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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  June 1, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at five, with exactly a week to go before polling day, brexit takes centre stage in the election campaign. there are two major speeches from the top contenders for number 10. jeremy corbyn says a tory brexit will lead to a jobs meltdown, but theresa may says she offers a future of new opportunities. i'm confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together, and build a britain that is stronger, fairer and even more prosperous than it is today. theresa may says no deal is better thana theresa may says no deal is better than a bad deal. let's be clear, no deal is in fact a bad deal. it is the worst of all deals. so, are voters any clearer as to what brexit will mean? we'll have the latest from the campaigns, and speak to labour's keir starmer. the other main stories on bbc news at five: in or out? the world waits to hear whether america, will honour its commitments,
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under the paris climate agreement. president trump will make an announcement in the next few hours, but he's facing mounting pressure from the eu and china, to help the world cut greenhouse gases. the boss of british airways' parent company, has defended the airline's handling of the recent computer failure, that left passengers stranded around the world. i think the team at british airways has done everything possible to get ba back flying a full schedule as quickly as possible and tickets for the manchester bombing tribute concert, sell out in just 20 minutes. it's five o'clock, our top story is that the brexit debate has moved back to the heart of the election campaign, with both labour
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and the conservatives insisting they offer the best approach to the upcoming negotiations. in a campaign speech in north yorkshire, theresa may said britain could look forward to a brighter future outside the eu. she insisted she had a clear plan for the future unlike labour. jeremy corbyn told supporters in basildon in essex that the conservatives' approach was reckless and had left britain isolated. here's our political correspondent leila nathoo on how the parties are pushing their brexit messages. she wants to move on, to dig herself out of the hole of last night's debate no—show, and onto the safer ground of brexit. a brighter future awaits, she says, but only she can get us there. i want us to work together to fulfil the promise of brexit, too. because if we get brexit right, then together we can do great things. we can build a britain beyond brexit, that is stronger, fairer and even more prosperous than it is today. but the liberal democrats think she'd be taking britain down the wrong path.
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they claim the economy has already suffered, and there'd be worse to come. i think what people want to know is why on earth the conservatives want to pursue such a hardline, extreme version of brexit, which will not just take us out of the eu, but also harm our economy by taking us out of margaret thatcher's single market as well. so how do the party's approaches to brexit compare? the conservatives are promising to bring down immigration from europe. labour accepts the end of free movement, too, but would immediately guarantee the rights of eu citizens currently here. ukip wants a points—based system for immigration, while the lib dems would maintain the status quo. on trade, theresa may says we'll leave the single market and the customs union, pursuing new trade deals with the eu and abroad. labour accepts that but would negotiate to retain the benefits of both, while the liberal democrats want to stay as members. the snp wants scotland's place in the single market to be protected.
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on legal matters, the conservatives say they would end the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. labour would keep eu protections on worker and consumer rights and the environment, while the lib dems would hold a referendum on the final brexit deal before it was put in place. jeremy corbyn, too, wanted to talk brexit today, dismissing claims he is not ready for the talks and critical of what he calls theresa may's brexit approach. britain certainly can thrive and prosper outside the eu. our businesses are creative and inventive. but they need access to european markets. they need to be part of the unimpeded supply chains. and they need the chance to grow beyond our borders in order to protect and create jobs, wealth and opportunity. brexit is the backdrop to this election, and we've heard plenty of
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sound bites and slogans from all the parties about what they do. but there are still a number of unanswered questions on all sides, like how much if any of a divorce bill we would pay, what would be the consequences of not agreeing a deal? britain's future outside the eu is beckoning. there is just a week left to decide who will be in charge. vicki young, who's in essex with the labour leaderjeremy corbyn. we know the conservatives want to talk about this, this is their strong point, they believe, theresa may believes that is the case. less so may believes that is the case. less so for labour, how well did jeremy corbyn‘s speech go down today? so for labour, how well did jeremy corbyn's speech go down today? he wa nts to corbyn's speech go down today? he wants to tackle this head on. he hasn't said an awful lot about brexit, but wants to show that he and his team are ready for those negotiations, saying clearly that they want to keep the benefits of they want to keep the benefits of the single market. they wanted to be aboutjobs. not the single market. they wanted to be about jobs. not that the single market. they wanted to be aboutjobs. not that different from what theresa may is saying, but he
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is certainly ruling out walking away without a deal. he says that no deal would be the worst option for the united kingdom. there is a difference between the parties on immigration. i asked them today about whether they would set a target for reducing immigration to the uk. they didn't want to put numbers on it. they pointed out numbers on it. they pointed out numbers set either conservatives have never been met. they want to make sure that there are people in the country that do jobs that need to be done. emily thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, one of jeremy corbyn's top lieutenants, she suggested that if there is a hung parliament, in the event of a hung parliament, in the event of a hung parliament, if the labour votes, and a majority of seats, they would govern. there is no suggestion of a coalition or any kind of packed. they ruling out a coalition or a formal pact. they are saying that if
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they were in that circumstance, they would put forward a budget in the queen's speech, and put forward a movement forward. it is likely they could prop up a labour minority government, the snp, but not in a formal sense. there has been a lot of chat today about prospects for labour. coming in with the local elections as well, the tories regard it as being ahead. some polls suggest labour is making headway. a couple of polls suggest they are doing exceptionally well. i have spoken to senior labour politicians, they still do believe they are in a position to win... 0h, sorry, they are in a position to win... 0h, sorry, we they are in a position to win... 0h, sorry, we have lost vicky young in mid—flow. let's try to join ben wright in west yorkshire on the conservative party bus. i see you have crisps and water behind you, they are treating you well, it looks great. tell me, there you are, there
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are the crisps... the conservatives today have spoken about brexit, perhaps the time of territory they feel comfortable with. —— kind of territory, especially after the comments about social care. definitely. i haven't touched the crisps, by the way. but they are. this is where they want the election to be, focused on brexit, focused on theresa may's leadership, and the choice between the two people that can be promised after the 8th of june. it is quite optimistic, theresa may pointing a warm and enthusiastic picture of written outside the european union. she said she really believed in it. it wasn't just about brexit, she talked about trying to make britain a more meritocratic society after brexit.
