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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 1, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at four: the main parties focus on brexit as the leaders travel britain canvassing support. i am confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together, and build a britain that is stronger, fairer and even more prosperous than it is today. instead of posturing and pumped up animosity, a labour government under my leadership will set out a plan for brexit based on the mutual interests of both britain and the european union. lib dem leader tim farron has also spoken about brexit today. heartbreaking stories of what is happening to them and their families because of the conservative party's choices that they have made sense that referendum. we will be bringing
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you the snp leader nicola sturgeon shortly here on bbc news. other developing stories this afternoon: president trump is to announce this evening whether the us will pull out of the paris climate agreement. but he's coming under increasing international pressure to honour the commitment to cut greenhouse gases. tickets for sunday's concert to raise money for the victims of the manchester attack sells out within 20 minutes of going on sale. no more mr nice guy, then. and the actor roy barraclough — best known for his role in coronation street — has died at the age of 81. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. brexit has become the focus of campaigning in the general election this afternoon, with the conservative,
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liberal democrat and labour leaders all holding events to outline their position on the eu. earlier theresa may, who was in teesside, said the uk will be more prosperous once it leaves. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has been addressing supporters in essex, telling them that the conservatives' "rhetoric and threats" have fostered a "toxic climate" ahead of brexit negotiations. here's our political correspondent leila nathoo on how the parties are pushing their brexit messages. she wants to move on, to dig herself out of the hole of last night's debate no—show, and onto the safer ground of brexit. a brighter future awaits, she says, but only she can get us there. i want us to work together to fulfil the promise of brexit, too. because if we get brexit right, then together we can do great things. we can build a britain beyond brexit, that is stronger, fairer and even more prosperous than it is today. but the liberal democrats think
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she'd be taking britain down the wrong path. they claim the economy has already suffered, and there would be worse to come. i think what people want to know is why on earth the conservatives want to pursue such a hardline, extreme version of brexit, which will not just take us out of the eu, but also harm our economy by taking us out of margaret thatcher's single market as well. so how do the party's approaches to brexit compare? the conservatives are promising to bring down immigration from europe. labour accepts the end of free movement, too, but would immediately guarantee the rights of eu citizens currently here. ukip wants a points—based system for immigration, while the lib dems would maintain the status quo. on trade, theresa may says we'll leave the single market and the customs union, pursuing new trade deals with the eu and abroad. labour accepts that but would negotiate to retain the benefits of both, while the liberal democrats want to stay as members.
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the snp wants scotland's place in the single market to be protected. on legal matters, the conservatives say they would end the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. labour would keep eu protections on worker and consumer rights and the environment, while the lib dems would hold a referendum on the final brexit deal before it was put in place. jeremy corbyn, too, wanted to talk brexit today, dismissing claims he is not ready for the talks and dismissing what he calls theresa may's brexit approach. britain certainly can thrive and prosper outside the eu. our businesses are creative and inventive. but they need access to european markets. they need to be part of the unimpeded supply chains. and they need the chance to grow beyond our borders in order to protect and create jobs, wealth and borders in order to protect and createjobs, wealth and opportunity. regsit createjobs, wealth and opportunity. regs it is the backdrop to this
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election, and we've heard plenty of sound bites and slogans from all the parties about what they do. but there are still a number of u na nswered there are still a number of unanswered questions on all sides, like how much if any of a divorce bill we would pay, what would be the consequences of not agreeing a deal. britain's future outside the eu is beckoning. there is just britain's future outside the eu is beckoning. there isjust a britain's future outside the eu is beckoning. there is just a week left to decide who will be in charge. we will be talking to nicola sturgeon live a little bit later. let's talk to our chief political correspondent vicki young, who's in essex with the labour leaderjeremy corbyn. brexit is the word on everybody‘s lips today. interesting, because a lot of campaigners i have been speaking to from all the parties have said it's not really been the dominating issue in this election that some might have expected, but
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nevertheless, jeremy corbyn today deciding to tackle the issue head on. labour have had their problems with all of this, as the bill went through parliament an article 50, because most labour mps at the time backed remain, a lot of their supporters voted the other way. but jeremy corbyn saying today, being very critical of theresa may, saying that when she says no deal is worse than a bad deal, he says actually, no deal is the worst thing that could happen to the uk. he says he wa nts could happen to the uk. he says he wants there to be as close to a single market as there can be, and in some ways it is not much different to what he is saying and what theresa may is saying that they wa nt what theresa may is saying that they want the best deal to the economy. she trying to paint very optimistic future about what would happen. jeremy corbyn also presenting his team, the team that would lead the brexit negotiations for a labour if they do form the next government. on
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they do form the next government. on theissue they do form the next government. on the issue of immigration, that is where the stark difference is. jeremy corbyn not prepared to say that he wants those numbers, the net numbers of people coming to this country, to be reduced, even though there are some in his party who think that he should say that, and there were those who today when i asked the questions that they were not prepared to put a number on it. and in this kind of area where there was a big ukip vote last time around, jeremy corbyn will be hoping to entice some of those voters back to entice some of those voters back to labour, maybe the message on immigration might have to be toughened up to go down well here. we are going to take you straight to theresa may addressing business leaders in yorkshire. the promise of brexit is great, and the opportunities open to us enormous. so if we get the brexit deal right and we work together, i believe that we can build that britain that is stronger, fairer and even more prosperous than it is today. but also a britain that is more global,
