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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 1, 2017 3:00pm-4:00pm BST

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will be tomorrow plan. that will be tomorrow morning in york. soon we will no longer be members of the eu, but agreeing a deal that delivers the benefits of the european single market and customs union will be a priority for a labour government. leaving the eu will mean an end to the free movement of workers between britain and europe. so labour's new rules for managing immigration will be fairand for managing immigration will be fair and based on what is best for the economy and of all of our community ‘s. we will start with a package of strong labour working regulation measures which will stop the relentless undercutting of terms and conditions by unscrupulous employers, often through agency recruitment, which has fuelled the most recruitment, which has fuelled the m ost rece nt recruitment, which has fuelled the most recent movements of low paid workers to this country. applause we will crack down on unscrupulous employers, stop overseas only recruitment of workers, strengthen
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safety a nd recruitment of workers, strengthen safety and protection is at work and give all workers equal rights from day one in the job. cheering and applause and increase prosecutions of employers evading the minimum wage... applause and four areas where immigration has placed a strain on public services we will reinstate the migrant impact fund, scrapped by the tories and lib dems after the 2010 election. labour's team will also guarantee and expand the rights and protections that british workers have secured three eu legislation. we will bring forward specific rights and protections bill that will lock those protections into uk law. the conservatives simply cannot
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be trusted on rights at work. they fled an all out assault on workers‘ rights through their trade union act. borisjohnson rights through their trade union act. boris johnson has rights through their trade union act. borisjohnson has demanded that the government should scrap the eu social chapter, and the conservatives also failed to back labour‘s efforts in parliament to protect workers‘ rights, which have derived from the european union. labour will not only protect our existing rights, we will extend them. our strategy is to keep britain say. unlike the tories, we will not threaten to withdraw from security cooperation with our european allies. we share similar values on the solidarity shown by people across europe after the recent horrific attacks in manchester, or indeed far right or any other attacks that have happened across europe, and that point of common decency and solidarity. we need to work together to make britain safer and europe safer altogether. applause labour will use brexit negotiations
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to confirm our commitment to cross border agency such as euro poll and seek to continue to use the european arrest warrant. we will also hire 10,000 more police officers, to make communities safer and additional thousand people to help with the threat of terrorism. labour is clear, the safety of our citizen should never be used as a bargaining chip. the choice in this election is not brexit or no brexit, that has been settled. the choice is between a jobs first labour brexit and a reckless tory brexit, based on a race to the bottom in working conditions and corporate taxes. the choice is who you trust to fight for your future. a weekend wobbly tory party, which can‘t even stick to its own manifesto commitments for a
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week, which always, always, always puts the wealthy and big business first. 0r puts the wealthy and big business first. or a labour team with clear principles, proven confidence, which will putjobs, principles, proven confidence, which will put jobs, living principles, proven confidence, which will putjobs, living standards and oui’ will putjobs, living standards and our common interests first question 110w our common interests first question now we have a plan to transform britain into a high skill, high wage economy and build new trading relationships across the world. build a fairer country that the millions who voted both remain and leave last year want to see. by standing for the many, not the few, labour is the only party which can ove 1120 m e labour is the only party which can overcome the divisions of last year‘s referendum and deliver a brexit that brings our country together. 0n brexit that brings our country together. on june brexit that brings our country together. 0njune the brexit that brings our country together. on june the 19th, brexit that brings our country together. 0njune the 19th, labour will be ready to negotiate a brexit for the many, not the few. that is my promise to all of us today and all of our country. i will also say this, we have one
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week until the general election poster look around you in this hall today. we‘re young, old, black, white, gay, straight, disabled, not disabled, we are a microcosm of the whole country. what brings us together? a determination that we will have a government that will not walk by on the other side while so many are underpaid, so many children brought up in property, schools told to collect the school gate to collect paper the teachers. nhs workers, stressed beyond belief with trying to cope with unnecessary shortages created by a government that doesn‘t fund it properly and young people whose ambitions are damaged because they couldn‘t get a nursery place, their primary school couldn‘t help them as much as it should have done and secondary schools again underfunded in trying to decide which teacher to sack, which subject to close down. students, ambitious for themselves and our community, wanting to go to
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university, frightened by the level of debt they will get into by going to university. it is time for a change in this country. cheering and applause it's it‘s time... it‘s time for a change, andi it‘s time... it‘s time for a change, and i urge all of you here today, if you‘ve got any time over the next week and i‘m sure we have, it‘s lovely weather, go in the cafes and bars, goalie on the buses, go anyway july, just talk to people about what they think would be better in our society. are they happy with this degree of inequality? are they happy with this degree of underfunding of our public services on the way so many young people, instead of being optimistic about their future, are so nervous about the future because they feel they can‘t achieve everything they want to? it‘s not
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young against old, it‘s all of us doing things together. a society that helps each other. please think about it, go for it and vote labour next thursday. thank you! cheering and applause that was jeremy corbyn, speaking cheering and applause that wasjeremy corbyn, speaking to an enthusiastic crowd in basildon. the key message of his speech was about the eu, although he did finish talking about domestic policy. he criticised the tories‘ approach as being reckless and isolated. spoke about theresa may‘s mantra that no deal is better than a bad deal as being the worst deal, and economic disaster for jobs. being the worst deal, and economic disasterforjobs. he tried being the worst deal, and economic disaster forjobs. he tried to lay out labour‘s position as it is distinct from the conservatives, saying that labour wouldn‘t pull the uk are of eu security deals and also that it would guarantee the right to stay of eu citizens here.
