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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 2, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast on friday the 2nd ofjune. i'm charlie stayt. the main headline this morning: international condemnation for president trump after he pulls america out of the paris agreement on climate change. theresa may has told the president she's disappointed with his decision, while european leaders said there'd be no renegotiating. we all share the same sponsor ability. make our planet great again. good morning. there arejust
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good morning. there are just six days to go until the general election and we have bought the sofa to scotland's ancient capital, dunfermline. what does the politics mean for the money in our pockets and how does that affect how people vote in six days‘ time? we have come to meet local voters and local businesses to find out what it means for them. matt is also here with the weather. good morning. iam in the grounds of dunfermline abbey finding out what place it plays in the town's history. brighter and fresher conditions on the way and that lasts into the weekend. i will tell you what that means for you in 15 minutes. we are in the historic surgery of dunfermline in the kingdom of fife. let me set the scene will be here
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all morning with the sofa talking to voters and politicians about the issues that matter to them six days ahead of the general election. you will see in the background, lars, a historian. you'll be teaching us about robert the bruce who is buried here. also this was home to charles i. charles i, charles vi, i will explain later. he will take us through the history. we will hopefully guide you through the issues that matter to people here. then is in the batty van. he will be cooking up, i think, sam then is in the batty van. he will be cooking up, ithink, sam lorne sausage cooking up, ithink, sam lorne sausage and sam tattie scorns, later. —— butty van. one of the reasons we are here, over the last three elections glad this constituency has seen a lib dem leadership, a labour leadership and the snp leadership. it is constituencies like this that could
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make such a closely fought election. we'll be talking about migration. we will be talking about scottish independence and we will hear what it is like for everyday folk and what they are like ahead of the general election. also some music. we wa nt general election. also some music. we want to hear what issues matter to you and what we should be talking about. you can get in touch on the website, or you can get in touch with us on twitter and facebook. time for the news from charlie. i will be with you all morning as well. i think the sun will shine. matt will keep us updated as well. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may has expressed her disappointment over president trump's decision to withdraw the united states from the paris climate—change accord. in a phone call with mr trump, the prime minister stressed that britain remains committed to the agreement. our north america correspondent, david willis, has more. he had promised this to the people who voted him into office. nonetheless, it was a momentous
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announcement and one which drew swift condemnation from around the world. as president, i have one obligation, and that obligation is to the american people. president trump believes in a nutshell that the powers accord impedes his ability to restore jobs to parts of the american heartland, blighted by the move away from fossil fuels, such as coal and gas. time, in his view, to put america first. a philosophy summed up in one short phrase. i was elected to represent the citizens of pittsburgh, not paris. pittsburgh's mayor, bill peduto, swiftly responded, saying his city considered the heart of the american steel industry, actually favoured the paris accord. donald trump had previously said global warning was a hoax perpetrated by the chinese.
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he is now saying he'd be willing to renegotiate the paris accord, albeit on terms more favourable to the us, european leaders want nothing to do with that. there is no plan b, said one. france will not give up the fight. i reaffirm that the paris agreement remains irreversible and will be implemented. notjust remains irreversible and will be implemented. not just by remains irreversible and will be implemented. notjust by france, but by all the other nations. those gathered outside the white house to protest president's decision believed the departure of the second largest polluter on the planet will have a dramatic impact on to compact global warning. donald trump believes his decision represents an assertion of american sovereignty whilst his critics believe it is precisely the opposite. let's get some reaction. now our
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political correspondent. it is not that often that a british prime minister is so publicly and directly opposed to a us president. that is right. downing street said president trump called theresa may and that is when she expressed her disappointment at his decision. she said the uk remains committed to paris, which she said was the right framework. there has been criticism from opposition parties that theresa may was not more forceful in her condemnation. labour says, this is a derelict of duty on the part of theresa may not to try to persuade donald trump to think again. they are calling it an act of global generational vandalism. the lib dems are saying if the special relationship means anything, this is exactly the time when theresa may
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should be able to use her influence over president trump to try to persuade him to make a different decision. the government says we are taking a different approach to how we ex press taking a different approach to how we express our opinion. now for the response from china. very publicly, china is on board with this project. what has the reaction been? beijing has not explicitly criticise donald trump yet for pulling out of the paris deal but said, you want to pull out of it, we will stand by europe and other nations and will charge ahead with it. having a look at the newspapers here... same images, very different to the images of donald trump at the nato summit last week. if anyone is under any illusion as to the wider impact of
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this, you can see there could be greater geostrategic changes in terms of china taking on leadership change, alongside europe, britain, australia, other nations and pushing ahead with this climate deal. thank you very much. more on that story throughout the programme. the conservatives have denied their immigration policy is in confusion, after theresa may suggested she wanted net migration to be reduced to under a hundred thousand by 2022. the brexit secretary, david davis, said it was no more than an aim. our political correspondent, gary o'donoghue reports. cutting the overall immigration numbers to the tens of thousands has been conservative policy for seven years. but it's proved incredibly hard to achieve. last year, the population increased due to immigration went up by almost quarter of a million. with around 175,000 of those people coming from outside the eu, the group over which britain already has full control.
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the tens of thousands targeted again in the conservative manifesto. but with no timetable attached. yesterday, a home office minister appeared to put one on it. you are saying tens of thousands in five years' time? over the course of the parliament, yes. so, by 2022, that's a guarantee? eu and non—eu, down to tens of thousands? we want to see migration levels coming down to sustainable levels, which we think is tens of thousands, over the course of the next parliament. those comments were put to theresa may while she was out campaigning. she was asked the question whether the target would be down to tens of thousands in five years, to which she said that's what we're aiming for. but there was a different emphasis from the brexit secretary on question time. are you saying it is tory party policy if you're re—elected as the government next thursday to get it down to 100,000 within the five years of the parliament?
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the aim, yes. we can't promise within five years, that's the thing. downing street has denied there is any confusion or disagreement over the timetable but, even the appearance of a different is not what mrs may needs in her last week of campaigning. campaigning in york, jelly called also the labour government will pump £250 million into industry. vince cable believes both labour and the tories have turned their backs on business and warns trade could drop bya business and warns trade could drop by a third following britain's to force from the eu. the met police say they have so far found no records of any calls to the anti—terrorist hotline in relation to the manchester bomber, despite a number of people saying they had reported concerns over salman abedi's behaviour. it comes as greater manchester police have released new cctv footage, showing abedi in the city in the four days leading up to the attack. detectives say they're now concentrating their investigation on the rusholme area and are appealing for witnesses
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who may have seen him there. more than 30 people are reported to have died at a casino in the philippines, where a gunman opened fire before killing himself. the attacker also set fire to gaming tables. authorities say most of the people who lost their lives died of suffocation. police had feared the attack was terrorist related, but now suggest the motive was robbery. the number of patients waiting from more than six months for routine operations and treatment has tripled. that's according to the royal college of surgeons which analysed data from march 2013 — a time when targets were being met. nhs england declined to respond directly to the six—month figures. but a spokesperson has said "the nhs has cut the number of patients waiting more than a year for treatment by nearly 13,000 over the past five years. the bulgarian linesman who failed to spot diego maradona's infamous
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"hand of god" goal in the 1986 world cup has died. many of you will remember how the argentinan leapt to punch the ball past peter shilton into the net, during the side's two—one win over england. bogdan dochev, who died at the age of 80, said the incident stayed with him, his whole life. he described maradona as a great footballer, but a small man — both in stature and as a person. those are the main stories. with less than a week to go until the general election, our focus is ourfocus is on our focus is on scotland. the art in dunfermline and naga is there for us. it isa
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it is a rather lovely morning. we crossed the forth bridge to see this historic home, the ancient capital of scotland. also, home to goal. st andrew's is just up the road. of scotland. also, home to goal. st andrew's isjust up the road. two men came from here, john reid and robert lockhart. they first took the game to the united states will do you know i was like to play a bit of golf when i'm up there. see, one for each... not bad at all. two years in scotla nd each... not bad at all. two years in scotland was a political landslide. 56 of the 59 seats in westminster we re 56 of the 59 seats in westminster were won by the snp. the conservatives lib dems had one seat each. why are we here in dunfermline in east fife? it is a constituency that has had the snp, the lib dems and the labour party all rain over the last three elections. some
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history as wealth in may have spotted this man dressed as robert the bruce was that this is where he was buried. a history lesson for you as well for people very concerned about what is happening. there are six days to the general election. we have been asking what people feel strongly about. butty van went to edinburgh and that is where we got some views. let's talk about the general election. my concern, and i am sure this is not uncommon, i would rather have a labour government than a conservative government. but i'm not comfortable endorsing mr corbyn as prime minister. i prefer strawberry. i feel like the power is shifting away from the tories. not everyone will fight that. i thinki may
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from the tories. not everyone will fight that. i think i may be orange this time. i prefer their environmental policies to those of the others on offer. and also because i am not convinced that brexit is the right way to go.|j have always been a socialist, a labour supporter, but i am definitely not a jeremy corbyn fan. how are you going to go to? which bit of fruit fits you? the strawberry. even though you are not ajeremy corbyn strawberry. even though you are not a jeremy corbyn found. strawberry. even though you are not a jeremy corbyn foundlj strawberry. even though you are not a jeremy corbyn found. i am not a jeremy corbyn fan but i am even less ofa jeremy corbyn fan but i am even less of a diane abbott fan but i'm going to vote for the party. i am a banana. i kind of believe what they believe in. the snp has faults but they do have a solid voice and they speakfor the they do have a solid voice and they speak for the majority people up here. i am speak for the majority people up here. iam not speak for the majority people up here. i am not all about the independence but supporting scotland and looking after scotland, i think they are the right people.
