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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 1, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11: theresa may will promise britain will become a "more prosperous" country after brexit. president trump is to announce whether or not the us will stick to an major commitment on international climate change. tickets have gone on sale for sunday's benefit concert for those affected by the manchester suicide bombing. two brothers whose father shot dead their mother and sister have told the bbc he behaved like a "terrorist". and police in florida have released footage of golfer tiger woods struggling to walk, after he was found asleep at the wheel of his damaged car. good morning.
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it's thursday 1st june. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. this time next week, the polls will have opened across the uk for the general election. last night, key figures from the seven main parties went head—to—head on the bbc‘s election debate. so let's bring you up to date with the latest from the campaign trail. this morning, the prime minister is attempting to move the agenda back to brexit — pledging to use the "promise of brexit" to build a "stronger, fairer and even more prosperous" country and calling for voters to unite behind her leadership. meanwhile, labour is returning to its rail policy — promising to save money for rail commuters by changing the way fare increases are calculated. the party says the move would save an average rail season ticket holder £319 a year by 2022. last night key figures from the seven main parties went head—to—head on the bbc. theresa may was criticised for her failure to appear
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at that debate. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminsterfor us. in the wake of the debate, the criticism of theresa may noting there there, she is make bg this bold assertion that britain will become more prosperous after brexit. what is striking, nothing unusual about the prime minister trying to get the election back on to her favoured terrain of brexit, but what is striking is the tone and the specific claim that we will be wealthier and more prosperous after brexit. why that is contentious? because a number of independent economic forecasters have suggested quite the reverse. you look at the office for budget responsibility in their november forecast suggesting that investment would be hit, trade would be hit, the pound would be hit and our economic prospects would be hit. today theresa may wanting to
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trike a more up beat optimistic note, saying that our future will be brighter, we will be a more confident, more united and more prosperous country. something which certainly the liberal democrats have challenged, warning about the laingers of leave —— dangers of leaving the single market. i'm joined by nick clegg. we could be better off out side the eu if we can negotiate our own deals. better off out side the eu if we can negotiate our own dealslj better off out side the eu if we can negotiate our own deals. i think the speech shows how much the conservatives are divorced from reality. this is on the same day it has been confirmed the british economy has plummeted from being the fasters to the slowest economy. prices are increasing in the shops directly as an effect of brexit. how prices are stagnating for the first time in many years. i don't know what kind of britain the conservatives inhabit if they think
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they can bamboozle people with slogans. if slogans could have fixed brexit, the conservatives would have fixed it. people want to know why the conservatives want to pursue a hardline brexit that will not just ta ke hardline brexit that will not just take us out of e. u but take us out of margaret thatcher's single market. the way you talk, many people say you're just talking down britain. it is all gloom and doom. no, ithink britain. it is all gloom and doom. no, i think we should be proud of what as britain created in establishing ourselves at the heart of world's largest borderless market place and i can't understand why the conservatives if they get re—elected wa nt conservatives if they get re—elected want to embark on the greatest act of economic protectionism in the post war period that will do damage to people's livelihoods and what frustrates me is it will do most damage to the hard—pressed families who already are seeing the increase
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in their wages stagnating compared to the increase in prices and the increasing petrol prices, food prices, clothes prices are a result of brexit and a direct result of ha rd of brexit and a direct result of hard version of brexit that theresa may is pursuing. so to put it mildly, it is rich for the conservatives to understand they know how to deliver a prosperous economy when they're putting the economy when they're putting the economy injeopardy. economy when they're putting the economy in jeopardy. mrs may describes brexits a great national mission and appeals for people to unite behind brexit. isn't there an argument for that. we have had the referendum, whatever one's views, we have to make the best deal of leaving the eu. no one will disagree with the best possible deal, that is one of meaningless cliche that all politicians say. what cannot be allowed to a pass is the choices
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that theresa may's made and they're are choices, she didn't need to announce that only would we quit the political institutions of eu, but we would be quitting the customs union and the single market and that will put the united kingdom, because of her choices at a greater distance from our main export markets in europe than countries like turkey, norway and iceland. it is a monumental act of economic self—harm and the author of that self—harm is theresa may and for her to give a speech on the day that we already, where we have already seen the material effects of brexit on the economy to claim that she has the secret for prosperity is something i don't think will be believed by many people. thank you, nick clegg. and we are expecting a speech too from the labour leaderjeremy corbyn this afternoon, also on brexit and he will set out labour's approach the the brexit negotiations. if
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yesterday was debate day, today i suspect is brexit day. thank i yochlt throughout the day we are looking at the bigger issues influences the debate. here is simon gompertz to tell us more. i'm at a retirement village in birmingham. we will be looking at issues for older age groups throughout the day it is age groups throughout the day it is a place where 300 people are residents and own or rent their apartments here and they have lots of facilities. before you #24i it is just for older people that we are looking at, remember everyone is paying the costs of people who are retired and get the state pension and supporting care homes etc and of course all of us are going to be there eventually. so it is important for everyone, we will have updates throughout the day and asking for comment and advice on many of the election issues. thank you. president trump is due to announce
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later today whether he'll pull the united states out of the paris climate—change agreement. china and the european union have been working on a statement in support of the deal, which pledges to cut global greenhouse emissions. china's people are ‘s premiere said the country would honour their climate change mission. mr trump has previously described climate change as a chinese hoax and an american job—killer, as david willis reports from washington. the trump white house is said to be deeply divided on the issue of global warming. the president's daughter ivanka, favours america remaining part of the paris accord. as does the g7 whose leaders, angela merkel among them, took time out from last week's summit in sicily to lobby mr trump on the issue. even pope francis rallied to the defence of the historic accord when he welcomed the president to the vatican. we are going to cancel the paris climate agreement. but having made that pledge
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on the campaign trail, it seems the president intends to stick to it, dealing what environmentalists say would be a shattering blow to the most comprehensive agreement on global warming ever reached. he will announce his verdict, the president told his followers on twitter, in the rose garden of the white house. opponents fear it could prompt other members of the accord to ponder whether they too should think about withdrawing. america produces more in the way of greenhouse gases than any other country on the planet, apart from china. but president trump is keeping faith with fossil fuels in the hope of creating jobs. his critics say such a policy will never work and that by holding true to his pledge to put america first, he's favouring isolationism over cooperation on one of the biggest challenges facing the planet. david willis, bbc news, washington. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, says the uk is continuing to lobby the us.
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of course, we want to see america to continue to show leadership on climate change and in reducing c02 emissions and we continue to lobby with the americans to encourage them to do that. to those who are worried about what the president or might not be about to do — and i stress that we are not there yet — ijust want to make one point, which is that it's with the state government at a state level that so many of the important gains have been made in the last few years in reducing c02 and we will continue to work, as the uk, with all levels of government in the united states. we will continue to work with our friends and partners in the white house and the federal government but also of course with the state governors. with me is our environment correspondent matt mcgrath. remind us about what the paris
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agreement means and how the united states fits into that agreement and therefore what will it mean if the united states pulls out. the us were integral to the making of the paris agreement, under president obama they showed their commitment to doing a deal with rich and poor country and built a coalition and put together a deal that would limit global attempt temperature rises to below 2 degrees. everyone would do something, but not at the same speed. it is a carefully balanced thing, it would be reviewed every five years. that is what it expects and 194 countries signed it and 140 ratified. so it is operational and a lot of people are worried that president trump will pull out and deal it a significant blow. we have heard of caveats and there may be a
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twist in the tail and he may not pull out on a wholesale basis. what is your understanding? it is hard to know. president trump loves a show and it is a reality show and whether he goes the full hog and pulls the united states out straightaway, we don't know. he could go for ask for a renegotiation and there are a number of things he could do. we heard borisjohnson refer to the british government working with white house administration and working with individual states, so if we look at the break down of how the us deals with climate change on a federal level and on a state level, how important are the individual states in tackling emissions? they're critical. you have california and new york and oregon, big producers of solar and wind energy and are committed to
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cutting carbon. two thirds of new electricity general raymented in rated in the united states came from wind and solar. the financial sense and the political sense is with people moving to a green economy and president trump seems to think if he pulls out he can reverse that trend and reboost coal. but the stock markets didn't show any great india case that they would —— indication that they would boost coal stocks. thank you. myles allen is a professor of geosystem science at oxford university and attended last year's paris summit as a climate scientist. he joins me now from our oxford studio. just give us your take on what you think will happen if president trump chooses to pull the united states out of paris accord? first, azmat mat said, he has not announced his decision yet and there is a lot of people with a vested interest in
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prothe ending the president's —— pretending the decide has decided one or other. one puzzle is why would the united states want to pull out of paris agreement? the paris agreement placed very few obligations on countries signing it. basically they agreed to talk about what they were going to do about climate change. not a huge amount more. the us's own commitments are close to what the us emissions are likely to do any way over the next decade. what do they gain by leave something maybe a sort of temporary political boost, but it is not clear that the country or the economy gapes anything at all. —— gains anything. the disadvantage of the us leaving is we lose a strong voice for particularly sort of imaginative, market—friendly approaches to dealing with climate change. i think a big worry is how
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the rest of the world will respond. is it understating it to say if president trump pulls the us out that would be largely symbolic. as we heard from matt, a lot of what happens is down to the individual states. yes, at the end of the day it is not what we emit over the next five years that matters, it is what we commit to emitting over the next 50 toa we commit to emitting over the next 50 to a hundred years. what really matters are decisions being made about investing in new coal—fired power plants in the us that may get made over the next few years and maybe are affected by the president's decision. but as matt says, they probably won't b investors know administrations come and go, but power stations last for 70 years. they're not necessarily going to make, change their minds on whether to build a new coal—fired power station on the back of donald