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more outward looking, a britain that is alive with possibilities, which is alive with possibilities, which is more confident in itself, more united and more secure, and a country which our children and grandchildren are proud to call home. and a vote for the conservative candidates at the election, a vote for me and my team, isa election, a vote for me and my team, is a vote to build that stronger britain and to strengthen our hand in negotiations for brexit to get the best eel for britain. and a vote for anybody else would risk putting jeremy corbyn in number 10 downing street propped up by the liberal democrats and the scottish national party. and although this has been several weeks of campaigning, actually, if we look at it, i think theissues actually, if we look at it, i think the issues that we are looking at today are the same as they have been throughout this campaign. i think there are some simple questions for people to ask. first of all, there isa simple people to ask. first of all, there is a simple choice, and that is
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about who do you trust to have the strong and stable leadership to actually out there and negotiate the best deal for britain and get the best deal for britain and get the best deal for britain and get the best deal as we leave the european union? secondly, ithink best deal as we leave the european union? secondly, i think there best deal as we leave the european union? secondly, ithink there is best deal as we leave the european union? secondly, i think there is a simple question, which is who has the world but crucially also the plan tojust the world but crucially also the plan to just get on with the job and deliver brexit. those brexit negotiations will start in 11 days after election day, so whoever is elected as prime minister has got to be ready to hit the ground running and get into those negotiations. there will be no delay in, no stalling, no waiting around for a long time. you have got to be in there and able to start those negotiations. and then the third thing i would say is there is to to simple reality, which is that if i lose just six seats, then my government loses its majority, and asi government loses its majority, and as i say, that would risk putting jeremy corbyn into number 10 downing street, john mcdonnell in the treasury, diane abbott in the home
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office, and the strings being pulled by the liberal democrats and nicola sturgeon. and vote here in west yorkshire are vitally important in this election. i am going out around the country looking and talking to people and earning i hope every vote, because every vote counts in strengthening my hand in those brexit negotiations. so i'm offering myself as your prime minister. i'm optimistic about the future. i have an absolute resolute determination to go out there and fight for britain, to get that best deal for brexit for britain, because everything else depends on those
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brexit negotiations. i am also optimistic that we can get a good deal that does work for us all, and i'm confident in our ability as a country to grasp the opportunities that are open to us for the future. and i say that because i believe in britain and the british people. but ican britain and the british people. but i can only do that with your backing if you give me a mandate, and my final message is a very simple one, which isjust this. if final message is a very simple one, which is just this. if you final message is a very simple one, which isjust this. if you give me your backing, i will deliver for britain. thank you. applause did anybody have any questions they wanted to ask? yes. what are you going to do to ensure that the pound doesn't lose against other currencies to give us a stronger standing against anybody else as well? there has been movement in the pound which those who are importing products, movement in the pound since before the brexit referendum, but then afterwards, which obviously if you are importing products, that has made that more expensive. what i think is absolutely fundamental in relation to the pound is getting that overall issue about a strong economy right, and ensuring that
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there are a number of things government needs to do to get that right, it needs to ensure that we are living within our means, so we need to assure that we reduced the deficit, that we get rid of that. but then it is about ensuring that up but then it is about ensuring that up and down the country, we are encouraging business, encouraging sectors to be able to invest, create jobs here in the uk and create that strength in the economy for the future. we've got what we call our modern industrial strategy which is about looking at different parts of the country and finding out where the country and finding out where the expertise is, where the strength is, where the different sectors are of expertise so that we can build on that for the future, and for the jobs of the future. and the other thing i would say, and this isn't about the currency, it is about the general issue of the economy, we need to make sure that prosperity and growth spread across the whole of the uk, and that is about a country that is working for everyone and every part of the uk. there is
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one at the back? i will take the one at the back and then i will come to you. we know that polls can be misleading, and especially in the la st misleading, and especially in the last election and only brexit referendum. would it be fair to say that given that today's latest poll shows that the lead has been cut to three points, and your personal favourability rating has also been cut that next thursday can't come quick enough for you? as i say, and i have said throughout my political career, the only poll that matters is the poll takes place on election day. and that is the important one. i have been from the start of the campaign around and about the country out there talking to people, asiam country out there talking to people, as i am today, answering questions, speaking about what i think is the important choice that is going to be made at this election, because if we get brexit right, it underpins so much else for us. is it the next