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and looking after scotland, i think they are the right peoplelj and looking after scotland, i think they are the right people. i would say the straw poll has been fruitful. this is all about what you think as an election. we are joined this is all about what you think as an election. we arejoined by this is all about what you think as an election. we are joined by a this is all about what you think as an election. we arejoined by a host of voters. good morning. let's find out some views. good morning to you from what are you passionate about? independence is a really big issue. how's that influenced your vote at all? have you changed party you might be voting for? are you undecided? i have considered voting labour but i will vote snp. we will talk to the politicians from all the main parties. what is on your mind ahead of the general election?” main parties. what is on your mind ahead of the general election? i am on the same subject but with a different point of view. the prospect of an independent referendum is a big worry. we have had the referendum and made a
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decision. the polls say that people don't want it. i want mrs sturgeon to take it off the table. we will talk a lot more about independence. it isa talk a lot more about independence. it is a big issue in scotland. and the whole idea of the independence vote. what is going on in your mind? any social issue. social collusion isa any social issue. social collusion is a massive issue. anything that affects social cohesion and the impact of brexit on small business. when you say that, you talking about migration? i am talking about everything that influences how well we get along as a group of people. it could be poverty or mental health. any issue that creates social unrest. good morning. what is playing on your mind ahead of the election? the key issues for me are equality and the impact of poverty. lama equality and the impact of poverty. i am a teacher at a local high school. we are seeing every day pupils who are affected by
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government cuts. as teachers, we are having to manage that and tried to re move having to manage that and tried to remove all barriers regarding education. it is a trickyjob. we're up education. it is a trickyjob. we're up for it. others like to see what the other parties can offer to try to help. lots of views to get through, lots of issues to talk about throughout the programme. the weather is important. good morning. certainly, this morning, it is very peaceful. i am in the surroundings of dunfermline abbey, a centrepiece to the city and a centrepiece to scottish history. it is the final resting place of robert the bruce. if we have a look at this latest addition to the abbey, you can see his links to the city are well and truly in place. there are grey skies overhead. a bit
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ofa there are grey skies overhead. a bit of a dull start but things have brightened up. we have fresher weather coming in from the west. still humid in the east. to get from one to the other we need a weather front. that stretches from eastern scotla nd front. that stretches from eastern scotland done through north—west england and wales will do this is where we have rain in the next few hours. it is slowly pushing eastwards. a fine start in western scotla nd eastwards. a fine start in western scotland and northern ireland. the rain will ease over the coming hours full bill be wet for a while across north—west england. the rain pushing across the pennines. not only is it drives start with low cloud and mysterious, it is a humid and murky start. temperatures approaching 20 degrees. it will not last all day long. as we go through to the western half of the country, you can see the rain is starting to pushing. that fragments as it goes eastwards. as it comes into contact with rising
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temperatures in the south and east we could see some nasty thunderstorms. minor risk of flooding. we could see temperatures reach 26—28. much pressure and to the day but pleasant enough in the sunshine. into tonight, we will continue to see a few showers across parts of central and eastern england. the odd rumble of thunder across east anglia and parts of kent. most places will become dry. pressure than the nightjust gone. temperatures down into single figures as you start the weekend. still muddy in the south east corner. full saturday, it looks like some of the driest and brightest weather will be across parts of england and wales. scotland and northern ireland will see frequent showers develop. in between a bit of sunshine around. is it enough when the sunshine is out. temperatures
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are down on recent days, probably high teens at best. same temperatures as we go into sunday. recreate a chance in england and wales seeing a few showers from west to east parts of northern england and north wales will get away with the largely dry day on sunday. showers. in. we move into fresh conditions as we go into the weekend and the start of next week. a reasonable amount of sunshine as well. that is how it is looking. back to you. not too much rain here in durham firm then. when voting in a westminster election you must think about devolution. some of the powers to decide on the issues are down to holyrood. those are the big issues that will affect people's lies. how should devolved issues matter. lorna
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gordon has been to stirling and has been finding out. sterling is a place which is at the heart of the story of scotland and a constituency which reflects the history of scotland's elections too. over the last three decades, people here went from sending a conservative mp to westminster, to favouring labour. then, at the last election, there was a big swing to the snp. so, what issues do the hairdressing students at raploch community campus think that for them in this election are cutting through? education. i've got my son. the working class, like i feel the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. education and the national health service has got to be stepped up. next week's election will be the seventh time scots have gone to the polls in three years. mark, who owns a bike shop believes the question of what you are voting for and when and wheather the issues
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are devolved or reserved, can sometimes prove confusing. it's more complicated certainly than it is in england. in england, basically you've got one centre, here we have two. a lot of people aren't quite sure where the power lies — either at holyrood or westminster. so you've got to know really exactly where everything is before you can make a decision. have you made up your mind about which way you are going to vote in the general election? yes, i have and i shall be voting conservative. i seem to think that it's the party for small businesses, more business generally. so i feel more comfortable with their policies. others here aren't convinced. no, i've never voted conservative. i would find that really hard. my heart has always been more towards the labour side of things anyway. for many in scotland, the choice of independence or the union is now the dividing line. but it's not always as clear—cut as you'd think.
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i think i'm a mass of contradictions because i am actually a member of the snp, but i'm not pro—independence. i'm an instinctive belonger, i want to belong to the uk, europe and the world. yeah, i'm slightly different in that i am pro—europe and i would rather leave the uk to remain in europe. that's more important to me. stirling is not a marginal, the snp has a big majority here. but this is a constituency where the electorate has shown its open to changing its mind and if, and that's a big if, the seat changed hands again, it might indicate yet another shift in scotland's political allegiances is underway. lorna gordon, bbc news, stirling. lorna is with me now. how will
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devolution affects the way that people vote? strictly speaking, it should not. issues like health and education are decided at holyrood was whoever is elected to westminster does not really have a say about how those areas are run on the ground. inevitably these areas are cared about by voters. they influence the way they think. unionist parties in scotland are, to a degree, using this general election to try and attack the snp on its record in government at westminster. the snp, for their part, so there is much to be proud of their record in this area. one issue we were talking about to voters, we spoke to people in edinburgh and all over. migration and brexit. these will play quite highly in peoples lives. there are elements of the argument that play
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in scotland. i think it is more a political argument than one that is uppermost in most voters minds. certainly brexit is an issue. up here, everyone i spoke to in sterling, in that bt, had thoughts on it. the parties are positioning themselves on it as well. the parties had strong views on it. there are the three main unionist parties who are very much opposed to a second independence referendum. they are making it a campaigning issue. particularly the conservatives and snp saying, what we would like, the snp argues, is the second independence referendum on the terms of the brexit deal alone. you can hear them, can't you? it is the dunfermline and district hidebound. dash pipe band. now the
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news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. fresh disruption for travellers on southern rail services has been temporarily halted. a planned overtime ban by drivers on the network has been suspended for two weeks by the aslef union. it's to allow time for talks about the long—running dispute over who should operate the train doors. 70% of people retiring this year in the capital are doing so earlier than expected — that's according to a survey by finance company prudential. people retiring in 2017 may have benefited from generous final salary schemes — which some experts say will only be available to a handful of people in future generations. the sundance film festival opens in
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london today. despite several events and red carpet premieres being cancelled over security fears, following the recent attack in manchester. salma hayek stars in the movie beatriz at dinner, which opens the festival. speaking alongside director miguel arteta, she explained why she wasn't put off from attending the screening here in the capital. first of all, i live here, so i didn't have to take a long flight. second of all, i am super excited for the uk to see this film. i think the sense of humour, it's perfect. for the english. and i think that the subject matters are going to be... they're just going to eat them up, you know? let's have a look at the travel situation now. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. we start today how we ended yesterday, with lots of blue sky and sunshine around and of course still in the warm and humid air, so it is another mild start to the morning. some sunshine around first thing and then we'll see some showers develop a bit later on through the afternoon. some of the showers could turn out to be heavy and even
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thundery, bit of hail to be expected, possibly. we've got a met office weather warning out for some heavy rain. but as with all showers, they will be fairly hit or miss in nature. so lots of sunshine around through the morning, then the sunshine will turn hazy and we start to get some high cloud pushing in from the west and then the showers will start to develop. some places could stay dry for the whole day, but the showers will rattle on where we get get them through the first part of the evening. it's the warm and humid, top temperatures 26 or 27 degrees celsius. through the evening and overnight then, the showers will gradually start to fade away. we start off the day tomorrow again on a very mild note, 15, 16 celsius, but it will be a rather grey start to the weekend. it is going to cheer up, so we start to get some sunshine developing but look at the drop in temperatures. temperatures back down to where they should be at this time of year over the course of the weekend. probably dry on saturday. by sunday, some scattered showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast
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with charlie stayt here in the studio, and naga munchetty is in dunfermline. our focus is ourfocus is on our focus is on scotland and the general election campaign there. we'll be back out there soon, but first a summary of the morning's main news. theresa may is disappointed with donald trump withdrawing america from the paris accord. our political correspondent, leila nathoo, is in westminster for us this morning. we have a phone call made by donald trump to theresa may in what appears to bea trump to theresa may in what appears to be a relatively frank discussion? theresa may told donald trump she was disappointed with his decision and she stressed the uk was committed to remaining signed up to paris and about was the right
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framework. although there was a difference of opinion, there has been some criticism of theresa may that she wasn't more critical of donald trump's decision and didn't try to use what influence she may have over donald trump to try to persuade him to change his mind. labour said it was a dereliction of duty on her behalf and they are causing donald trump's decision an act of global environmental vandalism. they say we have a special relationship and we should be able to tell donald trump like it is. labour say theresa may cannot stand up to donald trump when she said because of the need to stay close to the usa after brexit. but america said they did notjoin up today letter of condemnation. we'll have more on that decision later in the programme. the conservatives have
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denied their immigration policy is in confusion, after a minister played down theresa may's comments on a key target. the prime minister appeared to signal her aim was to reduce net migration to under 100,000 in the next five years. but her brexit secretary david davis sounded a more cautious note, saying it was no more than an aim. the met police say they have so far found no records of any calls to the anti—terrorist hotline in relation to the manchester bomber, despite a number of people saying they had reported concerns over salman abedi's behaviour. it comes as greater manchester police have released new cctv footage, showing abedi in the city in the four days leading up to the attack. detectives say they're now concentrating their investigation on the rusholme area and are appealing for witnesses who may have seen him there. more than 30 people are reported to have died at a casino in the philippines, where a gunman opened fire before killing himself. the attacker also set fire to gaming tables. authorities say most of the people who lost their lives died of suffocation. police had feared the attack was terrorist related, but now suggest the motive was robbery.
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the number of patients waiting more than six months for routine operations and treatment has nearly tripled overfour years in england. that's according to the royal college of surgeons, which analysed data from march 2013, a time when targets were being met. nhs england declined to respond directly to the six—month figures. but a spokesperson has said "the nhs has cut the number of patients waiting more than a year for treatment by nearly 13,000 over the past five years". a ten month old boy has crawled to victory to be crowned lithunia's fastest toddler. the competition, held every year in the capital vilnius, sees babies scramble across a five metre long red carpet, enticed by their relatives. it was touch and go for a while, but here is young mykolas pociunas emerging victorious,
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with his mum waving a box of lego. the question is, where was mike busheu the question is, where was mike bushell when that competition was going on? you should have been there. i love the fact that little girl just there. i love the fact that little girljust sat down halfway there. i love the fact that little girl just sat down halfway through. the winner came storming through. they were trying to entice them at the end with mobile phones and remote controls. but is a sign of the times. we are talking cricket. after an early set back, england's batsmen showed why they are tipped to win their first global, 50—over trophy. joe root made 133 not out against bangladesh in this opening match at the oval, as the bookmakers‘ favourites for the tournament, reached their target of 306 with 16 balls to spare. victory on tuesday against new zealand should secure a place in the semi finals.
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we're not the finished article, we're not a perfect team, but we're definitely striving to get better all the time and you know, it's a really enjoyable team to bat in and to be a part of. so hopefully we can take a lot of confidence from today and move on to cardiff. and england should find out this morning if all—rounder chris woakes will miss the rest of the tournament, after he left the field after two overs yesterday, with a side strain. it was a good day for britain at the french open yesterday, with world number one andy murray, and kyle edmund, both booking places in round three. murray had a tough battle, with the world number 50, martin klizan. he had to fight back after losing the opening set, eventually winning it, in four. he'll face huan martin del potro, next. he's obviously been very unfortunate with injuries through his career and this year, he's had a lot of tough draws as well.
