent and three of unlawful wounding. this was against ten patients who he treated between 1997 and 2011 at a privately run
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hospital. in sentencing paterson, mr justicejeremy hospital. in sentencing paterson, mr justice jeremy baker said: the surgeon lost sight of the impact the procedures would have on his patients, while trying to boost his reputation for his own gain and had played on patients‘ fears by exaggerating or inventing the threat of cancer. outside the court, some of cancer. outside the court, some of his former patients spoke about their ordeal. i lost absolutely everything. he took everything away from me and i‘m still, up until today, this has been going on now since the 90s and only today i‘ve gotjustice. since the 90s and only today i‘ve got justice. throughout the trial, he's made no attempt to show any remorse he's made no attempt to show any remorse for his actions. and maybe revealing his true character, rather than the charming professional man we all thought he was. i'm still processing if i think 15 years is enough for somebody who has shown no remorse, enough for somebody who has shown no remorse, who's put his patients
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through hell, if 15 years is enough. we‘re joined now by one of ian paterson‘s former patients. judy conduit needlessly underwent a double mastectomy. jew dirks you were in court yesterday. what were your feeling seeing the sentence handed out? —— judy. it was relief. personally i didn‘t think the sentencing was long enough for what he did to everybody. i think he should have got a life sentence. but thejudge made i think he should have got a life sentence. but the judge made the decision of 15 years, but i think he should serve that 15 years, i don‘t think he should be allowed out after seven and a half. a lot of people made reference to the point that you we re made reference to the point that you were there in court, about his lack of remorse, about his attitude that
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seemed to carry on until the point that he was taken away from the courtroom? yes. i mean, hejust sat there and, as the judge was reading, he went through all the ten witnesses individually and what he‘d done to them, and he just sat there shaking his head. as if to say, what are you on about, that‘s not me. obviously it did have a huge detrimentam impact on the people performing unnecessary surgeries. you were one of those people who was, conned? conned into this? yes. wham what happened ? was, conned? conned into this? yes. wham what happened? you first realised you had some lumps in your breast and so went to see your gp?|j breast and so went to see your gp?” went to see my own gp and she referred me to spire, not to mr paterson directly, but when i rang up, he was the first available appointment which i accepted. he sort of conned me into believing
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that these lumps were what were no known cause for these lumps, no known cause for these lumps, no known cure, very rare, iwas known cause for these lumps, no known cure, very rare, i was only the third person in his career that he‘d ever come across with this disease. but the other two ladies both finished up with mastectomies. so straightaway, i was going down the line of thinking, well that‘s where i‘m heading. the line of thinking, well that‘s where i'm heading. and what happened long—term? where i'm heading. and what happened long—term ? what happened ? where i'm heading. and what happened long-term? what happened? well, i think it was four operations that he did, during the course of the rest of that year to remove lumps which he confirmed to me was a disease and we got to the end of that process and he told me he couldn‘t remove any more lumps, that i really needed to seriously consider having the double mastectomy because it was the only way to control this disease. so what ended up happening? you had this and more operational procedures
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as well? i had the double mastectomy and immediate reconstructions after each one. the first operation went fine, no problems at all. the second operation, there was big problems with it. i developed a blood clot next to the heart and they hadn‘t got the specific instrument to remove the blood clot so at the time the surgeon who was doing the operation with mr paterson sent to selly steven oak hospital which was then in birmingham dr —— selly oak hospital in birmingham. i was under anaesthetic for hours. be as clear as you can on this, what you know now is that none of this was necessary , now is that none of this was necessary, none of this whatsoever. so in your head, how‘ve you tried in any way to explain why he would have done what he did to you?” any way to explain why he would have done what he did to you? i can't. i
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don‘t know. i mean, i can think that he was money motivated and ijust think he‘d got this god complex of inventing putting the fake diseases and putting the fear of god in you, knowing there was nothing there, doing the operation, and then relishing in his mind in some sick way that he could come back and say i‘ve cured you. way that he could come back and say i've cured you. do you get any sense now that there are safeguards in place that would mean this couldn‘t happen again? not at the moment but i‘m hoping that there‘s going to be a public inquiry ifjeremy hunt gets back in, if the conservatives win the election and he‘s kept as health minister, he‘s promised a public inquiry and i‘m actually with thompson solicitors who‘re launching a patients before profits so i would like to see something put in place.
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and to think that if the people he‘d been reported to in the hospitals had taken notice, most of us this wouldn‘t have happened to. judy, thank you so much for coming on and talking to us about what happened to you. we appreciate it. thank you. carol is out this morning and has found herself a beautiful place, an oasis in the middle of a big city. carol. that is right, charlie, i‘m in the centre of london at camley park natural park, it‘s two acres of natural park. we have seen geese and goslings wandering around. behind me you can see the pond, we have irises, it‘s really pretty. yet on the other side, life is starting in london as people make their way into work. we have had joggers. it‘s busy over there. this is really a haven of tranquility. if you have an
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allergy to pollen, the pollen levels across england and wales are high. the exception is across the north of england where they‘re moderate and in northern ireland and scotland they‘re low. the themture currently in london isjust above 13 they‘re low. the themture currently in london is just above 13 and they‘re low. the themture currently in london isjust above 13 and it‘s not just in london isjust above 13 and it‘s notjust in london, for most of us this morning it‘s a mild start. now, as we go through the course of the morning, we find any mist and fog will lift quite readily in the next couple of hours and then most of us will have a dry start with a fair bit of sunshine. in the sunshine, the temperature will pick up quickly. towards the west, we have a weather front coming quickly. towards the west, we have a weatherfront coming in. as quickly. towards the west, we have a weather front coming in. as that crosses northern ireland, introducing stronger winds and also some heavier rain, it will push east, getting into western scotland through the course of the day. by the afternoon, what we are looking at is that rain coming in across the west of scotland, making progress towards the east with cloud building ahead of it. we‘ll see it get into the far north—west of england, just the far north—west of england, just the fringes. the rest of northern england stays dry. as we come south