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labour understand getting the right deal, one that secures the country‘s interests for the long—term will challenging. he said labour is ready. that isjeremy corbyn and emily thornberry in basildon. theresa may is shortly to take questions from business owners in west yorkshire, so we will hear some of that shortly and also from the scottish national party on their position on brexit as well. at 4:15pm bbc news we will put your questions about issues that affect older people to ask personal finance correspondent and two pensions experts. if you have a question on the pensions triple lock, social care, or inheritance tax — you can get in touch via twitter using the hashtag bbc ask this, or text your questions to 61124 and you can email us as well at askthis@bbc.co.uk. that is this afternoon at 4:15pm. the us president, donald trump, is coming under growing international pressure to honour
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the paris global climate change deal. he will announce this evening whether the us will withdraw from its commitment to reduce carbon emissions. china‘s premier said this morning that his country will honour the agreement, and urged others to do the same — but donald trump has previously described climate change as a hoax, and an american job—killer. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin reports. it‘s coal that‘s driving president trump away from the global climate deal. before his election, he promised jobs for american miners. we‘re going to cancel the paris climate agreement. the president is now scrapping rules to clean up coal—fired power stations, but will that work? his economic adviser, gary cohn, says it won‘t. "coal doesn‘t even make that much sense any more," mr cohn said recently. the president disagrees. my administration is putting an end to the war on coal. and the glad—handing climate deal
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signed in paris represents exactly the sort of liberal internationalism his supporters despise. but the likelihood that he‘ll reject that paris deal has been met with worldwide dismay. at the hay book festival on the welsh border, children are learning how solar power transforms african villages. president trump has scrapped funding for this sort of thing. as he promised, he‘s putting america first. after years of working together to get a consensus, with all the countries finally working together, we‘re now in a situation where the richest economy in the world is abandoning its obligations to the poorest people, and it is those very poor people who are going to suffer. support for the paris climate deal stretches far beyond this tent. if the us pulls out, it will be on a list ofjust three nations not doing their bit for the climate, including tiny nicaragua and war—torn syria.
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it is obviously a very important decision, as the united states is the biggest economy in the world. but independently of the decision of the american government, it‘s important all other governments stay the course. china, with its massive investment in renewables, is set to take over global leadership on climate, in partnership with the eu at their summit tomorrow. india says it won‘t back down either. 0vernight, president trump said he would announce his decision on the paris deal today. but even in the president‘s own backyard, there is defiance on climate change. president trump can‘t command science. he can‘t command weather, he can‘t command a climate. the rest of the world is getting it. i don‘t think we‘re getting it enough. if anything, our response at this point is rather feeble, given the threat that climate change represents. so california will be on the field, doing its role, playing an active role in promoting climate strategies.
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here at the hay festival, this installation is lit by solar power, clean energy is all around us. and if president trump turns his back on the paris climate agreement, he won‘tjust be enraging other world leaders, he‘ll be potentially undermining america‘s own clean energy jobs for the future. roger harrabin, bbc news. that was roger harrigan... 0ur washington correspondent, barbara plett usher, told me that latest indications are that president trump is set to pull america out of the paris climate agreement. that‘s the signals the white house is sending, from anonymous sources, that he is looking at pulling out of the agreement, as he pledged to do during his campaign. he is getting
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strong voices from his voter base, the coal—mining industry, pledged to bring jobs back to the coal producing areas of the united states is and is under pressure to keep that campaign promise. and also from some republican senators on certain businesses that say the environmental regulations imposed because of the climate agreement are on the risk, they are bothering business and that there is no way to actually enforce them globally and therefore the us would be at a disadvantage in following them. so he is hearing those voices, but in that build—up to his announcement he said to journalists he that build—up to his announcement he said tojournalists he is hearing from both sides. we know there is a strong lobby on the other side as well. true to form, likes the drama, likes to keep people guessing. he has made the announcement of when he will make the announcement and even people close to him say he can change his mind up until the last minute, so until we actually hear what he says, we don‘t know what the
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decision will be. those strong voices on the other side, they are quite interesting. his daughter ivanka trump, her husband, a senior white house adviser, rex tillerson, james mattis. there those telling him he can‘t do this, it would be a mistake? cosyns that is right. within the white house there isa right. within the white house there is a lobby for him staying in the agreement. it had to do with the us leadership and credibility, to a degree. they argue the us needs to keep a seat at the table otherwise its leadership will be diminished, its leadership will be diminished, its credibility will be damaged and you just don‘t call out of agreements that you have signed #fullst op there agreements that you have signed #fullst 0p there is a strong business lobby as well, urging him to out for various reasons, and also