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if you look at the matches he's lost, it's been mainly against the top guys very early on in the tournaments. you know, i think deserves to be ranked higher than what he is, so i'm expecting it to be very, very tough. edmund beat argentine, renzo olivo, in straight sets to progress into round three, in paris for the first time, in his career. he'll be up, against south african kevin anderson next. while good sportsmanship was also flowing in paris. nicolas almagro was almost inconsolable, after he was forced to retire with injury, and so opponent, juan martin del potro, took a moment to console him. a man who knows a thing, or two about injuries. del potro will play andy murray in the next round in a rematch of the 2016 olympic final. it was the goalkeepers who decided the women's champions league in
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cardiff. it went to sudden death penalties. well but paris saint—germain keeper put hers wide, she was then in goal as lyon showed how it was done. they have now done but trouble for two seasons running. —— treble. president trump has been widely condemned by leaders around the world, after announcing the united states is to withdraw from the paris agreement on climate—change. he made the decision despite several appeals from the united nations, arguing he wanted a deal that didn't punish america. as president, i have one obligation and that obligation is to the american people. the paris accord would undermine our economy, hamstring our workers, weaken our sovereignty, impose unacceptable legal risk and put us at a permanent disadvantage to the other countries
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of the world. applause. so we're getting out. but we will start to negotiate and we'll see if we can make a deal that's fair. and if we can, that great. and if we can't, that's fine. kate andrews is a republican supporter based in the uk. shejoins us now from our westminster studio. you could have condensed that speech simply. i was elected to represent pittsburgh and not paris. he said this was about the economy and the money in america? it was a good line, but you could condense it down further because he has been saying
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america first. that is what donald trump is going for, but is who he is appealing to. he did a lot of polling in the state he had his surprise winds, he couldn't have won without wisconsin, michigan, pennsylvania. where those jobs are on the line. independent reports have suggested a few million jobs could be lost due to the paris agreement going from the west to different parts of the world. that will be his perspective and that is the line he's trying to take. the backlash against this has been huge and in many ways, quite rightly. america choosing to pull out of an agreement 195 countries have signed into has taken an isolationist attitude, one we haven't seen for many decades. over role in terms of the worldview, it makes america look weaker. but to not understand where he's coming from and whether voters are coming from is a big mistake because it relates to making changes
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in the future to better protect the environment. to be a fly on the wall in the phone call between donald trump and theresa may. i understand the words i am disappointed, came into it. donald trump doesn't care, this is a bold decision, the always knew that most of the rest of the world, outside of a couple of countries, would say, you have made the wrong call? yes, but coming from britain in particular will go to his heart a bit more. the special relationship is so key, notjust to donald trump, because he needs an ally somewhere, but historically, to have the prime minister say she is disappointed in the president is a tough blow. then the other criticisms from france, germany and italy play in the donald trump's hans. donald trump has said i would like to negotiate a better deal for america in his rhetoric. these countries pushing back and saying, no more negotiations does play into
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his hands and he said it is a bad dealfor his hands and he said it is a bad deal for america. his hands and he said it is a bad dealfor america. i his hands and he said it is a bad deal for america. i am his hands and he said it is a bad dealforamerica. iam not his hands and he said it is a bad dealfor america. i am not fully convinced it is a bad dealfor america, much of the agreement wasn't legally binding and the us did have more room to play than he is letting on. i am disappointed to see him make this move. it is incredibly isolationist when he should be reaching out across the world. on these pittsburgh miners come he kept going back to those people, that he represents, it may bea people, that he represents, it may be a little harder to explain to them this doesn't kick in for four yea rs, them this doesn't kick in for four years, which time he will be a pre—election. the reality of this decision isn't quite as easy as the rhetoric? you are right, during the next election cycle, which is so horrible to think about, this‘ll be a big deal. you can be certain the democrat candidate will be using it
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say we need to get back into this agreement. donald trump will have to convince his voter base he will deliver. it will not happen right away. donald trump likes to get big winds quickly. it will be a sticking point him. thank you very much. we will be talking more about that decision throughout the programme this morning. with less than a week until britain goes to the polls, breakfast is on the road talking to voters across the uk. this morning naga is in dunfermline. the bertie van, going over the forth bridge in scotland. good morning. you caught me practising. this is the home of golf. scotland's ancient capital, this is dunfermline, steeped in history. who better to tell us more than lars cup, historian. you dress up as robert
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the bruce. why is he so important here? he is buried here. this is his last resting place. he wanted to be buried in the last resting place of many of scotland's kings. dunfermline to history is one of the most important places. it is the last resting place of andrew carnegie. why is he important. he was born here and went to america when he was 12. it is a typical lab that when good and became a leading industrialist in america. in america, he is revered because he led the american dream. i do enjoy my history lessons, kings were born here as well? charles the first. his fatherjames the sixth went to
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becomejames fatherjames the sixth went to become james the first. the place is steeped in history. lots of kings and queens buried here as well. and at the cathedral where the weather is being done fun, lots of history? yes, it was founded by saint margaret, she brought the european christianity to scotland when she fled from those horrible people down south. her son, david fled from those horrible people down south. herson, david the fled from those horrible people down south. her son, david the first founded a number of monasteries throughout scotland. that probably being the centrepiece. how warm is it in that costume? it is very warm. let's see how the weather is. dreek.
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anyway, let's get on with where we are at the moment. just been hearing about dunfermline abbey. two sections fused together, the old and then the slightly more modern. just over my shoulder this is the sao paul and the gatehouse of the palace, which stretches all the way back to the 11th century. but to put this into perspective, where we are in relation to the rest of scotland, over my left shoulder you can see the road bridges and the latest one coming on. slightly misty this morning and grey overhead. a weather front clearing away. but it is crucial because it separates the forecast from west to east. some eastern areas are humid at the moment but there is fresh air in the west and that will be moving across all parts during the rest of the day. looking at the wider shot as far as the weather is concerned, the
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weather front stretches across eastern scotland down through western pa rt of eastern scotland down through western part of england and wales, moving slowly eastwards. right conditions already into northern ireland and boston scotland which will see one or two showers during the day. cloudy across eastern scotla nd the day. cloudy across eastern scotland in the rush—hour. but the drizzle becoming more confined to shetland. becoming wet in north—west england, wales. sunniest driest and warmest towards the south. we have sunshine at times across parts of the midlands, east anglia and the south east but it will cloud over and it is here we could see some heavy and maybe thundery showers. potentially tarantula is well across pa rt potentially tarantula is well across part of east anglia and the south east. to the west, one or two showers and where as we can hit 28 degrees in east anglia today, temperatures back down to where they should be, 17 or 18 degrees. the
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fresh air will be slowly trying to push into the south—eastern night but showers around eastern england in particular. maybe the odd heavy and thundery one, east anglia and the likes of kent. but isolated showers elsewhere and temperatures down into single figures away from towns and cities. in the south east corner, we see the driest and brightest whether to start the weekend. one or two isolated showers and the worse. in northern ireland, it showers more frequent, some could be heavy with thunder and hail mixed in. sunny spells in between. gone are the mid to high 20s, all others generally around the mid to high teens, may be low 20s at the best. we continue with those temperatures into sunday. sunday, greater chance of showers across england and wales, particularly the further south you are. there will be some areas of showers altogether. looks like north
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wales, north midlands, it should be a largely dry day. we continue with the fresher team into next week with a mixture of sunshine and showers. that is how you weather is looking into the firth of forth. i think you were supposed to be doing the cooking. i think that is your turn. i wanted a slightly healthier brea kfast. i wanted a slightly healthier breakfast. you are not doing this very well, a lot of smoke. iam very well, a lot of smoke. i am expecting a sandwich after all of this. expect away! we are talking about what it means that the economy here. in six days, people go to the polls. they will be voting in the election. how does it figure when it comes to the economy, how does scotland fit in with the
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rest of the uk and what does it mean for vote rs rest of the uk and what does it mean for voters here? two people can explain, chris and stephanie, good morning. chris, you run an international business, talk me through some of the biggest issues for voters ? through some of the biggest issues for voters? i think currency and brexit has a major impact. we pay a lot of our bills in euros and we have seen a 20% increase on those. we have two members of staff who are european citizens. they are highly skilled people so it has caused some concerns. stephanie, the challenge at the moment is we are feeling the squeeze on incomes. less money in our pockets because prices are rising. no exception, you are feeling it? iwork rising. no exception, you are feeling it? i work 20 hours a week. even with things like child care, half of my wage goes to childcare. at the end of the month, the rises of prizes is making a struggle, even to buy a weekly shop. so it definitely... things like wages,
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living wage and childcare is a big thing and people all over the country like myself. i know you want to go back to university, but there are some things that have devolved to scotland, education is one of them. free tuition fees... how will that figure in your decisions? free tuition fees will be good for me, but what will i do with my son when lam but what will i do with my son when iamat but what will i do with my son when i am at university? free childcare isn't until three years old, my son isn't until three years old, my son is 18 months. how does it work for people like myself? it is quite difficult, free tuition fees, free childcare, big things when it comes to my decision and who i will vote for. brexit is a big issue in this election, how does it play out in scotland? election, how does it play out in scotland ? we saw election, how does it play out in scotland? we saw the results of the referendum and scotland voted remain. do you fill your part of
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europe as an international business? i travel to london every week and inward investment is important and double taxation questions come into play. if it is an independence reference, that comes into the equation. for now, thank you. we will talk more later. what does it mean as faras will talk more later. what does it mean as far as the wider economy is concerned and how can it affect voters here. professor, from the university of stirling, welcome. we have talked about issues and how it might affect how they vote in six days, i want to talk about oil because it is an important part of the scottish economy. we have seen oil prices since the independence referendum nearly halving and that has affected revenues for the scottish economy? it does, it has a substantial effect on the revenues
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on an independent scotland so the taxation and spending would be more difficult. at the moment, it doesn't look like oil price will go up any time soon, for a variety of reasons. it does make the case for independence more difficult. when we look at where scotland figures in the whole uk picture, economic growth is a big problem, because it affects how much people have in their pockets. growth is shrinking, if we get another quarter of economic growth shrinking, we fall into a recession? the scottish economy has grown markedly less slowly down the uk. part of the money the scottish government gets now comes from its own income tax revenues, so that is a worry. clearly, for the last two, three quarters has been falling behind the uk. let's talk about income. we all feeling the squeeze, prices are
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rising, wages are not keeping up and it is an issue as voters go the polls. yes, in many ways, the labour market in scotland is similar to that in the uk, employment is at a high level, unemployment is very low, but incomes aren't much bigger than they were in real terms seven or eight years ago. so that is a big worry, meeting the weekly bills is becoming more and more difficult. picture that is brighter is unemployment. lower than the national average, lower than the uk average. so a healthier picture as far as thejob market average. so a healthier picture as far as the job market is concerned? it is at the margin, it is a bit better. the scottish economy has been better at creating jobs but not creating the productivity that generates the higher incomes in terms of the tax revenues and so on. but is why a lot of people are feeling stretched, even though they are injobs. feeling stretched, even though they are in jobs. for feeling stretched, even though they are injobs. for now, david, thank you very much. how are you getting
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on? isee you very much. how are you getting on? i see a lot of smoke. how do you like your sausage in the morning? chris b. yay! maps, who is in the park behind, we will send him a goodie bag. —— mafi. he did say you wanted brea kfast, —— mafi. he did say you wanted breakfast, now you will never ask for it again. i think you need to get out of the band. you have been talking to people about the economic impact and we will be talking about immigration and the issues here and cohesiveness. and of course the economy and independence. lots of views coming here from scotland. what is it time to do now? get the news, the travel and weather from where ever you are watching us this
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morning. we will see you soon. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. fresh disruption for travellers on southern rail services has been temporarily halted. a planned overtime ban by drivers on the network has been suspended for two weeks by the aslef union. it's to allow time for talks about the long—running dispute over who should operate the train doors. 70% of people retiring this year in the capital are doing so earlier than expected — that's according to a survey by finance company prudential. people retiring in 2017 may have benefited from generous final salary schemes — which some experts say will only be available to a handful of people in future generations. the sundance film festival opens today in london — despite several events and red carpet premieres being cancelled over security fears, following the recent attack in manchester. salma hayek stars in the movie beatriz at dinner, which opens the festival. speaking alongside director miguel arteta, she explained why she wasn't put off from attending
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the screening here in the capital. first of all, i live here, so i didn't have to take a long flight. second of all, i am super excited for the uk to see this film. i think the sense of humour, it's perfect. for the english. and i think that the subject matters are going to be... they're just going to eat them up, you know? let's have a look at the travel situation now. looking at the roads, traffic is queueing on victoria embankment. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning.