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through the midlands to east anglia, essex and kent, hampshire and towards the isle of wight, it will bea towards the isle of wight, it will be a warm afternoon. in elight winds we could have temperatures up to 26. towards the south—west, through dorset, somerset, gloucestershire, devon and cornwall, a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine. a bit more cloud coming in across the extreme south—west ahead of the weather front. for wales, a extreme south—west ahead of the weatherfront. for wales, a lot of dry weather. we‘ll start to see some rain getting in across anglesey and the tip of north—west wales at this stage. northern ireland, the rain continues to drift through so we‘ll have a late improvement into the west. through the evening and overnight period, that rain will continue to progress slowly south—east wards. behind it, there‘ll be some cloud and a few showers. ahead of it, across england and wales, there‘ll be some clear skies, mist and fog patches forming. in the south—east, it will be a sticky night. any mist and fog will readily clear tomorrow. as the front
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heads towards the south—east, it will tend to weaken and fragment and turn more showery. we are pumping out some very warm air into eastern england tomorrow. that could spark off some showers and in east anglia and the south—east there is the risk of some of them turning thundery in nature. the other side of the rain band, we are back into sunshine in fresher conditions. by the time we get to saturday, the weather front producing that rain clears into the near continent, leaving us all in fresher conditions, notjust for saturday but also for sunday and both days we are likely to see a mixture of sunshine and showers. temperatures closer to where they should be at this stage injune, charlie and naga. looks marvellous there. just wonderful carol, thanks so much. have you got a little place tucked away somewhere, like in your own back garden, a place where you can go for some calm. send us a picture. social media has reached everyone‘s
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lives and the campaigning hasn‘t ignored that. here is a selection of some of the ads you may have noticed on your social media timelines from labour, the liberal democrats and the conservatives. it‘s called microtargeting. we can learn a little more about this from jess blair from the electoral reform society. good morning. a lot of people will have seen some of this, ora people will have seen some of this, or a lot of this messaging, whatever social media platforms they‘re on. this is becoming more and more important? yes, digital campaigning is nothing new, but the levels of it we are seeing in this election have grown exponentially. when people are on facebook, they are liking things daily and parties use that information to gather information about you to target people with what they think they want to hear. how
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effective is it, because there is a resista nce effective is it, because there is a resistance to just general advertising being targeted to us, you know, on our social media pages, people resent that, so why wouldn‘t they resent it when it comes to political campaigning? we don't know what the impact of dingical campaigning —— digital campaigning is going to be in this election. trump in america spent up to $77 million per month on facebook advertising, so it will have a huge impact. with trump's spending, did that have a direct impact? we can't measure it exactly but it‘s bound to have implicated the result somehow. is the thinking that what you do is hopefully have some kind of a profile of a person because of what they do on social media, so you approach the people who might already be on your side or, are you doing the thing they really need to do, which is change people‘s votes, so do you deliberately target people
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who you think probably aren‘t naturally your voters. what are they doing? with facebook now, you can do everything. it‘s not a bill board that everyone sees in the street, parties have hundreds and hundreds of adverts, different ones going to different people that they think might impact the vote in a more strategic way. how much of the resources a re strategic way. how much of the resources are parties using? in terms of percentage—wise, how much focus is there on social media campaigning, as opposed to dropping leaflets through doors?” campaigning, as opposed to dropping leaflets through doors? i suspect it‘s going to grow more and more as we hit the next election and this election but labour and the conservatives are both spending over £1 million this time around so it‘s something that they are focussing more and more on. something that they are focussing more and more 011. ll“! a something that they are focussing more and more on. in a funny way, looking at the images, the thinking behind it might be full of changing the way thicks are done, the pictures and messages are
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old—fashioned —— pictures and messages are old —fashioned —— the pictures and messages are old—fashioned —— the way things are done. the messages haven't changed, the way we use them have changed and the way we use them have changed and the ability for parties to be much more focussed, sending the messages they think voters might want to hear that will change their minds. is this one of the target areas particularly for younger people? it's particularly for younger people? it‘s so dangerous to make assumptions about who uses social media most because that‘s clearly not the case any more, but maybe inevitably they would be thinking, here is an avenue into people who won‘t have been watching say the debate last night for example? we genuinely don‘t know. that is the problem with this type of campaigning, the lack of transparency, we don‘t know what the parties are saying and don‘t know who they are targeting because the only people who see the ads are the intended recipients. thank you very much. farmers from all over the country are gathering at england‘s biggest ago cultural show and sean is there for us this morning. that
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is there for us this morning. that is not sean. sean, where are you? that is not me! i‘m in somerset, the biggest ago cultural show in england. that is not a big sheep that, is hours and hours of brushing and fluffing to get him look like that. lots of livestock here today. people are working hard. the reason we are here is not just to is notjust to the animals, but to see what we export. any small changes to the industry will affect that. half a millionjobs rely on that, and the food on your plate, 60% of the food we eat in the uk comes from farms in the uk. so, over the morning we‘ll look at that. harry is here with me, you‘ve got a
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job for me, where are we off to? we are going to go and sort out these sheep, but first the news travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m victoria hollins. two people are still being questioned over the fatal shooting of montana abdhou in kilburn. a 19—year—old and 20 year old were arrested in west london on suspicion of murder in the early hours of yesterday. montana was killed near a children‘s playground in malvern road a week ago. londoners are racking up credit card debt to cover the cost of living in the capital, according to a new report. renters in liverpool street, clapham junction, and putney are said to be most at risk of falling into persistent debt — as the report from experian found that people who live in those areas tend to be young and employed — but not saving. naturists are campaigning to be able to sunbathe on hampstead heath this summer. supporters of the naturist action group will be carrying out informal polls to gauge public opinion.