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because the, from top corporations. topsy 0jo ‘s has said he cannot pull out for various reasons, and also because the is moving in the direction of renewable energy. they‘ve made decisions about adjusting to the decisions under the climate decision and that will be a problem for them notjust in the us but in terms of their business dealings globally. there is a strong lobby coming from that end. they have taken out adverts in the newspapers here. he is hearing from both sides. i think and that will be a problem for them notjust in the us but in terms of their business dealings globally. there is a strong lobby coming from that end. they have taken out adverts in the newspapers here. he is hearing from both sides. i think at they are finessing what the announcement account some of the concerns from both sides, but again, the main signals coming from the white house is he will in some form keep his campaign pledge to withdraw. he once famously said global warming is a hoax perpetuated by the chinese. yes, he did say that. although he has qualified that a little bit since then, as he has qualified a number of other things. it is worth point cowie has climate change, probably trying to take into account some of the concerns from both sides, but again, the main signals coming from the white house is he will in some form keep his campaign pledge to withdraw. he once famously said global warming is a hoax perpetuated by the chinese. yes, he did say that. although he has qualified that a little bit since then, as he has qualified a number
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of other things. it is worth point out he has climate change deniers in his cabinet a leading climate denier who organised 22 other senators to write a letter to him, urging them to pull out of the agreement. he is getting input from that end as well a leading climate denier who organised 22 other senators to write a letter to him, urging organised 22 other senators to write a letterto him, urging him organised 22 other senators to write a letter to him, urging him to pull out of the agreement. he is getting input from that end as well. that was barbara plett on bbc news. the main parties time for the headlines on bbc news. the main parties focus on bbc news. the main parties focus on the leaders travel britain canvassing support. president from macros to divide this evening whether to pull out of the climate agreement. tickets for sunday's concert to raise money for the manchester attack sell—out within 20 minutes of going on sale. in sport, bangladesh settings render target of 306 at the opening match of the champions trophy at the oval. in the last few moments england‘s worth 51-1 in last few moments england‘s worth 51—1 in reply. andy murray is on course for the second round of the french open against world number this evening whether to pull out of the climate agreement. tickets for sunday‘s concert to raise money for the manchester attack sell—out within 20 minutes of going on sale. in sport, bangladesh setting vendor target of 306 of the opening match of the champions trophy at the oval. in the last few moments england‘s worth 51—1 in reply. andy murray is on court for the second round of the french open against world. he has
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come back after losing the first set to ta ke come back after losing the first set to take the second and third. it looks like antoine griezmann won‘t be going to manchester united after all. sources club‘s interest the latest from roland garros coming up at 230. more on that and the latest from roland garros coming up at 2:30pm. tickets for this weekend‘s one love manchester concert, organised to raise money for the victims of last week‘s terrorist attack, have sold out in less than 20 minutes. performers including take that, katy perry, and justin bieber are due to appear alongside ariana grande — whose show at the manchester arena was targeted by a suicide bomber. 0ur correspondent frankie mccamley reports. a concert that less than two weeks ago didn‘t exist. but now acts from across the world are making their way to the old trafford cricket ground in manchester to raise money for those affected by last monday‘s bomb attack. preparations are well under way here, getting the stage ready for ariana grande, who is going to bejoined by some of the biggest pop stars in the world. and with around 50,000 people expected here on sunday, it‘s hoped the concert will raise more than £2 million. which is looking likely,
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after tickets sold out within minutes of going on sale this morning. stars took to social media to say they‘ll be performing, sending their messages of support. while tickets are being reserved for fans who were at last monday‘s concert, susan and her daughter chloe said they won‘t be going. i wouldn‘t go there. i wouldn‘t go back. and i won‘t. i haven‘t registered for the tickets. because i know i can‘t do it. chloe was saying, "my dad says he will take us, if we get the tickets." but deep down i know she doesn‘t want to go, i know she can‘t do it. if she doesn't come back then i've missed that opportunity to see her again, but it's like, i want to go but i don't want to in case anything happens. despite vina‘s reservations, she says she will attend. i think it‘s definitely very brave of all the artists that are coming. it‘s a great thing to show respect to the ones who unfortunately passed away and also to their families, and even people who were there.
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i am very scared. i mean, you never know what‘s going to happen. when i was there on monday i was like, well, nothing‘s going to happen, but then it did. while security is being stepped up, with those going asked not to bring bags, it will no doubt be an emotional event following a tragedy that‘s affected so many. in kabul, the death toll from the suicide bomb attack has reached at least 80. it happened in kabul, the death toll from the suicide bomb attack has reached at least 80. it happened close to guarded diplomatic area and now people are asking if anywhere is around at the scale of the damage and destruction that has been left by kabul is no stranger to
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terrorist attacks but when you look around at the scale of the damage and destruction that has been left by this explosion and the scale of needed, you get the sense this attack was far larger than people are normally used to. over here you can see the crater that was left by the explosion. construction workers have been working throughout the night and today to try and repair it. one told me it was 7—8 metres deep work is needed, you get the sense this attack was far larger than people are normally used to. 0ver than people are normally used to. over here you can see the crater that was left by the explosion. construction workers have been working throughout the night and today to try and repair it. one told me it was 7—8 metres this area is really the heart of kabul. i mean you can see these walls, they mark the boundary, known as the fortified green zone. some of the wall has been partly destroyed. in the green zone you get most of the international charities and it is where most of the foreign embassies are the building that is partly destroyed is the german embassy. it is thought the attacker may have been trying to gain access into the of this explosion. this area would have been dealing but couldn‘t get past the security. as a result, it was buildings of local companies like this local phone company that