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five years of government is about notjust brexit five years of government is about not just brexit but five years of government is about notjust brexit but going beyond brexit do that more confident country that i was talking about, so lam going country that i was talking about, so i am going to be doing that over the next few weeks, and then we will see what happens on election day. my question is, with going into brexit, how are we going to ensure our national security in light of recent events with the terrorist threat? what plans have we got in order to secure oui’ what plans have we got in order to secure our cities and people in public places? because it really is becoming a concern, i think people generally are getting quite worried about going to events now, so what plans have we got in order to facilitate that? there are a number of layers to what we can do. first of layers to what we can do. first of all we need to ensure that the police and security services here in the uk have the resources and the powers that they need to deal with these issues. and we saw that
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terrible attack in manchester at the end of march we saw the attack in westminster, in between those two, five plots were foiled. so our security services and police are working all the time. when i was home secretary, i put through a major piece of legislation to ensure they have the powers they need. we have protected our counterterrorism policing budgets, and we have uplifted the armed police and also put more money into the security services so that they can employ more people, they have more resources for the future. but you mention brexit, it is also about making sure in those negotiations that we continue to be able to incorporate with our european partners on these issues of security, and also on issues relating to organised crime particularly. so in that area, that is going to be part of the negotiations as well as negotiations oi'i negotiations as well as negotiations on the economic issues of trade. is there anybody with a first question? you say about identifying expertise,
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but has ever body seen over the past few years, university fees have gone up. what are you going to do to ensure that people who want access to university to gain access to these betterjobs are not then having to fork out a lot of money to ensure that they can get at education that they want? there are two things i would say to that. the first is that in relation to university fees, yes of course those fees, tuition fees have come in and been increased, and we have seen the student loans to go alongside those. that has enabled a significant expansion in our university sector so expansion in our university sector so that more people are going to university now than did in the past asa university now than did in the past as a percentage of the population. but i think it's notjust about university. as we look to the future, it's also about ensuring that young people are getting the skills they need to go forward, and
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thatis skills they need to go forward, and that is about technical education, and we have got major plans for having what i believe would be a real, proper technical education syste m real, proper technical education system in this country for the first time. iwas system in this country for the first time. i was speaking about it earlier today elsewhere, which is about introducing new qualifications, the t skills as they are called, the technology skills around the country, but giving young people that alternative and showing that whether it is academic or technical education that you are going through, it should be what is right for you as you go through that, and we see a parity between these which we haven't seen in the past. yes? hello. i have a question because you are saying a lot about going out of the european union, and as you are visiting warehouses like this one around south west
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yorkshire, i'm not sure if you are aware that half of us from other countries. so we are quite afraid, some of us, that if you go out, you might not look after our rights, we may have limited access to the nhs services. so what can you say about these issues? i recognise the concern that people will have. what i want to do is be able to guarantee the rights of eu citizens who are living here in the uk, but as british prime minister, i also went to ensure that uk citizens living in the 27 other countries of the european union are also going to have their rights guaranteed, so i wa nt have their rights guaranteed, so i want a reciprocal arrangement, and i have said to the european union and the european commission that i hope that we will be able to look at this at an early stage in the negotiations, precisely because i think it is important to us to be able to give reassurance to people so able to give reassurance to people so that you know about your future.
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sol so that you know about your future. so i want to be able to guarantee those rights, but i want to see uk citizens having their rights guaranteed as well so that we have a reciprocal arrangement for that. could i ask about the nhs... studio: but was theresa may speaking to an assembled group of businessmen and in west yorkshire. asked some quite searching questions about the problems that businesses have given the debt in the value of the pound. she was asked about the polls narrowing during the course of the campaign, about national security after brexit, and also about the future of people from other eu countries who are here. we hope to discuss all of these things shortly with our political correspondent ben wright, who is travelling with the prime minister, and we hope to build to speak to him in a few minutes' time. the us president, donald trump,
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is coming under growing international pressure to honour the paris global climate change deal. he will announce this evening whether the us will withdraw from its commitment to reduce carbon emissions. china's premier said this morning that his country will honour the agreement, and urged others to do the same — but donald trump has previously described climate change as a hoax, and an american job—killer. correspondent laura bicker is in washington for us now. a few hours to go until we know, what is the feeling in washington as to what he's going to say? he has said, and certainly when he was asked yesterday, he said he was looking at both sides. you have got to remember he made a promise to his voters, he vowed to oil and gas workers that he would use money earmarked to tackle carbon dioxide emissions in the us to get them back to work. he has said that the paris accord costs trillions to the us economy, and has
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few tangible benefits. however, he is coming under growing pressure from both within and without the white house. from within, his chief political strategist steve bannon is pushing him to say, let's withdraw from this accord. but then there is his daughter, a white house aide, if anchor trump, who is also an environmentalist. out with the white house, you have various companies who signed a letter this morning urging the president to stay in the paris accord. they say they have put money aside to try to deal with climate change issues and have employed people to do just that. they are arguing that pulling out of the accord will actually cost them money and cost them jobs. oil and gas industries have also come forward to say that they would like donald trump to stay in, mostly because they say they want donald trump to be able to influence other countries. so he does have a tough decision to make, and we will hear