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the city of london corporation, which manages hampstead heath, said public nudity was prohibited by its bylaws and could lead to prosecution as a criminal offence. final preparations are underway to open up an underground train network that most londoners will never even have heard of. the london post office railway, also known as mail rail, stretched from whitechapel to paddington but closed in 2003. the new postal museum will open to the public injuly and will include the opportunity to ride through part of the tunnels on the modern equivalent of a mail train. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there are currently minor delays on the circle and hammersmith and city lines following a signal failure at paddington. and also minor delays on london overground between highbury and islington and crystal palce. on the roads, traffic on the a13 is building westbnd from dagenham eastbound at richmond
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circus following a broken down bus , with congestion back over twickenham bridge. now the weather. warm and humid air, so it‘s a mild start to the day. a few early mist and fog patches around, but that is lifting nicely. lots of sunshine around this morning, sunny spells with more cloud building into the afternoon. a light southerly breeze. top temperatures between 23 and 26. watch out, the pollen levels will be creeping up. plenty of late sunshine around this evening. sunshine to enjoy tonight. overnight, it‘s looking dry and mild. mist patches again into tomorrow morning. we start the day off on 14 or 15. tomorrow, this is the weather front thatis tomorrow, this is the weather front that is going to change the weather
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in time for the weekend. tomorrow we are still in the warm and muggy air. temperatures will be even higher, at 26 or 27. plenty of sunshine through the morning and maybe some scattered showers around to end the day. feeling fresher in time for the weekend. temperatures back down to where they should be at this time of year. there could be some showers about, but also some spells of sunshine. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. theresa may will again put brexit at the heart of the conservative campaign today, as she faces continued criticism for failing to take part in last night‘s television debate with other party leaders. the event saw heated exchanges on a range of issues including brexit and immigration. meanwhile, labourare, this morning, pledging to save commuters a 1000
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pounds on season tickets over five years, as part of plans to renationalise the railways. in just over half an hour, we‘ll be speaking to the foreign secretary, borisjohnson. president trump is due to announce later today whether he‘ll pull the united states out of the paris climate agreement. china and the european union have been working on a statement in support of the deal, which pledges to cut global greenhouse emissions. mr trump has previously described climate change as a chinese hoax and an american job—killer. police investigating the manchester arena bombing have released a 21—year—old man from nuneaton without charge. 10 people remain in custody as detectives try to establish whether the bomber, salman abedi, had any help. meanwhile, tickets for a benefit concert in aid of the victims of last week‘s attack will go on sale later this morning. artists including katie perry, take that, justin bieber and coldplay will all perform alongside ariana grande at the event on sunday. a number of british airways‘
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board members are pushing for an independent inquiry into the it failure, which caused the cancellation of hundreds of flights over the weekend. up to 75,000 people were affected by the disruption, which ba has blamed on a powerfailure. the airline says all the baggage has now left heathrow. police in florida have released footage of the golfer tiger woods struggling to walk, after he was found asleep at the wheel of his car. the 14—time major champion was subsequently arrested for driving under the influence but was not found to have been drinking. he blamed his state on an "unexpected reaction" to a mix of prescription medicine following back surgery. scientists have poured cold water on the theory that we need to wash our hands with hot water to kill germs. a new study has found that cool water removes the same amount of harmful bacteria as warm or hot water. researchers from rutjers university
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in newjersey also found that antibacterial soap is no better than normal soap, but they do recommend scrubbing your hands for at least 10 seconds. makes you think a bit? i am hoping it brings an end to the scalding hot ta ps it brings an end to the scalding hot taps in public toilets. it hurts. you need to toughen up. i will stick to the cold tap. what have you got for us. talking about the cricket. just three hours until the cricket. just three hours until the start of the champions trophy which is one of the biggest global 50 overs cricket event in the world, just behind the world cup. second in terms of how prestigious it is. eight of the best teams in the world. they only ones allowed to
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compete. england are favourites and we have never won a global 50 overs cricket tournament yet. until now? possibly. good morning everyone. england will begin the champions trophy later this morning as favourites. it‘s the biggest 50—over global event outside of the world cup with just the world‘s top eight sides taking part. they begin their tournament against bangladesh at the oval, with their star all—rounder ben stokes expected to play despite a persistent knee injury. england‘s captain believes his side has a big chance of making history. we have a huge amount of talent. we have put ourselves in pressure situations before. the consistency of the side has been impressive over the last two years. we knew there would be ups and downs, but there hasn‘t been as many as i thought there would be. we are well ahead of our progression. i think coming into the tournament as one of the favourites
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is pretty flattering. sam warburton will captain the british and irish lions in their opening match against the provincial barbarians on sunday. the flanker will play his first game since suffering a knee injury in april, lining up in an all—welsh back—row. the scottish trio of greig laidlaw, tommy seymour and stuart hogg all start, as does kyle sinckler, who has yet to start a test for england. i was constantly panicking four years ago when i was going to get a game and whether i was going to pull through. seeing other guys playing for the first time for the lions. an you envy that because you worked so hard to achieve it. now the ball is rolling and hopefully i can stay fit and get a good view fixtures under my belt. and it‘s been confirmed this morning that warren gatland‘ son bryn will be in the provincial barbarians side against his dad‘s lions on saturday. bit of family rivalry going on. there‘s a champions league double in cardiff this weekend, the men play theirfinal on saturday, but the women‘s final is tonight, favourites lyon take on paris saint germain.
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lyon are aiming to win theirfourth champions league title in seven years having beaten manchester city in the semi—finals. they‘re looking to add the title to their french league and cup double. the defending champion novak djokovic is into the third round at the french open. the world number two beat portuguese joao sousa in straight sets. eight—time grand slam champion andre agassi watched djokovic once again, having taken over as his coach on a temporary basis. also through is the nine—time champion rafael nadal. he won in straight sets as well — outclassing the dutchman robin haaser. petra kvitova‘s return to action came to an end in the second round of the women‘s singles. the two—times wimbledon champion only returned to full—practice last month after being stabbed at her home in december but lost in straight sets to bethanie mattek—sands. and finally — do you remember this? britain‘s davis cup tie in february against canada, the match was settled when the canadian player denis shapalov hit umpire arnaud gabas in the eye with a wild swing in anger.