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bore the brunt of this explosion. this area would have been traffic yesterday morning and is one of the reasons why there were civilian casualties. among them was one of our bbc colleagues, a driver he is amongst one of over 90 people who went out on their morning commute never to he is amongst one of over 90 people who went out on their morning commute never to return set out labour‘s position on brexit you are watching bbc news. returning to the election campaign. a short while agojeremy corbyn set out labour‘s position on vicki young is travelling with he was on stage, emily thornberry came on stage i am just reading after he was on stage, emily thornberry came on ruled out any talk of a coalition. is that new? jeremy corbyn took some questions and was discusses all comments on opinion polls. opinion polls. he said he never discusses all comments on opinion polls but then he was a hung parliament situation, what will you do, will you do deals? he has said before, no, they are up fighting to win in
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every constituency. emily thornberry, was here as well, then stood up and said, actually what we will do is put forward a programme of government, the queen‘s speech and then it is up to others in parliament whether they vote for that or not. that is a bit more of if you are in a hung parliament situation, what will you do, will you do deals? he has said before, no, they are up fighting to win in every constituency. emily thornberry, was here as well, then stood up and said, actually what we will do is put forward a programme of government, the queen‘s speech and then it is up to others in parliament whether they vote for that or not. that is a bit a more expansive argument, if, then we have heard of excitement injeremy corbyn. a lot of excitement in when the idea of opinion polls was front page of some of the newspapers, suggesting labour are drawing closer to the conservatives they will be reading what‘s on the front page of some of the newspapers, suggesting labour are drawing closer to the they are feeling pretty optimistic infairabout they are feeling pretty optimistic in fair about there is out there to win thisjoburg in fair about there is out there to win this joburg 0pen in fair about there is out there to win thisjoburg 0pen very much sticking to the line he is out there to win this general election once a huge surprise because he is travelling with those who support him but buoyed by last night‘s reception, not a huge surprise because he‘s travelling with those who support him but buoyed by last
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nightthought very much that they did the right thing by turning up at and the right thing by turning up at and the nonappearance of the prime minister at the debate. the nonappearance of the prime minister at the debatelj the nonappearance of the prime minister at the debate. i think so. i think they thought very much that they did the right thing by turning up they did the right thing by turning up at that debate. i don‘t think there from particularly clear outstanding winners, but may for, what they would say, running scared from debate. what is interesting about today is the fact he has talked about brexit pretty directly, something he hasn‘t done an awful lot. he has come to an area where there is a large ukip vote. i think maybe he, like theresa may, is trying to win over those people who switch to ukip last time in huge numbers. they will be hoping, labour, that in places like allowed them to attack theresa may for, what they would say, running scared from debate. what is interesting about todayis debate. what is interesting about today is the fact he has talked about brexit pretty directly, something he hasn‘t done an awful lot of. he has come to an area where there is a large ukip vote. i think maybe he, like theresa may, is trying to win over those people who switch to ukip last time in huge numbers. they will be hoping, labour, that in places maybe they can persuade them with the offers in their manifesto, will to come back to the labour folder may hope that will certainly help them hold onto seats around the country. he laid
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into and attack theresa may when she said no deal is better than a bad deal. he said no deal is exactly that, the worst and laid into and attack theresa may when she said no deal is better than a bad deal. he said no deal is exactly that, the for this country, for the economy and he says that is not the approach he and his team would labour and quite a turnaround from the start of this campaign. two words in a sentence we weren‘t using, labour and hope i thinkjeremy corbyn's tea m and hope i thinkjeremy corbyn's team would say they have always been i thinkjeremy corbyn‘s team would say they have always saw of him and heard his message, they would win people hopeful. the more he got out there and the more people saw of him and heard his message, they would win people going into this election, and it‘s not just win people going into this election, and it‘s notjust the polls we‘re talking about, we know because local elections at the beginning of at all. the ukip vote pretty much labourdid all. the ukip vote pretty much labour did not do very well at all. the ukip vote pretty much the tories did incredibly tories were at that point the tories were pretty confident they still are. i don‘t think anyone is really able to ahead. i think they feel privately that they still are. i don‘t think anyone is really able
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what is going on with some of the opinion polls. thank you very what does certainly frustrate me is it will do most damage to the so—called just about managing, the hard—pressed families up and down the country who are already seeing the increase in their wages stagnating, compared to the increase in prices, and the increase in petrol prices, food prices, clothes prices are a direct result of brexit, and a direct result of the very hard, extreme version of brexit that theresa may's pursuing. soto put it mildly, it is pretty rich for the conservatives to claim that they understand how to deliver a prosperous economy when they themselves, through their own choices, are putting the british economy in seriousjeopardy. willie walsh — the chief executive of british airways‘ parent company, iag — has defended the airline‘s handling of the computer failure which caused chaos for passengers worldwide. in his first television interview since the bank holiday incident he praised the way the crisis