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trump's decision. but if other countries, perhaps see this as an opportunity to water down their commitments to climate change or to water down their enthusiasm for doing something about the problem, then you know, it could become serious, the momentum could be lost. and our own government, despite what borisjohnson said, has been notably, well, if they have been lobbying the us administration hard on climate, they have been doing it quietly. we didn't hear any news that theresa may had raised this as a major issue when she met president trump. soi a major issue when she met president trump. so i think it is worrying that other governments are not perhaps entirely in lock step in their smons. you might that lobbying to be done before the decision is announced. what is your reaction as announced. what is your reaction as a professor of when you hear donald
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trump describe global warming as a hoax? well, he says that was a joke. i hope he is right. it is a joke for somebody in that position to think this was a chinese hoax i think is what he came up with. much of the science that underpins our understanding of global warming has been formed by excellent american scientist and america should be proud of that. i think that was a campaign rhetoric and we had other m essa 9 es campaign rhetoric and we had other messages since the election which suggest that both he and members of his administration actually understand a lot more about this than they're prepared to let on. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may is promising britain will become a "more prosperous" country after brexit, as she returns to the campaign trail after refusing to take part in the bbc‘s election debate. president trump is to confirm whether or not the us will stick to an major commitment
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on international climate change. tickets for the concert to benefit the victims of the manchester attack sell out within minutes of going on sale. in sport, england have begun their champ owens trophy campaign —— champions trophy campaign against bangladesh. manchester city have agreed a £35 million dealfor a goalkeeper. the 23—year—old has made 37 appearances for benfica since joining in march last year. and british and irish lions het coach said he won't the same mistake as his predecessor by splitting the squad during their tour of new zealand. i'm back with more at 11.30. tickets for a benefit concert in aid
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of the victims of last week's attack have gone on sale this morning. they have sold out within minutes. artists including katie perry, take that, justin bieber and coldplay will all perform alongside ariana grande at the event on sunday. our correspondent fiona trott is in manchesterfor us now. tell us are there any problems with the ticketing? i understand that a number of people who were at the concert haven't managed to get tickets yet. well what the agency have told us today is the reason why we can assume that tickets sold out so quickly is 140,000 people were calling them and going on the web—site this morning to get the £40 tickets. £40 that will go towards helping victims of those caught up in the attack. they also say
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thousands of tickets were allocated to people at the original concert. they were getting tickets for free and had to register, but they said, we understand a number of fans didn't receive an e—mail with regards to free kibgts. tickets. we have verified thousands of bookings, but some they couldn't verify. so they're going to open up the registration again until 2 o'clock this afternoon to enable people to register. people at the original concert are being given more time to get their free tickets. technically, although we are hearing that this concert on sunday has sold out, they had thousands of tickets put aside for these people and not everybody has registered for them. some people also obviously telling us although they're entitled to tickets s they would find the experience on sunday too difficult. and that is why even
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here at the local council have set up here at the local council have set upa here at the local council have set up a special centre for anybody who is at the concert on sunday and feels it is too difficult for them. they can go there and get support and counselling from the local authorities. in the meantime, before then, the race is, they have a few days left to get everything ready. the stage is already there. they have got some scaffolding being set up have got some scaffolding being set up at the moment for sound and light engineers. over the next couple of days more of this flooring will put put over the pitch that is usually used for cricket matches. we are also being told that security will be doubled on the day. so they're asking people who are coming to the concert on sunday not to bring bags. so they can get through the check in process more quickly. could you bring us up—to—date on state of investigation into the attack? one more person who was arrested in
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nuneaton a few days ago has been released. police say that ten people now remain in custody. a thousand officers are working on the case. 18 sites across greater manchester are still being examined. thank you. earlier this year, a report for the government suggested that workers under 30 may not get a pension until they're 70. another report said those under 45 may have to work up to their 68th birthday. ministers were due to make a decision on the pension age issue this month, but the general election has delayed things. as the cost of pensions — and the number of pensioners — continue to rise, what are the political parties' plans for the state pension? let's cross to edgbaston in birmingham and join our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz. good morning. i'm at a retirement
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village in edgbaston in birmingham, i will give you quick look around. there are around 240 flats here. 300 residents. you can buy your way in forup to residents. you can buy your way in for up to £250,000. but some people will rent their accommodation for a lot less, as little as £30 a week and there is a restaurant, snooker a jim. it is a bit like a cruise ship without the sea. but first that issue that you were raising, the the possibility or how long will you have to wait to go to a retirement home or pick up your pension and the possible young people will wait until their 70. here is a report i put together on that. this is the first time people picked up the state pension, 1909. it was just £27 in the day's money. we're not going back to that, but the talk is we will return to anotherfeature, you had to be much older. we've managed to track down, in the west midlands,
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a very rare example of an old—age pension order from 1909, the first year. you take this in each week to the post office and cash in yourfive shillings. but you'd only qualify if you were over 70 years of age. that's what we could be going back to. so, could people now in their 20s and their kids after them had to wait until 70 as well to get the pension? that's a projection which was made for ministers in march by the government actuaries department because life spans are growing with every new generation. i think everyone's living longer now aren't they? so they're pushing it out, getting people to work a bit longer. his generation are probably going to have to work even longer, aren't they? i'm a nurse and i know that i couldn't have worked on the wards until that i'm that age. i'm quite conscious that i'm paying as much into my pension currently as i possibly can because like you say, i might have to wait until i'm a lot older before i actually get that. the projection was that someone
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like louise, who is 27, could have a pension age of 70 yet still be likely to get the pension for the same proportion of her life as people who've retired in the last 20 years. gemma, who is 32, would be waiting until 69. karen, at 51—year—old grandmother is already set to have 67 as a pension age. it's entirely realistic that today's 20—year—olds won't get a state pension until they are 70. i think the problem is, some people have a physical, stressfuljob. there has to be some mechanism which allows them to work part—time and there has to be some mechanism which allows them to take a pension earlier than the state pension age, albeit a small and reduced pension. so, the younger you are, the more the pension age is on the move. the conservatives say they'll ensure it reflects increases in life expectancy. labour rejects changes beyond 66 — it'll have a review. the lib dems stick with current policy, which means
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at least 68 eventually. there's a law which forces the government to reassess her when future generations could get their pension. so whoever wins the election will have to decide whether they dare make people wait until 70. simon gompertz, bbc news. asi as i said, i'm at a retirement village in birmingham. and we are going to test some of the issues on some of the residents here. first, lesley, what do you think about the idea of today's young people having to wait until they're 70 pick up the state pension? well, i think it's a very u nfortu nate state pension? well, i think it's a very unfortunate but fair event. because of the length of time for eve ryo ne because of the length of time for everyone living. i'm sure that my pension providers, including the state, didn't ever dream that i would still, they would still be paying me money at 89 years of age
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and still apparently hail and hearty. congratulations on beating the system there. moving on to the election and the manifesto, what are the main priorities for you? well, i think the priority is, the main one is the economy. but another one is that the conservatives should before the election, before the vote is counted etc, i think they should announce what the cap will be on our care. so that we know how much we are going to have to pay out you see. and can make some arrangements. now to beryl. that is the main thing. you're living here, but you're also a carer yourself. yes. what worries you looking at the election? didn't realise untilthis
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point the guy i care for is nearly 100 years of age and therefore, and i have onlyjust come across, he is now in the early stages of dementia andl now in the early stages of dementia and i did not realise before now... that is being properly addressed. and i did not realise before now... that is being properly addressedm is being addressed here because we are fortunate enough to live in a place like this. i don't know how people living in their own homes would cope with this situation. it is very difficult. you haven't seen the parties addressing that? not really, no. tony, you're in your track suit, because you're about to go to the gym? and fitness, the fitness of the economy is important for you? it is very important. it is something that hasn't been emphasised during the election campaign. what they have evaded the issue. it is just campaign. what they have evaded the issue. it isjust peripheral and it issue. it isjust peripheral and it is going to be very important, because if we come out europe, when we come out of europe, the economic
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situation is going to be very different. and the amount of money thatis different. and the amount of money that is going to be available to pay the benefits that everybody is promising us may not be there. sol think it is very important and it has not been emphasised in this... you think they have been skirting around the issue? yes certainly. previous elections we have always heard the phrase, who is safest with the economy. nobody said that this time. thank you very much. we will are going to be here all through the day looking at the issues for older age groups and very relevant to the young as well. back to you. thank you. this afternoon here we will be putting your questions about issues that affect older people to simon and pensions experts. if you have a
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questions on pensions you can get in touch. police in florida have released footage of the golfer tiger woods struggling to walk, after he was found asleep at the wheel of his car. the 14—time major champion was subsequently arrested for driving under the influence, but was not found to have been drinking. he blamed his state on an "unexpected reaction" to a mix of prescription medicine following back surgery. with temperatures hitting 32 degrees in florida at the moment, you might be tempted to go for a dip to cool down. until, that is, you see something like this. a seven foot long alligator was removed from a family's swimming pool. it seems to be going quietly at first but then reacts with a death roll, normally used to kill prey. sarasota county sheriff's department
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said the unwelcome guest was eventually removed unharmed. it's now been moved to what they've described as a more ‘appropriate location'. now the weather. we are not going to reach 32 degrees, but it is going to turn very warm for many of us. lots of sunshine around. not the story of eve ryo ne of sunshine around. not the story of everyone though, as we did have some rain in northern ireland. that is spreading into scotland, particularly west and south scotland. more cloud across northern england and wales. good sunny spells elsewhere. temperatures getting up to 26 degrees in the south—east of england. a bit fresher further to 26 degrees in the south—east of england. a bit fresherfurther north and west. overnight tonight that area of brain will continue to move
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gradually eased, pushing into west wales and south—west england by friday morning. quite a warm and muqqy friday morning. quite a warm and muggy night for into friday. this area of rain will introduce much pressure conditions to these northern and western areas. that rain breaks up as it moves further south and east. in that fresh air, temperatures about 17 to 19 degrees. in the south—east, temperatures potentially up to 28 degrees. that will trigger some heavy thundery showers. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11.30am: theresa may is to set out her vision for a "britain beyond brexit", as campaigning for the election enters its final week. she'll use a speech to say she wants to build a "stronger, fairer and even more prosperous" country. a senior united nations official has said that the coalition to combat climate change will not break up if the united states decides to turn its back on the paris agreement.