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what he has to say in just a few hours' time. and laura, presumably if he does in fact confound expectations and say that the us will remain part of the agreement, he will be letting down the millions of people who voted for him? yes, i think that's one of the things he will be weighing up, and he has never really been convinced of the signs when you look at what he has said, he in the past described climate change as a hoax perpetuated by the chinese. so when it comes to his own views, perhaps he feels, and certainly this is what he has been saying from the campaign podium, that it saying from the campaign podium, thatitis saying from the campaign podium, that it is a waste of money and he would be breaking his promise to the voters. but there are various ways that people are telling him, look, you can stay in, but perhaps withdraw slowly from the paris accord over three years, or stay in and try to work within these nearly 200 countries to lessen the burden on the us. so perhaps that's the
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kind of agreement he may be considering. or he could pull out within three years, but that would be just within within three years, but that would bejust within a within three years, but that would be just within a year off his re—election campaign. or he could just pull out completely and the treaty on which this is based. so there are various options he will be looking at. laura bicker, many thanks. professor kimberly nicholas, associate professor of sustainability science at lund university centre for sustainability studies in sweden. i wonder how you would react if as expected he says america is pulling out of this deal. the paris climate agreement is the world's commitment to maintaining a liveable and living planet earth, and i think that is an incredibly important commitment, one thatis incredibly important commitment, one that is shared by 200 countries, businesses, faith communities, all kinds of city and regional governments, individuals in civil society. and if that is a commitment
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that the us president doesn't share, it greatly concerns me and keeps me awake at night. why do you think he is so out of step with yellow that i can't answer, and i wouldn't try to understand what happens in the mind of donald trump. what i do know is that the science is overwhelming about climate change, that the climate is warming and it is caused by people and it is overwhelmingly negative in its impacts. but how damaging would it be if the us pulls out, given that china and india are making such vast strides and progress in terms of climate change? the worst thing that could happen for global climate would be if the world sees the us and trump isa if the world sees the us and trump is a global climate leader, and if he does pull out of the agreement and others were to use that as an excuse to weaken their commitments oi’ excuse to weaken their commitments or actions. what i'm encouraged buyers that what we see happening is the opposite, people are realising that the us is not at a federal
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level stepping up to its commitments, and countries are jumping forward to fill that gap that has emerged, so china and europe yesterday announced strengthened ties and collaborations, and in california the senate passed a resolution for 100% the senate passed a resolution for ioo% renewable energy. there is really widespread support, and i believe that those who are not bind climate action will be left behind. professor, thank you very much for joining us, thank you for your time. let's return now to the general election. the snp leader, nicola sturgeon, is campaigning in edinburgh today, and we can speak to her now. good afternoon. in the last few minutes, theresa may has said that the best deal for brexit and the britain is a vote for her because the alternative is a labour government propped up by the likes of you. well, theresa may i think
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has found herself very exposed as this campaign has worn on. she has been completely unable to answer the most basic of questions about how cuts to pension benefits or cuts to public spending or indeed what the indications would be the jobs and investment and living standards of the extreme form of brexit that she appears to be intent on pursuing. so i think what we are hearing from what you have just quoted to me is a sign of tory desperation rather than anything else. my position here is very clear. i except the uk as a whole voted to leave the eu, but if we come out of the single market, then we are needlessly and unnecessarily putting tens of thousands of scottish jobs on the line, and no doubt hundreds of thousands of jobs line, and no doubt hundreds of thousands ofjobs across the uk on the line. so i think after this election it is really important to have strong voices from scotland, strong snp voices, arguing for a position that doesn't weaken our economy and cost jobs, position that doesn't weaken our economy and costjobs, but instead keeps us in the world's biggest
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single market, and i think this week we have seen that the tories have been exposed, and the poles across the rest of the uk are narrowing, and that puts scotland in a very strong position. it may be that whether or not theresa may can increase her majority will depend upon the outcome in scotland. so my message to people is not to elect tory mps who will be a rubber stamp anything theresa may wants to do, but ensure that there are strong scottish voices arguing against austerity, for public services and againstan austerity, for public services and against an extreme brexit. austerity, for public services and against an extreme brexitm austerity, for public services and against an extreme brexit. if as many seem against an extreme brexit. if as many seem to believe, she gets the majority, what voice will scotland have, particularly in brexit negotiations? strong voices from scotla nd negotiations? strong voices from scotland can stand up for us, make oui’ scotland can stand up for us, make our voices heard, protect our interests. we have seen in the last couple of days, scotland potentially being in the decisive role in this election. we have seen the polls narrow a cross election. we have seen the polls narrow across the rest of the uk, andi