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we start today how we ended yesterday, with lots of blue sky and sunshine around and of course still in the warm and humid air, so it is another mild start to the morning. some sunshine around first thing and then we'll see some showers develop a bit later on through the afternoon. some of the showers could turn out to be heavy and even thundery, bit of hail to be expected, possibly. we've got a met office weather warning out for some heavy rain. but as with all showers, they will be fairly hit or miss in nature. so lots of sunshine around through the morning, then the sunshine will turn hazy and we start to get some high cloud pushing in from the west and then the showers will start to develop. some places could stay dry for the whole day, but the showers will rattle on where we get get them through the first part of the evening. it's the warm and humid, top temperatures 26 or 27 degrees celsius. through the evening and overnight then, the showers will gradually start to fade away. we start off the day tomorrow again on a very mild note, 15, 16 celsius, but it will be a rather grey start to the weekend. it is going to cheer up, so we start to get some sunshine developing but look
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at the drop in temperatures. temperatures back down to where they should be at this time of year over the course of the weekend. probably dry on saturday. by sunday, some scattered showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello. this is breakfast on friday the 2nd ofjune. i'm charlie stayt. the main headline this morning: international condemnation for president trump after he pulls america out of the paris agreement
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on climate change. we will see if we can make a deal that's barefoot if we can, that's grateful to if we cannot, that's fine. theresa may has told the president she's disappointed with his decision, while european leaders said there'd be no renegotiation. we all share the same responsibility. make our planet great again. good morning. there are six days to go until you cast your vote in the general election. we have brought
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ourselves to dunfermline. what does the politics mean for many in our pockets and what does it mean for voters here? i thought the butty van to find out what could affect the vote in six days' time. matt is also here with us. he has the weather. good morning. iam in the here with us. he has the weather. good morning. i am in the grounds of the abbey and the powerless. find out what role it plays in scottish history. the weather is rather grave. we have bright and fresh weather in for the weekend. the full forecast details in the next 15 minutes. see you then. we are in the historic town of dunfermline, steeped in history. also a constituency that has seen lib dem, labourand also a constituency that has seen lib dem, labour and snp leadership. it is constituencies like this that
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make the general election so close and could be very crucial when votes are part —— cast in six days. we are talking about migration, independents and brexit. tenancy issues that matter to you. —— tell us issues that matter to you. —— tell us the issues. get in touch via twitter and on social media. we are getting their history. we have robert bruce over there to tell us the history of this place and getting views on what election issues matter most to you. now for the news from charlie. first, our main story. theresa may has expressed her disappointment over president trump's decision to withdraw the united states from the paris climate—change accord. in a phone call with mr trump, the prime minister stressed that britain remains committed to the agreement. our north america correspondent, david willis, has more. he had promised this to the people who voted him into office. nonetheless, it was a momentous announcement and one
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which drew swift condemnation from around the world. as president, i have one obligation, and that obligation is to the american people. president trump believes in a nutshell that the paris accord impedes his ability to restore jobs to parts of the american heartland, blighted by the move away from fossil fuels, such as coal and gas. time, in his view, to put america first. a philosophy summed up in one short phrase. i was elected to represent the citizens of pittsburgh, not paris. pittsburgh's mayor, bill peduto, swiftly responded, saying his city considered the heart of the american steel industry, actually favoured the paris accord. donald trump had previously said global warning was a hoax perpetrated by the chinese. he is now saying he'd be willing to renegotiate the paris accord,
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albeit on terms more favourable to the us, european leaders want nothing to do with that. there is no plan b, said one. france will not give up the fight. i reaffirm that the paris agreement remains irreversible and will be implemented. not just by france, but by all the other nations. those gathered outside the white house to protest president's decision believed the departure of the second largest polluter on the planet will have a dramatic impact on efforts to combat global warning. donald trump believes his decision represents an assertion of american sovereignty whilst his critics believe it is precisely the opposite. let's get some reaction. now our political correspondent.
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what we know now is there was a phone call late last night. what has been said about the call? downing street said theresa may told donald trump she was disappointed with the decision. she's said she believed that paris was the right framework and the uk would continue to sign up to it. there has beenjoint condemnation from france, germany and italy. all signed a letter condemning donald trump for the decision. there has been criticism of theresa may not signing up to it. all being forceful of their criticism and not trying to influence him to persuade him to try to think again. labour said it was a dereliction of her duty and called donald trump's actions and act of global generational vandalism.
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saying this is time that the special relationship should matter. we should be able to tell president trump to use our influence to try to persuade him to change our mind. the conservatives are very clear they are taking a different approach. china was mentioned many times. it has recently been reaffirming its commitment through the accord. beijing has explicitly criticise donald trump for pulling the united states at the paris agreement that it is saying when you want out but we will stand by europe and other nations push ahead on climate measures. it is interesting, china's number to leader will meet senior figures from the eu and sign a statement reaffirming their
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commitment to the paris measures. have a look at the local newspapers. here is angela merkel. here is an english language daily with the same sort of images. what a contrast to donald trump at the nato summit recently! they'll be geopolitical ramifications well beyond climate change in terms of the us pulling out of the paris deal. they could see china getting a leg up on the world stage in terms of becoming something of a leader in terms of tackling climate change. the conservatives have denied their immigration policy is in confusion, after theresa may suggested she wanted net migration to be reduced to under a hundred thousand by 2022. the brexit secretary, david davis, said it was no more than an aim. our political correspondent, gary o'donoghue reports. cutting the overall immigration numbers to the tens of thousands has been conservative policy for seven years.
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but it's proved incredibly hard to achieve. last year, the population increase due to immigration went up by almost quarter of a million. with around 175,000 of those people coming from outside the eu, the group over which britain already has full control. the tens of thousands target is again in the conservative manifesto. but with no timetable attached. yesterday, a home office minister appeared to put one on it. you are saying tens of thousands in five years' time? over the course of the parliament, yes. so, by 2022, that's a guarantee? eu and non—eu, down to tens of thousands? we want to see migration levels coming down to sustainable levels, which we think is tens of thousands, over the course of the next parliament. those comments were put to theresa may while she was out campaigning. she was asked the question whether the target would be down to tens of thousands in five years, to which she said that's what we're aiming for. but there was a different emphasis from the brexit secretary on question time.
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are you saying it is tory party policy if you're re—elected as the government next thursday to get it down to 100,000 within the five years of the parliament? the aim, yes. we can't promise within five years, that's the thing. downing street has denied there is any confusion or disagreement over the timetable but, even the appearance of a different is not what mrs may needs in her last week of campaigning. elsewhere in the campaign, labour is promising to create a million newjobs, while the liberal dems are warning of economic uncertainty post brexit. jeremy corbyn will say today that a labour government would pump £250 million into industry through a new national investment bank. but the former lib dem business secretary, sir vince cable, believes both labour and the tories have turned their backs on business, and will warn trade could drop by a third following britain's divorce from the eu. the met police say they have so far found no records of any calls
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to the anti—terrorist hotline in relation to the manchester bomber, despite a number of people saying they had reported concerns over salman abedi's behaviour. it comes as greater manchester police have released new cctv footage, showing abedi in the city in the four days leading up to the attack. detectives say they're now concentrating their investigation on the rusholme area and are appealing for witnesses who may have seen him there. more than 30 people are reported to have died at a casino in the philippines, where a gunman opened fire before killing himself. the attacker also set fire to gaming tables. authorities say most of the people who lost their lives died of suffocation. police had feared the attack was terrorist related, but now suggest the motive was robbery. leading surgeons say the number of patients waiting more than six months for treatment in england has nearly tripled over four years. the royal college of surgeons has analysed data since march 2013 — a time when targets were being met. our health editor hugh pym has more.
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the target for waiting times for routine surgery and treatment in england is 18 weeks. the head of nhs england, simon stephens recently said that performance would be allowed to slip because of other urgent health service priorities. the royal college of surgeons argue this will mean increasing numbers of patients enduring long delays. the college, using nhs england data, says around 126,000 people had waited more than 26 weeks for non—urgent treatment in march, up 180% on march 2013, a time when targets were being hit. the biggest increases were for dermatology, ear, nose and throat and urology patients. we know we need to have more facilities for planned surgery. we need to have better planning for planned surgery and we need to make sure that the pressures on the health service don't interfere with patients who could legitimately
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expect their surgery to be done within 18 weeks of presentation. labour said it would increase nhs funding and restore the 18 week treatment target, which it says has been abandoned, to bring people of the waiting list. the conservatives said there had been a sharp drop in the number of patients waiting more than a year for treatment, and only their plans to grow the economy would support the nhs. scotland, wales and northern ireland have seen increases in totals waiting long periods for operations, so they have different target regimes. nhs england said the number of patients waiting more than a year for treatment has fallen over the past five years. the bulgarian linesman who failed to spot diego maradona's infamous "hand of god" goal in the 1986 world cup has died. many of you will remember how the argentinan leapt to punch the ball past peter shilton into the net, during the side's win over england. bogdan dochev, who died at the age of 80, said the incident stayed with him,
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his whole life. he described maradona as a great footballer, but a small man — both in stature and as a person. it's less than a week until we go to the polls for the general election. so — as you can see behind me — breakfast has been back on the road. sampling in opinion and talking to people about what are the big issues. naga's in dunfermline. you know when we go through the papers and sometimes we get a little bit scrunched up because it is all awkward when we are holding them? remember that? this is the answer. i have the dunfermline and district pipe band with me. you had earlier and we'll hear from them again for the let's take a look at the papers.
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the guardian is taking a look at the lead story that united states and donald trump has rejected the climate change called. the president is claiming american jobs are climate change called. the president is claiming americanjobs are being put at risk by the paris deal to curb emissions and the news that nigel farage is a person of interest as the fbi is an amateur —— examining russian links to donald trump. labour wanting to use the snp to form a minority government in the event of a hung parliament. a picture that of donald trump on the front page. the scotsman is taking a look for is that there is a picture ofjeremy corbyn and theresa may, saint theresa may is coming for a fresh message as the polls on the harrowing. —— saying theresa may. also looking at the popularity of nicola sturgeon at the moment.