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president trump is due to announce later whether he will continue to honour the commitment to reduce emissions. tickets for the concert to benefit the victims of the manchester attack sell out within minutes of going on sale. the event at old trafford on sunday will raise money for those affected by the suicide bombing. residents clear the debris following yesterday's car bomb attack in kabul — which killed at least 90 people — and injured hundreds more. another attack today, near the airport injalalaba — has has killed one solider and injured six others. now it's time for a sports update. let's start with the latest from the first match in the champions trophy where england won the toss and decided to bowl first against bangladesh at the oval — so far it's been the batsmen who have been on top. the bangladesh openers put on 56 with jake ball in particular coming
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in for some punishment although he had a catch off his bowling put down by moeen ali, but a few minutes ago ben stokes took england's first wicket of the tournament in his first over, with soumya caught by substitute jonny bairstow for 29. it's currently bangladesh 60 after 14 overs. reports coming out of portugal this morning suggest that benfica goalkeeper ederson has agreed to move to manchester city. sources at city say however the deal is not done yet but the fee is believed to be in the region of £35 million. former arsenal and england captain tony adams says that manager arsene wenger was not the best coach he ever had, despite the pair winning two premier league and fa cup doubles together. wenger yesterday was confirmed as staying in charge at the emirates for two more years. adams was speaking this morning on bbc breakfast.
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i think he's a fantastic physiologist. no one could have done the change from, the transition from highbury to the emirates. an economist, he was the best in the game at that, physiology, preparation and recovery, best in the game. benitez is pretty gerber arson is the best. but he has never been a coach to me. he's a good coach, but not the i've ever had. other guys are fantastic coaches. they taught me how to defend. arsene wenger never did that. british and irish lions head coach warren gatland says he won't be making the same mistake as his predecessor by splitting the teams. the squad arrived in new zealand yesterday ahead of the start of their tour. gatland says suggestions the schedule is too tough are overblown and has been talking about the importance of keeping the squad together for the tests and midweek matches unlike graham henry in 2001. it is paramount for these guys at
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the moment. the players that are involved in 2001, he lost half the tea m involved in 2001, he lost half the team on day one because he had you quys team on day one because he had you guys over here, you guys over there. the players knew straightaway, that's the test side and we just make up the numbers. it's important these guys feel like they are putting themselves in the shop window. they have a chance to improve themselves. tennis legend martina navratilova has accused another former wimbledon champion margaret couty of being a homophobe in the wake of the australian's controversial comments about the lesbian and gay communities. court described tennis as — quote — full of lesbians yesterday after expressing her opposition to same sex marriages. navratilova, the nine—times wimbledon singles champion, described court as an amazing tennis player and a racist and homophobe. she also called some of court's comments as "sick and dangerous". court's views led to some players this week suggesting a boycott of the margaret court arena during the australian
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open in melbourne. and world number one andy murray is second on court this morning in his second round match at the french open — the scot faces slovakia's martin kleeshan, ranked 50 in the world. kyle edmund also plays his second round match later today. a quick update on the cricket. bangladesh now 70—1 against england in their opening match of the champions trophy at the oval. that's all the sport for now. let's return now to the election campaign and there are just seven days to go before polling day. we have just had from the labour party ahead of a speech byjeremy corbyn later today, as he gets back
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on the campaign trail as well. he is saying the choice is not between brexit or no brexit but between a labour brexit for jobs, and brexit or no brexit but between a labour brexit forjobs, and a tory brexit that he says will riskjobs meltdown. the conservatives are reckless approach has left us isolated and marginalised, he says. britain is leaving the eu but let's be clear, there is no such thing as no deal. if we leave without a positive agreements, we still have to trade with the eu but on what terms? that the latestjeremy corbyn. let's join terms? that the latestjeremy corbyn. let'sjoin ben wright in deeside. this is a bold assertion from the prime minister about britain becoming more prosperous after brexit. a number of independent forecasters disagree with that. how successful do you think she is going to be today, in moving the conversation onto the terms that she wants to talk about?
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it isa terms that she wants to talk about? it is a contrast to those forecasts. and contrast to what theresa may we re and contrast to what theresa may were saying before the referendum. she did not say a lot in the referendum campaign but she was clear ina referendum campaign but she was clear in a big speech she made that she did not think britain could be more prosperous, safe and secure outside the eu. in the last year of course she has a determine narrative around, on brexit, herself, and some passion and she believes this can be a great moment for the uk. that is what she will be saying here in the next half—hour or so. she is wanting to get the tory campaign back on to the central issue, that they want this to be all about comedy, negotiations. the contrast between theresa may and jeremy corbyn, leadership. the conservative party ‘s vision for brexit. she will say it could be a great moment, she will urge the country to come together behind this moment now. it will have quite an upbeat tone i think, her
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speech today. whether it will deliver any more in terms of substance, whether it will tell us more substance, whether it will tell us m o re exa ctly substance, whether it will tell us more exactly on how the government hope to get a conference in free trade deal with the eu, and what the new migration system might look like, what the border with ireland is going to be, i don't know. it will certainly be heavy on rhetoric. it's interesting these lines we see a head of thejeremy corbyn speech later, that he is going to be taking on theresa may on the subject of brexit. we know theresa may has said repeatedly that she will not accept a bad deal, that no deal is better than a bad deal. jeremy corbyn is saying there is no such thing as no deal. he is really going after the territory that perhaps theresa may feels most comfortable on. yes. it isa feels most comfortable on. yes. it is a contrast between labour and the tories, when it comes to brexit. theresa may has been quite emphatic from the beginning that she would be prepared to walk away from the negotiating table if she did not
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feel that the deal on offer was good for the uk. whereas labour have a lwa ys for the uk. whereas labour have always said that they would go back and try again. that is, there was quite a bit racal difference. theresa may herself has also warned of dire consequences, were there to be no deal between britain and the eu. the question remains, under what circumstances would she actually be prepared to leave the table and walk off? for her perspective, the eu is setting the terms of these talks. they are laying down the order that things can happen in. the elements of the divorce, in what order they are prepared to talk about it. in away the strongest card theresa may has going into these negotiations, if she is still in downing street after polling day of course, is that the threat to walk if the terms are not good enough. that's why she keeps saying it but it is interesting thatjeremy corbyn today is arguing that she is increasing the likelihood of that happening because of the rhetoric around
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brexit. a confrontational approach to brussels that we have heard over the few weeks. thank you, ben. we will be back when theresa may start that speech, to bring that to you live. theresa may faced criticism for failing to take part in last night's television debate with other party leaders. the tories were represented by the home secretary, amber rudd, in an event which saw heated exchanges on a range of issues. let's get a flavour of what happened. plaid cymru exists to defend and build up our country. we have shown time and again, you do not need the keys to number ten to open the door to change. the only question to consider is who should be in number ten to steer britain to a brighter future. the question in this election is whether we want a country for the many, orjust a few. i believe in our great country. i believe in british values. i believe in our way of life. this election is about the kind of country we want to be. now more than ever, scotland needs strong snp voices at westminster.