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poor gabas had to undergo surgery for a fractured eye socket. well gabas is making his grand slam comeback to umpiring at the french open this week, and history almost repeated itself in the rafa nadal v robin haaser match, this time from a loose shot which had the umpire cowering for cover yet again. this is the first time people picked up the state pension, 1909. it was just £27 in the day‘s money. we‘re not going back to that, but the talk is we will return to anotherfeature, you had to be much older. we‘ve managed to track down, in the west midlands, are very rare example of an old—age
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pension orderfrom 1909, the first year. you take this in each week to the post office and cash in yourfive shillings. but you‘d only qualify if you were over 70 years of age. that‘s what we could be going back to. so, could people now in their 20s and their kids after them had to wait until 70 as well to get the pension? that‘s a projection which was made for ministers in march by the government actuaries department because life spans are growing with every new generation. i think everyone‘s living longer now aren‘t they? so they‘re pushing it out, getting people to work a bit longer. his generation are probably going to have two were even i'm a nurse and they know that i wouldn't have worked on the wards until that i'm that age. the projection was that someone like louise, who is 27, could have a pension age of 70 yet still be likely to get the pension for the same proportion of her life as people who‘ve retired in the last 20 years. gemma, who is 32, would be waiting until 69. karen, at 51—year—old grandmother is already set to have 67 as a pension age. it‘s entirely realistic that today‘s 20—year—olds won‘t get a state pension until they are 70. i think the problem is, some people have a physical, stressfuljob. there has to be some mechanism
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which allows them to work part—time and there has to be some mechanism which allows them to take a pension earlier than the state pension age, albeit a small and reduced pension. so, the younger you are, the more the pension age is on the move. the conservatives say they‘ll ensure it reflects increases in life expectancy. labour rejects changes beyond 66 — it‘ll have a review. the lib dems stick with current policy, which means at least 68 eventually. there‘s a law which forces the government to reassess her when future generations could get their pension. so whoever wins the election will have to decide whether they dare make people wait until 70. simon gompertz, bbc news. we can speak now to george leeson, who‘s co—director of the oxford institute of population ageing. thanks for talking to others. most people are aware there is a likelihood they will have to work
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longer and at an older age, but i suppose what this is bringing up is just how people are now expected to be living way beyond 100 in some cases. what isa way beyond 100 in some cases. what is a reasonable age then or a reasonable expectation of how old we should be when we stop work?” reasonable expectation of how old we should be when we stop work? i think the expectation in terms of stopping working is more to do with the individual capabilities of being able to work and in one way we seem
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to be fixed in a time warp where we worked in onejob to be fixed in a time warp where we worked in one job all to be fixed in a time warp where we worked in onejob all our to be fixed in a time warp where we worked in one job all our lives and quite frankly for some very demanding jobs, the sooner we could stop, the better. but that doesn‘t mean that we should stop working. remaining active for as long as possible, especially in these long lives, is going to be crucial as we move forward through the 21st century. so we are heading towards a pension crisis, many have said. how do we tackle that? well, are we heading towards a pension crisis? again if we keep things fixed the way we are, then yes we are. the crisis arises because maybe our attitudes to where we‘ll get our pension from need to change as well. i think it‘s completely unrealistic, given our standard of living today and what we expect from life, that the state should be able to provide an income that will provide that standard of living. i think state
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pensions need to focus on the people who really need them and the rest of us, and that‘s quite a large proportion of us, the rest of us need to think of other ways of supplementing our pension, one of which of course will be continuing to work for much longer, something which our research here at the university of oxford shows people actually want to do if they are able to do it. but what industries would be more open to that because you have already mentioned some jobs physically you can‘t do when yer you‘re older, so what industries would we see older people working? again, we‘ve got to think outside that box of everything‘s going to stay the same as it is today. i‘ve just been to a festival listening to lots of talks about artificial intelligence and robotics and on the one hand we seem to fear that, on the other hand, as we know, technologies will open up newjobs that we have no imagination about at the moment. so again, i think we have to top thinking traditionally,
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not just about when we stop working but where we are going to be working. thank you very much. labour is pledging to cap railfares. president trump will announce whether he‘s pulling the us out of the paris climate change agreement. carol is a hidel gem this morning. —— hidden gem. carol is a hidden gem. and she's in a hidel gem as well this morning in a beautiful park but slap—bang in the middle of london. morning, carol. good morning. charlie, you sweet—talking man! it's man! it‘s lovely here this morning. i‘m
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at camley street natural park a stone‘s throw from kings cross. you may be able to hear the trains. the reason i‘m here is because today the wildlife trust launches its 30 days wild. so who better to talk to than lucy robert who knows all about that. good morning. good morning. what is 30 days wild? it's the uk's month long challenge. it's simple. the wildlife trust challenge you to do something wild every single day for 30 days throughout the month of june and see if you feel happier and healthy for it. people in cities, we know from research, they're craving wild experiences, this into be close to nature and want mornayture in their lives and now ways to help it. that is what the campaign is about, inspiring random acts of wildness. there was figures, something like 80% of people feel they don‘t get into nature enough? so many people are disconnected. in this technological world where people are
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busy running around, i'm the worst cull april not getting out enough —— culprit. we know getting outside makes you feel happier and healthier and we have worked with the university of derby to examine the effects of 30 days wild and the impact. those daily doses of nature have proven so important for the kind of experiences you want to have and in making you feeljust wonderful about yourself and life. it isa it is a lovely, tranquil haven and just over there, we are back in london where it is so busy. it is an mild start in london. in blackpool it is 16 and around the borders it is around 14. there will be a change in the weather coming in from the west because we have a band of rain slowly moving into northern ireland and then getting into western
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scotland. the rain will be heavy across scotland this morning. move away from that and the rest of the uk is off to away from that and the rest of the uk is offtoa away from that and the rest of the uk is off to a beautiful start. pollen levels are high across most of england and wales. this afternoon the rain will be getting into scotla nd the rain will be getting into scotland in the west and into central areas and eastern scotland is seen cloud build. in northern england it is the extreme north—west which will see the rain. the rest of northern england is dry. the south—west will be sunny, dry and warm. highs in london about 25 or 26 celsius. the home counties down towards the isle of wight will be dry and sunny. but a little bit more cloud starting to develop across the extreme fringes of south—west england. for wales, lot extreme fringes of south—west england. forwales, lot of extreme fringes of south—west england. for wales, lot of dry weather and the cloud building in from the north—west with the signs of rain across anglesey and the peninsula. and the rain moving away
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from northern ireland so late afternoon brightness in the west. as we head through the evening and overnight, the band of rain migrate slowly south eastwards. the head of, there will be clear skies, mist and fog patches forming and quite a sultry night in the south—east. behind the band of rain it will be fresh and one or two showers. we start tomorrow with a few mist and fog patches and they will readily lift and then we have a band of rain fragmenting as it continues its journey heading in the direction of the south—east. turning more showery. we will have warm air from the continent across eastern england which could spark off a few showers and they could be thundery. the other side of the band on rain from northern england, northern ireland and scotland, it will be fresh. on saturday the weather front will have moved to the near continent and saturday and sunday, the forecast will feel fresher, we will have sunshine and showers and temperatures would be closer to where they should be at this stage
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it injune. i know we were saying it earlier, but today being the 1st of june is the start of the meteorological summer. the weather is agreeing for once. from one oasis to another, because you have been sending us pictures of beauty spots on your doorstep. the first one is in icky in worcester. she said herfavourite beauty spot... look at that. rachel sent us this view from her window in lewisham. she calls it her way sis of calm. frank has been in touch from chorley. he says it is his favourite beauty spot. it is his back garden. just stepped outside, that is what it looks like. you can tell that is loved, that back garden. let‘s talk farming, sean is at one of the