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narrow across the rest of the uk, and i except that the polls suggest she is on course to win this election, but whether or not she increases her majority could actually depend on the outcome of this election in scotland. so what i'm saying to people here is let's not throw theresa may a lifeline, let's use this opportunity to keep the tories firmly in check. we have seen the tories firmly in check. we have seen the damage they can do to our public services and economy without a big majority, so we can stop them increasing the majority, we should ta ke increasing the majority, we should take that opportunity. tory mps from scotla nd take that opportunity. tory mps from scotland would be a rubber stamp for theresa may, but snp mps would stand up theresa may, but snp mps would stand upfor theresa may, but snp mps would stand up for scotland's interests. it is clear that only the smp has the strength to take on the tories. a vote for a ny strength to take on the tories. a vote for any other party would risk letting a tory mp in the back door. i'm interested to hear you talking about public services. you heard from your labour counterpart today in first minister's questions that waiting times under the snp in the
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nhs are longer than they were before. there are problems for you on the domestic front, and are you using brexit as a way to cover those? with the greatest respect, you have asked me to come onto your programme today to talk about brexit, and i am here in edinburgh campaigning around public services and making sure we have strong voices against tory austerity. but theissue voices against tory austerity. but the issue of the nhs is a good one to illustrate the point i'm making. the nhs in scotland like health services across the world face pressures from ageing populations and the changing demographics of population. but what we are seeing in scotland is the nhs performing more strongly than it is in other parts of the uk. our accident and emergency departments, for example, are the best performing anywhere in the uk consistently for more than two years. the uk consistently for more than two yea rs. we the uk consistently for more than two years. we see that there are more doctors, nurses and other health workers per head of population in scotland than there are in other parts of the uk. the
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health budget per head of population is 7% higher in scotland than it is elsewhere in the uk. what puts that risk are further tory austerity cuts, that is why our manifesto put forward an alternative to austerity, a clear fiscal path that gets the public finances on to a sustainable footing but also makes sure we can free up footing but also makes sure we can free up resources footing but also makes sure we can free up resources to invest in the nhs and other public services and also in lifting people out of poverty, not washing more people into poverty like the tory welfare cuts are doing. let's return to brexit. in the real world, what influence would the snp have in any brexit talks while those negotiations are going on, until a deal is reached ? negotiations are going on, until a deal is reached? well, unless you are arguing that the voice of scotla nd are arguing that the voice of scotland doesn't count for anything, then eight people in scotland vote for the snp next thursday, if the snp wins the election in scotland,
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that strengthens scotland's hand to influence dregs aergerter negotiations. that is exactly my point. theresa may, as prime minister of the uk, is carrying out those negotiations with the eu, both the uk and eu are saying that scotla nd the uk and eu are saying that scotland are not part of those talks, you are part of the uk and thatis talks, you are part of the uk and that is who carries out the negotiation? well, my message though is we can change that next thursday by making sure the snp‘s hand is strengthened to represent scotland. theresa may, when she became prime minister, and this is what i welcomed at the time, said she wa nted welcomed at the time, said she wanted to proceed in these negotiations on a four databases. she wanted consensus between england, scotland, wales and northern ireland. she has not behaved in that way since making that commitment. she is ignoring the voice of scotland, wales, northern
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ireland as well. if we give jet —— democratic legitimacy next week to the compromise proposals the snp has put forward, accepting that we would leave the eu but wanting to stay in the single market so we could protect jobs, then we the single market so we could protectjobs, then we give ourselves a stronger hand to influence these negotiations. i think as we have seen negotiations. i think as we have seen during this can't —— campaign theresa may duck and dive, trying to avoid scrutiny, unable to answer the most basic questions about her policies, including her approach to brexit, i think everybody should be concerned about her ability, if she is left to run devices, to get the best dealfor is left to run devices, to get the best deal for the uk. is left to run devices, to get the best dealfor the uk. so is left to run devices, to get the best deal for the uk. so the is left to run devices, to get the best dealfor the uk. so the more is left to run devices, to get the best deal for the uk. so the more we can strengthen the hand of scotland to make sure our are interest are not ignored, the better. if you want scotla nd not ignored, the better. if you want scotland to have a strong voice, we need strong snp mps. you once said jeremy corbyn was not a credible candidate to be prime minister. with
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one eye on the opinion polls, are you looking at a possible deal with labour if there was a hung parliament? i have always said if the arithmetic allowed a progressive alliance to keep the tories out of office, i would want the snp to be pa rt office, i would want the snp to be part of it. i think of labour had got its act together earlier and had a more credible opposition for the prime minister, i think labour may well be winning this election. i think the opinion polls suggest the tories will win this election. but the narrowing of the polls elsewhere, says we have a new towns in scotland to hold them in check. pollsters say it could be the outcome of scotland that determines the majority theresa may gets. let's not throw her lifeline. let's keep the tories in check by returning snp mps, making sure scotland's interests are to the fore and we don'tjust interests are to the fore and we don't just have interests are to the fore and we
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don'tjust have tory mps doing what she wants to. thank you for your. thank you. now the weather. the weather has turned across north—western parts of the uk. we have had rain today. that rain will pushit have had rain today. that rain will push it to other parts of the country in the next 24—hour is. for many, despite the rain in the north—west, it will be a dry and warm night. this is the satellite picture from early. this is the weather front. it is obscuring most of northern ireland and scotland. much of wales in the clear. this is how we're ending the afternoon. much fresher weather in glasgow and belfast. through this evening and overnight, bad weather front will be just about edging towards the east. it is sliding northwards as well as moving towards the east. that is why it is so slow in many areas across england. dry and warm tonight. eventually that weather front does