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where do you think theresa may is tonight? take a look out your window — she might be out there, sizing up your house to pay for social care. some of those people on the lowest incomes have been massively hit by welfare cuts. we will always provide that safety net where it is needed. but you tried to take personal independence payments away from people with disabilities, then turned yourselves around in a few days on that. you're not credible. jeremy, jeremy, i know there is no extra payment you don't want to add to, no tax you don't want to rise. but the fact is, we have to concentrate our resources on the people who need it most. and we have to stop thinking, as you do, that there is a magic money tree. you have to be accountable for the money you want to spend. for amber to say that this is a government that actually cares for those most vulnerable i think is downright insulting to the kind of people i see in my constituency. applause. we want to see corporation tax
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reduced, not raised, because if you raise it, companies will leave this country. if they leave this country, what happens then? there is less jobs. that's complete nonsense, if i may say so. cheering ifjeremy cared about having enough money to spend on those who need it the most to raise living standards, he would not have trooped through the lobbies with conservatives and ukip to trigger article 50 and to make britain poorer. judge us on our record, on our record we have... laughter jeering which does sometimes mean making difficult choices. those sorts of choices, no other party here is prepared to face up to. the conservative government has made a lot of choices. we know what those choices are: our schools are underfunded, our hospitals are overcrowded, our students are saddled with debt, and there
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is a growing housing crisis. in wales, they aren't doing those things. you have a labour government in wales that is charging students to go to university. leadership is about understanding the people you represent. it is about being prepared to learn, is about not being so high and mighty yukon to take advice. and mighty you can't take advice. well, i have never changed my stance. pretty much. i don't flip flop. good leaders don't run away from the debate. theresa may undoubtedly should be here. whatever we discuss this evening, her absence is undoubtedly the shadow that hangs over the selection. how dare you call a general election then run away from the debate? part of being a good leader is having a good, strong team around you. i am proud and delighted to be here representing the conservative party and the prime minister, making that case. leaders should walk the walk and should be prepared to defend their politics. real leadership is about putting the country before
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you put your party. i think we all now know that this was a totally unnecessary election, and the only reason theresa may called it was that she thought she was going to have a massive majority as a result of it. i think the first rule of leadership is to show up. from all of us here, goodbye. there has been widespread condemnation of a bomb in the diplomatic area of the afghan capital, kabul. yesterday's attack, which killed at least 90 people and left more than 400 injured, has been described by the country's president, ashraf ghani, as inhuman and cowardly. a further explosion has hit jalalabad airport this morning killing one person and injuring 6 others. a bbc staff member was among the dead. the former coronation street actor
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roy barraclough has died after a short illness. roy barraclough — who was 81 — was best known for playing alec gilroy in the soap for more than 20 years. he left coronation street in 1998 and was made an mbe in 2006 for services to drama and charity. he more recently played mr grainger in a remake of are you being served?. his agent broke the news of his death this morning. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: actually, when not going to have business news the sour. let me bring you the headlines. theresa may is promising britain will become a "more prosperous" country after brexit, as she returns to the campaign trail after refusing to take part in the bbc‘s election debate. president trump is to confirm whether or not the us will stick to an major commitment on international climate change. tickets for the concert to benefit the victims of the manchester attack sell out within minutes of going on sale. two brothers whose father shot
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dead their mother and sister have described him as behaving like a "terrorist". lance hart killed his wife claire and daughter charlotte outside a swimming pool in spalding last july before turning the weapon on himself. his sons, luke and ryan say that domestic abuse is not necessarily defined by violence, but by the mindset of the perpetrator. they spoke exclusively to my colleague victoria derbyshire and described a "lifetime of struggle" in enduring their father's controlling behaviour. we realised that he had slowly taking everything away from us. that was when we decided we had to leave. was their physical violence? no. and i think that's why we were so blind
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to our situation. we were both looking for physical violence. all of us were. that was our sign that it was abuse. so, i think like you said, the ratcheting away over decades. we did not realise in that situation, we did not understand it for what actually it was. that's one of the messages we want to get out. physical violence is not the only sign of domestic abuse. quite often there is no physical violence. in our case, people would have seen it as may be just a normal family. dad who was a bit angry sometimes? people used the word is protective and expose to us it was euphemistic. he was protective but he would never let us protect ourselves. if there was a bruise, we could go to the police? was that your thought? mum
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was recording everything he did in a diary. we had it all written down but the things we had written down we re but the things we had written down were like, en masse. you could may be present a case but as they were it was almost like... it was very difficult to see it for what it was. the thing we learnt in the end was, with our father, he the thing we learnt in the end was, with ourfather, he had the thing we learnt in the end was, with our father, he had the mentality of a terrorist. he was willing to kill himself to achieve what he achieved. someone who was that fundamental, you cannot stop. i think that is the thing that makes our case is so difficult for us to come by hand. it's almost like we weren't safe whatever we did. if we had have stayed, he was planning to kill us the fact we had left, he then justified in kill us the fact we had left, he thenjustified in on kill us the fact we had left, he then justified in on different terms. before he attacked your mum and charlotte, you both had managed to secretly get your mum out over the family home and into a rented
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place four days before he attacked them? that place four days before he attacked them ? that presumably place four days before he attacked them? that presumably at that point, you were thinking, this is freedom for my mum and charlotte finally. yes. i think it was the first time i had ever seen my mum that happy. we worked for the past month secretly trying to set everything up without him realising. he had no idea. we did not have any idea until the last few days that it was going ahead. it felt like a victory on the day but what we did not realise were most murders occur after the family has moved out. in reality, we were less safe after we had moved out. i think thatis safe after we had moved out. i think that is very important to realise. you cannot let your guard down once you have moved out. basically, domestic abuse is torture. after a while you suffer from stockholm syndrome. you are under... itjust, fades into the background. there you are and you don't see it. the power
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of it is the manipulation. that's what you have to be aware of. i've asked your permission to read to our audience some of the words that your father wrote on his computer. you described it as a murder note, ryan. as you say, he began writing this three weeks before. this is what he says, in part. this was released... in fact, neither of you have read this 12 page letter in full, have you? i think you skimmed it. you have given us permission and the reason i'm going to read some of the words is to give an insight into, and also perhaps this will help shape the media narrative afterwards, which is —— perhaps this helped shape the media narrative afterwards. which is perhaps different to what you have said today. i'm completely screwed, you destroyed my life without giving me a chance. revenge is a dish served cold. ryan, you know what you have
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done and you've got what you wished for. ryan interfered all the time. sorry charlotte, you plotted against me, you cannot forgive me for what happened. i'm completely screwed, right or wrong, i happened. i'm completely screwed, right orwrong, i had happened. i'm completely screwed, right or wrong, i had to do it. you destroyed my life without giving me a chance i will destroy yours. i love you all, i always have, always will. what do you think of those words? they are the words of an abuser. anyone who knows an abuser knows their ability to twist words, to manipulate people. their ability to manipulate people. their ability to just... it's a 12 to manipulate people. their ability tojust... it's a 12 page note. it's written in cold blood. you can't... he tried to create a narrative, like you said, ahead of time. he tried to define the narrative. that's what abusers do. they spend the whole time shaping your mind. to us, it's disgusting. anyone that has been in that situation will know where those words have come from, it's just pure evil. if you are recognise some of the controllnig behaviour that ryan and luke described, and thnk that might be you —
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or are affected by any of the issues we talked about in the interview, then you can find information about organisations that can help from the bbc action line. it's at bbc.co.uk/actionline. scroll down and click on the link to domestic abuse — where you'll find a range of support groups and charities. only around a third of teenage boys say that they enjoy reading. that's according to a survey of more than 40,000 children across britain. but the study by the national literacy trust does suggest an overall rise in the number of children who say they like to read. tom burridge has the details. suddenly he realised he didn't know where his friend was... it is story time in liverpool. this charity, called the reader, encourages children to get their hands on books. a new survey suggests the real challenge is keeping boys reading when they get older. i have got three boys and i think as they
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get older it does get more difficult to keep them interested in reading. we have always read to them and i think it isjust about giving them things to read that they find exciting and interesting. the national literacy survey asked more than 40,000 children across britain how much they like reading. the eight to 11—year—old boys were largely enthusiastic, more than seven out of ten of them said they liked reading the original quite a lot. but only a third of older teenage boys gave the same response. the challenge is building up that pattern thinking of how in particular during the teenage years we promote reading to boys, that is about finding books about things they are interested in, whether it is football, dragons, sharks, and making sure those books are on hand. overall, girls like reading more than boys and the positive news from this year's survey is that the number of girls and boys of all ages who are keen on books is building up. we're just
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we'rejust going to we're just going to show you some images from teesside where what we are expecting theresa may to make a speech soon. she has said today she is going to promise that britain will become a more prosperous country will become a more prosperous cou ntry after will become a more prosperous country after brexit. we will be back there when that speech begins. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather... for many of us it's a dry day with some sunshine. quite warm across the southeast this afternoon. sunny spells continuing for many of us. this was the scene early on in west sussex. fluffy clouds developing. it's not like that everyone. we have this area cloud here. some rain as well for northern ireland and the west of scotland. much cloudier skies here. eventually we will see
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some of that rain pushing into the highlands as well. its associated with this cold front which has brought the rain, it's going to move its way further east gradually. it will get wetter across scotland. for this afternoon, about 4pm, the sunshine will continue across the south—west of england. temperatures here potentially getting up to around 20 degrees. pretty warm and sunny in the south—east. temperature is 26 of this. some fairweather developing. the cloud may well thicken up across north west wales and north—west england. head of that weather front. rain likely for the isle of man and much of northern ireland. some rain in the south west of scotland, it could be on the heavy side. not much reaching the far east. this evening and tonight, that rain will continue to move its way gradually eastward for most though, it will be a dry night. quite a warm and muggy night into friday morning. temperatures 14 to 16. tad fresher the further north