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biggest farming shows in the country. it is the royal barton and west show. morning. where are you? one of these times we will start on me. this is ruby, and melody slough. she is very excited. —— sow. lots of the pigs getting excited. 5000 livestock, some are more up for it than others. but some reason, this one is having a snooze. try not to disturb her. the farmers are getting ready because it is a big day for the industry, it is worth about £18 billion of exports to the economy. also the dinner you get on your plates, 60% of that is made in farms
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in the uk. here are my little friends. we will look at them later, but let‘s talk to melanie and michael. melanie, you are from the national farmers‘ union. lots of people showing off their animals, but what is the talk of the town when it comes to the industry at the moment? the election next week, combined with brexit, whatever sector you are in, livestock or indeed growing fruit and vegetables, we need to know what the future holds. brexit will affect our sector more than anything so we wanted to talk to prospective candidates here at the show. we have been as well as members about what the future holds and ensuring our candidates understand how important our industry is. it provides the raw material for 108 industry is. it provides the raw materialfor108 billion industry is. it provides the raw material for 108 billion of the food sector in this country. it is very important, but what is the key thing you want from these candidates, what do you want them to be saying? we
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wa nt do you want them to be saying? we want assurances they will fight our corner on trade and access to labour. fighting is all well and good, but what is the thing you want specifically, access to the european union? yes, good trade negotiations that put food and farming at the heart of the future to ensure future farmers can produce more food in the coming years. michael, you are a dairy farmer, has there been much of an effect on your sector of farming since the vote to leave the european union? currency has had a massive effect already in the dairy sector, but going forward, a lot of uncertainty. investment has come from overseas. a lot of dairy products are exported. it has created so much uncertainty and we will be able to write our own domestic agricultural policy. the first time in my lifetime, but we wa nt first time in my lifetime, but we want one but is productive,
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profitable and sustainable. one of the big things you get from the european union when you are a member of it is the subsidies for farmers. the conservatives said they will maintain that for a few years at least. the labour party said they will prioritise access to europe, are you happy with what the parties have said? they all giving assurances, with the domestic agricultural policy and there will be some transition and it is vital we don't drop off a cliff edge because we need to compete. we are comfortable with what they are saying, whether they will sit down after the election and work constructively to come up with something that actually takes a us forward. the common agricultural policy in europe will change, our money won't be going into the fog, so money won't be going into the fog, so their support system will change. but equally are as well. —— into the
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part. melanie, the noise is kicking off because it is feeding time, how important is this event and events like this around the country? are they more important now that uncertainty is ahead? they have been a phenomenal showcase of everything, food, drink, farming and everything the countryside has two other. the role of somerset countryside is important, the tourism sector is worth over 20 billion to the economy. so all of this is a showcase at this week it is half term, great to see families out over the next few days and hopefully the weather continues. we can show off what is good in our industry. hopefully the animals will get their grub soon. we will talk about the different consequences, and it is
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feeding time at the moment. they haven‘t got time to clean my shoes the way they were earlier. you can feel the excitement building over the morning. people earlier will have heard you say you were going to put oil on one of the pigs. will we see that, what is happening? is this you misquoting me while i have been out cleaning my shoes. they will be oiled. i think it is doreen over here. she is sleeping at the moment, but she will be properly being oiled up. that is what you mean. i cannot promise i will be in there with my baby lotion trying to help out, but we will see what we can do in the next hour or so. stepped over the line. do we know why we oil pigs? it is very good for them, good for their skin. it is routine practice. i never
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knew! 0f knew! of all the things i thought i would be watching this morning. as cardiff prepares to host the biggest game in european football, we‘ll find out about the massive security operation that‘s being put in place for the champions league final. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m victoria hollins. two people are still being questioned over the fatal shooting of montana abdhou in kilburn. a 19—year—old and 20 —year—old were arrested in west london on suspicion of murder in the early hours of yesterday. montana was killed outside a block of flats near a children‘s playground in malvern road a week ago. londoners are racking up credit card debt to cover the cost flats. of living in the capital, according to a new report. renters in liverpool street, clapham junction, and putney are said to be most at risk of falling into persistent debt — as the report from experian found that people who live in those areas tend to be young and
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employed, but not saving. final preparations are underway to open up an underground train network that most londoners will never even have heard of. the london post office railway, also known as mail rail, stretched from whitechapel in east london to paddington in the west and ran for 22 hours a day. it closed in 2003. the new postal museum will open to the public injuly and will include the opportunity to ride through part of the tunnels on the modern equivalent of a mail train. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. now the weather. a bit more sunshine around the many others. yesterday. we are still in the warm and humid air so it is an mild start to the day. we have had
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some mist and fog patches but that is lifting nicely. sunny spells with a bit more cloud into the afternoon. a light, southerly breeze and top temperatures between 23 and 26 celsius. the pollen levels will be creeping up. plenty of lead sunshine this evening. overnight, it is looking dry and still miles. mist patches into tomorrow morning and we start the day on 14 or 15 celsius. tomorrow, this is the weather front that will change the weather in time for the weekend but tomorrow we are in the warm and muggy air. temperatures will be higher, 26 or 27 celsius. plenty of sunshine to the morning and maybe scattered showers to end the day. feeling pressure to start the weekend. temperatures back to where they should be this time of year. there could be some showers about but there will also be spells of sunshine. we‘re back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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a leaders‘ debate with one missing. the prime minister came under repeated attack for not taking part, and there were heated exchanges over immigration and cuts to public services. there is no extra payment you don‘t wa nt to there is no extra payment you don‘t want to add to, no tax you don‘t wa nt to
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want to add to, no tax you don‘t want to rise, but the fact is we have to concentrate our resources on the people who need it most. have you been to a food by? have you seen people sleeping around our stations? good morning it‘s thursday 1stjune. donald trump will announce today if he‘s pulling america out of the paris climate change agreement, but chinese and eu leaders are preparing to pledge their support for the deal. in sport — they‘re favourites to win the champions trophy. and england get their campaign started against against bangladesh at the oval in just a couple of hours time. he‘s won the premier league, and captained england, but tony adams‘ greatest challenge has been staying sober. he‘ll be here to reflect on living life as an alcoholic. and carol‘s going wild with the weather, looking at the nature on our doorsteps. good morning from the heart of london, you can hear the trains rattling past because we are a stone‘s throw from st pancras and king‘s cross. the weather this morning, i‘ll start, a sunni one for
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many others, but we have some rain moving it to northern ireland which will affect other western parts of the uk later in day. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will again put brexit at the heart of the conservative campaign today as she faces continued criticism for failing to take part in last night‘s television debate with other party leaders. the tories were represented by the home secretary, amber rudd, in an event which saw heated exchanges on a range of issues. our political correspondent, vicki young was there. with a week to go, this was a chance for all the parties to pitch their offer to voters and, at the last minute, jeremy corbyn decided it was worth turning up for. theresa may was ridiculed for staying away. the prime minister can't be bothered. she can't be bothered, so why should you? unlike theresa may, i'm not afraid to defend my principles and values.
