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tv   Newsday  BBC News  June 2, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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world continues today. in singapore the headlines. president trump confirms the united states will withdraw in combating climate change from the paris agreement calling it an unfairdeal from the paris agreement calling it an unfair deal that would cost millions of american jobs. we want fair treatment for our taxpayers, we don't want other leaders and other countries laughing at us any more and they won't be. reaction to the president's decision has been swift. the man who signed the deal on behalf of trump's predecessor calls ita behalf of trump's predecessor calls it a grotesque abdication of responsibility and leadership. in london. police say an attack on a casino in manila could have been a robbery and not a terrorist attack, the gunmen has reportedly been killed. flushing out the system. taiwanese government calls for a major change in the culture. good morning 7am here in singapore,
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midnight in london and seven peerman washington where president trump has announced in the past few hours that he is pulling out the us of the paris climate change deal which united the world in efforts to stop global warming. he said united the world in efforts to stop globalwarming. he said he united the world in efforts to stop global warming. he said he wants to negotiate a new deal which is fairer to the american people. the white house rose garden, the most fragrant of settings for what environmentalists will see as toxic presidential decision. one that affects ecosystems all over the planet from donald trump's back lawn
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to the mightiest of oceans and ice sheets. in order to fulfil my duty to protect america and its citizens, the united states will withdraw... from the paris climate accord. he slammed this global agreement, a legacy of barack obama, claiming it gave china and other countries an unfair competitive advantage and penalised american workers. from the first word to its last, this was an america first address. this agreement is less about the climate and more about other countries gaining a financial advantage over the united states. the rest of the world applauded when we signed the paris agreement, they went wild, they were so happy. for the simple reason that it put our
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country, the united states of america, which we all love, at a very, very big economic disadvantage. at what point does america get demeaned? at what point do they start laughing at us as a country? we want fair treatment for its citizens and we want fair treatment for our taxpayers. we don't want other leaders and other countries laughing at us anymore and they won't be. they won't be. i was elected to represent the citizens of pittsburgh, not paris. for donald trump it is all about the art of the deal. he said he wants to negotiate a better one for america. but he didn't seem that worried if the rest of the world doesn't agree to one. in negotiations to re—enter, either the paris accord, or in really entirely new transactions,
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on terms that are fair to the united states, its businesses, its workers, its people, its taxpayers, so we're getting out but we will start to negotiate and we will see if we can make a deal that's fair and if we can, that's great, and if we can't, that's fine. climate change is an american problem too. visit florida, a floodline, rising sea levels risk turning miami beach into a modern day atlantis. a city submerged by water. even on sunny days it can get water—logged as the tides bring the water up to the doorsteps. further up the coast, the estate here of the president, it is estimated that a quarter of it could be under water in a decade. miami beach is going to disappear.
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no wonder the local residents are alarmed. our so—called president think it is is a chinese hoax. i mean, i can't believe it. i live right in the middle of climate change every day. we are so affected here. how dare the leader of this great country say it doesn't exist! travel to the mist west coal and rust belt, there is a different view. here, the paris agreement is seen as a killer of american jobs but head further west to california, a state that long set the pace on green issues on america, there is a democratic governor who promised to conduct his own climate change negotiations with the president of china. donald trump has gone awol. now it is up to the president of china and for california to work with him and other countries to do whatever we can to off set the negative pathway chosen by president trump. this is a decision of enormous planetary and geopolitical