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you go. this rain will continue to move east, eventually breaking up. we will see some showery outbreaks around the midlands and eventually into the south—east, where with some heat we will see thunderstorms kicking off. temperatures here potentially up to 28 degrees. behind that rain, much pressure conditions with highs of 17, 18 degrees. overnight, that warm air will be moved out of the way by this cold fronts, fresh as conditions meant going into the weekend. low pressure in charge of our weather, the airstream coming off the atlantic. that will bring some showery conditions i think, for saturday. there will be some showers and sunny spells, the best towards the east. it will not be as warm or has he made in the southeast. 20, 201 degrees. on sunday, that mixture of sunny spells and showers. temperatures getting into about 20 degrees. goodbye. this is bbc news and these are the top stories
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developing at midday: theresa may is promising britain will become a "more prosperous" country after brexit, butjeremy corbyn accuses her of adopting a reckless approach to the negotiations. and we'll shortly be crossing to teesside, where the prime minister is due to make a speech. president trump is to confirm whether or not the us will stick to an major commitment on international climate change. tickets for the concert to benefit the victims of the manchester attack sell out within minutes of going on sale. two brothers whose father shot dead their mother and sister have told the bbc he behaved like a "terrorist". and police in florida release dashcam footage of tiger woods struggling to walk after he was found asleep at the wheel. it is thursday 1st june.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. this time next week, the polls will have opened across the uk for the general election. after last night's debates politicians are returning to the campaign trail across the uk. so let's bring you up to date. this morning the prime minister is attempting to move the agenda back to brexit — promising britain will become a "more prosperous" country after it leaves the eu. meanwhile labour is returning to its rail policy — promising to save money for rail commuters by changing the way fare increases are calculated. the party says the move would save an average rail season ticket holder £349 a year by 2022. and last night key figures from the seven main parties went head to head on the bbc‘s
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election debate. theresa may was heavily criticised from across the political spectrum for her failure to appear at the debate. innerman smith is at westminster. strong words from theresa may and jeremy corbyn, who is really taking her on on the subject of brexit. yes, i think what we will hear from jeremy corbyn this afternoon will probably be as forthright as the remarks we are going to hear from theresa may shortly. because the prime minister will suggest that we will become in effect a richer country will become in effect a richer cou ntry after will become in effect a richer country after brexit and there will be morejobs, more opportunities and outside the eu will be free to again become a great global trading nation and england will be a more confident
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country. it is significant, because there is a change of tone a much more optimistic vision of what britain might look like after brexit, but also the claim that we might be more prosperous is one that i suspect will be challenged by many people. because we know a number of independent economic forecasters have suggested that our economy will be damaged by the uncertainty caused by brexit. we had the obr in november suggesting that exports would be hit, investment would be hit and they downgraded our growth forecast. on the back of that, jeremy corbyn is expected to warn that mrs may's form of hard brexit will lead to a jobs melt down, an economic disaster, because, he says, theresa may has alienated european countries and make it more likely we will crash out of the eu without a deal and that will result in
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manufacturers leaving britain and hitting jobs. a message echoed be i the former liberal democrat leader, nick clegg. what does certainly frustrate me is it will do most damage to hard—pressed families who are just seeing the increase in their wages stagnating compared to their wages stagnating compared to the increase in prices. and the increase in petrol and food and clothes prices are a direct result of brexit and a direct result of ha rd of brexit and a direct result of hard extreme version of brexit that theresa may's pursuing. so put it mildly, it is pretty rich for the conservatives to claim they understand how to deliver a prosperous economy when they themselves through their own choices are putting the british economy in jeopardy. not surprising perhaps that mrs may wants to get back on to her favoured terrain, namely brexit. but i do think it is interesting the much more sort of up beat tone we
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hear from much more sort of up beat tone we hearfrom her much more sort of up beat tone we hear from her regarding much more sort of up beat tone we hearfrom her regarding brexit in the extracts of the speech, there is no mention ofjeremy corbyn and it seeps —— seem they have chose on the park some of the aggressive language they have been using and try and present a more confident, upbeat tone. there is a view that voters tend to respond more to messages of hope than they do to warnings about how things will get very difficult. certainly in her manifesto launch, there was a lot warning about the difficult, hard challenges that had to be faced. ijust difficult, hard challenges that had to be faced. i just wonder whether in team may they have decide they have got to give more of the sun lit uplands to bring voters on board. as for brexit, interesting thatjeremy corbyn too has decided to focus on brexit today, because brexit has a lwa ys brexit today, because brexit has always been a difficult issue for labour. they have found themselves
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in this awkward position of not wanting to alienate those of their supporters who were passionate remain backers, at the same time trying to keep on board those in some of their traditional constituencies who clearly did back brexit. so they have this very awkward balancing act. interesting that mr corbyn could seek to go out of his way to make the case for brexit. i'm told he will set out labour's proposed brexit negotiating tea m labour's proposed brexit negotiating team that. suggests to me a degree of confidence in the corbyn camp that the initiative and momentum in the election has swung more their way. we are looking at the live shot, i think we can show your viewers the shot from teesside where we are expecting that speech from theresa may. on the point that you we making about whatjeremy corbyn
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will be saying this afternoon, it is interesting that he says there is no such thing as no deal. because of course we have heard this mantra almost from theresa may that no deal is better than a bad deal. jeremy corbyn saying there is no such thing as no deal. so he is taking her on on the subject that she has been seen to be more comfortable on and he perhaps has been seen to be less suren. on. and an issue on which he was press and struggled when he was asked about would he consider no deal and he was left say, i will get a deal. the question mark is what happens if other eu countries play ha rd ball happens if other eu countries play hard ball and really give britain nothing. are you then prepared to walk away? he never addressed that issue. today, saying no deal, there issue. today, saying no deal, there is no such thing, because a no deal would be the worst of all deals, it
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would be the worst of all deals, it would be the worst of all deals, it would be he says economic disaster. because of the danger that outside any sort of arrangement with the single market or the customs union we could face tariffs and he would suggest tariffs on car imports could be 10%. from his point of view no deal is sort of a nonsense. there is no such thing. it is the worst possible outcome. but i will be interested when he gets questioned what his responses will be to some of the other brexit questions where mr corbyn has been vague and one that springs to mind is around immigration, where while he has been clear on some areas, such as dparn —— guarantees the right of eu nationals he has not said what labour would do to replace freedom of movement. there was a leak suggesting they were looking at a us—style green card system. labour folks sought to play that down. but
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last night when jeremy folks sought to play that down. but last night whenjeremy corbyn was asked, he appeared to edge towards that, saying a fair deal would be a system that allowed people to come here if they had jobs. that would be in line with a green card system. when he is questioned about his brexit arrangements i imagine that will be at the top of the pile, what will be at the top of the pile, what will he do about immigration and what is his approach to numbers? at the moment labour have avoid putting any —— avoided putting any target on this. he superintendentinged it e—— suggested it might go down a bit. you get the feeling that is no at priority for labour and their focus is to ensure that the economy is not damaged by whatever new arrangements they have put in place to replace freedom of movement once we leave the eu. let's go to teesside and ben wright is there. theresa may will wa nt to
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wright is there. theresa may will want to move the conversation on from the fact that she wasn't at the deba last night? oh, and... apologies. no conversation u nfortu nately apologies. no conversation unfortunately from ben at this point. but we will be back in teesside when theresa may begins that speech. i'm told we do have ben now. let's try that again. i hope we can hear you. yes. there you are. i was making the point, that theresa may will really be wanting to move the conversation on from the fact she wasn't at the debate last night? she will. i'm sure she will be asked by people here at this business why she wasn't there, what she thought of it, the damage it may have done to her campaign. but she wants to make today about brexit, with a week to going, she will describe a
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positive life for britain and say it could be a great moment for britain and urge the country to get behind her and restate the arguments she has head, aspirations she has set out. freeing britain from the european courts, control over borders, but it will be heavy on rhetoric and perhaps short on fresh detail about how theresa may plans to extricate britain from the eu and the talks will start within days of the talks will start within days of the general election. the talks will start within days of the general electionlj the talks will start within days of the general election. i don't know how much longer we have to wait on the prime minister, but how much attention do you think the conservatives are paying to the polling, what the polls are saying at the moment? well, they will be aware of them, as we all are. i don't get a sense that there is panic at all. in a way, you could
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argue that the closer this election feels on the streets, that the electorate think it could be in the balance from, a conservative point of view that is not necessarily bad news, when the election was called, they worried about it feeling as if it was a foregone conclusion and getting their vote out and perhaps if their supporters feel this race is tightened that will get the turnout they feel they need. i don't think they are panicking about it. but i do think what we will see in the last week is a relentless focus on their core messages and they are brexit and the related question of leadership. who do you want to see negotiate with brussels. that is what theresa may will say and we will hearfor what theresa may will say and we will hear for the next week. thank you very much for the moment. in his first broadcast interview, willie walsh, the chief executive of the company who owns british airways and
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who remained silent after the ba computerfailure, has who remained silent after the ba computer failure, has admitted who remained silent after the ba computerfailure, has admitted it damaged the brand. this is his first broadcast interview since the huge computer problems. speaking to the bbc and our correspondent richard westcott. i'm pleased that ba has been able to recover from the significant disruption that the, they faced on saturday. i think the tea m they faced on saturday. i think the team at british airways has done everything possible to get them back flying a full schedule as quickly as possible. we apologise to any customers who were disrupted. we know the cause of the problem. it was not an it failure, it was a problem cause bedty failure — by the failure of electrical power. we understand what happened. we are still investigating why it happened and that investigation will take