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it‘s the most important election in her lifetime and she cannot even be bothered to come and debate the issues at stake. it was left to her home secretary to fend off the attacks in cuts to public services, including disability benefits. jeremy, i know there is no extra payment you don‘t want to add to, no tax you don‘t want to rise, but the fact is we have to concentrate our resources on the people who need it most and we have to stop thinking, as you do, that there‘s a magic money tree. i would just say this, since amber rudd seems so confident this is a country at ease with itself, have you been to a food bank? have you seen people sleeping around our stations? have you seen... ? cheering and applause. for amber to say that this is a government that cares for the most vulnerable i think is downright insulting to the kind of people that i see in my constituency surgery. tim farron was keen to make the liberal democrat case for staying in the single market after brexit. the liberal democrats have got a fully costed manifesto. i'll tell you what, though, there is a long—term economic plan
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underlying the whole of the liberal democrat manifesto, and that is don't leave the european single market and throw away £15 billion every single year in revenue. while others clashed over immigration, ukip suggesting britain would struggle to cope with rising numbers. we have to get the population under control, because if we carry on on the road we're on, we'll have a population of 80 million by the middle of the century. ukip keep using this issue, they want to whip up people‘s hatred, division and fear, and that‘s why they talk about immigration all the time. no, no, no. i think this debate shames and demeans us all. i don't think there's anyone in this room or anybody watching this debate from cornwall to caithness who does not understand the positive contribution that people have made to this land who've come from the rest of europe and the rest of the world and demonising those people is totally unacceptable. applause. this was a crowded field, with seven parties all desperate to have their say. and, as the party in government,
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it wasn‘t surprising that the conservatives came under sustained attack over their record. their response was to say that being in power requires difficult decisions. there were no clear winners in this debate, but there was plenty of passion. vicki young, bbc news, cambridge. let‘s speak to our political correspondent leila nathoo, who‘s in westminster. we have got a week to go, the conservatives keen to put brexit back at the top of the agenda. absolutely, theresa may very keen to move on from last night‘s no—show, she was roundly attacked by opposition parties forfailing she was roundly attacked by opposition parties for failing to turn up, they said it showed complacency, contempt for voters after she was the one who called the selection. she did have defence in the form of home secretary amber rudd who said all of the squabbling among opposition parties shows what among opposition parties shows what a coalition of chaos would be like underjeremy corbyn and she defended the government‘s record but i think
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theresa may would havejudged it was better for her not to appear and she would have more to lose from appearing and trying to appeared to be above the fray, so today we see a return to the core offering on brexit, saying this is going to be a great opportunity to transform the country and only she can get brexit right. labour, too, are going back to save space talking about the railways, promising to cap their increases and highlighting that ma nifesto increases and highlighting that manifesto promise to renationalise the railways as franchises expire so i think withjust the railways as franchises expire so i think with just seven days to go we can expect all the parties to return to their key messages, really pushing them home for the voters. thanks very much. we‘ll be speaking to the foreign secretary borisjohnson shortly. president trump is due to announce later today whether he‘ll pull the united states out of the paris climate change agreement. china and the european union have been working on a statement in support of the deal, which pledges to cut global
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greenhouse emissions. mr trump has previously described climate change as a chinese hoax and an american job—killer. there has been widespread condemnation of a bomb in the diplomatic area of the afghan capital, kabul. yesterday‘s attack, which killed at least 90 people and left more than 400 injured, has been described by the country‘s president, ashraf ghani, as inhuman and cowardly. a further explosion has hit jalalabad airport this morning, killing one person and injuring six others. police investigating the manchester arena bombing have released a 21—year—old man from nuneaton without charge. 10 people remain in custody as detectives try to establish whether the bomber, salman abedi, had any help. meanwhile, tickets for a benefit concert in aid of the victims of last week‘s attack will go on sale later this morning. artists including katie perry, take that, justin bieber and coldplay will all perform alongside ariana grande at the event on sunday. only around a third of teenage boys say that they enjoy reading. that‘s according to a survey of more than 40,000
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children across britain. but the study by the national literacy trust does suggest an overall rise in the number of children who say they like to read. tom burridge has the details. suddenly he realised he didn‘t know where his friend was. it is story time in liverpool. this charity, called the reader, encourages children to get their hands on books. a new survey suggests the real challenge is keeping boys reading when they get older.” real challenge is keeping boys reading when they get older. i have got three boys and i think as they get older it does get more difficult to keep them interested in reading. we have always read to them and i think it isjust about giving them things to read that they find exciting and interesting. the national literacy survey asked more than 40,000 children across britain how much they like reading. the eighth to 11—year—old boys were largely enthusiast, more than seven
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out of ten mod them said they liked reading the original quite a lot. but only a third of older teenage boys gave the same response. the challenge is building up that pattern thinking of how in particular during the teenage years we promote reading to boys, that is about finding books about things they are interested in, whether it is football, dragons, sharks, and making sure those books are on hand. overall, girls like reading more than boys and the positive news from this year‘s survey is that the number of girls and boys of all ages who are keen on books is building up. we know that president trump likes to treat, often late at night, sometimes not making much sense. have a look at this latest. "despite the constant negative press covfefe". the word didn‘t exist
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until last night, and everyone is talking about it. hillary clinton tweeted "people in covfefe houses shouldn‘t throw covfefe." the comedian james corden wrote, "i‘m gonna try and go back to sleep now. everyone stay #covfefe". and the actor, ashton kutcher tweeted: "getting ready to hit the old #covfefe". president trump‘s tweet was deleted after six hours. but the word is out there. interpretations of the words are quite varied. it is time to take a look at the weather... we will have a look at the weather in a memo, carol is in a beautiful place, we will see that in a moment. but if you want to see something more scary, in warmer weather, i am trying to make the link now, this is what is in someone‘s swimming pool. a seven—foot long
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alligator was removed from a family‘s swimming pool. reacted with a death row, didn‘t wa nt to reacted with a death row, didn‘t want to go. sarasota county‘s sheriff said that the creature was eventually removed unharmed and has been taken to a place described as appropriate. iam glad appropriate. i am glad you did not try to link the alligator with carol! why would i do that? well, there is a link to it, because look at those pictures, this is where carol is nearby, but i don‘t think there are any alligators. good morning, carol. there are no alligators in matt bond, iam pleased there are no alligators in matt bond, i am pleased to report! i am just a stone‘s throw from king‘s cross, lovely and tranquil, beautiful irises and lilies, but have a look over my other shoulder and you can probably hear the trains rattling past, king‘s cross isjust