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grammar schools may make a reappearance in the election campaign. it was a sunny speech looking to the future. that is what this election campaign, for them, it needs to be. you are on the conservative bus, any fall out from her nonattendance at the debate last night? is there a sense among the party rank and file that it was the right thing to do? i don't think so at all. she was in a furniture making factory in pontefract and yorkshire, and they wondered if she was too frightened to turn up. it was too frightened to turn up. it was spontaneously... there were a number of critical questions. somebody wanted to know what she
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would do to protect businesses, worried about brexit, leaving britain, she was asked about the currency and how it was faring against others. an eu worker fretted about his rights. she was given a tough time with robust questioning. these things are not stage—managed, this one wasn't at all. it was an interesting exchange between her and the workers of the factory. she is doing touring around labour held seats. she was in teesside earlier. it has been a wobbly few days, following the social care rewrite, u—turn, call it what you want. the polls are aware of it. they want to seize back the narrative, theresa may will want to make it about brexit. there are huge questions about what is going to happen when
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the talks begin. you hear the rhetoric and platitudes, how is the government going to deliver a conference of free trade deal? what is the new immigration system going to look at? what are the circumstances she might walk away from the table with? she has big questions about how brexit will unfold, and they remain hanging in the air. indeed. many thanks for that. ben wright on the conservative battlebus somewhere in west yorkshire. the us president, donald trump, is coming under growing international pressure to honour the paris global climate change deal. he's due to announce in three hours or so whether the us will withdraw from its commitment to reduce carbon emissions. china's premier said this morning that his country will honour the agreement, and urged others to do the same. but donald trump has previously described climate change as a hoax, and an american job—killer. our environment analyst roger harrabin reports. it's coal that's driving
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president trump away from the global climate deal. before his election, he promised jobs for american miners. we're going to cancel the paris climate agreement. the president is now scrapping rules to clean up coal—fired power stations, but will that work? his economic adviser, gary cohn, says it won't. "coal doesn't even make that much sense any more," mr cohn said recently. the president disagrees. my administration is putting an end to the war on coal. and the glad—handing climate deal signed in paris represents exactly the sort of liberal internationalism his supporters despise. but the likelihood that he'll reject that paris deal has been met with worldwide dismay. at the hay book festival on the welsh border, children are learning how solar power transforms african villages.