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significance. critics claiming america has abdicated leadership on the world's biggest problem, that america first, means america alone. nick bryant, bbc news, washington. john kerry took the lead on the paris agreement and he has been giving his reaction to the bbc.” think it was an extraordinary moment of self—destruction by a president of self—destruction by a president of the united states on behalf of the country, it is fake news in the president was not direct and was not true for about the treaty itself,
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rather than putting america first i think he has put america last along with syria and nicaragua, nicaragua wa nted with syria and nicaragua, nicaragua wanted to do more than the agreement did. ithink wanted to do more than the agreement did. i think the president really avoids the reality that this is an agreement in which no other country has required the united states to do anything. this is a voluntary agreements, every country designs its own programme and the president could have simply changed the programme, he had that's right, he didn't have two pull out but he pulled out because he is appealing toa pulled out because he is appealing to a very narrow ideological base at the expense of the real interests of america, american leadership that together with china stood up and tried to lead people to paris, leading to come to an agreement which the world needs to do a lot more on than even paris is required so more on than even paris is required sol more on than even paris is required so i think it is a moment of
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grotesque abdication and fundamental responsibility and leadership, it'll bejudged historically is responsibility and leadership, it'll be judged historically is one of the most self—destructive moves made by president of the united states and i think the truth over the next days will come out. that was john kerry, let's look at other news. authorities in manila say that the police are in control of a hotel which was on lockdown after shots and explosions were heard inside, police and swat teams were heard, police and swat teams were heard, police now say that the attack appears to be a robbery. reports say that the police have killed the gunman. at this popular leisure complex in manila, the guests films the attack from her balcony. complex in manila, the guests films the attack from her balconylj complex in manila, the guests films the attack from her balcony. i can hear gunshots right behind resorts
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world. you can see the smoke and there are gunshots and people are shooting at each other. the target seems shooting at each other. the target seems to do the casino. soon hundreds of people who had been enjoying the night running their lives. heavily armed police are quickly on the scene, not knowing how many gunmen inside the casino or what this attack is about. it isn't long before they announced that the situation is under control but there do seems to have been some casualties. whilst there are no information on that, the manager of the complex has announced that the attack was not the work of a large
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group of gunmen. at the moment we only know of one suspects, the affiliation and the identity is not known. but already police say there is no indication that the shooting was a terrorist incident. they said in instead its mobile robbery. for those caught up in it has been a traumatic night and they are still waiting to hear mr gunmen has caught. also making yesterday the white house says president trump has decided to delay moving from tel aviv to jerusalem in the decided to delay moving from tel aviv tojerusalem in the chances of negotiating a peace deal with israel and palestinians. israel said it is disappointed that spoke of mr trump's commitment to moving the embassy. the former fbi director is
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to testify next thursday before a congressional panel, investigating russian interference in presidential elections. fired last month he is expected to say he came under pressure to drop the fbi's investigation into this then national security adviser michael flynn. a car has exploded in saudi arabia, media sources say that two people in the cold killed and that the vehicle contained ammunition and explosives. the region is largely shia, ina explosives. the region is largely shia, in a mainly sunni saudi arabia, there have been harassed and sporadic violence there for years as activists and protesters clash. take activists and protesters clash. take a look at this. it is the biggest plane that has ever been built. it
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measures about 75 metres from nose to tail. that's huge. it'sjust left its hangar in the my hubby does it for some rigorous testing. the idea is that this huge aircraft will be powerful enough to carry a rocket and even possibly launch satellite and even possibly launch satellite and people into space using just passenger engines. pakistan has rejected allegations on the government is that it was involved ina government is that it was involved in a mass attack in kabul on wednesday in which 90 people were killed. the launch from an attack created a massive crater in the green zone. this man has identified his brothers remained at the morgue.