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over there, fight a different feel. today the wildlife trust launched its 30 days wales campaign, you can find out more about how you can get involved that by going onto their website. it is a mild start of the day, not just website. it is a mild start of the day, notjust in london but across many parts of the uk, but there is rain on the cards for some others, and that will be coming from the west. also some mist and fog at the moment, that should clear everywhere by 9am, leaving a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, and variable cloud. rain across northern ireland will be heavy this morning and will drift steadily eastwards, getting into western scotland and some western fringes of north—west england and north—west wales by the middle of the afternoon. by 4pm we do have the rain during its hand across western and central scotland, eastern scotland dry but cloudy. north—west england, the far north—west will see some of this rain by 4pm, the rest of northern england dry with some sunshine. the
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further east to travel, particularly. down the east coast generally, east anglia, lincolnshire, towards kent, the midlands, down to the ireland, a lot of dry and sunny weather with highs u pto of dry and sunny weather with highs upto 26 celsius. as we drift westwards through dorset, gloucestershire, somerset, devon, cornwall, again are a lot of dry weather with some sunshine, variable cloud, building from the west ahead of the weather front. for wales, a lot of dry and sunny weather but anglesey starting to see some rain as is the north—west tip of rails generally, and the rain in northern ireland continuing to move eastward so there will be late brightness across the west of northern ireland. through the evening that rain continues to slowly push eastwards, ahead of it clear skies, mist and fog patches forming, and muggy night particularly in the south—east. on the other side of the rain band, for scotla nd the other side of the rain band, for scotland and northern ireland, i
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returned to some showers. tomorrow the band of rain continues to drift to the south—east, it will weaken and turn more showery in nature. behind it, some sunshine and a few showers, ahead of it, pumping through warm air from the near continent, so it will be sunny, muqqy' continent, so it will be sunny, muggy, and some showers developing across east anglia and the south—east, the potentialfor them to be thundery. by saturday, the weather front will have cleared away altogether and it will mean fresher conditions for saturday and sunday, temperatures closer to where they should be at this stage injune, looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers. and it rather makes the point, as we are talking to you, we can hear the bin men so way off in the distance, in the other world?! know, charlie, that is the train! we are literally a stone‘s throw from king‘s cross st pancras. it isa king‘s cross st pancras. it is a beautiful spot, isn‘t it? carol, thank you very much. you have been sending lovely beauty
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spots on your doorstep. we had a field of bluebells earlier. now we have, i‘m sure there are poppies, in a field near her home. sandy and her dog lover heading to blakley reservoir —— love. it is hidden away in the valleys. it looks so tranquil. ross and mike‘s garden on the wirral. some are very well tended gardens. and this beautiful la ke tended gardens. and this beautiful lake in wenger worth. sylvia in hereford lives in a corner of peace, her garden. i can imagine sitting there, a cup of tea, maybe a paper. thank you for assuring those pictures. —— sharing.
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cardiff is preparing to host the biggest game in european football. tens of thousands ofjuventus and real madrid fans are expected to descend on the city for the champions league final this weekend. in the wake of the manchester arena attack, south wales police say they‘ll deploy their largest ever football security operation, as wyre davies has been finding out. this stadium has seen a rugby world cup final, several fa cup finals and played host to countless rock concerts. but this weekend‘s headliners are perhaps the biggest yet, certainly in terms of economic impactand yet, certainly in terms of economic impact and the level of security. by the time the multi—million stars from real madrid and juventus emerge from real madrid and juventus emerge from the tunnel, this stadium will have been scoured, scanned and searched many times over. police teams have been drafted in from across the country. this is the biggest club football match in the world. the security operation in cardiff is almost unprecedented. 6500 police officers on duty, 600 of
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whom will be armed. and a completed vehicle lockdown in the welsh capitalfor three vehicle lockdown in the welsh capital for three days. but a lot has changed in the world since cardiff was chosen as the venue for this final. attacks in paris, nice, berlin and manchester have shown how vulnerable big cities and big events can be. we have looked at different methodologies. we have had known actors with vehicles. nice was a lorry. we had the westminster attack, a vehicle. and stabbing. we‘re well aware of terrorist firearms attacks from previous occasions. we try to look at all ways we can mitigate and those attacks. hundreds of armed police on the streets are a visible deterrent, especially in the wake of manchester. but the decision to throw up wide gordon of barriers, fences and to exclude traffic from today, will enclose the city centre
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ina today, will enclose the city centre in a virtual ring of steel. not that too many locals seem put out. very glad it‘s here. great for the city. will it bring business? it should do, hopefully. hopefully the spanish and italians will spend their money. there is definitely an anxiety about any large gatherings. bring some money into cardiff and show where we are on the map for a change. every inch of cardiff real estate seems to have been draped in images of real madrid‘s gareth bale. while the economic impact is difficult to assess, some local businesses will benefit, others will feel squeezed out as the giants of the corporate world descend on cardiff. other cities would give their right arm to host the champions league final. we have to maximise this opportunity. i hope the welsh and uk government are squeezing the hand of every businessman who comes here and
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saying, why can‘t you come here ain? saying, why can‘t you come here again? with 170,000 visiting fans and another 200 million television viewers worldwide, this is a good —— an opportunity too good to miss. nor can security be taken for granted. and you can hear live commentary of the game on bbc radio 5 live on saturday evening from seven. theresa may dominated last night‘s political debate on bbc one, even though she wasn‘t there. her rivals accused her of running away and lacking guts. the prime minister repeatedly said she would be —— would rather be out speaking to voters tha n would rather be out speaking to voters than squabble with politicians. should she have been there? let‘s speak to foreign secretary borisjohnson. if there? let‘s speak to foreign secretary boris johnson. if we there? let‘s speak to foreign secretary borisjohnson. if we could just start on a separate issue, which is the paris climate change agreement. the news that donald trump is due to make an announcement
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this evening. it is widely expected he will not sign to the paris climate change agreement. it is a real blow? let's see what the president actually does. there are a number of different strokes he could play. yes, of course, we want to see america continue to show leadership on climate change and in reducing c02 on climate change and in reducing co2 emissions. and we continue to lobby with the americans to encourage them to do that. to those who are worried about what the president might or might not be about to do, and i stress we are not there yet, i just want to make about to do, and i stress we are not there yet, ijust want to make one point. it is the governments at state level where so many important gains have been made in recent years in reducing co2. we will continue to work as the uk with all levels of government in the united states. we will continue to work with our