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president trump has scrapped funding for this sort of thing. as he promised, he's putting america first. after years of working together to get a consensus, with all the countries finally working together, we're now in a situation where the richest economy in the world is abandoning its obligations to the poorest people, and it is those very poor people who are going to suffer. support for the paris climate deal stretches far beyond this tent. if the us pulls out, it will be on a list ofjust three nations not doing their bit for the climate, including tiny nicaragua and war—torn syria. it is obviously a very important decision, as the united states is the biggest economy in the world. but independently of the decision of the american government, it's important all other governments stay the course. china, with its massive investment in renewables, is set to take over global leadership on climate, in partnership with the eu at their summit tomorrow. india says it won't
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back down either. overnight, president trump said he would announce his decision on the paris deal today. but even in the president's own backyard, there's defiance on climate change. president trump can't command science. he can't command weather, he can't command a climate. the rest of the world is getting it. i don't think we're getting it enough. if anything, our response at this point is rather feeble, given the threat that climate change represents. so california will be on the field, doing its role, playing an active role in promoting climate strategies. here at the hay festival, this installation is lit by solar power, clean energy is all around us. and if president trump turns his back on the paris climate agreement, he won'tjust be enraging other
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world leaders, he'll be potentially undermining america's own clean energy jobs for the future. roger harrabin, bbc news. our correspondent barbara plett—usher joins us from washington. barbara, a few weeks ago, it would have been fairly straightforward to predict that president trump will pull america out of the paris climate accord, which he said on the campaign trail. but the situation has got more confused in the last few weeks, especially when he met the pope a few weeks ago. the pope pressed him not to pull america out of the paris agreement. he has been getting that from a lot of different places in europe, when he went to the nato meeting, and the g—7 meeting, he got the same as it from american allies. he is getting that message from various quarters here, from democratic congress people, including some republican congress people. he is getting it from environmental activists, and quite a lot of businesses, who say that if you pull out now, it will take us
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out of the energy mix, and we are looking at a change in the energy industries. the question about the us showing leadership with the climate agreement, and now its leadership role would be diminished. lots to think about. he says he is thinking about them and is getting that message from lots of different quarters, but also getting strong m essa 9 es quarters, but also getting strong messages from people who formed a big part of his voting base, which we re big part of his voting base, which were coalminers were out of work, and they believe the environmental regulations are very much at fault. he promised to bring backjobs to them as part of his campaign pledges, something he takes very seriously. and more broadly, he said that the climate agreement poses odorous restrictions on the us that it is going to cost the economy trillions of dollars, and that americanjobs trillions of dollars, and that american jobs and the economy must come first. he has the two different narratives, if you like. we were
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waiting to see which one he goes with. a lot for the president to think about there. also, perhaps, with the breaking news that james comey is going to testify in relation to his firing at the hands of the president as head of the fbi. yes, the director of the fbi who had been investigating possible collusion between trump's associates and the russians, and whether they tried to influence the outcome of the election. and of course he was sacked by president trump a couple of weeks ago. there has been a lot of weeks ago. there has been a lot of discussion in washington about when and whether he would testify. now we have heard he will do so in a week's time, 8th ofjune, in an open session and in a closed session, something washington will watch closely. we understand what the senators want to ask him the kind of things president trump said to him before he was fired. 0k, barbara. thank you for that. with me is professorjoanna haigh,
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co—director of the grantham institute for climate change at imperial college. good to see you. thank you for coming in. first of all, if america and donald trump decides that he is going to pull the country out of the paris accord, does that effectively, with america being the second biggest polluter, does that effectively mean the deal is dead? it doesn't necessarily mean the deal is dead, it means it is hit very badly. as you say, america is a big emitter, emitting a fifth of global emissions. if it stops its contributions, that is serious. but as we have heard from your correspondent, other countries are doing a lot, especially china and india, and now russia has today announced it is going to stick with its commitments. with those commitments, and people working very ha rd to commitments, and people working very hard to do their bit, it is not as bad as it might be. president trump makes the point, and his head of
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environmental protection makes the point, that america's costs and commitments to the paris climate deal, their commitments are front—loaded. they have got to deal with the costs of emissions now, whereas the likes of china, the world's biggest polluter, and india, there is no kick in for another 10-15 there is no kick in for another 10—15 years. there is no kick in for another 10-15 years. all countries have made their contributions to it, and each country is different, and can do different things, and they do it as well as they can. my comments to president trump, by sticking with coal, he is not helping his workers at all. he is keeping them stuck in an old—fashioned at all. he is keeping them stuck in an old —fashioned industry, at all. he is keeping them stuck in an old—fashioned industry, where he could create lovely, new, clean, renewable energies that will give more work, jobs and profit. might that be one way out of it for president trump in trying to make his commitment to the people who voted him in.
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one way for him to deal with it is to say, maybe our commitments don't kick in for ten years? ten years as a long time. a long time, right. we need to get carbon dioxide emissions stuck at zero to stop the warming going on in the globe. if president trump wants to help workers, he will do it as soon as he possibly can. and green energy, technology, looking at electric cars and so on, a lot of that is developing at a pace, and the suggestion, certainly, from environmentalists is that america is going to lose that race in order to develop those energies that are going to be the growth engines over the next few years. that's right. we have seen incredible developments in solar panels and electric vehicles, and the costs are coming down and down much faster than anyone predicted. the company is reducing those things will be making profits. and if
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america is not investing in those clea n america is not investing in those clean technologies, it will be behind the curve, and american workers will lose out. of course we need to be concerned about workers losing jobs in america, but it's the same wherever stop if you work in an old technology, your job same wherever stop if you work in an old technology, yourjob will be replaced by something. better sooner than later. one reason the chinese are so behind this, because with their command economy, they can throw billions of dollars at developing these new technologies, these new resources, to get a march on the likes of america. yes, i don't imagine the chinese motivation to do this is entirely altruistic. it is in their own interest, partly from the financial aspect, but also from the financial aspect, but also from a health perspective. by burning dirty fuels, they create horrible air quality issues that are poisoning their co—patria. horrible air quality issues that are poisoning their co-patria. we will leave it there. we have some breaking news that has
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come into us, concerning the tribute concert to take place at the old trafford cricket ground on sunday. this is to help those people affected by the manchester bombing last week. we have a statement from ticketmaster, regarding the one love manchester concert. a spokesperson says we have set aside tickets for 14,200 people who were at the ariana grande concert, to attend the concert for free. those are the people that were at the concert which was attacked a few days ago. more than 25,000 people applied for them, and sadly, overi0,000 more than 25,000 people applied for them, and sadly, over 10,000 on scrupulous applications have been made. at ticketmaster, we are doing everything we can, including extending today's deadline, to make sure that tickets go to actual fans, and not opportunists or touts who
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have also been applying for free tickets. remember, one love manchester, the benefit concert after the manchester bombing, taking place on sunday stop the people who attended the original concert that was attacked, the ariana grande concert a while ago, they will have been allocated free tickets for the one love concert, but a lot of unscrupulous people have tried to apply to get hands on those free tickets. ticketmaster is aware of this, and are trying to deal with the situation. at 6:15, we will speak to someone that has a ticket for this weekend's concert at the cricket ground. the boss of british airways' parent company, iag, has said the airline did everything possible to resolve the chaos caused by it problems over the bank holiday weekend. willie walsh says the company will do everything it can to make up for the disruption people suffered.