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there were dozens of bodies will burn sperm recognition, we only found him after searching for days. the blast left a huge plume of smoke. attacks are common in kabul but this is one of the largest ever. abdul rashid worked in office directly opposite the of the blast. 0ur directly opposite the of the blast. our office was three floors, all three floors went down. today construction workers were filling in the huge crater left behind by the blast. this area really is the heart of kabul, this marks the boundary of what is known as the fortified green zonein what is known as the fortified green zone in which most of the foreign
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embassies are located. there are questions of how an attacker could get into this part of the city. security in afghanistan has increased seeing highest civilian casualties last year, no one has claimed responsibility for this attack, the afghan authorities have blamed pakistan militants, pakistan denies this. for those waiting, the focus of their anger was there in government. the government were sleeping, nothing else. their own sons and daughters are in foreign countries and only the poor people they are killing and destroying. no one else. the united states is due to decide on whether to send an extra 3500 troops to afghanistan. you're watching newsday on bbc and
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still to come, bathroom etiquette in taiwan. we will have a major change. details night. welcome back you're watching newsday. and i'm in london. the top stories. president trump has confirmed the united states will withdraw on combating climate change. the police say an attack on a casino in myler there could've been a robbery rather than a terror attack, the gunmen has reportedly been killed. the front pages from around the world now. we start with the japan times which is a parliamentary committee has approved a bill that abdication of emperor
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due to advanced age. it says that the bill has cross—party support and is expected to become law. the south china has said it will work with the european union to uphold the paris climate deal, this was before president trump said he was pulling out of the deal. the terror threat to singapore is at its highest level in recent years. the ministry of home affairs... is also heightened. that brings you up—to—date with all of the papers. two gay male vultures ina of the papers. two gay male vultures in a dutch zoo is proving to be popular and they have effectively become parents after successfully
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hatching an egg. staff gave the griffon vultures and abandoned egg which they cared for in their nest and the sue said the fathers are a devoted couple doing the job perfectly. the asian pacific region is going through rising tensions with north korean missile tests. there will be plenty of torque and they'll all gathering to the annual asian security summit and the james mattis will be among those attending. outlining the trump administration policies. for the latest report is outside the venue at the shangri—la hotel. concerns over the south china seas,
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presumably all of these will dominate the agenda so will be expected progress? as you know from having covered this before there is really no official communique that comes from the two and a half day summits, defends misters from more than 50 countries around the world, the asian pacific region is in the spotlight, he will be giving a key speech and all eyes are on that for any hint as to, that is a big topic of contention because people say there have been a pivot away from asia by the us and so there will be a key speech from the australian prime minister malcolm turnbull, both the us and australia are expecting to urge china to do more of it comes to north korea's nuclear
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threat. in previous years, the shangri—la dialogue has been much about the south china seas. but as a sign of how that appears to be on the back burner if you are, the chinese delegation is not sending high—level officials as it has in yea rs past. high—level officials as it has in years past. that's right and you sort of hinted at it, we are expecting a keynote speech. what is the president of australia going to be saying? he will be underlining the us and australia have a strong relationship and the reason and that isn't a threat, he will also take the opportunity to talk about china's role when it comes to pressuring north korea to contain its nuclear threat. there have been several missile tests. there have
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been rhetoric from beijing that it is not doing enough and needs to step up with this great economic might comes responsibility. very quickly there is this hint of a warning saying the terror threat to singapore, is this something that will be figuring on the minds of many in willett there?|j will be figuring on the minds of many in willett there? i think terrorism as a whole, regional terrorism as a whole, regional terrorism i should say will be on the agenda here and that is no surprise given the recent developments in the philippines but asi developments in the philippines but as i said, whilst it's an opportunity for experts and defence ministers and government officials to talk about coordination, it's unlikely that we will see any regionalframework
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unlikely that we will see any regional framework coming out of this. certainly you can see much of that security very seriously and singapore. we have seen police cars and security officials say so singapore is not taking this lightly at all. taiwan is undergoing a major change, environmental is changing its policy on what people should do with the toilet paper in vietnam. —— taiwan. taiwan high—tech and modern in many ways, except in its bathrooms. flushing toilet paper is something