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friends and partners in the white house and in federal government, but also with the state governments. america, like the uk, has actually made huge progress in reducing co2, very often through a lot of technical fixes of one kind very often through a lot of technicalfixes of one kind or another. we want to drink —— continuing to a courage that. can i make the point that your whole thing in this campaign, the way lee conservative party presents themselves, is strength. you sound a bit woolly on this. why have you not got a strong message for the united states on this issue? why have you not got a strong message for donald trump? you are just saying, not got a strong message for donald trump? you arejust saying, we continue to lobby. is that all you have got? we haven't yet had a decision from the united states. why don‘t you tell him in advance? he will wake up this morning and hear the words of the british foreign secretary telling him, we will
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continue to lobby? have you got a stronger message? i can assure you a great deal of lobbying is going on in the last few days and months to persuade our friends and partners in the last few days and months to persuade ourfriends and partners in the united states of the wisdom of sticking with american leadership on climate change. i think you want me to depart from my iphone into a more aggressive stance of language. i‘m not going to do that. we have been clear and firm with our friends and partners in the united states. in the end it is a matter for them. what i‘m trying to get across to our viewers is that actually, who may be worried about what president trump may or may not be about to do, much of the progress that has been made and will continue to be made by the us, is made at state level rather than at federal level. the uk government will continue to work with all levels of government in the united states to drive down co2. and
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the uk has played a leading role in reducing co2. we were instrumental in the paris climate accord. and as isaid in the paris climate accord. and as i said just now, when i was mayor of london we reduced co2. let me finish. i'm keen to get onto the general election issues. can i ask you, where was theresa may between 7:30pm and 9pm last night?” you, where was theresa may between 7:30pm and 9pm last night? i think she was absolutely right. i'm asking where she was. do you know where she was? i don't know exactly where she was. wherever she was she was right not to be at that debate. it was a yammering cacophony of abuse. even by the bbc‘s on standards, i think you would agree, that audience was notably to the left of many people in this country. you had plaid cymru and the snp and the lib dems and the labour party. there was a certain sort of echo chamber for a left—wing
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views. and actually, i think many people in brussels, if they did tune into that debate, and i doubt very much they did, if our european friends and partners at what state, they would have learned absolutely nothing of value about the crucial question, which is what does the principal party of opposition, the labour party, intends to do in the negotiations? what approach do they have? we haven‘t got a clue. all we learned about jeremy corbyn have? we haven‘t got a clue. all we learned aboutjeremy corbyn and the labour party is they have to do it in coalition with the liberal democrats and the scottish nationalists, both of them squawking in corbyn‘s ear telling him not to go ahead with brexit. it is not clear what their policy on immigration would be, and getting immigration would be, and getting immigration down. and on such basic questions as whether you are in or out of the customs union, in or out
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of the single market, the labour party is completely modelled. it would be a catastrophe for our negotiations in brussels. the prime minister‘s stance is clear, it is negotiable, and it is positive. it is about taking this country forward , is about taking this country forward, solving the negotiations with the european union in a way that would be good for the uk and the rest of europe. if i may but i would like to ask you, you mentioned clarity, and this, you are co nsta ntly clarity, and this, you are constantly saying the labour party has no clarity on things. you are here. let‘s cover clarity on the cap on social care, how much people will have to pay for social care. give us the clarity that you want other people to get. what will that cap the? we have said we are going to consult on that. that is not an a nswer consult on that. that is not an answer for people who are trying to
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plan their lives. i'm afraid - macro we will protect people in their old age and we will allow them to keep more of their cash than they currently do, and we will stop them having to send —— sell their homes. the crucial thing is that we do not have clarity from the labour party about what they would do with the customs union, with the single market. let‘s talk about the 350 billion, which is so beloved of everybody who interrogates me. ok, people say to me this is a mythical song. it‘s not. it refers to the amount of cash every week that this country does not control. how much of that does the labour party think they would take back control of? what are their plans for the money that we currently sent to the eu? how are they going to do it? i don‘t think they have the faintest idea, certainly not if they continue to
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deny that this cash actually exist. ididn‘t deny that this cash actually exist. i didn‘t ask you that question. billions of uk taxpayers‘ money. i trust theresa may, i trust theresa may to get a great deal for this country and a great deal for europe. you trust, and that‘s interesting, because a lot of people don‘t. a lot of people look directly at all sorts of people look directly at all sorts of records. she said there wouldn‘t bea snap of records. she said there wouldn‘t be a snap election there is. she did a u—turn on the cap on social wherever, that people care so much about. they look at the u—turn on national insurance for the self—employed. and they look at the previous pledges on getting rid of the deficit. pledges on immigration. all of which have turned to nothing. well, i have to say, i disagree with you. she set out a very clear position. it wasjet you. she set out a very clear position. it was jet —— there on january 17. it is a negotiable
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position. everybody in brussels on the standard. it is positive for this country. our brexit negotiations can be a wonderful moment. if we get it right, we can strike in your relationship with our european friends and partners that is positive. we can get rid of so much that has been painful and difficulty in our relations over the last 30 years. and we can then rekindle friendships and trading partnerships with countries around the world. we can create a truly global britain. that is the ambition. it is a fantastic ambition. it is a fantastic ambition. and i think that theresa may understands it. she understands the scale of what can be achieved. and i think it is only she who can really deliver it. when i look at whatjeremy corbyn really deliver it. when i look at what jeremy corbyn and really deliver it. when i look at whatjeremy corbyn and the labour party have two offer, and i consider the possibility of them going into those negotiations, i think of corbyn walking in to negotiate with
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jean—claude juncker and angela merkel and the rest of them, i am truly apprehensive. boris johnson, my apologise if we were talking over one another couple of times, we return to get through a lot of. thank you. yeah thank you. time for the news where you are. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and ben bland. to for the price of one! can the european union and china create their own alliance — cutting out america? as eu and chinese leaders meet in brussels they‘re looking to counter president trump‘s stance on trade and climate change. live from london, that‘s our top story on thursday 1st june. so what would a deal between the eu and china look like — and what role for india in the middle? we‘ll have all you need to know. also in the programme... in from the cold.
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pakistan‘s economy rejoins the emerging markets index —
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