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i'm pleased that british airways has been able to recover from the significant disruption that they faced on saturday. i think the team at british airways, under the leadership of alex cruz, has done everything possible to get british airways back flying a full schedule as quickly as possible. we clearly apologise to any of our customers who were disrupted. we know the cause of the problem, it was not an it failure, it was a problem caused by the failure of electrical power to our it systems. we understand what happened, we are still investigating why it happened. and that investigation will take some time. but i think the team at british airways did everything they could in the circumstances to recover the operation as quickly as they did, and our focus will be on making sure that any of our customers who experienced disruption are managed and satisfied with how we handled things. clearly, we will do everything we can to make up the
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disruption that they suffered. some of the other stories making bbc news at five. pakistan has rejected afghan claims that it was involved in yesterday's bomb attack in kabul. the attack happened close to the heavily protected diplomatic area, killing around 90 people and injuring about 350 others. no group has claimed responsibility, but afghan intelligence officials suggested militants allied with the taliban carried it out with pakistan's support, a claim which they reject. house prices across the uk have fallen for the third month in a row, according to the nationwide building society. it's the first time that's happened since 2009. the nationwide said the slowdown provided further evidence that the housing market was "losing momentum". the former ukip leader nigel farage says he has "no connections to russia", following reports that he is a "person of interest" to fbi investigators.
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they are examining possible collusion between the kremlin and donald trump's presidential campaign. farage described the claims as "hysterical" and a result of the "liberal elite" being unable to accept brexit and mr trump becoming us president. the ulster unionist leader robin swann says his party is strongly opposed to granting special status to northern ireland in the brexit talks. he says such a move would be a "back door" to a united ireland. launching the party's manifesto, mr swann said special status would weaken northern ireland's place in the union. he also dismissed nationalist calls for a border poll as "nonsense". i, nor my party, will tolerate any attempt to undermine the principle of consent. there can be no border up the middle of the irish sea. there can be no passport checks for citizens of northern ireland arriving in cairnryan or heathrow.
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all our energies should be focused instead on the brexit negotiations, and getting the best deal for our people. let's return now to our lead story — the politics of brexit — and how the party's are using the issue during their political campaigns. joining me is labour's shadow brexit secretary keir starmer. good to see you, thank you very much indeed for being with us. first of all, jeremy corbyn today said that the conservatives believe no deal is better than a bad deal, and that's wrong. does that suggest you lot would be willing to settle for a bad deal? not at all. i am confident that if labour is elected into power next week, we would negotiate a good dealfor britain. we next week, we would negotiate a good deal for britain. we would next week, we would negotiate a good dealfor britain. we would do next week, we would negotiate a good deal for britain. we would do that by resetting the tone, abandoning the belligerent extremist approach, sitting down, as you would in the 21st—century, to professionally negotiate a new relationship with
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the eu, not membership of course, but partnership. i'm absolutely confident we can achieve that. isn't it much more about more than tone. eu says there won't be no access to the single market unless there is free movement of people. labour have made it clear that you are willing to get rid of the immigration side of that equation, but you will still somehow push for access to the single market. that is what the negotiations are about. there will have to be adjustments. we voted to leave the eu, meaning the arrangements will change. the negotiations are about how much change, and in what way. we are confident we can get the right result. in the end, we had to remember, the eu has concluded 3a agreements involving 60 countries. i simply do not believe that with the right tone and approach, and a professional attitude, that we can't
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achieve a good dealfor britain. labour will achieve that. does that mean, then, that you would potentially still tried to push for access to the single market. of course. if, for instance, it involves paying the european union? we will have two c. access to the market may involve making payments. the prime minister has accepted that proposition. the question will be, what is the dividend, what does it mean for the economy? that is why we are going into negotiations. we would go into negotiations setting the agenda, privatising jobs and the economy. it also recognises that we continue to collaborate and cooperate with eu partners. whether thatis cooperate with eu partners. whether that is on counterterrorism, or whether it is on brilliant scientific medical research, these are countries that we have a shared history with, shared values with. we are leaving, we are not going to be members of the eu, but we do want to be partners. the tone and getting
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that right will set us up for the next generation. do you have any sympathy with voters that say your party and the conservatives, you still are not laying out really beyond platitudes. we have had from the other nations in the eu, retail documents of how they are going to approach negotiations. we haven't had that from jeremy corbyn today, and we haven't had that from theresa may. well, we have set out our priorities, we have set out what we will do in the fused few days of a labour government. but then of course we go into the negotiations and that is on the hard work will be done. but i think we have been very clear about our priorities. what matters is deceptive what we want to achieve, of course we want to trade with europe, i haven't met a business in the last six months and