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saying she is in denial about the decision for wanting a second independence referendum causing the decline in her popularity. good morning. on the front page of the daily mirror, remember those tickets went on sale for the tribute concert after the author events in manchester. saying people have been lying about being at the original ariana grande concert and claiming free tickets. thank you for helping out with the papers. with me are john and pat. musician and campaigner for scottish independence. you are forgiven for a slight stumble. what do you think is
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the biggest issue question we're talking about independence was debilitating a look at the fall in popularity of nicola sturgeon. also the timing of another referendum being behind the fall in her popularity. how much is independence is playing into people's minds?m is playing into people's minds?m isa is playing into people's minds?m is a perverse election when nicola sturgeon has said she does not want to talk about independence. it is always the other party leaders who talk about it. that has had an interesting effect. the focus of the election, especially with regard to question time and debates, they focus on health and education. nicola sturgeon very effective as a politician has been in power for ten years. that legacy, the weight of that government and the weather stays is beginning to have a drag on her ratings. down 18 points. the
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real paradox for the snp is to show how well they govern. there is a limit on the amount of things they can do any amount of resources they have control over. what is interesting is whether there ann anti—politics vote going around up and down the country with people fed up and down the country with people fed up with the political classes. the way that is panning out in scotland, no more firsts and no more referenda. which party will benefit? it is an interesting spread. the tories will benefit, i think. ruth davidson has completely targeted her campaign to deal with the anti—political settlement. we are all exhausted with politics at the moment. how that is being expressed is not another referendum where we have to have arguments. as someone who supports independence, i would quite like those energies to be stoked up again. it might require a
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period of calm stop there are general issues here about disillusionment with politics and exhaustion with politics. it is true that the tories have very much presented themselves like that. labour has also got into that game. kezia dugdale is riding forward. there is a problem. she is running away from to recent me's manifesto. she repudiates fox hunting. she tries to carve off the winter fuel allowa nce tries to carve off the winter fuel allowance to be different for scotland are not to have the cut. allowance to be different for scotland are not to have the cutm seems to me, amongst labour and conservatives, about how the leader in westminster in london is reflected in the influence they are having in scotland as well. whether or not there should be some detachment from the messages coming from the party from westminster.m
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that fair? it is funny. on the side of independence, the centre—left, when you look at some might corbyn and think, that guy probably expresses about 80%. the 20% he does not express is to do with trident. they're not very enthusiastic about constitutional reform. there are a lot of people on the yes side in scotland wondering what will happen with the election. if it is a hung parliament and there is a progressive majority emerging, it could be an interesting number of years. if corbyn wants to get rid of trident and reform over the house of lords, his power over snp is where it has side. with regard to the progressive alliance, it depends on the idea of a confident of vote with the idea of a confident of vote with the snp. it is spending all of its
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time to campaign to leave that arrangement. that does not give you arrangement. that does not give you a stable government. it could be an u nsta ble a stable government. it could be an unstable proposition. when you look what happened with callaghan, it would be even more when the snp walked out. go forward to the 20 20s. walked out. go forward to the 20 205. it walked out. go forward to the 20 20s. it is not in the interests of scotland, it is not in a good state and we want to be in a good state. it stays to go to vote and the passion is rising. thank you so much real time. just behind me, the two—minute walk away is dunfermline abbey. matters inside the abbey, ready to give us the weather for today. good morning. —— matt is inside. this stunning romanesque architecture inside. the abbey was
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established by queen margaret. behind the doors at the back is somewhere near where robert the bruce was buried. here edward i of england held court in the 14th century. when he left a lot was burned to the ground. i am sheltered away from the weather. not too bad across dunfermline this morning. rain overnight clearing its way towards the east. the brain is the dividing line between humid air across eastern parts of the uk this morning and fresh air moving in from the west. taking a look at the uk scene for the breakfast period that you can see the line of rain extending through the east of scotla nd extending through the east of scotland through parts of england and wales. into the fresh air already in northern ireland and western scotland, fairly cloudy and the odd spot of rain. wet across northern england, parts of wales and the south—west. the rain steadily
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pushing eastwards. in parts of southern and eastern england, this is where not only there is a humid start but also some of the brightest conditions to begin the day. temperatures were ready approaching 19,20. temperatures were ready approaching 19, 20. the rain band fragments into clusters of showers. there is very humid air in east anglia and the south east and there could be intense thunderstorms. the small risk of flash flooding and light showers. note the temperatures this afternoon. a big contrast. 26—28 potentially across south—east england and east anglia. through tonight, the humid air madejust about hold on across east anglia and the south east. still some showers to come. further west, some isolated showers. lots of dry and brighter weather but it will fill cooler going into the start of the weekend. temperatures in rural figures
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going into the start of the weekend. temperatures in ruralfigures down to single figures. overnight, the cloud should then an break. across good parts of england and wales saturday's looking dry with sunshine. one or to isolated showers. it will feel fresher than recent days. sunshine in scotland and northern ireland will be interrupted by some showers. some of those could be heavy and thundery. temperatures still in the late to high teens. the mid to high teens. those temperatures go into sunday. the greatest risk of showers in scotla nd the greatest risk of showers in scotland and northern ireland. a few more showers in england and wales compared with saturday. stick with the sunshine and temperatures after what has been into the 20s over the past few days, hovering around the mid to high teens for many. that is how it is looking in the surroundings of dunfermline abbey. we are here in dunfermline, the
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ancient capital of scotland. you can see breakfast is beautifully delayed out on the table. i am with our voters. a few minutes ago we were talking about the issue of independence. it has been three yea rs independence. it has been three years since we had the independence referendum. there is still talk about whether another referendum should be held. rachel has her exam later this afternoon to saubers is commitment. this is an interest in politics. you are too young to vote last time around. you are interested in independence. i definitely think it is the only way that scotland can control their own country. last time, there were 56 mps and we still can't get listened to. they will either be outvoted by the labour government, the conservative government. you can't win either way. have you decided how you're going to vote? are you happy to say?
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i will be voting snp. we spoke to alan earlier. you previously voted snp, strongly in favour of scotland staying part of the uk. you have changed your mind. i have changed my mind. ivoted changed your mind. i have changed my mind. i voted for them because changed your mind. i have changed my mind. ivoted for them because i thought they would be a competent government. now we have seen how incompetent they are. the other reason for voting for independence, not me but others, is because they wa nt not me but others, is because they want to be free. the opinion polls continue say the majority don't want independence. i would like that to be respected. do you know how you are voting? absolutely. i'm going to vote conservative. stefanie... you area vote conservative. stefanie... you are a mum. you have a baby boy. you intend to go back to university next year. give me some background. you wa nt year. give me some background. you want your little boy to grow up in
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an independent scotland. want your little boy to grow up in an independent scotlandlj want your little boy to grow up in an independent scotland. i feel it is the only way we can control our own country and take back... have our own legislation. i know a lot of issues are devolved. in brexit, scotla nd issues are devolved. in brexit, scotland voted overwhelmingly to stay in the new. how is that fair that we are being taken out of the eu?! that we are being taken out of the eu? i think scotland would benefit from having their own legislation, taking over their own control and access to the single market as well. jonathan, a restaurant and used to work in the oil industry. very much mindful of business and economy first of you think scotland would be better off in the uk. scotland would better off in the uk. scotland would be better off in the uk. it does serve to have its independence. it needs to put a plan together we can see and view and agree with. we do not want to be a country on its own which is highly taxed against
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everyone else in europe. i am on the fence at the moment with two parties. i am fence at the moment with two parties. lam not fence at the moment with two parties. i am not sure which way i will go at the moment stop you saw the dunfermline and district pipe band earlier. they were helping me with the papers. they are back to doing what they are really good at. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. fresh disruption for travellers on southern rail services has been temporarily halted. a planned overtime ban by drivers on the network has been suspended for two weeks by the aslef union. it's to allow time for talks about the long—running dispute over who should operate the train doors. 70% of people retiring this year
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in the capital are doing so earlier than expected — that's according to a survey by finance company prudential. people retiring in 2017 may have benefited from generous final salary schemes — which some experts say will only be available to a handful of people in future generations. the sundance film festival opens today in london — despite several events and red carpet premieres being cancelled over security fears, following the recent attack in manchester. salma hayek stars in the movie beatriz at dinner, which opens the festival. speaking alongside director miguel arteta, she explained why she wasn't put off from attending the screening here in the capital. first of all, i live here, so i didn't have to take a long flight. second of all, i am super excited for the uk to see this film. i think the sense of humour, it's perfect. for the english. and i think that the subject matters are going to be...
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they're just going to eat them up, you know? let's have a look at the travel situation now. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. we start today how we ended yesterday, with lots of blue sky and sunshine around and of course still in the warm and humid air, so it is another mild start to the morning. some sunshine around first thing and then we'll see some showers develop a bit later on through the afternoon. some of the showers could turn out to be heavy and even thundery, bit of hail to be expected, possibly. we've got a met office weather
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warning out for some heavy rain. but as with all showers, they will be fairly hit or miss in nature. so lots of sunshine around through the morning, then the sunshine will turn hazy and we start to get some high cloud pushing in from the west and then the showers will start to develop. some places could stay dry for the whole day, but the showers will rattle on where we get get them through the first part of the evening. it's still warm and humid, top temperatures 26 or 27 degrees celsius. through the evening and overnight then, the showers will gradually start to fade away. we start off the day tomorrow again on a very mild note, 15, 16 celsius, but it will be a rather grey start to the weekend. it is going to cheer up, so we start to get some sunshine developing but look at the drop in temperatures. temperatures back down to where they should be at this time of year over the course of the weekend. probably dry on saturday. by sunday, some scattered showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. in your
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hello, this is breakfast in your with charlie stayt here in the studio and naga munchetty is in dunfermline. we'll be back out there soon, but first a summary of the morning's main news. theresa may has expressed her disappointment over president trump's decision to withdraw the united states from the paris climate change accord. mr trump said the deal disadvantaged the us and threatened american jobs. world leaders have reacted with dismay to the move, with chinese and eu leaders meeting in brussels to make a joint statement on the issue later today. the conservatives have denied their immigration policy is in confusion, after a minister played down theresa may's comments on a key target. the prime minister appeared to signal her aim was to reduce net migration to under 100,000 in the next five years. but her brexit secretary david davis sounded a more cautious note,
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saying it was no more than an aim. the met police say they have so far found no records of any calls to the anti—terrorist hotline in relation to the manchester bomber, despite a number of people saying they had reported concerns over salman abedi's behaviour. it comes as greater manchester police have released new cctv footage, showing abedi in the city in the four days leading up to the attack. detectives say they're now concentrating their investigation on the rusholme area and are appealing for witnesses who may have seen him there. more than 30 people are reported to have died at a casino in the philippines, where a gunman opened fire before killing himself. the attacker also set fire to gaming tables. authorities say most of the people who lost their lives died of suffocation. police had feared the attack was terrorist related, but now suggest the motive was robbery. the number of patients waiting more than six months for routine operations and treatment has nearly tripled overfour years in england.