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was handled. we know the cause of the problem, it was not an it failure, it was an electrical failure which affected our our it. earlier we had from happened. we are investigating why it happened and that investigation will take some time we understand what happened. we are investigating why it happened and that investigation will take some time. 0ur transport correspondent richard westcott gave us the latest. they‘re sticking with this line that there was this local power surge, it wasn‘t an it problem, it was a power problem. why is that interesting? well, all of the it experts i have spoken to over the last few days, and this is people involved in airlines, some of them former workers at ba, have said they are sceptical about that. they are sceptical over whether a local power surge could wreak this kind of havoc, because they know there are back up systems in place that clearly didn‘t work. so that is point one. we‘re not going to know for a while why this happened that made may never make it public, of course. secondly, what was interesting, we didn‘t hear it in there, but he defended alex cruz,
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the boss of british airways. this is a man who was criticised because he didn‘t do an interview for three days. this is the man who was criticised because virtually everyone i spoke to who was stranded, their number one complaint was, "we don‘t know what‘s going on, no one is telling us anything". well, is being defended there by his boss, interestingly. bear in mind, this happened on saturday. there are still people on holiday now who don‘t have their bags. back to the election. theresa may is campaigning in west yorkshire this afternoon back to the election. theresa may is campaigning in west yorkshire this in the day and there enright is on the conservative party bus. we had the prime minister speaking earlier in the day and there this was a more optimistic and there this was a more optimistic and sunnier speech. what has triggered inaudible wonderful and great for britain and it can bridge divides that were revealed by the brexit vote and that
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it would be wonderful and great for britain and it can bridge divides that were revealed by the brexit wanting to return is thebecause she thinks it is the party‘s strongest hand to play. very enthusiastic. she also said to make brexit work, to do also said to make brexit work, to do a good job in these negotiations, you have to believe in it. drawing a contrast between herself and jeremy corbyn. it is in contrast to what she said before the referendum last year. she said before the referendum last yea r. towards she said before the referendum last year. towards the back of the bus behind those doors, she is hunkered down with her advisers. she is making several stops in the heart of england today, hitting three labour held seats. we are in west yorkshire. that is the key message of the day from her. putting brexit and leadership at the heart of her campaign. the prime minister is behind you and her name is prominently displayed behind you. is
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there still feeling theresa may is there still feeling theresa may is the number—1 selling point the conservatives or is there a feeling that that is somewhat less so? the slogans are interesting. today is theresa may at the conservatives will get the best deal for brexit... it does change day by day. she called this election, saying she needed a big win, to give her a strong mandate going into brexit. there must be an awareness within the tory campaign that there has been the odd wobble. the quick rewriting of the social care ma nifesto rewriting of the social care manifesto pledge. criticism in the last 2a hours about her nonappea rance last 2a hours about her nonappearance at the debate last night. they feel they are still pretty much on track. talk about
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tightening race is not necessarily bad for the tories. 0ne tightening race is not necessarily bad for the tories. one thing they we re bad for the tories. one thing they were worried about was a sense of complacency, that this would be a done deal. inaudible i think we got the large gist of what you‘re. thank you. now in crystal clear clarity, the weather. there is a change in the weather on the way. it is already reaching western parts of the uk. cooler, fresher, breezy conditions. that will spread into the country tomorrow. today, it is in the north—west. outbreaks of rain through the course of the afternoon in belfast, glasgow. across the bulk
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of england and wales it is a dry day and very warm. temperatures 26 degrees in the south—east. the rain continues to fall in the north—west and western parts of the british isles by the time we get to the early on friday morning. but for the bulk of central and eastern england, a very mild and dry night. tomorrow, this cold front will move east. there could be some storms in the south—east and east anglia. for the bulk of the uk, a fresher day. temperatures in the teens. still very temperatures in the teens. still very warm temperatures in the teens. still very warm in the south east. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: the main parties focus on brexit as the leaders travel britain canvassing support. theresa may says she wants a "britain beyond brexit", jeremy corbyn says conservative
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rhetoric and threats have fostered a toxic climate. president trump is due to announce later today, on whether he will continue to honour the commitment to reduce emissions. tickets for the concert to benefit the victims of the manchester attack sell out within minutes of going on sale. the event at old trafford on sunday will raise money for those affected by the bombing. the chief executive of the company that owns british airways, willie walsh, has finally spoken about last weekend‘s computer failure that disrupted tens of thousands of passengers, admitting it damaged the company. let‘s get the sport. good afternoon. let‘s start with cricket and the opening match in the champions trophy, where favourites england are taking on bangladesh at the oval. eoin morgan‘s team won the toss and chose to —— chose to field. john watson is there. will they be regretting that decision?” watson is there. will they be regretting that decision? i think england will be quite relieved.