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i have talked to hundreds doesn't wa nt to i have talked to hundreds doesn't want to trade with europe but we wa nt want to trade with europe but we want more. we have to the referendum result and reset that the next generation. sir keir starmer, thank you. labour's shadow brexit secretary there. much more coming up. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz shafernaker. it was very warm today. but some have not had the weather, it's been raining in the north—west and this is where the rain will continue tonight and tomorrow as well, the rain is moving very slowly towards the east. this is the band of weather across northern ireland and scotland, the east and south is where we have the warm air wafting in from france all day. it's 15 in belfast, mid 20s in london, is where we enter the afternoon and start the evening and tonight is fresher wetter weather of the atlantic just
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about merges into western wales, the la ke about merges into western wales, the lake district, possibly cornwall as well but the vast majority across england, a good chunk of wales is going to be a dry and the warm night, the weather front will rejoin the bus tomorrow, still stay in humid and very warm across east anglia and the south—east, and to the high 20s and risk of some thunderstorms breaking out. that's it, have a good evening. this is bbc news at five. the headlines. with exactly a week until polling day the election turns to brexit. jeremy corbyn says backing the tories will lead to a jobs meltdown, but theresa may says she offers a future of new opportunities. iam i am confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together. and build a britain that is stronger,
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fairerand build a britain that is stronger, fairer and more prosperous than today. in or out, the world waits to see if america will honour its commitments to the paris climate change agreement. former fbi directorjames comey, who was fired by president trump, is to testify to the intelligence committee on the administrations links with russia. the boss of british airways's parent company has defended the recent handling of the computer failure that left passengers stranded all over the world. than 10,000 fake applications have been made for the tickets for the tribute concerts set aside for those caught up in a majesty attack. now time for a look at the sports news. here's mike bushell. hello, it should be a cracking
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finish to the england— bangladesh match, at the oval, on the evidence so far nothing can be taken for granted against bangladesh. that's right, mike, absolutely, bangladesh posting a very impressive score in their opening innings of 305—6. tamim iqbal, the opener, did the damage. an impressive 129 from him, his ninth odi score for bangladesh and it was that third wicket partnership that he put on with his partnership that he put on with his partner who made 79, they made 176 together hoping to egg helping bangladesh post that 305,000 six. england made the worst possible start, openerjason roy went for one as he chipped down the leg side and was caught by rahman. that continues a bad run of form the jason roy who hasn't posted a total in his last six innings but alex hales steadied
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the ship with an impressive 95, he fell five runs short of what would have been a sixth odi century. and ably assisted by joe have been a sixth odi century. and ably assisted byjoe root, who was looking impressive himself, closing in on looking impressive himself, closing inona looking impressive himself, closing in on a century as well. that would be his tenth odi century for england. eoin morgan is at the crease with joe england. eoin morgan is at the crease withjoe root england. eoin morgan is at the crease with joe root at the moment. i think they are a bit under the required run rate at the moment but with the big hitters that they've got in their side, eoin morgan, jos buttler to come, ben stokes, we know about his abilities, they will feel confident that they were chased and this total. england have yet to win a major tournament and 50 over cricket. this is their best possible moment to do so, following the progress they have made in recent yea rs progress they have made in recent years in this format of the game and in front of a home crowd. hosting the matches between edgbaston, the oval and cardiff, they will feel that this is their best possible moment to lift a major trophy in
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this format. still some way to go but england are looking good for the moment, mike. thank you, england have wickets in hand, they still got australia and new zealand to play in the group to make the semifinals, all that to come after this cracking opener. british success at the french open with andy murray and kyle edmund both winning. edmund beat his argentinian opponent in straight cents while world number one andy murray had a tougher match. despite battling with injury and illness andy murray is targeting success in paris. the runner—up last year admits he needs to play himself into form and world number 50 martin klizan provided a suitable test. the slovakian is anything but conventional but he packs an impressive punch as he broke serve early on. a resilient murray fought back yet the first set went the other way after a tie—break. before
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the word "upset" could creep around roland garros the world number one was back on form, the opening set long forgotten as murray took the second and the third looking far more assured. but the fourth was anything but. martin klizan raced into the lead, the drop shot his main weapon. again murray showed why he is the world noble one. his own power and determination bringing the game back his terms. and victory followed soon after for murray returning to form atjust followed soon after for murray returning to form at just the followed soon after for murray returning to form atjust the right time. that's all the sport for now but keep right up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport, including highlights of the cricket, the very latest, england 244—2. more in sports at half past six, see you then. thank you, mike. with a week to go until the country goes to the polls in the general election the main parties have been back on the campaign trail.