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that's according to the royal college of surgeons, which analysed data from march 2013, a time when targets were being met. nhs england declined to respond directly to the six—month figures. but a spokesperson has said "the nhs has cut the number of patients waiting more than a year for treatment by nearly 13,000 over the past five years". our concern is that it is extremely difficult to bring these waiting a ten month old boy has crawled to victory to be crowned lithunia's fastest toddler. the competition, held every year in the capital vilnius, sees babies scramble across a five metre long red carpet, enticed by their relatives. mike bushell is doing the commentary. there is a sprint on. they have stopped half way along. from nowhere, he comes through to ta ke from nowhere, he comes through to take it by ahead. there we go, he was very slow off the line. great
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rates. did you see in the pictures, some of the parents were lowering their toddlers with remote controls and mobile phones. sign of the times! toddler knows how to use our control? probably do. what is going on, mike. we are talking cricket now. england are among the favourites to win. after an early setback... after an early set back, england's batsmen showed why they are tipped to win their first global, 50—over trophy. joe root made 133 not out against bangladesh in this opening match at the oval, as the bookmakers‘ favourites for the tournament, reached their target of 306 with 16 balls to spare. victory on tuesday against new zealand should secure a place in the semi finals. we're not the finished article, we're not a perfect team, but we're definitely striving to get better all the time and you know, it's a really enjoyable team to bat
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in and to be a part of. so hopefully we can take a lot of confidence from today and move on to cardiff. and england should find out this morning if all—rounder chris woakes will miss the rest of the tournament, after he left the field after two overs yesterday, with a side strain. it was a good day for britain at the french open yesterday, with world number one andy murray, and kyle edmund, both booking places in round three. murray had a tough battle, with the world number 50, martin klizan. he had to fight back after losing the opening set, eventually winning it, in four. he'll face huan martin del potro, next. he's obviously been very unfortunate with injuries through his career and this year, he's had a lot of tough draws as well. if you look at the matches he's lost, it's been mainly against the top guys very early on in the tournaments. you know, i think deserves to be ranked higher than what he is, so i'm expecting it to be very, very tough. edmund beat argentine,
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renzo olivo, in straight sets to progress into round three, in paris for the first time, in his career. he'll be up, against south african kevin anderson next. while good sportsmanship was also flowing in paris. nicolas almagro was almost inconsolable, after he was forced to retire with injury, and so opponent, juan martin del potro, took a moment to console him. a man who knows a thing, or two about injuries. del potro will play andy murray in the next round in a rematch of the 2016 olympic final. it was the goalkeepers who decided, the women's champions league final in cardiff. after a goalless two hours, it went to sudden death penalties, and while paris saint—germain keeper put hers wide, her despair was compounded when lyon counterpart sarah bouhaddi, showed how it's done. so lyon's european dominance continues. they lifted the trophy
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for the second year in a row, and with it, have completed a double treble, for the second season running. you do feel for the paris keeping the end. lots of motion in your bulletins lately. it is the time of year when season is coming to an end. we will talk to you later on. theresa may has informed donald trump of her disappointment after the president announced he would be withdrawing the united states from the paris climate—change accord. under the agreement, countries pledged to cut carbon dioxide emissions. the aim — to limit the rise in average global temperature to two degrees by the year 2,100. with the promise of $100 billion a year to help poorer countries meet their targets. america willjoin nicaragua and syria as being the only countries not to sign up to the paris deal. defiant reaction came in thick and fast from leaders across europe
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and around the world, following president trump's announcement. this is what the french president, emmanuel macron, had to say. i can assure you, france will not give up the fight. i reaffirm clearly, that the paris agreement remains irreversible and will be implemented. not just by france, but by all the other nations. because where ever we live, where ever we are, we all share the same responsibility. make our planet great again. richard black is the director of the energy and climate change intelligence unit here in the uk. iimagine, you i imagine, you were watching last night, your initial reaction? combined a lot of emotion with quite a few numbers. it was going back to an america built on coal and steel
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with real men in hard hats doing realjobs. they spoke of massive economic losses and massive job losses in the future. basically he was saying we need to pull out of this agreement in order to rebuild those industries such as coal and steel on which america became great. the world has moved on. the number of people employed in coal mines in america has halved in 20 years. that wasn't because of the paris climate agreement, it is because better things came along like natural gas, renewable energy and ways of stopping wasting so much energy, which are betterfor stopping wasting so much energy, which are better for society. help me with a couple of thoughts. i heard from quite a few experts in this field, in some ways, his decision won't make much difference, meant has changed and so many countries are signed up, symbolically hugely important, but in practice, maybe not so much.
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symbolically hugely important, but in practice, maybe not so muchlj think it is right. in a large part, agreements like the paris agreement reflect what a lot of countries are doing anyway and what they see as their national interests. even before the paris agreement was signed, china revealed massive plans for renewable energy, india are following suit. they have intensified their pledges and commitments, particularly with regard to closing coal fired power stations. there is no reason for those countries to change course. the balance of world power is shifting towards asia. asia has half of the world's population already. that is driving things forward. in europe we have seen incredible su ccesses europe we have seen incredible successes through cutting climate change. in the uk, per capita of wealth is growing by 45% in the 25 yea rs wealth is growing by 45% in the 25 years since the rio earth summit started this. the real—world evidence is controlling carbon
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emissions and getting richer, do go hand in hand. some states in america, california leading discharge, they say we will do what we wa nt discharge, they say we will do what we want to do anyway. in a way, what president trump has decided for the nation will not change the way we operate. california's output is like the fifth largest in the world. can they carry on and the effect be almost as if america hasn't pulled out? there was a new alliance launched straightaway between the governors of california, washington and new york and they count for 20% of us carbon emissions. california has ambitious targets, half of renewable sources by 2030, doubling the rate at which stop wasting energy. they want to change motoring to electric vehicles. they can do it, the only thing that might stop them is if the white house decides
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to impose new regulations that have an impact nation wide. if they tried to block the states. but we know how lawyers in court would react to that. we will see, richard. thank you for your time. by this time next week, we're likely to know the result of the general election. so, with just days left until the polls open, breakfast has been hitting the road and talking to voters about the issues that matter to them. naga is in dunfermline for us this morning, discussing everything from immigration to independence. good morning to you, naga. good morning, it is breakfast time and we are feeding our voters this morning. is it good? excellent. one of the issues we are talking about and an issues we are talking about and an issue that is quite important is migration. thinking attitudes perhaps could be different here,
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compared to the rest of the uk. graham satchel will explain why. he went west of here, about 30 miles away to take a look to see how voters are thinking about migration. the people who make glasgow today come from all over the world. can i ask you where you come from? poland. what do you think of glasgow? i like glasgow, i've been living here for overfour years. glasgow styles itself as a friendly, welcoming city, but like the rest of the uk, it's seen record levels of immigration in the last decade and for some, it's too much. there's an awful lot of asylum seekers coming in. i have to admit. i think every country has to curtail the amount of people that are coming in. the standard of this area has gone rapidly downhill. as immigration goes, economically, i don't know but for living here, you know, the standards have gone right downhill. 0k. that kind of concern about immigration is probably,
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in the end, the main reason that england and wales voted for brexit. but scotland voted to remain. immigration here is a much more subtle, complicated nuance issue than it is in the rest of the uk. after world war ii, but until around 2000, scotland was a mass exporter of people. we have more deaths than births in scotland, the only way the labour force is growing and has been growing over the last 15, 20 years is through the cause of net migration. this is the maryhill integration network and help session for newly arrived refugees in glasgow. the scottish government has actively encouraged immigration, to support population growth. so, 40% of the syrians who come to the uk, for example, have been settled in scotland. scotland needs more people here and syrian people, as you know, they are very active and they can do something
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here in this country. this man has been here forfour years. the syrians can help the scottish people? they can work together. we can. many of them have skills and they can do something here. the food that we cook here is punjabi food, totally authentic. this man runs one of the biggest curry houses in scotland and wants to expand. but he says, brexit and you tighter immigration rules and new tighter immigration rules from westminster are already threatening his business. it's now nearly impossible to recruit indian chefs from abroad. basically, what we are seeing is, to the rest of the world, we are closed for business. you are not welcome here. and i think that is commercial suicide. can migration be managed to suit the needs of business on one side and the worries many have about social cohesion? getting the balance right will be a challenge, whoever winds
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whoever wins the election next week. graham satchell, bbc news, glasgow. we are around 30 miles from the home of golf, st andrews. so i couldn't resist. the gold bowls, representing all different parties. wonderful morning, we are getting views from voters and we will be speaking to politicians later on. now the weather. we are in the grounds of dunfermline abbey, now we have robert the bruce himself. good morning. thanks for
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joining us. amazing getup. i grew up in scotland and i am only learning out the significance dunfermline has in scottish history? it has been overshadowed by edinburgh, but dunfermline is where the royal seats were. robert the bruce is buried here, malcolm campbell is buried here, malcolm campbell is buried here, most of his sons are buried here. this is where robert the bruce is known, an icon for dunfermline. he was a king that really sort of united scotland. he united the highlands, he united the lowlands. dunfermline is an important part of that. why dunfermline? why is it so important? there has been a site here since we think 500 a.d.. but this is where the church became strong. the church as we know it,
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the medieval church, this is where it all began when margaret came up. so robert felt this was important, this was sanctified ground, the seat of the scottish church. fantastic. this is the costume robert the bruce for when he went into battle? yes. this chain mail is very heavy?m for when he went into battle? yes. this chain mail is very heavy? it is about two and a half stone. this is very heavy, i cannot believe they went into battle with this. i will give that back to you. thanks forjoining us. fine morning in dunfermline, grey skies but it will be a dry day, i think here and across the uk, bit of a split. eastern areas humid worm or western areas are fresher. there is a dividing weather front bringing rain, as they always do. sitting across parts of eastern scotland,
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into western england and wales. nudging eastwards. brighter weather already but for eastern scotland, patchy rain across western england and wales. the weather front will push its way eastwards. far south—east of the uk is where we have the humid air. temperatures climbing rapidly. sunny spells but it will cloud over into the afternoon. the weather front fragments, showers becoming heavy and fragmented. where you start with the club further west, sunshine comes out and only one or two showers. tebbit is back to where they should be for the time of the year. but in east angrier and the south east corner we could get 26 to 28 celsius. that humidity sparking off storms. into the night, the storms will continue to rumble around for a short while across the east anglia and the south—east. there will be further showers
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overnight. further west, isolated showers and clear whether around. it will be cooler than last night. temperatures away from towns and cities will be dropping into single figures but in the south east corner of the country, this is where we have the showers to begin with and things are drier later on and temperatures will hold up. 16 cells is potentially in and around the london area. we go into the weekend with some humid air in a south east corner but that will be replaced by the fresh conditions experienced elsewhere. tomorrow, it looks like england and wales will be dry, good, long spells of sunshine and a few isolated showers in the west but the scotla nd isolated showers in the west but the scotland and northern ireland, showers every now and again. some on the heavy side. cannot rule out the odd rumble of thunder. but across the uk, high teens, maybe low 20s in the uk, high teens, maybe low 20s in the south east corner. fresh conditions continue. one or two more
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showers around on sunday compared to saturday. that is how it is looking from the gorgeous ground here from dunfermline and i hand you back to the centre of town with naga. they say a good worker never blames his tools, but i am this morning. i set you the task of cooking brea kfast i set you the task of cooking breakfast earlier, which he failed miserably. not only cooking for me, but you have to cook 15 breakfast for the pipes bang. —— band. given you burns my brea kfast —— band. given you burns my breakfast this morning, did you write the sign this morning? maybe. while naga is cooking 15 brea kfast, maybe. while naga is cooking 15 breakfast, if she does that, i will be amazed. in scotland, one of the big issues
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will be the money in our pockets. we have specific issues when it comes to scotland. not least, the fall in the price of oil which means reve nu es the price of oil which means revenues in scotland, but were substantial have fallen significantly. the price of oil has halved since the referendum. let's find what it could mean for some voters. louise and sinead are here. you guys have a shop in town. it is fairto you guys have a shop in town. it is fair to say it is the centre of the community, you get a lot of people talking about all sorts of things. albee, what are the issues for you? what do you have to contend with? our business is focused on economics and social issues. social issues shapes the economics. it is a social enterprise that has to provide us with an income. we are not really worried about the size of the income, as long as it is enough. the
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social part of it is much more important. it is about getting books into the hands of children, improve literacy and to provide a forum for open debate as well. if it is a debate in the shop, what are people talking about? most people are struggling everyday to get by. nhs, education and people want to know they have got supports. at the moment, we feel that isn't there. it is important people go out and vote for what they really, really feel are the issues important to them. we a lwa ys are the issues important to them. we always hear there is apathy and voting will not change anything. do you think it will make a difference, the people you speak to, do they feel it will make a difference? yes, everyone we speak to, they are positive about going out and voting.