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bangladesh only made 305—6. at one stage it could —— they could have been posting a score close to 330. that would have put england under real pressure. the damage was done by camier iqbal, who made a sensational score of 128, his ninth odi century coming off 124 balls. 11 fours and 16. mushfiqur made 79. that partnership put bangladesh on their way. but when they were dismissed, two more wickets followed. liam plunkett the standout performer. he made 4—59. a very reasonable return as he continues to cement his reputation as one of england‘s standout one—day bowlers. in reply, england needed to score quickly. they failed to do so. jason roy went for just one. quickly. they failed to do so. jason
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roy went forjust one. he scooped a shot down the leg side caught by rahman off the bowling of mortaza. he will be bitterly disappointed. increased clamours forjonny ba i rstow, increased clamours forjonny bairstow, opening the batting for yorkshire at the moment, to come in to replace him. joe root has come into steady things. a short while ago there were 71—1. they have a huge amount of capabilities in the batting department through this side. england, as one of the pretournament favourites, are hosting the tournament once again. there is a certain amount of pressure, not just from there is a certain amount of pressure, notjust from the scoreboard, but in front of an expectant home crowd. a fascinating afternoon of cricket to come. absolutely fascinating. the pressure will be on. thank you. andy murray is on court in the second round of the french open — he‘s facing world number 50 martin klizan. murray came back from losing the first set to win the second and
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third. in the fourth martin klizan is 3—0 ahead. kyle edmund has lost the first set against renzo oleevo. it looks like french winger antoine griezmann won‘t be going to manchester united — according to sources close to the club. it had been widely reported that united were making griezmann their top target this summer, and were close to triggering the escape clause in his contract with atletico madrid. but it seems united have turned their attention away from the winger to concentrate on signing a main striker. their first test takes place this weekend, but british & irish lions head coach warren gatland says there‘ll be a battle for the number 10 shirt. the squad begin their tour of new zealand on saturday taking on the provincial barbarians. owen farrell, dan biggar and jonny sexton will compete for the fly half spot — with the irishman starting this weekend. but gatland has said the other two are likely to start in the following two games. knowing the three of them, they are
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desperate to all want to play and start in that position. last week, at the end of the training i sort of said, cani at the end of the training i sort of said, can i have a chat to the tens? dan was there and jonny sexton was there and owen farrell was over there. jonny said, don‘t worry about him, he is a midfielder! there is a bit of banter. i think the players are bit of banter. i think the players a re pretty bit of banter. i think the players are pretty aware of the conversation. that is all your sport now. plenty more this afternoon. mike bushell will keep you updated. he will be back in the next hour. the us president, donald trump, is coming under growing international pressure to honour the paris global climate change deal. he will announce this evening whether the us will withdraw from its commitment to reduce carbon emissions. china‘s premier said this morning that his country will honour the agreement, and urged others to do the same — but donald trump has previously described climate change as a hoax, and an american job—killer. earlier, alex thier,
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a former official at the us agency for international development, explained what would be the cost to the planet if the us pulled out of the paris agreement. i think it would be profoundly damaging both politically and economically for the united states and the world if president trump doesin and the world if president trump does in fact pull out of the paris agreement. when we look at the costs at home, clearly being part of the new energy economy leading the world in the technology that it is going to ta ke in the technology that it is going to take to change these things, not only for getting them to deal with the challenges that will come from rising sea levels and other things that also affect the united states, those things will be quite costly. equally, the united states is not only the largest emitter of c02 in the world, it is also the largest donor supporting other countries to get on a path of green development. that is fascinating. that is
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something lots of people don‘t know. where does it donate to? for example, i was in uganda last week. uganda is going through a drought. it is impossible to say that any given dragon is the result of climate change but we are seeing profound effects across the world, increasing dread and other things that make this not an abstract debate but really —— a very real tangible prospect. uganda are part of the paris accord. they have nationally determined commitments that they made that say we are going to grow in a way that emits less carbon in the future. and that contributes less to climate change. our they going to do that? countries like the united states have, until now, supported uganda heavily in the —— and other countries like them, to come up with plans to make it possible. uganda and south africa are making a decision to build a power plant. they can build a coal power plant. they can build a coal
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power plant. they can build a coal power plant or something that has renewable energy. what choice will they make? often that difference, which will have profound consequences for decades, comes down to costs. it comes down to policy. and the united states leadership has been critical in helping countries like uganda, south africa, others around the world, to make the right choices that accept them and the planet as a whole on a better path. but do we know that the funding would be at risk if the us were to pull out of the paris agreement? we see that it is very likely. we see in the budget proposal mr trump put out are few weeks ago, nasa proposed cuts for previous commitments made by the united states not only to restrict their own emissions, but to support others in doing the same. our correspondent talked about what this would mean for the us‘ role as a global leader if president trump or to pull out of paris. what do you think it would mean? agreements like
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paris don‘t happen by accident. the thing that determines whether something like that comes about and people follow through, it takes leadership. and the united states has been a fundamental driver now for several decades on getting the word pay attention —— get in order to pay attention to climate change. and on bringing agreements like paris to fruition. if united states pulls out of that, the absence of leadership, the vacuum, will be felt around the world. it will be felt in united states, in industry, in capitals. and it will be felt by businesses trying to make hard decisions to do the right thing and protect the climate. i fear that cascade of consequences with the us stepping off the leadership stage will be profound for the planet. the actor, roy barraclough, has died at the age of 81. he was well known for playing alec gilroy in coronation street and for playing opposite les dawson. david sillito looks back on his life. i'll have it
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seemed too. roy barraclough was alec gilroy for more than 30 years, the tightfisted theatrical agent who ended a up marrying bet lynch. and running britain‘s best—known northern pub, the rovers return. alec was good at looking after the pennies, a bit short on romance. go on, kiss me. julie goodyear said today she was devastated. she treasured the last they shared. they wore, she said, just like a married couple. i nearly had a flush. is the long—running tv role was another on—screen couple. his double act in which he played the slightly more refined friend of les dawson‘s aider. new guinea, new asia, new york, new zealand. where do you want to go, choke? new brighton. he continued to act after leaving coronation street. here in last