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in a moment i'll be speaking to three former political advisors, but first let's take a look at what the parties have been saying today. the prime minister, theresa may, promised that britain will become a "more prosperous" country after it leaves the eu. iam i am confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together and build a britain that is stronger, fairer, and even more prosperous thanit fairer, and even more prosperous than it is today. because the promise of brexit is great. the opportunities before us enormous. and i am ambitious for brexit and ambitious for britain. jeremy corbyn told supporters in essex that the tories had taken a reckless approach to negotiations. so far the rhetoric and threats from the tory government has fostered toxic climate. labour will start negotiations by setting a new tone. we will confirm to the
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other member state that britain is leaving the european union, that is it is not in doubt. meanwhile nick clegg, the liberal democrat europe spokesperson has been warning about the effect of brexit on the nhs. you'll remember that lai emblazoned on that bus, £350 million for the nhs. everyone knows that was a blatant light but now we discover that the truth is even worse. it will actually cost our nhs hundreds of millions of pounds if we are going to have to replace all those good non—eu nurses, doctors, co nsulta nts good non—eu nurses, doctors, consultants and others who have worked so hard for us in our country for so long and are now being treated in such a shoddy fashion. i'm joined by three former political advisors — jo—anne nadler who worked forjohn major — special advisor polly mackenzie — and sam tarry —— a former advisor to jeremy corbyn. thanks for being here, it is good to
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see you. polycom if i could start with you, it was a bit trickier for jeremy corbyn last night, and for mr tim farron because mr tim farron at the end of the day had to punch above his weight. i thought tim did above his weight. i thought tim did a crediblejob above his weight. i thought tim did a credible job and above his weight. i thought tim did a crediblejob and everyone is going to struggle when there are seven voices, is one interesting chart somebody did of the number of times people interrupted each other and it did come across as a noisy squabble each sheep might! i thought you were going to say a cheap date! not exactly the most disorder and political rhetoric but i think it's clear thatjeremy corbyn political rhetoric but i think it's clear that jeremy corbyn landed political rhetoric but i think it's clear thatjeremy corbyn landed a blow on theresa mayjust by being there even though he was a bit boring and wishy—washy because he made her look weak for not turning up. it is the fact of not turning up that has got more cut—throat than the debate which most people didn't watch. jo-anne, as far as theresa
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may is concerned, would you have advised her not to turn up?” may is concerned, would you have advised her not to turn up? i think she was quite right not to turn up. i think she hadn't ever said she was so i think she hadn't ever said she was so it wasn't a surprise but i think it was the right strategy because as polly said, i didn't watch the whole thing but it did seem a bad—tempered scrap for the most part and i think she's wanting to position herself as being above the fray. i think that's the correct approach. sama, you said earlier that you thought mr corbyn turning up might be a disaster. —— sam. i think people would be worried that, one misstep and it could go badly but it stand out clearly from all the responses, have come straight from knocking on doors, people were like, with theresa may. this is someone who's supposed to be taking is it to negotiate with some of the world's greatest economies when we leave europe and she can't even take on the leader of the opposition in the debate. we've heard today that she's just pulled out woman's hour. i say, where are
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you, come out and face labour. the electorate deserve better. they are fed up. she's bottled it. the wheels are falling off the tory election campaign. it seems to be a complete disaster. i'm sure borisjohnson is sharpening their knives ready to stick them into her back a few days after election day. jo-anne comedy think that's the case? surer ground for them to stand on compared to social care and so on. i think the cut—throat issues that polly and some is a cabin referring to, if you are sitting in political hqi to, if you are sitting in political hq i think are very careful decision will have been taken as to what is the most appropriate way to sell theresa may over the next week, and having her take part in these scrappy debates is not it. it will
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lose some support but it's not fundamentally going to make a difference to the kind of campaign that they are now going to be running over the next seven days. i think it's better to see her out making these speeches about what the vision is, taking us back to the passion and the real enthusiasm that we heard from theresa may in that very first speech that she made at no 10 on the day she became prime minister. i think we've all been wanting to hear more about that. and thatis wanting to hear more about that. and that is essentially why i think jeremy corbyn has had a pretty good campaign because he is authentic, he is arguing from the heart. we haven't had enough of that from theresa may and that's what we need to hear now. some suggest that today she given uplifting speech about what brexit could mean, the future and that, sunny uplands. that's what has been lacking from her campaign, it's been getting rid of your winter fuel allowance and making you flog your house if you need social care! it's been about negative things,
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nothing uplifting. i think that's partly the way that the message has not been particularly school fully communicated. i think the idea not been particularly school fully communicated. ithink the idea is not been particularly school fully communicated. i think the idea is to say he is an authoritative prime minister prepared to take difficult decisions in the interests of the nation but somehow with the other things going on, you're right, campaign has seemed wouldn't say negative but there hasn't been sunny uplands approach of david cameron. we must remember the context of the real world and what happened in manchester rightly has cast a shadow across the way you can conduct a campaign like this, and i think that should apply to all politicians involved in this. it wasn't very positive leading at the tragedy in manchester. i think the argument we re manchester. i think the argument were not made in the right way. clearly something must be done about social care and it was right to take that on. all right. polycom brexit