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sinead, we talk about younger voters getting out and voting and changing things, specific things like education fees? it is important for young people to vote and our voices will be heard. so things like tuition fees are things we don't need to worry about in scotland. do you feel there are more of your friends, of your colleagues that will go out and vote because they feel this is the time to do it? will go out and vote because they feel this is the time to do mm is so important that we go out and make our voices heard. everyone i know definitely wants to vote. great tit talk to you all. that is some of the issues affecting people here in scotland but what about the wider economic problem and how does it affect people how they vote. with me to talk about that, professor david bell from the university of stirling. let's talk
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about the wider economic picture. a lot of similarities with the rest of the uk, but scotland has some big differences. i want to start with oil, big fall in the price of oil has an impact on how much the government has to spend here? yes, at the moment, effectively, virtually no revenues are being raised from oil. about five years ago there was £11 billion a year being raised. it does make a huge difference to revenues. that is affecting economic growth and we have seen the figures from the end of last year. economic growth struggling here. power that affect people? oil industry jobs struggling here. power that affect people? oil industryjobs are well—paid jobs. that has a knock—on effect through the economy. people have less to spend, their real incomes are lower than they were five or six years ago. as a result of that, less money to spend effectively because partly affected
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by inflation at the moment. people have less spending power than they have less spending power than they have than before. let's talk about brexit because this has dominated this election campaign. how has it beenin this election campaign. how has it been in scotland? scotland doesn't export huge amount to the rest of europe so that is less important to the migration issues. we have low skilled and high skilled from the rest of europe. david, thank you and good to see you. so let's see how naga is getting on. 15 breakfasts have been caught, but i am not seeing many. it didn't go well. they are slightly burnt underneath. i did promise i would serve breakfast to the pipe band, deny? this is one she prepared area. i'm
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sorry i burnt the breakfast, but this is healthy stuff, do you like fruit? yes. great, we can have this. who says i don't deliver. we will be talking about the issues affecting voters six days to the general election. now it is time for the news, travel and the weather from where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. fresh disruption for travellers on southern rail services has been temporarily halted. a planned overtime ban by drivers on the network has been suspended for two weeks by the aslef union. it's to allow time for talks about the long—running dispute over who should operate the train doors. 70% of people retiring this year in the capital are doing so earlier than expected — that's according to a survey by finance company prudential. people retiring in 2017 may have benefited from generous final salary schemes — which some experts say will only be available to a handful of people in future generations. the london—based royal academy
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of dance is teaming up with marylebone cricket club in a bid to encourage more boys to get into ballet. the academy said there has been an increase in the numbers of boys taking part in ballet activities in the uk in the last year, but that more needed to be done to encourage others to get involved. the initiative also aims to take inspiration from the worlds of sport, video games and comic books in a bid to attract more young people. let's have a look at the travel situation now. looking at the roads, this is chiswick. queues were back to the m4
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junction. let's have a check on the weather now. hello, good morning. we start today how we ended yesterday, with lots of blue sky and sunshine around and of course still in the warm and humid air, so it is another mild start to the morning. some sunshine around first thing and then we'll see some showers develop a bit later on through the afternoon. some of the showers could turn out to be heavy and even thundery, bit of hail to be expected, possibly. we've got a met office weather warning out for some heavy rain. but as with all showers, they will be fairly hit or miss in nature. so lots of sunshine around through the morning, then the sunshine will turn hazy and we start to get some high cloud pushing in from the west and then the showers will start to develop. some places could stay dry for the whole day, but the showers will rattle
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on where we get get them through the first part of the evening. it's the warm and humid, top temperatures 26 or 27 degrees celsius. through the evening and overnight then, the showers will gradually start to fade away. we start off the day tomorrow again on a very mild note, 15, 16 celsius, but it will be a rather grey start to the weekend. it is going to cheer up, so we start to get some sunshine developing but look at the drop in temperatures. temperatures back down to where they should be at this time of year over the course of the weekend. probably dry on saturday. by sunday, some scattered showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello. this is breakfast on friday the 2nd ofjune. i'm charlie stayt. the main headline this morning: international condemnation for president trump after he pulls america out of the paris agreement on climate change we will see if we can make a deal that's fair and if we can, that's great. and if we can't, that's fine.
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theresa may has told the president she's disappointed with his decision, while european leaders said there'd be no renegotiation. whoever we are, we all share the same responsibility — make our planet great again. good morning. we've brought the sofa to dunfermline, scotland's ancient capital. there are just six days to go until you cast your vote in the 2017 general election. away from all the politics, how will the economic affect the money in our pocket and what difference can make when voters go to the polls in just six days? well, i've brought the
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butty van to meet some voters and local business to find out. matt is here with the weather. good morning. i'm in the grounds of the abbey and the palace, a place of huge historical significance to dunfermline and scotland. weather—wise, pretty humid and later ran thundery towards the south of the country. fresher weather moving into the west and we weekend of sunshine and showers. all the details in the next 15 minutes. good morning. we're here in scotland's ancient capital, dunfermline. the constituency of dunfermline. the constituency of dunfermline and west fife over the past three elections has been with the liberal democrats, snp and labour and his constituencies like this that make the general election, or close calls in the general election, so interesting. we have been talking to voters and are going to be talking to politicians. they are talking to each other and voters to get their views, six days away
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from the general election, from when we all go to the polls. ben is with the butty van and is going to be taking a look at what voters are thinking and also the economic issues that are affecting scotland at the moment and, let me tell you, we are not far from the home of golf. st andrews is about 30 miles away to talk match will have the weather for us in dunfermline away to talk match will have the weatherfor us in dunfermline abbey. plenty going on. we're going to be talking about migration, independence and the economy. you can talk to us by getting in touch on social media or e—mailing us. i will have plenty more coming up. let's go to charlie for the latest news. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may has expressed her disappointment over president trump's decision to withdraw the united states from the paris climate—change accord. in a phone call with mr trump, the prime minister stressed that britain remains committed to the agreement. our north america correspondent, david willis, has more. he'd promised this to the people who voted him into office.
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nonetheless, it was a momentous announcement and one that drew swift condemnation from around the world. as president, i have one obligation and that obligation is to the american people. president trump believes, in a nutshell, that the paris accord impedes his ability to restore jobs to parts of the american heartland blighted by the move away from fossil fuels such as coal and gas. time, in his view, to put america first, a philosophy summed up in one short phrase. i was elected to represent the citizens of pittsburgh, not paris. pittsburgh's mayor bill peduto swiftly responded, saying his city considered the heart of the american steel injury actually favoured the paris accord. donald trump had previously said global warming was a hoax perpetrated by the chinese.
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he is now saying he'd be willing to re—negotiate the paris accord, albeit on terms more favourable to the us, but european leaders want nothing to do with that. there is no plan b, said one. france will not give up the fight. i reaffirm clearly that the paris agreement remains irreversible and will be implemented, notjust by france but by all the other nations. those gathered outside the white house to protest the president's decision believe the departure of the second—largest polluter on the planet will have a dramatic impact on efforts to combat global warming. but donald trump believes his decision represents an assertion of american sovereignty, whilst his critics believe it's precisely the opposite. david wills, bbc news, washington. let's get some reaction from home and abroad. we'll talk to damian grammaticas in brussels in a moment, but first our political
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correspondent leila nathoo is in westminster. we know there was this late—night phone call, donald trump calling theresa may. what do we know about what was said? theresa may expressed her disappointment at president trump's decision. she said that she continued to stand by the paris agreement and she believed it was the right framework. win over france, italy and germany have signed thisjoint letter france, italy and germany have signed this joint letter of condemnation but britain hasn't there has some criticism of theresa may for not taking a more forceful sta nce may for not taking a more forceful stance against president trump's decision. i think it will revive allegations that she is not able, or unwilling to stand up to president trump when she wants or needs to because of the desire to stay close to america after britain leads the eu. labour accusing theresa may of a dereliction of duty for not trying
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to persuade president trump to think again. the liberal democrats are saying this is exactly the point of a special relationship — we should be able to commence president trump to think differently. the government is very clear, though, that they are taking a different approach. let's go to damian grammaticas in brussels. looking at president macron's rather pointed use of words, we want to make the planet great again, how is that reflected among other eu leaders? the sentiments are shared right across the european union. what was really striking last night was that as soon as that announcement came from washington, we had a whole slew of announcements from across the eu all saying the same thing, all coordinators, all obviously prepared, saying this was a sad day, they did not share the same opinion, they did not share the same opinion, they regretted the decision from the us. we heard about thejoint statement from france, germany and italy, saying this could not be
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renegotiated. what we are going to see today now is here in brussels the chinese premier, the chinese prime minister, in brussels for a prescheduled summit, at which one of the key declarations will be that both the eu and all its countries and china remain committed to the paris accord and will continue to meet their obligations under that, so what they wish to signal here is that there will be no turning back, because they do not want any fraying of what they call historic achievements, under the paris accord, to result from donald trump's decision in america. so a very strong signal here that europe and china will work together to remain committed to that. thank you. thanks to damian grammaticas in brussels and leila matthew in westminster. the conservatives have denied their immigration policy is in confusion, after a minister played down theresa may's comments on a key target.
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the prime minister appeared to signal her aim was to reduce net migration to under 100,000 in the next five years. but her brexit secretary, david davis, sounded a more cautious note — saying it was no more than an aim. elsewhere in the campaign, labour is promising to create a million newjobs, while the lib dems are warning of economic uncertainty post brexit. jeremy corbyn will say today that a labour government would pump £250 billion into industry through a new national investment bank. but the former lib dem business secretary, sir vince cable, believes both labour and the tories have turned their backs on business, and will warn trade could drop by a third following britain's divorce from the eu. and sticking with election news, theresa may and jeremy corbyn will face questions from a studio audience tonight in a special edition of question time. our reporter danni hewson is in york ahead of the event — but if viewers were hoping to see the pair go head—to—head, they'll be disappointed. absolutely right. this is the first
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time theresa may has taken part in a debate format but if you are expecting her to go head—to—head with jeremy corbyn, expecting her to go head—to—head withjeremy corbyn, you are going to be disappointed. instead, it is going to be the audience that are going to be the audience that are going to be grilling the leaders and if you remember what happened two yea rs if you remember what happened two years ago down the road in leeds, it was pretty ferocious. of course, there has been a lot of criticism of theresa may, about her decision not to attend the debate on wednesday afterjeremy corbyn changed his mind and showed up. so expect those questions to come thick and fast. everything is ready. there is tight security, the police are doing last—minute checks around the area, and as those polls narrow, there really is everything to play for, so expect some heated debate, some tough questions and some very interesting answers. thank you for that. question time is on bbc one from 8.30pm this evening.