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tango in halifax. are fair enough. i‘m with alex. only last year he starred in a one—off return of you being served. are you free? at the moment, captain peacock, but i've just heard there is an under 21 italian football team on the ground floor. so i'm just my underwear. italian football team on the ground floor. 50 i'mjust my underwear. but roy barraclough will be remembered best for his many years on coronation street. he brought many laughs. and even alec gilroy had his heartfelt moments. i love you, rita. alec... heartfelt moments. i love you, rita. alec. . . and heartfelt moments. i love you, rita. alec... and i want to marry you. i know i have no right to expect you to feel the same way. especially after what you said tonight. after all, i‘m just a lonely man with many good years left in him long since
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gone. roy barraclough, who has died at the age of 81. more of us than ever are shunning the traditional 9—5job in search of greater flexibility and, perhaps, control over our life. in the last ten years, there‘s been a 50% increase in the number of women who‘ve become self—employed — and many of those are setting up small creative businesses. emma simpson reports on the changes in our working lives. i left school at 18, went straight into being a receptionist front of house girl. but after having my daughter, it just became impossible to juggle work and home life. sound familiar? dani bolser managed to find a creative solution. she‘sjust started her own business at her home in ilkley, selling imitation flowers online. we want to be there for the school run, and we want to be there for the parties, the playgroups, the play dates and everything. but we also want to work as well, and have a sense of self,
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and to give our skills back into the workforce. small, creative businesses like this one may often start on the kitchen table, but they‘re flourishing. according to new research, they make up1—in—40 businesses in the uk. women own nearly a third of them, generating some £3.6 billion for the uk economy. there are thousands of women, just like dani, who are turning their back on the traditional 9—5 job in search of flexibility, and to gain more control over their working lives. and technology is a big help. it allows laura hutton to work wherever she may be. she‘s learned new digital skills too, to become a self—employed social media manager. i've never actually met my boss. i work within the marketing department, and there's a head of that department,
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and i don't know him, which is a bit unusual. i've had the office job, and i'm just not interested anymore, i like the fact that it doesn't really matter what i wear, or whether or not i've brushed my hair that morning. for us to be able to shoot their products, and put them in front of customers... this boss says traditional workplaces need to adapt. he runs an online marketplace for small businesses, which has grown 50% in the last ten years. these are life choices. last year, we had 20 businesses that made more than £1 million with us, and 17 of them were actually founded by women. it's a genuine way to make a difference. dani hasn‘t regretted her choice. it‘s early days, but she hopes she‘s finally managed to get the balance right. we are going to go to bbc ask this
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as an earlier time, partly because it coincides with a press conference we‘re expecting from the prime minister later. today it is looking at issues that affect older people in the election, particularly around personal finance. examining the various issues around social care, triple lock and inheritance tax. simon gompertz is in birmingham with pensions expert alongside. simon... hello. iam pensions expert alongside. simon... hello. i am at the hagley road retirement village in edgbaston. —— hagley road. it has about 300 residents, 240 apartments. you can buy them or around them. they have all sorts of facilities. hairdressing, snooker, bar, restau ra nt. hairdressing, snooker, bar, restaurant. various sporting facilities as well. it is quite a nice place to get into. it will cost you around £250,000 to buy one of the apartments. you would also be
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able to rent them. that is £100 to £200 a week. but for people on modest means it can be as little as £30 a week. it has been touted as one of the solutions to the problem of where people go if they are stuck ina large of where people go if they are stuck in a large house. and they need somewhere to live for a substantial pa rt somewhere to live for a substantial part of their retirement. some people are going out to work. others have quite substantial care needs. it isa have quite substantial care needs. it is a good cross—section of people. we will be asking some of your questions about retirement and pensions. i‘m joined by daniela silcott from the pensions policy institute and tom mcphail from hargreaves lansdowne. institute and tom mcphail from hargreaves la nsdowne. if institute and tom mcphail from hargreaves lansdowne. if i could start with you, danny. we are having a lot of questions about the social ca re a lot of questions about the social care issue that has come up in the election campaign, particularly about the conservative plan to force people to use the value of their
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home to pay for a domiciliary care, so when people come into their own home, to give them some care. graham small asks if a person receiving social care dies before their spouse, will their housby sold to cover the cost? that is when they are still alive and presumably want to live in the house? the proposal has not been fully thought out and costed. from what i understand, the way it is proposed, if their spouses are dependent, it will not be sold. if their spouses independently is supporting themselves, it may need to come out from the estate in which the person died. does the £100,000 allowa nce for ca re the person died. does the £100,000 allowance for care costs, that means you will always be able to keep £100,000 from the value of your house, does that apply separately to the husband and wife, or is it transferable? are not sure that is something many people have thought about. at the moment i think these
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things are applied individually. i don‘t think it would be applied across the household, so if both people needed care it would be £100 in the wife‘s name and £100,000 in the man‘s name. if it wasjoint ownership, they would need to be assessed jointly. can you clear up for smack the triple lock? the triple lock is the increases to the state pension. in 2010 the coalition government introduced the idea that the state pension would increase by the state pension would increase by the best of 2.5% earnings growth or inflation. legislation requires the state pension only to increase in line with earnings. this was a discretionary measure. it was reiterated in the 2015 election. the previous government stop to that promise of giving state pension increases the best of those three in
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any giving year. we have now got to the situation in this election which has become something of a hot political potato. the liberal democrats and the labour party have said that they would once again retain the triple lock and give pensioners the best of those three in any giving year. whereas the conservatives, part of the introduction of the triple lock, said they would drop the 2.5% measure. if they are re—elected, they would still increase state pensions by the best of inflation or earnings, but not the 2.5%. daniela, it is also being presented as a battle between the generations, younger generations are paying for a much higher state pensions for older generations. do you think that is absolutely fair? there are a few different myths going around. there isa different myths going around. there is a myth that pensioners are wealthier than working age people. this is not actually true. there is a wide range of incomes among
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pensioners. it is also important to understand that even with a triple lock, the state pension is relatively low. it only represent around 24% of average earnings. and it only goes up with the triple lock by £3a it only goes up with the triple lock by £3 a week. we‘re not talking about an enormously generous increase every year. if we continue to pay the triple lock into the future, today bus working age people are investing in a future with higher average earnings. we will hopefully be picking up the state pension at some point, so if it is higher, we all benefit. is that your point? yes. i know there is scepticism as to whether or not there will be a state pension. but there will be a state pension. but the state pension reforms that have taken place are really about ensuring the state pension doors stay sustainable into the future.