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has been centrestage in the campaign, they've talked about it today, the lib dems and it would be theissue today, the lib dems and it would be the issue that help them cut through a bit. a promise of a second vote, some kind of referendum on a deal. it hasn't really connected, though. i think the electing shifting away from brexit has been problematic for the lib dems and there are areas in which being the anti—brexit party, areas of historic support the lib dems, it doesn't work. it doesn't mean they can't make gains in other areas, in london perhaps, or places like cambridge where people are sceptical, as i am, about the devastation that will be wrought on our economy by brexit. in the way i think theresa may is adopting the right strategy, trying to get the conversation back to brexit because it works for her. hopefully it will work for the lib dems as well because i think these conversations, speeches from jeremy corbyn and
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theresa may have reminded us how complicated, difficult and dangerous the negotiation process is going to be. sam, you were quite bullish aboutjeremy be. sam, you were quite bullish about jeremy corbyn a be. sam, you were quite bullish aboutjeremy corbyn a few seconds ago, brexit is not their strongest subject, it must be said, many would argue. today he said that no deal is better than a bad deal and that is the tory mantra and that is the wrong way to go. which suggests that he would settle for a bad deal?” don't think so at all. his speech in basildon, heart of essex, i'vejust come back from dagenham and brexit is still a massive issue there. what's interesting, lots of seats which will decide this election which will decide this election which i think is a battle between labour and the tories fighting to pull your cousin supporters back to them and about 50 seats, if labour don't manage to do that, jobs will be the highest priority. i think the problem is today you see the tories coming out, with a think tank saying the corporate donors feeding into
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theircampaign are all the corporate donors feeding into their campaign are all people set to benefit from brexit but brexit at the expense of ordinary working people. jeremy has clearly said, we will put ordinary people first rather than global corporations and the super rich. and that is starting to have traction when you couple that with a manifesto which clearly says we will take back control of this country for ordinary people. that's breaking on the doorsteps in a big way and people think the tories have now been exposed on it. all right. you all now have newjobs advising the current leaders. jo—anne, seven days to go before the poll. in a few woods, your advice to theresa may? stick to brexit. stick to explaining her vision that we had outside no 10. which was a very persuasive take on conservatism. ok. polly. for mr farron? focus on winnable seats because this election is about all of those different marginals, where i think this yougov
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polling nonsense is not representative of what is really going on. you have to think about that. sam, polling nonsense? i'm sceptical about it as well, to be honest. the big thing is to get out onto the ground, labour is putting tens of thousands of people out, today 50,000 people have signed up already for election day. the key thing is thatjeremy has to keep doing what he's doing, this is about bread and butter issues the people in this country whose life is not getting better and the tories. all right. it's good to see you all. thank you forjoining us. . this is bbc news at five — the headlines. with one week to go before polling day brexit takes centre stage as party leaders attend rallies across britain, canvassing support. president trump is facing mounting pressure from the eu and the world
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as he appears to be pulling america out of the paris climate change agreement. former fbi directorjames comey, fired by the president, is set to testify about the administration ‘s links with russia. and a quick look at the market. a lot of green there. the ftse and the ducks, london and frankfurt both up, and trading in the united states a lwa ys and trading in the united states always looking pretty good —— also looking pretty good. tickets for ariana grande's concert for manchester bombing victims have been sold in less than twenty minutes. the us pop singer will return to the city on sunday to perform at old trafford cricket ground. take that, coldplay and justin bieber will be among the performers. ticket sellers ticketmaster have released a statement saying that they have received more than 10,000 fraudulent requests for free tickets set aside to the people who are at
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the manchester arena last monday when it was attacked. that speak to our correspondent fiona trott. she is outside the old trafford cricket ground in manchesterfor us now. that's right, we've seen online that tickets are being sold for £200 or £400 although genuine sales are expected to raise about £2 million for the people affected by the bomb attack. we heard from the we love manchester emergency fund and they said they will begin to release that money soon. a flat rate payment for people who have been bereaved, and another four people who have been injured. iwant another four people who have been injured. i want to speak to nicole smith, you were at the concert when it happened so you could get a free ticket today, what was your thought process in deciding whether or not to come because a lot of people find that hard. it was definitely a hard
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decision. the crowds was one of my main worries. and i was a bit nervous, thinking about the security but at the same time it is quite comforting. overall, i decided to 90, comforting. overall, i decided to go, because i absolutely love concerts, and i don't want one event to stop me from going and doing what i love. plus i need to pay my respects to those who are injured and killed in the event. how difficult was it for you to get that free ticket? because a lot of people are saying today that it was a difficult process. was it easy for you? i was up quite early pretty much when the e—mail got sent out, but i didn't have any issues, but i do know some friends who had real issueis do know some friends who had real issue is especially with the free tickets as well. and it was many because they went when the general sales were on, i know the website crashed and there were issues that way, yes. you said you wanted to come here on sunday to show your