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move towards the east. we could see some thunderstorms tomorrow breaking out across parts of east anglia and the south—east. that is because we are seeing that warm air coming in off the continent. temperatures could get as high as 28 degrees. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: the main parties focus on brexit as the leaders travel britain canvassing support. theresa may says she wants a "britain beyond brexit". butjeremy corbyn says conservatives' rhetoric and threats have fostered a toxic climate ahead of negotiations with the eu. international pressure is growing on president trump not to abandon america's commitment to the 2015 paris deal on climate change. he will announce this evening whether he will honour the agreement. tickets for the concert to benefit the victims of the manchester attack sell out within minutes of going on sale. the event at old trafford on sunday will raise money for those affected by the bombing. the chief executive of the company that owns british airways,
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willie walsh, has finally spoken about last weekend's computer failure that disrupted tens of thousands of passengers, admitting it damaged the company. some breaking news to do with the concert on sunday in aid of the victims of the manchester bombing. we arejust victims of the manchester bombing. we are just hearing that as well as being the host broadcaster for international television and radio, bbc one, radioi, international television and radio, bbc one, radio 1, radio 2, international television and radio, bbc one, radioi, radio 2, bbc international television and radio, bbc one, radio 1, radio 2, bbc radio 15 live, bbc world service, bbc radio manchester and commercial radio manchester and commercial radio will be covering the event live. bbc one coverage beginning at 6:55pm. alljoining togetherfor a simulcast programme. let's get the sport. good afternoon. lots going on this afternoon. andy
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murray is through to the top —— third round of the french open. he had another scare. he had to, from a set down for the second match running. this time it was against martin klizan of slovakia. anyone the first set on a tie—break. murray, who has been struggling for form on clay, won the second and third sets. the fourth went into a tie—break and it was murray who came through that just a tie—break and it was murray who came through thatjust a few moments ago. he will playjuan martin del potro in the fourth round. kyle edmund is playing renzo oleevo. he has won the first set 7—5. their first test ta kes pla ce first set 7—5. their first test takes place this weekend, but british and irish lions coach warren gatland says there will be a battle for the number ten shirt. the squad begin their tour of new zealand on saturday taking on the provincial barbarians.
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owen farrell, dan biggar and jonny sexton will compete for the fly half spot — with the irishman starting this weekend. the irishman starts this weekend. but gatland has said the other two are likely to start in the following two games. knowing the three of them, they are desperate to all want to play and start in that position. last week, at the end of the training i sort of said, can i have a chat to the tens? dan was there and jonny sexton was there and owen was over there. jonny said, "don't worry about him, he's a midfielder!" there is a bit of banter. i think the players are pretty aware of the competition. it looks like french winger antoine griezmann won't be going to manchester united — according to sources close to the club. it had been widely reported that united were making griezmann their top target this summer, and were close to triggering the escape clause in his contract with atletico madrid. but it seems united have turned their attention away from the winger to concentrate
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on signing a main striker. the uefa women's champions league final will be played in cardiff on thursday as leon play paris saint—germain. —— lyon. lyon aiming to make it back to back troubles having done it last year. it is amazing when we do it again, of course, iam new amazing when we do it again, of course, i am new in the team. i don't win it last year. i don't know ifa don't win it last year. i don't know if a team do this, so i'm not sure. i don't think so. so it will be amazing. now to the cricket. it has been a dramatic last few moments. england have been staging a recovery in the opening champions trophy match
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against bangladesh at the oval. they lost openerjason roy very cheaply but since then the hosts' prospects have been looking brighter, until a few moments ago. let'sjoinjohn watson. few moments ago. let's join john watson. many thanks. that recovery, thanks largely to alex hales, who hasjust gone for a 95, five runs short of a century. joe root alongside him as well is nearing his century. but i guess the story of the day started this morning when bangladesh posted a respectable total, 305—6. thanks largely for a 166 partnership between tamim iqbal and mushfiqur. iqbal making i28, mushfiqur 79. england 175—2 in reply. jason roy was the first wicket to go. a real disappointment for him. he has
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failed to reach double figures in the past six matches. suggestions thatjonny bairstow could replace him at the top of the order. at the moment england going along nicely. joe root nearing his century. another odi century for him. eoin morgan as well, the captain, has come in. england will be hopeful they can get those —— the runs they need which would see them come away with a victory in the opening match of the champions trophy. indeed. important that for england because they have australia and new zealand to play in their group. that is all the sport for now. thank you. the ulster unionist party have launched their election manifesto. the party's leader, robin swann, set out policies including strengthening northern ireland's place in the united kingdom, better regulation of the northern irish assembly the ulster unionist party have launched their election manifesto. better regulation of
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the northern irish assembly and opposing any special status for northern ireland in brexit talks. steve n aiken is the uup‘s chief whip, and hejoins us from belfast. thank you forjoining smack. let's pic up on last point, opposing special status for northern ireland in brexit? we don't need special status. we know that the irish government, the british comment and the europeans are clear we don't wa nt the europeans are clear we don't want any hard borders. we don't need any hard borders between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. we don't need internal borders within the united kingdom. we need to develop the trade processes across these islands, these islands which produce overi billion euros a week of trade going back and forth across the irish sea. we need that to continue and we need to see our industries, agribusiness, tourism, and very much our life sciences businesses, being able to grow and develop, so there are no significant