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some time. but i think the team at ba did everything they could in the circumstances to recover the operation as quickly as they did and our focus will be on making sure any of our customers who experienced disruption are managed and satisfied with how we handle things and clearly we will do everything we can to make up the disruption that they suffered. our transport correspondent is with me now. he has taken some time before giving this interview, do you think he has deliberately done that, because of the enorty of the problem? deliberately done that, because of the enorty of the problem7m deliberately done that, because of the enorty of the problem? it is ha rd to the enorty of the problem? it is hard to know. i think he has kept away from it as much as he can, because he told us, we have given you the boss, i spoke to the chief executive on monday and you have spoken to the person in challenge, its is hisjob and nothing to do with me. but he is brought into it. these boss of the parent company
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that owns british airways and it is willie walsh, the guy who ran british airways and the person people would know. he has finally broken cover. he had spoken to one newspaper. it took a long time to get him to talk on camera. and defending his boss alex cruise, who he brought in to run ba, saying he couldn't have done a betterjob. possibly passengers will scoff at that, because ba was criticised for not putting the boss up for three days. it took from saturday to monday to face up to questions. and a huge criticism that no one on the ground knew what was going on. willie walsh saying he couldn't have done a betterjob. what more have we learned? not a lot. we heard about
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this power surge. i have spoke on the lots of it experts who used to work at british airways, everyone is sceptical that a power surge could have caused that havoc. we still don't feel like we have the answers. willie is saying they know what happened and they don't know why and there will be an investigation. they don't know how long it will take. i'm not sure that they will ever eveal the results of the investigation. we haven't been told yet. we don't have any more detail on what happened, but he is defending the boss who was in charge and who has come under so much criticism. thank you. president trump is due toy a to announce whether he will pull america out of the paris agreement on climate change. china's premier confirmed
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china would honour its commitments on climate change. president trump has described climate change as a chinese hoax. the trump white house is said to be deeply divided on the issue of global warming. the president's daughter ivanka, favours america remaining part of the paris accord. as does the g7 whose leaders, angela merkel among them, took time out from last week's summit in sicily to lobby mr trump on the issue. even pope francis rallied to the defence of the historic accord when he welcomed the president to the vatican. we are going to cancel the paris climate agreement. but having made that pledge on the campaign trail, it seems the president intends to stick to it, dealing what environmentalists say would be a shattering blow to the most comprehensive agreement on global warming ever reached. he will announce his verdict, the president told his followers on twitter, in the rose garden of the white house. opponents fear it could prompt other
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members of the accord to ponder whether they too should think about withdrawing. america produces more in the way of greenhouse gases than any other country on the planet, apart from china. but president trump is keeping faith with fossil fuels in the hope of creating jobs. his critics say such a policy will never work and that by holding true to his pledge to put america first, he's favouring isolationism over cooperation on one of the biggest challenges facing the planet. david willis, bbc news, washington. our correspondent is in washing tovrn. everyone knows president trump likes twitter, including the donald tusk who said on twitter, please don't change the world
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climate for worse. what is the latest you're hearing about what the administration plans to do? donald trump likes twitter, but he likes to keep people guessing. he made the announcement of the announcement but he kept his cards close to his chest. he said, i'm hearing strong opinions from both sides. we know within the white house there are lobbies on both sides. you have the globalists such as the secretary of state and his own daughter who say we should not pull out of the agreement and it could be damaging to the us credibility and us leadership would be diminished. but you have nationalists who say, like his advisor steve brannen, who said you made the promise to your voters and you have support from the coal mining areas of the country and you have support from some republicans
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who say environmental regulations are damaging business. he is getting both of those inputs. he has been leaning towards pulling out. there had been lea ks leaning towards pulling out. there had been leaks saying that is what he is going to do. but we won't know until he makes the announcement. the chinese prime minister is brussels and eu and china reaffirming their commitment to the paris accord. some members of eu more scathing of donald trump and we heard jean—claude juncker also saying that the president doesn't get close enough to documents on the paris accord to truly understand them. clearly president trump is not going to be happy about that sort of comment is he? well no, although he gets all kinds of criticism. but the europeans are disappointed that the united states might be withdrawing from the agreement and they have made that very clear since the g7
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and the nato meeting, where president trump would not commit to staying in the agreement. the agreement doesn't dissolve if the united states leave, especially if countries like china step up and there will be an agreement between china and the eu. but the united states is the second largest emitter in the world and one of largest economy and there has been a lot of moral input from the obama administration in helping countries meet their commitments. if you take that away, i think there is no question the agreement is weakened. that is something that concerns the europeans. i have to say the united states is already weakening it, because of the, mr trump's moves to roll back on the environmental regulations that president obama put in place to meet us commitments. but pulling out from the agreement would obviously further that move. thank
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you very much. let me tell you a few moments ago theresa may was seen arriving in teesside, ahead of speech she is due to make. there is the evidence. we will be back there in teesside as soon as her speech begins. she is expected to promise that britain will become a more prosperous country after brexit. tickets for a benefit concert in manchester have sold out within minutes. we can talk to our correspondent at the old trafford cricket ground. some people who were at the concert, the original ariana grande event, who have been trying to get tickets for this concert
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haven't so far been able to, so there is concern and frustration about that. what can you tell us about that. what can you tell us about the ticketing process?m about that. what can you tell us about the ticketing process? it has been difficult for them, although all the tickets were sold out within about 20 minutes, the regular £40 tickets, of course thousands had been put aside for people at the original ariana grande concert last monday when the bomb attack happened. some of them though bought those from another site, a resale site. th they went on—— when they went online to register, their ticket reference was not being recognised. the agency involved said that has now been solved. but there isa that has now been solved. but there is a backlog and so not everybody woke up today and got the ticket that they were expecting on an e—mail. what ticket master have said is they will extend the registration deadline until 2 o'clock this afternoon. but many people have told
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us they're too upset too take up the offer and won't be coming here on sunday. that is not a surprise. and thatis sunday. that is not a surprise. and that is why the council here, trafford council, has set up a centre, close to the venue on sunday, so if people find the experience too difficult they can go there for help and support. but of course £2 million is expected to be raised from ticket sales for those people, for people affected by the bomb attack. aside from the £40 regular tickets, there are the more expensive vip tickets on sale today. when you book online you can, you will be asked if you want to de—nate more to the —— donate more to the charity and what we are hearing a live events company that is operating the bars here at the site will also be donating profits to the fund. so before then, just a few days to get ready, you can see the stage is set, they'rejust
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days to get ready, you can see the stage is set, they're just putting up stage is set, they're just putting upafew stage is set, they're just putting up a few more bits of scaffolding. the rest of the pitch will be covered as well over the next few days. we are also hearing on site that security will be doubled on sunday. that is why people are being asked not to bring bags, to make that check in process go more smoothly. what is the latest on the investigation into the attack? the man that was arrested in nuneaton a few days ago has been released. that means now there are still ten men in custody. of course a thousand officers are still working on the close and going over all the footage and they have 7,000 police log entries they're going through and there are hundreds of officers still guarding 18 sites across greater manchester that are being fore nsically manchester that are being forensically examined. thank you for that update. just a reminder that we
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are waiting on the prime minister to speak in teesside. we know he shaz arrived at the —— she has arrived at the venue. we will be back there as soon as her speech starts. the former coronation street actor roy barraclough has died. he played mr granger in a remake of are you being served. his agent broke the news of his death this morning. a prisoner who overpowered guards to escape from hospital has been recaptured in wiltshire. the man who was described as dangerous was spotted by a member of the public yesterday. scientists have poured cold water on the theory
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we need to wash our hands with hot water to kill germs a study found cool flows remove the same amount of harmful bacteria. researchers also found antibacterial soap is no better than normal soap, but they recommend scrubbing your hands for at least ten seconds. police have released footage of golfer tiger woods struggling to walk after leaving his car. he wasn't found to have been drinking. he blamed his state on medication. now we are waiting on that speech in teesside from theresa may. we hope to be back there soon. first let's check out there soon. first let's check out the weather. hi anita, a mix of
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weather. the weather has turned in north western parts. we have fresher, wetter atlantic weather. the many of us are enjoying sunshine. this is the satellite, a clear band of weather, the front moving into northern ireland and scotland. rain—bearing cloud, but many central and southern areas are enjoying sunshine and temperatures could peak at 26. the rain will come and do in northern ireland and scotland. very slow—moving band of rain. by the early hours of friday morning, we will get some light rain into the tip of cornwall and western wales and the lake district. tomorrow that, front will cross other parts of the u. k behind it it will be fresh, but we could see storms in the south—east. a warm day
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in the south—east, but for most of usa in the south—east, but for most of us a fresher day. that is it. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12.30am: the chief executive of the company that owns british airways — willie walsh — has finally spoken about last weekends computer failure that disrupted tens of thousands of passengers, admitting it damaged the company but said it was not caused by the company outscoring its it systems. theresa may is to set out her vision for a "britain beyond brexit", as campaigning for the election enters its final week. but the labour leader — jeremy corbyn — will warn that theresa may's approach to brexit risks "a jobs meltdown." a senior united nations official has said that the coalition to combat climate change will not break up if the united states decides to turn its back on the paris agreement. president trump is due to announce later whether he will continue to honour the commitment to reduce emissions.
