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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  June 2, 2017 5:30am-5:46am BST

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this is bbc world news. the headlines — reports from the philippines say at least 3a bodies have been recovered from a casino in the capital manila hours after it was attacked by a gunman. police and fire officials said most of the victims died of suffocation. president trump is withdrawing the united states from the paris accord on climate change, signed by 195 nations. he called it an unfair agreement that would cost millions of americanjobs. there's been swift international criticism of the withdrawal. in a joint statement, germany, italy and france warned donald trump that the paris agreement could not be renegotiated. the french president, emmanuel macron, said there could be no plan b, because there was no planet b. the white house has asked the us supreme court to reinstate a travel ban on people from six mainly muslim countries. it follows an earlier decision by several lower courts that the ban violated constitutional rights. now it's time for world business report. while president trump walks away
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from the paris climate agreement, europe and china are expected to re—affirm their commitments and expand collaborations. and what effect will brexit have on countries like south africa? we have an exciting report. including some wine. it may be a little bit early for wine in the uk but not everywhere in the world. welcome to world business report. i'm rachel horne. in a minute, we'll enter a parallel universe of augmented reality. but first, president trump has said he will pull the united states out of the paris climate change accord, calling it an unfair agreement that would hamstring the american economy while empowering the worst polluting nations.
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the announcement drew immediate criticism around the world. european leaders said the deal could not be renegotiated. but us coal producers welcomed the decision, while the move drew criticism from other business executives likejeff immelt, the chief executive of ge, who said it would hurt us companies‘ ability to work abroad and inhibit innovation. tesla ceo elon musk and walt disney boss robert iger said they would leave white house advisory councils after trump's move. meanwhile, in a few hours, chinese and eu leaders will issue theirjoint statement on the paris climate agreement. china has already said it will honour its commitments on climate change. with me is james thornton, ceo of clientearth. thank you for coming in. let's start with the point that donald trump made, he believes the agreement is unfair, he believes there are bigger request of america and they need to do more than other countries like china or india and he believes following through with that would
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cost america millions injobs following through with that would cost america millions in jobs and following through with that would cost america millions injobs and in money. what is your reaction? as with so many things mr trump lives in an ultimate reality. what he has done his commit an act of vandalism against the greatest achievement of the 21st century, the paris agreement. it requires only involu nta ry agreement. it requires only involuntary moves on the part of countries. at america's state at the table, it would voluntarily do what most of america wants, 69% of the voters in the united states wanted to stay part of the agreement, the majority of citizens in every one of the 50 states of the us wanted to stay in, and since mr trump announced his move, 30 states have said they will continue their own plans to rip —— reduce climate change summit means most american people and the economy is going to go ahead despite what mr trump is doing. he is going to find out that the american president isn't an emperor and the country will stay
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connected with the world and keep reducing emissions. so you say he could have stayed at the table and decided to reduce the requirements that america had signed up to but if he does decide to go ahead and pull out, what timetable are we discussing? it takes four years under the agreement to leave what will happen in his america, at the federal level, will stall during his presidency right we have to remember that president trump is it temporary blip, he is an unfortunate but temporary phenomena in the united states and america will rejoin. there is no doubt. america doesn't like to be left out of the party, it likes to be a leader, not a pariah. 0ther likes to be a leader, not a pariah. other countries staying in, china and the eu, we are expecting a joint announcement today. what do you think we will hear? china and the eu will lead the world on reducing emissions. i've met with the chinese
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chief negotiator and he is clear that china is reducing emissions for its own benefit. that's true of every country. reducing emissions is for the benefit of the economy and the people in every country and china knows that, the eu knows it. the sad thing is that the deal before the paris agreement was, when 0bama was president, the us and china led the world, the two biggest polluters joining to lead the world and he is leaving the party, the eu is stepping up and it is a good thing for europe but a bad thing for the us. jim, thing for europe but a bad thing for the us. jim, cso thing for europe but a bad thing for the us. jim, ceo of clientearth, thank you. that is a story we will follow for many weeks. in a week's time, the general election in the united kingdom will be over. some analysts say that the current prime minister, theresa may, wants it to be largely about the country leaving the european union. it's almost a year since the british public voted in a referendum for brexit, and there's still a good deal of uncertainty as the start of negotiations looms. but how will all the deal—making in europe affect companies in africa? the bbc‘s karen allen went
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to south africa's western cape to find out more. south africa's western cape seems an ocean away from britain's political woes. tourism is big business here, but so too is trade. so when the brexit negotiations began, —— begin, they will be pushing hard not to get cut adrift. alan is back from a lobbying trip and is upbeat. cut adrift. alan is back from a lobbying trip and is upbeatm cut adrift. alan is back from a lobbying trip and is upbeat. it will be about people than product. it will be much more between the two regions than the rest of the world. soi regions than the rest of the world. so i think that the relevance is that we have to be seen as part of a tea m that we have to be seen as part of a team at the end of the day that is trying to find a deal. but it isn't just about britain. 100,000 germans live here. they are not only consuming the products that remind them of home but they also a running businesses, exporting goods back
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into europe and they are preparing to count the cost of brexit. this is the wine estate owned by third—generation germans. 9.8 billion us dollars worth of south african goods are destined for germany. fair chunk of that is wine. and though far fewer bottles of the good stuff from here find their way into britain, those that do face the prospect of newly negotiated tariffs, possibly on less favourable terms. now with an exit strategy, you then try to go to areas which are easier to ireland would be a market for us which would be easier because they are still in the eu. relationship which has stood the test of time is about to be scrapped once the process of eu withdrawal begins. south africa could be bruised by a bad brexit deal, for what they are hoping for at the very least is a bit of stability.