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the met police say they have so far found no records of any calls to the anti—terrorist hotline in relation to the manchester bomber, despite a number of people saying they had reported concerns over salman abedi's behaviour. it comes as greater manchester police have released new cctv footage, showing abedi in the city in the four days leading up to the attack. detectives say they're now concentrating their investigation on the rusholme area and are appealing for witnesses who may have seen him there. more than 30 people are reported to have died at a casino in the philippines, where a gunman opened fire before killing himself. the attacker also set fire to gaming tables. authorities say most of the people who lost their lives died of suffocation. police had feared the attack was terrorist related, but now suggest the motive was robbery. the number of patients waiting more than six months for routine operations and treatment has nearly tripled overfour years in england. that's according to the royal college of surgeons, which analysed data from march 2013 —
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a time when targets were being met. nhs england declined to respond directly to the six—month figures. but a spokesperson has said, "the nhs has cut the number of patients waiting more than a year for treatment by nearly 13,000 over the past five years". the bulgarian linesman who failed to spot diego maradona's infamous "hand of god" goal in the 1986 world cup has died. many of you will remember how the argentinan leapt to punch the ball past peter shilton into the net, during the side's win over england. bogdan dochev, who died at the age of 80, said the incident stayed with him his whole life. he described maradona as a great footballer, but a small man — both in stature and as a person. all through the morning, naga has been in dunfermline talking about the issues affecting
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voters in scotland. we have been crisscrossing the uk getting reaction ahead of the election. we have ended up in dunfermline, the ancient capital of scotland, not far from the home of golf. i wonder why i got sent it! we're talking to the politicians. two years ago there was a political shock wave when the snp won 56 of the 59 seats in westminster. labour was almost wiped out as the lib dems, the conservatives and labour were left with one seat each. can the tories, labour and with one seat each. can the tories, labourand lib dem with one seat each. can the tories, labour and lib dem group back of those seats? joining us is someone from all other four those seats? joining us is someone from all otherfour main those seats? joining us is someone from all other four main parties, christine jardine, liberal democrat candidate, dean lockhart,
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conservative, and labour and snp candidates. welcome to breakfast. let's start off with the snp. we we re let's start off with the snp. we were looking up the newspapers earlier and on the front pages, it focused a lot on nicola sturgeon's approval ratings, at the lowest ever point, the papers are saying, according to the polls, and they are suggesting that the reason is that she is at her least popular moment because of a push or the quest for independence. do you think this has turned off voters? ido i do not. people realise it is a westminster election with big issues decided over pensions, over europe. nicola sturgeon remains popular. theresa may, jeremy corbyn... she remains popular with voters, as do snp policies and the policies we
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will pursue to draw back on austerity and holds the tories to account and work on having a positive relationship with european partners that benefits jobs, economy, education, research and the food & drink industry. and you have made a u—turn? food & drink industry. and you have made a u-turn? we have always said... the lib dems want a referendum that we have said at the end of the negotiation with the rest of europe, people in scotland should be given a choice, given scotland voted overwhelmingly to remain part of the eu. and also we offered a compromise, putting aside the independence referendum, a substantial set of detailed proposals to remain in the single market and maintain freedom of movement and the relationship with european partners. you have not changed on the independence referendum? we said we would give
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people a choice at the end of the brexit negotiations. let's take a look at a story that made the front page of the times newspaper with the labour party saying they will use the snp to give us power. there seems to be a conflict. emily thornberry saying no coalition is planned with the snp. the implicationjeremy planned with the snp. the implication jeremy corbyn is planned with the snp. the implicationjeremy corbyn is keen to work with the snp. what is your message? the message is clear in the manifesto. opposition to a second independence referendum.” manifesto. opposition to a second independence referendum. i asked you about a coalition with the snp. we are working towards a labour majority government. any talk before then is frankly speculation. you do not think the party is preparing to have a coalition with the snp? not to my knowledge. emily thornberry is talking about a minority government.
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you need to ask emily about that. i am campaigning fora you need to ask emily about that. i am campaigning for a labour government, majority government, because that is the best way we can deliver a strong set of proposals in the manifesto. the conservatives. interesting what is happening at the moment. decision made on the referendum. i was talking to a journalist earlier and he said ruth davidson is running away from theresa may's manifesto. talking about the fox hunting u—turn, winter fuel allowa nces about the fox hunting u—turn, winter fuel allowances and the disparity and how that relationship is going. do you accept she is running away from the party leader's message?” do not. devolution means we can have different policies. there is difference and there is clashing. with winter fuel payments, we said we have a different climate here and
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different needs. we have two strong leaders in theresa may and ruth davidson and i do not think there is a difference in emphasis. there is a slight difference in policy but that is not an issue. ruth davidson is not running away from theresa may's policies? no. devolution is devolved powers to the scottish parliament and using them where relevant in a different fashion for the needs of scottish people. let me say, the snp asked standing on a manifesto saying they are stronger for scotland and ten years in government in scotland shows they are not stronger for scotland. christine, let me talk about the liberal democrats. a decision has been made on the scottish referendum. you said there is no need for another referendum yet the decision was made on brexit and you want another eu referendum.
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two very different decisions were made and different starting points and end points. to give the s&p credit they gave a white paper that laid out the deal and it was rejected and once you have rejected the deal there is nowhere else to go. with europe, we never saw anything except a bus with figures on it. people said no. we have no idea what the deal is. once we get the deal, which is where we were with the snp, then the british people have the right to say we are better off where we are. i believe we are better off where we are and as we see how bad the deal is going to be. there will be no good deal. i said the lib dems, labour and conservative have one seat. are you strong enough going on the anti—brexit policy? strong enough going on the anti-brexit policy? that is not the only thing we have. we have strong policies specifically for scotland,
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wanting to invest in health care, education, which the snp have forgotten about. the only thing they have given is legislation on a referendum that took ali days. the mental health strategy was 15 months late and that we want to focus on. christine, thanks. thank you very much all for your time. we will leave them to talk amongst themselves. matt has the weather. he has been at the abbey. where are you? iama you? i am a little bit closer. i can see the butty van. we have come into the park. known locally as the glen. this stowed on the residents of dunfermline by andrew card needy, the world —famous philanthropist. dunfermline by andrew card needy, the world—famous philanthropist. he was born in dunfermline —— andrew
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carnegie. we are in here and it is beautiful surroundings. grey skies at the moment. the forecast is not the same everywhere. the rain is separating humid air in eastern parts and something fresher further west. over the next hour we have rain clearing. continuing to move eastwards. to the west of that, across parts of northern ireland and scotland, rain has cleared with sunny spells and one or two showers. still cloudy through much of eastern scotla nd still cloudy through much of eastern scotland with rain. lingering in shetland. over the next two hours, rainy at times in northern england. down through western areas. further south and east, starting dry.
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already feeling humid. temperatures rocketing up where you have the sunshine. the best of the sunshine through the morning. as it moves into the humid air, we could see storms. 26—28d possible. some storms will be torrential in places. further west, fresher. many will have an afternoon of sunshine with isolated showers. tonight, showers across eastern parts. isolated showers in the west. the big story will it will be cooler than the last few nights. down into single figures in parts. the south—east holding on to humidity but it will not last long. into saturday and we will see humid aircleared long. into saturday and we will see humid air cleared away. england and
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wales probably enjoying the best of the sunshine on saturday. isolated showers in the west. scotland and northern ireland will have sunshine interrupted by showers, some on the thundery side. sunday, we do it all again. maybe more showers across england and wales. the bulk of showers in scotland and northern ireland. the next days, uv levels will be high. that is how it is looking. back to you. we are here with our scotla nd back to you. we are here with our scotland correspondent. you have avoided the food so far, very wise! i was talking to politicians, questioning what they are tackling now. six days until the polls. what are they focusing on? a couple of
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big themes. the unionist parties in scotland, they are trying to attack the snp which remember was a party of opposition at westminster and a party of government in scotland. they are trying to attack the snp record in government at holyrood. these are devolved issues and strictly speaking you should not be voting on those in an general election. the s&p say they have a lot to be proud of and are robustly defending their record but it is one area of attack in the general election. the other is the unionist divided. that is a big issue. the parties that have the clearest position constitutionally seem to be the ones cutting through. looking at the ones cutting through. looking at the lie of the land at the last
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general election. the snp are a very big party, winning all but three seats at the last general election. it would be hard for them to do any better this time. they are trying to defend a large number of seats. they may lose some, but they will try to keep the momentum and mood and they are fighting for them. how is brexit playing into the parties? the snp said they want a seat at the negotiating table over brexit. they say a vote for them will strengthen their hand in negotiations. it is an issue playing out on the doorstep. people care greatly about this. the majority of people in scotland voted in favour of remaining in the eu. when you speak to people they are concerned about the issue, be it they want to remain in the eu or
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they want to remain in the eu or they want to they think is the best person to carry forward negotiations, which is a big part of the conservatives' strategy. it is an issue people care about but when it comes to referendums, the one uppermost is the possibility of a second independence referendum on the doorsteps. the hats that is the one people are talking about more and certainly the one the unionist parties are talking about more. the unionist parties are saying no to a second referendum and making it part of their campaign. we will speak to voters and politicians later. skirl of bagpipes. that is the dunfermline and district piping band. they will play you out ahead of your getting big use where you are. —— the news where you are.
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it is friday so it is merely the weekend on the weather is going to be more changeable through this weekend. it will feel fresher for many of us with a breeze coming in from the west. a good deal of sunshine and dry weather but the risk of one or two heavy showers, particularly northern and western areas. this morning we have this weather front, a cold areas. this morning we have this weatherfront, a cold front, moving its weight gradually eastwards, bringing some rain but that rain moving up as it moves eastwards. a good deal of weather with some sunshine. some showers across scotla nd sunshine. some showers across scotland and northern ireland this afternoon, which could be heavy side. temperatures around 17 or 18. north—west of england and wales
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having a bit of sunshine but down towards the south—east, quite a bit of cloud. there will be some showers which could turn heavyweight in the afternoon into the evening but very warm, temperatures in the south—east getting up to about 27 potentially. towards the south—west wales and south—west england, some sunshine. the thunderstorms clear away quickly as the front players. fresher air coming in across all parts of the uk as we go into saturday morning. overnight temperatures about 11 or 12, perhaps a bit warmer towards the south—east, with 1a or 16. for saturday, the start of the weekend, a bit of cloud across eastern parts with a few showers. those will clear away and there will be showers across parts of scotland and northern ireland, heavy, perhaps sunbury on saturday, but a good deal of dry weather on saturday. that is the emphasis, with sunny spells. fresher for all of the emphasis, with sunny spells. fresherfor all of us, the emphasis, with sunny spells. fresher for all of us, temperatures about 17 to 20. sunday, a similar
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story. lots of dry weather around with some sunny spells. a few showers toward south—west england, scotla nd showers toward south—west england, scotland and northern ireland. top temperatures about 15 to 18. more details online but that's it from me. this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and rachel horne. president trump has walked away from the paris climate agreement. but europe and china are expected to re—affirm their comittments and expand collaborations. live from london, that's our top story on friday 2nd june. president trump's decision to withdraw the united states from the paris climate change agreement has been condemned at home and abroad. cities across america and nations across the world
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say the fight against global warming will continue. russia signs a deal to build two new reactors at a nuclear power station in india — oh, and it's going to loan
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