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ta riffs develop, so there are no significant tariffs and definitely no regulation preventing the free movement of trade. there in mind, we are islands, and we should be able to work together to make these things happen. how do you square the vote to leave the eu with keeping that border between north and south opened? we can do it. we're already seeing examples across europe. exa m ples seeing examples across europe. examples between norway and sweden, france and switzerland, andorra and lichtenstein. examples all over the place. the united kingdom has been a trading nation for over a thousand yea rs. we trading nation for over a thousand years. we can make it work. the republic of ireland needs to united kingdom, bearing in mind the united kingdom, bearing in mind the united kingdom is the largest market for agri— business in the republic of ireland. the republic of ireland is the largest market for our agribusiness. it is interdependent and interconnected. we need to keep that going. ifi and interconnected. we need to keep
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that going. if i were an eu bureaucrat i would say you can't have free movement of goods without free movement of people. before we we re free movement of people. before we were pa rt of free movement of people. before we were part of the eu, there was a common travel area across these islands. we can make that work again. we should be looking for solutions that work for everybody. we can make that happen. we will leave it there. thank you. the main parties focus on brexit as the leaders travel britain canvassing support. president trumpets to announce this evening whether the us will pull out of the paris climate agreement. —— president trump is to announce. tickets for the manchester concert on sunday have sold out within 20 minutes of going on sale. hello. now the latest snapshot on the markets. let's check in with
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the financial markets now. and shares in multinationals listed on the ftse 100 have risen, as the pound has extended losses over the uncertainty of the outcome of the general election. it's because around 75% of the revenues generated by the index's companies come from abroad. there has been some recovery in stirling this afternoon. some of those gains in the ftse 100 stirling this afternoon. some of those gains in the ftse100 were erased. it is still in positive territory. the pound has moved up against the euro. lets take a look at some more stocks in detail now. shares in supermarket giants tesco and sainsbury‘s have had quite a volatile day, after the latest industry data showed rivals aldi and lidl had grown at their fastest rate since 2015. the two german discounters reached a joint record market share of 12%, as inflation cost families an extra £27 on groceries over the past 12 weeks, according to figures from ka ntar world panel. the head of british airways' parent company, iag, has defended the airline's handling of a worldwide computer failure that disrupted flights for thousands of passengers. willie walsh, who used to run ba,
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says an investigation is under way into how a power supply failure knocked out the company's it systems. mr walsh made the comments at the launch of a new budget airline in spain. oil has risenjust above its three week low. rising output in libya had exacerbated concerns about the success of production cuts agreed by opec, which includes countries like saudi arabia, iran and nigeria. there is also interest in the potential impact of the us leaving the paris climate agreement and what that may have on the price of oil. let's get some more detailed analysis from brenda kelly. let's first of all talk about oil. and those cuts agreed by opec didn't have the effect they were intended to, did they? you can't control what is happening elsewhere in the world. you certainly can't. that is down to
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the demand we are expecting in the next few years. despite the fact we have seen some production cuts from middle eastern countries, it will still be a tempering point. oil price is very much displaced from a thais but well above those lows. given the fact we will see perhaps donald trump pulling out of the paris agreement, it could be a sign he is going to double down on oil and this could lead in an increase in production from the middle east to negate that. that could send oil prices into a spiral. what impact will this have on shale production in the united states? what is interesting about shale production is that the companies involved have kept their margins extremely low. it would have to fall quite considerably to affect their margins are that much. but ultimately we could expect to see the oil price fall to below $30 a barrel. that
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could cause problems for the smaller independent companies. let's move on to retail. we have seen the supermarket wars continued with aldi and little gaining market share. will this continue if inflation falls as the bank of england predicts? yell are the trend has been there for a number of years. this particular hubbard set in during the credit crunch were consumers changed their habits in the uk. aldi and lidl have continued that trend. there has been significant growth in both sales. and market share. looking at the big four supermarkets, they are starting to decline. if inflation declines, yes, we could see a certain stability. i think the trend is certainly there. i also think inflation is likely to continue to rise, so it could very well play in favour of aldi and lidl going
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forward. brenda kelly, many thanks forward. brenda kelly, many thanks for that update. so the ftse remains just about in positive territory. it has an inverse relationship to sterling. more for the multinationals abroad. the dax is also up. and the dowjones in the united states. nasdaq up as well. all positive so far. that is it from me. thank you very much. the actor, roy barraclough, has died at the age of 81. he was best known for playing alec gilroy in coronation street and for performing alongside les dawson. david sillito looks back at his life. i'll have it seen to. roy barraclough was for more than 30 years alec gilroy, the tightfisted theatrical agent who ended up marrying bet lynch. elizabeth and alexander... and running britain's best—known northern pub, the rovers return.
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alec was good at looking after the pennies — a bit short on romance. go on, kiss me. julie goodyear, who played bet, said today she was devastated, she treasured the laughs they shared. they were, she said, just like a married couple. i can't take you anywhere. i nearly had a flush. his other long—running tv role was another on—screen couple, a double act in which he played cissie, the slightly more refined friend of les dawson's ada. new guinea, newjersey, new york, new zealand — where do you want to go, chuck? new brighton! he left coronation street in the late 90s, but continued to act, here in last tango in halifax. fair enough, but if i'm being honest, i'm with ali — disappointed. and only last year as mr granger, in a one—off return of are you being served? mr granger, are you free?