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thatis flushing toilet paper is something that is common in the modern world but in taiwan it is a big no. there are signs in public bathrooms all over the island edge in people not to flush toilet paper, many offices and households are following this rule. people are supposed to put use toilet paper in trash bins placed inside bathrooms. it creates an unpleasant smell and sides. toilet paper would clog up the pipes. starting july the government wants every body to flush toilet paper, they said that speakers the toilets have become better these days so the paper can dissolve in water and it won't clog pipes. not flushing is unsanitary and can raise the risks of infection so they say it is time time that taiwan caught up with a modern world. but will people be to change this age—old habit? translation i think we shouldn't throw it in the trash bins because i often go
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overseas and people put them in the to i lets. overseas and people put them in the toilets. translation: siren i'm used to throwing it in the trash bin because i've been doing that since i was young. i'm worried if i throw to the toilet it'll clog the drainage system and it'll clog the drainage system and it'll cost our apartment building a lot to fix it. throwing toilet paper into the trash bin is so dirty and smelly. so i'm basically for throwing it in the toilet but in our family there is an agreement, my wife charla and i throw the toilet paper in the toilet but my parents are traditional and continue to throw it in the trash bin. it has created arguments between us. to make everybody complied, trash bins will be removed from many bathrooms. so happy flushing. you learn something new every day. microsoft
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is getting snappier as the tech job willett giant —— tech giant copy some snap chat element in skype. something would toilet papers and before we go, let's take a look at these pictures. it is no ordinary flower, it is an arab lily and it is blamed one major times in 100 years around the world. this is in china but it originated in sumatra, it is nicknamed the corpse flower because when it blames it smells like rotting flesh to attract insects to feed on it. good morning it feels as though it has been a week of extremes, extreme heat, thunderstorms and even brain, as we move towards the weekend, things are
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not as extreme, nevertheless sunny spells and scattered showers. it'll feel noticeably fresher. good news if it is been too hard. the reason being this swell of cloud that arrived during thursday weather front unwanted arrived during thursday weather front u nwa nted moves arrived during thursday weather front unwanted moves through it will introduce slightly fresh air from the west. it brought a change of thursday, in the wes goosen highs of 26. it stays pretty humid into the south but that will push further inland. it will weaken as it moves out of scotland down the peaks and pennines towards the south coast. the band of cloud here at large. somewhat brighter conditions behind and in actual fact it'll be a better day for scotland and northern ireland, particularly in comparison to yesterday, willsie temperature is a little higher. 18 or 19. some sunny spells across northern england and not a bad day through the peaks down into the midlands, over in the wales. ahead of that fun we could
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see 26th 27 the time, that could spark of dramatic hungary downpours and then once the frankly as we will start to feel the benefits, the fresher air moving in. start to feel the benefits, the fresherair moving in. if start to feel the benefits, the fresher air moving in. if it has been too hot and humid you'll be happy with the story. it means overnight, friday to saturday we will see this temperature is around 9-15, at will see this temperature is around 9—15, at a more comfortable the sleeping and better starts this saturday. not a bad start to saturday. not a bad start to saturday and generally speaking, we have this weather front from the atla ntic have this weather front from the atlantic given the chance of more showers to the north and west. starting largely dry, one or two coastal fringes may be that in the sunshine it was still feel pleasant enough, 20—21, tempered as further north at around mid to high teens.
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we will need to keep an eye on that, sunny spells and scattered showers making it feel a bit fresher. gardeners and growers take notes, in the weekend there is a potential to see more heavily organised rain. and now on bbc news it is time for the latest edition of the andrew newell interview. today he talks to the liberal democrat leader tim farron. in just one week, voters will go to the polls in the general election to decide who will represent them in parliament and who'll lead the country. so which of the party leaders has the best plan for the future of the united kingdom? tonight, i'm joined by the leader of the liberal democrats, tim farron. tim farron, this election
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is about electing mps to sit in the british parliament. but you're fighting on a manifesto which advocates uk laws being made in brussels, having no control over immigration policy, and for britain to stay under thejurisdiction of the european court of justice — why? liberal democrats are campaigning, in this election, to trust the people, and we know that people voted to leave the european union lastjune. i grew up with, you know, with people who voted to leave, i completely respect those who did — obviously i hold a different view. the issue now is, how do we move forward? and we know that a deal will be
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negotiated between theresa may and those from brussels, and it's one that we'll have to live with, our children will have to live with for generations. so it seems to me the people should be sovereign, it should not be a deal stitched up by the politicians in brussels and london. instead, it should be a deal that we agree with, as a country, and that's what we're supporting. we think that the people should be trusted with the final deal. but you don't want to trust the british people. you still want uk laws to be made in brussels, you still want no control over immigration policy, and you want the european court to have jurisdiction in britain. how is that trusting the british people?
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