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respects for people who are affected by the bomb attacks. what do you think when you hear stories of tickets being sold for an elevated price or and scrupulous applications? well i price or and scrupulous applications? welll don't price or and scrupulous applications? well i don't agree with that anyway even when it's just general concerts. but for something where the money is being raised for people who are injured and for a good cause, ijust don't think is a great idea. i think it is morally wrong. nicole, thank you for speaking to us. have a good time on sunday. live from the old trafford cricket ground, back to the studio. thank you, fiona. meanwhile, our religious affairs correspondent, martin bashir, has been speaking to the muslim paediatric trauma and orthopaedic surgeon ibrar majid. he led the medical team on duty at the royal manchester children's hospital, on the night of the attack. viewers may find some of the content of the interview disturbing. as salman abedi walked towards
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manchester ‘s largest arena a member of my jitters manchester ‘s largest arena a member of myjitters medical profession was getting ready for bed. at 11 o'clock i was getting ready to retire for the night and i got a text message from the registrar. it read, there has been a bomb blast at the emmy and arena, we think it's a major incident. doctor majeed is the leading trauma and orthopaedic surgeon at the royal manchester children's hospital. when i arrived the first patient had arrived and the first patient had arrived and the doctors were working to resuscitate that patient. the response was phenomenal. within an hour and response was phenomenal. within an hourand a response was phenomenal. within an hour and a half we had 30 or 40 co nsulta nts, hour and a half we had 30 or 40 consultants, and it surgeons, plastic surgeons. a pop concert attended by large and of children have produced some of the most severely injured patients to ever arrive at his hospital. what we saw was essentially war wounds. all
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wounds, yes. the kind of whimsy woodsy on a battlefield. shrapnel wounds, the shrapnel included things like nuts and bolts and nails —— the kind of wounds you would see on a battlefield. we operated from one in the morning to around eight o'clock. when they had stabilised the children there was a pecking order of what had to be done. life saving surgery had to be done before the limb saving surgery. were their children needed multiple surgeries? yes, and to this day we are continuing to operate on some children and some of them will need surgery is going into next week. did you lose any patience? fortunate that might in theatre we didn't lose any. the clinical challenge for doctor majeed was only compounded by the knowledge that the attacker claimed to be a muslim.” the knowledge that the attacker claimed to be a muslim. i don't understand how someone who professes to have that same faith has such a
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discordant view of life. how do you feel about individuals who claim to be muslims and to this kind of thing. angry that someone would do this to children, in our city. after eight hours of nonstop surgery, he finally went home to his family. what did you tell your wife when you got on? i couldn't really talk to her much. ijust explained, i think the words i used were, it was horrific. and i said i need to rest. and ijust went horrific. and i said i need to rest. and i just went upstairs. horrific. and i said i need to rest. and ijust went upstairs. did you sleep for long? from about two hours. i was woken by my son who had just come back from nursery and i remember giving him the biggest hug i had ever given him, having operated on children or night with life and limb threatening injuries, i cherished any moment with him more than i ever have. has this
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experience made you a better surgeon? i think it has made me a better person. dark night of the medical community but the darkness did not overcome them. martin bashir, bbc news, manchester. time for a look at the weather. tomasz is here. today we've had ten bridges in the mid—20s in london, it felt humid and it will stay pretty warm across south—eastern areas into the cause of tomorrow —— temperatures. but there is a change on the way and we are already feeling it in the north—west, northern ireland, scotland, it's been overcast, rain on and off through the day, that is how it will continue, really, as we go into the evening. you can see where the sunnier weather is across england and wales whereas in the north—west temperatures are in the mid—teams and their outbreaks of
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rain. this weather front is very slow to move east because it is also pulling up north, doing that, it's taking a while before it will reach england so by the early hours of friday morning may be into cornwall, western parts of wales, and throughout scotland as well, many eastern areas it will take time before that weather front goes through, before it fizzles away, across east anglia, we will see across east anglia, we will see across many western areas, by the time we get to saturday and sunday, that fresh air will be right across the country so a mixture of sunshine and showers with temperatures closer to 20 degrees. that's it, enjoy your evening. tonight at six: with a week to go before the election, labour and the conservatives focus on brexit.
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mr corbyn says a tory brexit will lead to a jobs meltdown. mrs may says she offers a future of new opportunities. i am confident that we can fulfil the promise of brexit together and build a britain that is stronger, fairer and even more prosperous than it is today. theresa may says no deal is better than a bad deal. let's be clear, no deal is in fact a bad deal, it is the worst of all deals. we will be looking at how the brexit argument sits in the campaign as a whole. also tonight: donald trump poised to make an announcement that could set back
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