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tickets for the concert to benefit the victims of the manchester attack sell out within minutes of going on sale. the event at old trafford on sunday will raise money for those affected by the suicide bombing. residents clear the debris following yesterday's car bomb attack in kabul — which killed at least 90 people — and injured hundreds more. another attack today, near the airport injalalaba — has killed one solider and injured six others. more now on the news that willie walsh, the chief executive of the company that owns ba and who has remained silent in the media after the immediate aftermath of the be a computerfailure the immediate aftermath of the be a computer failure fiasco has admitted it damaged the company ‘s brand. he has been speaking exclusively to us. i'm pleased ba has been able to
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recover from the significant disruption that they faced on saturday. i think the team at british airways under their leadership has done everything possible to get ba back flying a full schedule as quickly as possible. we clearly apologise to any of our customers who were disrupted, we know the cause of the problem. it was not an it failure, it was a problem caused by the failure of electrical power to our it systems. we understand what happened, we are still investigating why it happened, and that investigation will take some time. i think the team at british airways did everything they could in the circumstances to recover the operation as quickly as they did, and our focus will be on making sure that any of our customers who experienced disruption are managed, satisfied, with how we handled things. clearly we will do everything we can to make up the
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disruption that they suffered. cardiff is preparing to host the biggest game in european football. tens of thousands ofjuventus and real madrid fans are expected to descend on the city for the champions league final this weekend. in the wake of the manchester arena attack, south wales police say they'll deploy their largest ever football security operation, as wyre davies has been finding out. this stadium has seen a rugby world cup final, several fa cup finals and played host to countless rock concerts. but this weekend's headliners are perhaps the biggest yet. certainly in terms of economic impact and the level of security. by the time the multi—million pound stars from real madrid and juventus emerge from the tunnel, the stadium will have been scoured, scanned and searched many times over. police teams have been drafted in from across the country. this is the biggest club football match in the world, but the security operation here in cardiff is almost unprecedented. 6500 police officers on duty.
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600 of those will be armed and a complete vehicle lockdown around the welsh capital for three days. but a lot has changed in the world since cardiff was chosen as the venue for this final. attacks in paris, nice, berlin, westminster and only last week in manchester have shown how vulnerable big cities and big events can be. that made us look at the way in which those atrocities were carried out, so we've looked at different methods, such as we've had lone actors with vehicles. nice was a lorry, we've had the westminster attack which was a vehicle and stabbing. we are well aware of terrorist firearms attacks from previous occasions, so we've tried to look at all ways in which we can mitigate and prevent those attacks. hundreds of armed police on the streets of cardiff are deliberately visible deterrent, especially in the wake of manchester. but the decision to throw up such a wide cordon of concrete barriers, fences and to exclude traffic from today, will enclose the city centre in a virtual ring of steel.
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not that too many locals seem to be put out by the inconvenience. very, very glad it's here, it's great for the city. going to bring in business, is it? it should do, definitely. you've got the spanish and the italians, so hopefully they'll spend all their money. but there's certainly anxiety, definitely about any large gatherings, really. brings some money into cardiff and show where we are on the map for a change. every inch of cardiff real estate seems to have been draped with images of real madrid's local galactico, gareth bale. and while the economic impact is difficult to assess, some local businesses will benefit, others will feel squeezed out as the giants of the corporate world descend on cardiff. other cities would give their right arm to actually hold the champions league final and we've got to maximise this opportunity. i hope that the welsh and the uk governments are squeezing every hand of every businessman that comes in here and say, why don't
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you come here again? we can look what we can do for your business in this great country of ours. with 170,000 visiting fans, and another 200 million television viewers worldwide, this is an opportunity too good to miss. but nor can the city's security be taken for granted. wyre davies, bbc news, cardiff. more now on the ariana concert this weekend in manchester — to benefit the victims of last weeks bombing. on the line is guy bartlett who was at the concert there are tickets available close to people who were not at the original concept and to those who were. who wa nt to concept and to those who were. who want to attend this new event. —— the original concept. some people have been having problems getting hold of those tickets. on the line is guy bartlett who was at the concert. thank you to joining thank you tojoining us. first
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thank you to joining us. first of all, before we talk about the ticketing issues, you could tell us about your experiences last monday night. of course. we were down in the auditorium when the bomb went off. initially, idid the auditorium when the bomb went off. initially, i did not actually think it was a bomb. i thought maybe it was a gas canister or perhaps some other building related problem. then there was a pause and people started screaming and running and so on. wejust started screaming and running and so on. we just stood still and waited to see if anything else was going to follow. then we made our way out of an exit away from where the sound had come from. it's only when we came out of the building we realise that something pretty serious it happened. we were fortunate, we had parked away from the actual arena so we we re parked away from the actual arena so we were able to walk to our car and drive out of the city and started tuning into the news to hear what had happened. you must really be counting your blessings. how did it
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affect your daughter and her friend? initially, they were ok. my wife and i managed to keep them quite calm and collected. obviously our behaviour reflected on them, and they were ok. it was really the next day when they both went to school and all theirfriends day when they both went to school and all their friends were gathering around and saying, are you ok? it started have an impact them. they're look i'm much more aware to their own social media networks, —— they became much more aware through their own social media networks. we supported her and her friend own social media networks. we supported her and herfriend to reassure them this was an incredibly random act, however horrible, and so far we have managed to get them through it, really. like so many people who were there last monday nights, you do want to go to this concept that is happening this weekend and i understand you have applied via the ticketmaster link setup for people who were at the
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original concept? but so far, you have not got any news back about getting these new tickets? it's been really frustrating. we've been keeping an eye on announcements ever since they said that ariana grande was coming back. our daughter was all over it straightaway. she and herfriend were all over it straightaway. she and her friend were really keen to go back. and enjoy a proper concept without the horrible ending. as soon as it was announced on the media on tuesday, we logged in the website and filled in the details and bought our tickets through ticketmaster. we still have those were all the references. we put them in, filled in the boxes. then waited for an e—mail that still has not come. in the boxes. then waited for an e-mail that still has not come. so you did everything you were supposed to do, but no reply whatsoever? nothing at all. not even an acknowledgement e—mail, when you press the submit it, normally you get something back saying, we have
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received your submission. but there has been nothing like that. it has been impossible to get through to anyone at ticketmaster. we treated them, messaged them. it'sjust nothing. i know ticketmaster are asking people again to try that link, which you have done presumably. yeah, we have done it again. our wife has —— my wife has got it on her phone. we are keeping an eye on it all the time to see if anything comes through. so far we still have not had anything. i'm very conscious that a new deadline is approaching 2pm, and we are desperate to get news of a successful application. desperate to get news of a successful applicationlj desperate to get news of a successful application. i know you're successful application. i know you' re really successful application. i know you're really frustrated because some people who have managed to buy tickets for the event, some of these tickets, are appearing for sale at a hugely inflated cost. you who were at the original concert have not been able to get hold of any tickets. that's correct. it's almost
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like a double injury in a way. we abandoned all hope this morning of getting the free feed tickets, then my wife and her friends, about six adults all logged online trying to buy so we could at least get to go to the concert. we failed. any of us, to get any tickets at all, even just buying them. the wife said to me about half an ago, i've just seen a ticket for sale for £400. which is pretty outrageous. i hope you manage to get a reply and get this sorted out and that you do manage to all get the tickets you want. to be able to go to this weekend concert. thank you for talking to us. guy bartlett. the time is 12:42pm. we are still waiting on the prime minister. first, let me tell you about this.
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only around a third of teenage boys say that they enjoy reading. that's according to a survey of more than 40,000 children across britain. but the study by the national literacy trust does suggest an overall rise in the number of children who say they like to read. tom burridge has the details. suddenly he realised he didn't know where his friend was... it is story time in liverpool. this charity, called the reader, encourages children to get their hands on books. getting young kids to readisn'tjrd a new survey suggests the real challenge is keeping boys reading when they get older. i have got three boys and i think as they get older it does get more difficult to keep them interested in reading. we have always read to them and i think it isjust about giving them things to read that they find exciting and interesting. the national literacy survey asked more than 40,000 children across britain how much they like reading. the eight to 11—year—old boys were largely enthusiastic, more than seven out of ten of them said they liked reading very much or quite a lot.