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tom mcphail. maximilian arndt twitter asks, how do young adults try to save for a mortgage deposit in the tens of thousands, and it often is tens of thousands, even 40,000, 50,000, for often is tens of thousands, even 40,000, 50,000,foran often is tens of thousands, even 40,000, 50,000, for an average as, how do they savour a pension at the same time? have any other parties addressed that? disappointingly we saw very addressed that? disappointingly we saw very little from the party to find out what they will do to help younger generations to save and invest for their future. there was reference in the conservative manifesto to a long—term ice. there was talk about extending the enrolment programme, introduced as pa rt of enrolment programme, introduced as part of a cross—party agreement. but overall, the parties have had very little to say about this policy imperative of helping younger generations to save and invest for their future. so generations to save and invest for theirfuture. so in generations to save and invest for their future. so in answer to the question, there are two areas to
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look at. one is a work based . l -l other areas look at is the lifetime isa. it was introduced by the last comment. you get a top—up from the government of 25%. we are talking about tax—free savings. government of 25%. we are talking about tax-free savings. yes. it is an isa where if you use the money to buy your first home, or for retirement, you can make withdrawals tax—free and you get to keep the top
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bonus the government puts in when you bonus the government puts in when you pay bonus the government puts in when you pay the money in. see you pay the money in, you get a top—up from the money in, you get a top—up from the government. if you use the money to buy your first, or retirement, you keep the gum and top—up. if you choose to take your money out and put it into other circumstances, the gum and will claw back that money from you. those are the two current policy and as we have got on the table, to answer that question of how do i save for my first home? there is not a great dealfrom any the parties in encouraging this? no. disappointing. when you look at the current pensions landscape, it is characterised by paletta —— progressive salami slicing, reductions to allowances and benefits, tax breaks. unless we see a change in direction from the next government, i think that practice is likely to continue. it would be a welcome change to see the next government acknowledge the
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imperative of getting younger generations taking responsibility for long—term savings, building up pension pot is, and helping them to do that, making it simple for them to do that. i have got a question from amt. do both main parties pledged to keep pensioners‘ bus passes? i think labour have said yes. i'm not sure the conservatives have said anything. i think they are committed to keeping all the other universal pension benefits for this parliament. i don‘t know if there is a more long—term commitment. parliament. i don‘t know if there is a more long-term commitment. thank you both. from this retirement village in hagley in birmingham, back to you. thank you. now the weather. the weather is changing across north—western parts of the uk. it has been raining already so far
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today. not a pretty picture. some of us have had nice weather. let‘s start with some weather watchers pictures. this is from the highlands. compare that to ethics. com pletely highlands. compare that to ethics. completely different story. a tale of two halves as far as today and tomorrow is concerned. the rain is slow moving. it will hang around the north—west. here is the low that is bringing the change in the weather. a ribbon of cloud stretching down south. ahead of it, a different story. the air has been coming in from france. a very warm day across some parts of england, was italy southeast and eastern areas. it stays dry across the bulk of england. that band of rain moves into north—western england, west and wales, the lake district and more central parts of scotland. this is tomorrow morning. the weather front
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is still just about tomorrow morning. the weather front is stilljust about in the south—west and into wales. hugging the irish sea coast. central and eastern parts of the country will have a dry and sunny side to the day. a bit fresher in northern ireland and western parts of scotland. tomorrow morning and afternoon, this weather front will continue to move towards the east. it will move slowly. ahead of this front it is quite warm. that is where the fresh atlantic air is. even here, warm enough for some storms to be sparked off in the afternoon. it could be across the south—east. quite a contrast. warm weather there. much pressure conditions for the west. these storms may rumble on for a time this evening across parts of east anglia. low pressure is driving the weather across the uk at the weekend. it is not directly over smack but it is
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sending weather front in our direction. that means there will be some press ——. . . direction. that means there will be some press ——... through saturday and sunday, the further east and south east you are, the brighter the weather will be. and the drier as well. some of the showers in western areas during the course of the weekend, saturday and sunday, could be foundry at times. the weather is changing. it is very warm right now in the south—east. slightly cooler weather is on the way. this is bbc news. i‘m simon mccoy. the headlines at four: the main parties focus on brexit as the leaders travel britain canvassing support. i am confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together, and build a britain that is stronger, fairer and even more prosperous than it is today. instead of posturing and pumped up
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animosity, a labour government under my leadership will set out a plan for brexit based on the mutual interests of both britain and the european union. lib dem leader tim farron has also spoken about brexit today. heartbreaking stories of what is happening to them and their families because of the conservative party's choices that they have made sense that referendum.
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