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now to silicon valley were augmented reality is taking centre stage this week and that is the term given to virtual images in post into the real world. normally viewed through smart glasses or your phone or tablet. we have been checking out some of the most clever ideas and we have found something that will make it easier to help friends when they call you and ask you how to use a gadget. have you ever been to somebody‘s house and being surrounded by gadgets and you have no idea how to use them? there is a new application which uses augmented reality to offer re m ote which uses augmented reality to offer remote help for something like this. it is called chalk. i am able to call up this. it is called chalk. i am able to callupa this. it is called chalk. i am able to call up a friend who knows how to use this copy machine better than i do. he will hopefully be able to help me get a nice brew. dave, how are you? i am trying to make toffee but i don't know how. get closer to
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the control panel. push this button right here. 0k, the control panel. push this button right here. ok, i can see that. 0k. you can see the clever thing is even ifi you can see the clever thing is even if i move around the machine, we still have the instructions overlaid in the same place which means you could be much more precise than if it was just drawn on a normal screen. chalk is made to work on all kinds of devices. digital nowhere, like an hourglass, phones or tablet. it'd be available on fremium basis. you could use some levels for free. once people have to pay, do you think they could go back to using skype or talking on the phone. —— freemium. if they do, we have failed. at the business news now brasch —— other business news now: airbnb has appointed a dedicated boss for china as it tries to make
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a big push into the mainland. the appointment of this local head has been a top priority for the home sharing giant because it faces stiff competition from local rivals who dominate the market. india is looking to expand its clean energy capacity after signing a deal with russia to build two new nuclear reactors at a plant in tamil nadu. they'll be the first of 12 to be designed and built by russia. moscow has agreed to lend india more than $4 billion for construction. now the markets. ben mckay, the first time since 2015 it has been above 20000 and the reason i will skip forward to the us market, it has been following those markets up. record closes, the s&p 5000 and the nasdaq is off the back of positive usjobs figures nasdaq is off the back of positive us jobs figures and we will expect more later today and you can keep in touch with that and me on some of the team on twitter — i'm @bbcrachelhorne. leading surgeons say the number of patients waiting more than six months for treatment in england has
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nearly tripled over four years. the royal college of surgeons has analysed data since march 2013 — a time when targets were being met. nhs england declined to respond directly to the six—month figures. but a spokesperson has said "the nhs has cut the number of patients waiting more than a year for treatment by nearly 13,000 over the past five years". our health editor hugh pym has more. that target the waiting times for routine surgery and treatment in england is 18 weeks. ahead of a nhs england is 18 weeks. ahead of a nhs england says performance would be allowed to sleep because of other urgent health service rarities. but the royal college of service argues this would be an increasing number of patients in during long delays. the college, using nhs england data, says 100,000 people had waited more than 26 weeks for nonurgent
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treatment in march, up 180% on march 2013. a time treatment in march, up 180% on march 20 13. a time when treatment in march, up 180% on march 2013. a time when targets were being hit. the biggest increases we re being hit. the biggest increases were for dermatology, ear, nose and throat and urology. we know that we need to have more facilities for planned surgery, we need to have better planning or planned surgery, and we need to make sure that the pressures on the health service don't interfere with patients who could legitimately expect their surgery could legitimately expect their surgery to be done within 18 weeks of presentation. labour said was increased nhs funding and restore the 18 week treatment target which it says has been abandoned to bring people off the waiting list. the conservatives said they had been a sharp drop in the numbers of people waiting more than one year for treatment and only their plans to grow the economy would support the nhs. scotland, wales and northern ireland have been increases in total is waiting long period for operations although they have different target regimes. this is bbc news.
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the latest headlines: reports from the philippines say at least 36 bodies have been recovered from the casino in the capital manila. hours after it was attacked by gunman. president trump is withdrawing the united states from the paris accord on climate change, fined 198 nations. called it an unfair agreement that would cost millions ofjobs. there has been swift international criticism of the withdrawal in a joint statement, gerry, italy and france warned donald trump the current agreement could not be renegotiated. the white house has asked the us supreme court to reinstate a travel ban on people from six mainly muslim countries. now it is time for our newspaper review. we start online with the asian correspondent website,
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and the incident at a casino in manila which has left at least 3a people dead. police say the incident is not terror—related. america first, climate last — that's the headline on the independent. it's got the news that donald trump will pull the us out of the paris climate agreement, because he wants to renegotiate a better deal for his country. the new york times reports mr trump is considering a change to us policy towards cuba. the paper says he's not made a final decision, but it reports he could reinstate limits on travel and commerce, citing human rights abuses. the gulf news looks at a meeting between russian president vladimir putin and indian prime minister narendra modi. with sanctions against russia in play, the paper says moscow is looking to diversify its political relationships. the guardian has research, partly on the panama papers, showing that on average the richest
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households evade 30% of their taxes. that's compared to 2% with the wider population. finally, battle and power, or love and magic? a leading british physicist quoted in the daily telegraph hits—out at toymaker lego, saying it's gone backwards in terms of gender equality for its toy range. with us is alpesh patel, ceo of praefinium partners. welcome to use. thank you. our first story, the attack on a casino in manila. —— you. it was feared it was a terror related attack, but that is not the case? yes, and the reason we may have thought that, part of the philippines is under martial law because they are fighting islamist

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