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at the moment, captain peacock, but i've just heard there's an under—21s italian football team on the ground floor, so i'm just rearranging my underwear. laughter. but roy barraclough will be remembered best for his many years on coronation street. he brought many laughs, and even alec gilroy had his heartfelt moments. i'm trying to say i love you, rita. alec... and i want to marry you. i know i've no right to expect you to feel the same way, especially after what you've said tonight. after all, what am i? just a lonely man with any good years left in him long since gone. the actor, roy barraclough, who has died at the age of 81. with the general election a week away, my colleague victoria derbyshire has been organising a series of election blind dates —
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a lunch between two people with very different political views. today, historian professor mary beard meets strip club owner peter stringfellow. they both claim to be feminists — but who will win the argument? this is how they got on. i'm mary beard, and i'm a professor of classics at the university of cambridge. it always amazes me that people do know who i am. my name's peter stringfellow, of course. so, that's ok, i'm happy! how are you? i'm good. good. i interpret feminism as saying, quite simply, women can do what they want to do and not be told not to by a man. that's simplistically... so if they want to take their clothes off... they can. they can do anything. it's not a matter of just being beautiful. they've got to be smart. have any of them gone on from this wonderful career start to make money at your level?
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of course they don't, but they make their money and then they go into their own businesses. this is one of the reasons, of course, that i'm a remainer, of course. so you can get girls to take... peter, this is wonderful. can ijust slightly parody you and say, i'm a remainer because i want all those nice eastern european girls to come and take their clothes off in my club? no! i'd love to teach, peter. it's too late to teach me anything, mary. i'd like to take you into my study and i'd like to set you an essay to write, and i'd like to have a good, real barney about... i'm older than you, aren't i? a lot older. yes. and therefore i know more than you. let me just tell you something off—camera here. you're quite a pretty lady. get that on camera! get it on camera. i think i'm paying. no, this is where political correctness goes through the window. i'm an old—fashioned guy.
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if you are an old—fashioned lady, you've got to let me have it. oh, my god! here, you can have it. that's an old joke. all right, mary, do we shake hands on it? a draw. iadmire you. your academic altercations are incredible. but you are somewhat... protected. and i haven't been, you have been. and when she's been to my club, when you've been to my club, me and you will agree on everything. i can just imagine what some of my best friends are going to say. can they come? can i come with you? they are not, stringfellow, they are going to say, mary, you just let him get away with it! mary beard and peter stringfellow. you can see the full version of that election blind date on the bbc news website — that's at bbc.co.uk/news. and there'll be two more blind dates on the victoria derbyshire programme on bbc two and here on the news channel — that's at nine o'clock
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tomorrow and friday. i don't know why you are looking at me. iam sure me. i am sure you want to watch! now the weather. it is thomas shafran actor. you're putting your work in today! just like yesterday, the same shift. it is pretty... what was i going to say? it is pretty cloudy. this is in the highlands. obviously cloudy. this is sunny. this is in essex. obviously big contrasts across the uk today. where it has been cloudy today, it has been raining. particularly across northern ireland, south—west scotland. it is this area of low pressure that is swinging in. it has not been giving a sunni weather across england. warm aircoming out of a sunni weather across england. warm air coming out of the south. temperatures into the mid—20s. quite humid as well. it is very slow
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moving weather front. it is not moving weather front. it is not moving towards the east, it is kind of sliding up north north—east into scotla nd of sliding up north north—east into scotland as well. that is why it is gone to stay damp for most of the night in northern ireland and scotland, where as across england it will be and dry. a flow of air coming in from the south. the same happens on friday morning. still just about wafting up the warmth from the near continent. this is where the weather front is. everything to this side is fresher airoff the everything to this side is fresher air off the atlantic. you can see the fresher air getting into the western isles. at this stage there is rain in eastern scotland, into the borders and most of north—east england. this weather front will push towards the east eventually. across many parts of the uk in the west, fresher weather. in east anglia and the south—east, some storms may break out during the course of the afternoon. 25 at least in london. 27 possible. in the
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yellows, more like 17 and 18. the storms that do brew in east anglia and the south—east, will rumble on in the evening, and then they are gone. saturday and sunday, this low pressure to the north and west, will send some showers and fresh conditions. a mixed bag this weekend. on saturday and sunday, showers mostly in the western areas, particularly in the north—west on saturday. they could even be some thunderstorms. and then on sunday, showers perhaps in the north—west as well. the further east and south—east you are, the dry at the weather will be this weekend. tomorrow, still warm, very warm like today in the south—east and east anglia. many of us might getting fresher weather of the atlantic. coming up next, the news at five. later this evening, outside source
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cove rs later this evening, outside source covers the global stories at nine. followed by another chance to see newsnight at 11:15pm. today at five, with exactly a week to go before polling day, brexit takes centre stage in the election campaign. there are two major speeches from the top contenders for number 10. jeremy corbyn says a tory brexit will lead to a jobs meltdown, but theresa may says she offers a future of new opportunities. i'm confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together, and build a britain that is stronger, fairer and even more prosperous than it is today. theresa may says no deal is better thana theresa may says no deal is better than a bad deal. let's be clear, no deal is in fact a bad deal. it is the worst of all deals. so, are voters any clearer as to what brexit will mean? we'll have the latest from the campaigns, and speak to labour's keir starmer. the other main stories on bbc news at five: in or out?
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