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but only a third of older teenage boys gave the same response. the challenge is building up that pattern early, thinking of how in particular during the teenage years we promote reading to boys, that is about finding books about things they are interested in, whether it is football, dragons, sharks, and making sure those books are on hand. overall, girls like reading more than boys and the positive news from this year's survey is that the number of girls and boys of all ages who are keen on books is going up, not down. farming is big business in the uk, with nearly half a million people employed in agriculture. and today — with just a week to go before the election — farmers from all over the country are gathering at the royal bath and west show. our correspondent sean farrington was at england's biggest agriculture show in somerset for us. lots of animals have had a lot of
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pruning today, in anticipation of the prizes at this agricultural show. it's not just the prizes at this agricultural show. it's notjust the animals on display, its big business. half a millionjobs rely on display, its big business. half a million jobs rely on the agriculture sector. you from the national farmers union. how big an industry is it for the uk? farming and food produces the raw material for a worth of food manufacturing. the biggest manufacturing sector in this country. it's a big deal and a great show to showcase so much of what we do. let's have a wander down while we talk about this. we have an election coming up. what is the one thing you want the winning government to put into play? we want them to champion and look after farming industries, that are going to go to change. it has to be a real opportunity for us, rather than a challenge. we are seeking the
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reassurance of the government of the data back british bombing and ensure that we are able to respond and be resilient. have you heard the right things so far? —— to back british farming. we can cross live now to theresa may in teesside. it's great to be here this morning on this, the first day ofjune. this is the most important election in this country has faced in our lifetime. we are now 12 months on from the eu referendum. 12 months since the british people voted for a brighter future since the british people voted for a brighterfuture for our since the british people voted for a brighter future for our country. 12 months since they voted to leave the eu. and embrace the world. in one week's time, they have the opportunity to rip a firm that decision, and secure that brighter future by voting for me to continue
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as promised. if they do, i am confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together. and build a britain that is stronger, fairer, and even more prosperous thanit fairer, and even more prosperous than it is today. the promise of brexit is great. the opportunities before us an enormous. and i am ambitious for brexit and ambitious for britain. for we are a great country, a country that is proud of its european heritage but a country that has always looked beyond europe, to the wider world. 12 months ago, the british people chose to do so again. they chose to build a more global britain. let us be clear. they did so with their eyes open. they knew that it would not be straightforward, they knew the road ahead would be uncertain. but they believed it would lead towards a
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brighter future believed it would lead towards a brighterfuture for believed it would lead towards a brighter future for their children and their grandchildren as well. with determination and characteristically british quiet resolve, they defied the establishment, ignored the threats, and made their voice heard. i respect that decision. i am clear about what needs to be done. it is time to act on their instruction, to deliver their will. it is time to respect the decision of the british people and take britain out of the european union. that is what i am ready to do from day one. i have the determination and i have the plan. a clear plan. laid out in a white paper and approved by our parliament to get the best brexit deal for britain. 12 negotiating objectives that provide the framework for a deal that works for the uk and for the eu as well. certainty at every
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stage, so that people and businesses can plan for the future. control of our own laws, so that we bring decision—making back to britain. a strengthening united kingdom so we all move forward together. the common travel area with ireland maintained, with no return to the borders of the past. control of immigration so that our immigration system serves the national interest. rights for eu nationals in britain, and british nationals in the eu secured. rights for workers enhanced. free trade with european markets. new trade agreements for british goods and services with other countries around the world. a leading role in science and innovation. continued cooperation to tackle crime and terrorism. and a phased approach to win new relationship delivering a smooth and orderly brexit. that is my clear plan for brexit. 12 objectives that amount to one ambitious goal. a new
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deep and special partnership between a successful eu and a successful britain. but that is not the limit of my ambition. i want to do more. because brexit is not a process, but an opportunity. it is this generation ‘s chance to shape a brighter future generation ‘s chance to shape a brighterfuture for our generation ‘s chance to shape a brighter future for our country. so i want us to work together, to fulfil the promise of brexit as well. if we get brexit right, then together we can do great things. we can build a bridge and beyond brexit, that is stronger, fairer, and even more prosperous than it is today. a bridge and beyond brexit thatis today. a bridge and beyond brexit that is more global and outward looking. a britain alive with possibilities, more confident in itself, and more secure. a country our children and grandchildren are proud to call home. if we get brexit
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right, we can be a confident self—governing country once again. a country that takes the decisions that matter to britain here in britain. we will be able to control our own borders, ensuring we continue to attract the brightest and the best to work or study in this country. but ensuring we have control over that process, so it is managed properly and that our immigration system genuinely serves the national interest. because while controlled immigration can bring great benefits, filling skill shortages, delivering public services and making british businesses the world beaters they often are, when the numbers get too high, it is difficult to build a cohesive society and united country. we will be able to control our own money. no longer paying huge sums to the european union every year. but spending that money on our priorities here at home. things like
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the new shared prosperity fund, we will put in place. replacing ineffective and restrictive eu structural funds with a new uk based scheme, whose sole purpose will be to reduce the inequalities that exist within and between the four nations of our united kingdom. we will be able to control our own laws, bringing thejurisdiction will be able to control our own laws, bringing the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice to an end, and returning decision—making authority to this country. as the public demanded that we shared. that means we will be able to control our own affairs, putting us firmly in control of our own future. if we get brexit right, i am confident that future will be bright. as we pursue a bold and ambitious free trade agreement between the uk and the eu, and as we get out into the world to do new trade deals with old friends and new allies around the globe, the opportunities for our economy will
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be great. we have already started discussions on future trade ties with countries like australia, new zealand and india. while countries including china, brazil, and the us and the gulf states have expressed their interest in striking trade deals with us as soon as they can. set free from the shackles of eu control, we will be a great global trading nation once again. bringing newjobs and new opportunities for ordinary working families here and at home. as we build the new modern industrial strategy i have set out, we will attract and invest in new, high—paid, high skilled jobs and spread prosperity and opportunity across the country. we will invest in the next generation. so that people growing up in britain today are ready and able to seize the opportunities ahead. that is why, whether it is continuing our school reforms, ensuring everyone gets the
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co re reforms, ensuring everyone gets the core academic education they need, the government i lead will revolutionise skills training in this country. putting technical excellence on a par with academic education for the first time. we will invest in further education policies, to ensure they have world —class policies, to ensure they have world—class facilities. we will introduce new t—levels for post—16 education, replacing a confused picture of 13,000 existing technical courses with new and better qualifications that give young people the skills they need to do thejobs of people the skills they need to do the jobs of the future. as we announced in the budget in march, we will implement the recommendations of the sainsbury review, into post—16 skills. increasing by over 50% the number of hours training for 16 to 19—year—old technical students. including a high—quality three month work placement for every student. that means that when those stu d e nts student. that means that when those students qualify, they will be genuinely work ready and able to
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make the most of the opportunities ahead. in support of all this, the government i lead will invest in a new generation of institute of technology, in every major city in england. important new institutions providing sought after skills for local, regional and national industry. they will be encouraged to develop their own local identity. to make sure they meet the skills needs of local employers. and they will give young people the chance to get a good job and put down roots in their local communities, the place they want to call home. we will do all this because for britain to succeed after brexit, we need to make the most of every talent and ensure no person or community is left behind. that is what i mean by fulfilling the promise of brexit. as we come together, behind this great national mission to make a success
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of brexit and of the opportunities it brings, we will build a more united country as our shared values, interests and aspirations bring us together. the government i lead will invest in the institutions that bring us together as a country. things like our vital public services, our schools, things like our vital public services, ourschools, our hospitals, our nhs. the nhs is the essence of solidarity in our uk, an institution that binds us all together. the symbol of our commitment to each other, between young and old, those who have and those who do not. the healthy and the sick. the government i lead will give the nhs its full support, and back it with the resources it needs. increasing spending by a minimum of £8 billion in real terms over the next five years. an increase in real funding per head of the population for every year of the parliament. our schools can be the greatest
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driver of social mobility in britain. the means by which we change the greatest injustice in britain today: the fact that your life is so often determined, not by your efforts and talents, but by where you come from, who your pa rents where you come from, who your parents are, and who you know. i wa nt to parents are, and who you know. i want to britain after brexit to be the ‘s great meritocracy. it means making britain a country where eve ryo ne making britain a country where everyone off whatever background has the chance to go as far as their talents and their hard work will ta ke talents and their hard work will take them. a country that asks not where you have come from, but where you are going to. where all that matters is the talent you have, and how hard you are prepared to work. the government i lead will continue to transform education in this country with more good schools, more and fairerfunding, and yes, we will lift the ban that stops people establishing selective schools in england as well. for too long,
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politicians have said two people in communities who are crying out for change, that they cannot have what they want. for too long, politicians have said, if you are rich or well off, you can have a selective education for their child. you can send them to a selective private school or move to a better catchment area, or afford to send them long distances to get the education you want. yet for too long, those same politicians have sought to deny that right to others, to ordinary working people, up and down this land. that isa people, up and down this land. that is a scandal and we will bring it to an end. we will do all this because despite all the progress we have made in our schools over the past seven yea rs, made in our schools over the past seven years, there are still nearly 1 million children in schools that are not good enough. if you live in the midlands or here in the north, you have less chance of attending a good school than children in the south. if we are to fulfil the
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promise of brexit together, that injustice has to end. if a lot all the promise of brexit, we need to ensure the benefits of that promise are shared by all. we can only do this with an economy that is strong and secure. we can only do this with and secure. we can only do this with an economy based on sound money and responsible economic management. an economy run by a government that is committed to bringing the deficit down, and getting the country back to living within its means. we can only do this with a government that understands that if you cannot manage your money properly, you won't command the confidence of investors at home or abroad. a government that knows that if you cannot manage your money properly, investment will dry up, taxes will rise, and businesses and the jobs they provide will flee from our shores. and ordinary working people... so, theresa may saying
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it's time to act on the instructions of the british people. she is confident she can deliver in her words, on the promise of brexit. if you want to continue watching the speech you can do so on bbc parliament. here we are ready for bbc news at one with jane hill. first a look at the weather. president trump prepares to announce whether he'll pull the us out of the paris global climate change deal. he says his decision will "make america great again". he's coming under increasing international pressure to honour the commitment to cut greenhouse gases. we'll have the latest from washington. also this lunchtime. theresa may has promised that britain will become more prosperous after brexit, with enormous opportunities leading to "a brighter future". i am confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together, and build a britain that is stronger, fairer, and even more prosperous than it is today. tickets for sunday's concert to raise money for the victims of the manchester attack have sold out within 20 minutes
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of going on sale.
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