Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  June 2, 2017 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

5:00 pm
today at 5, we're in york, where theresa may and jeremy corbyn will face questions from an audience this evening —— with 6 days to polling day. it happens on the day a conservative candidate, craig mackinlay and two party workers, are charged over expenses claimed during the 2015 campaign. the conservative party continues to believe that these allegations are unfounded, he's innocent until proven gulity and remains our candidate. shows bad judgement from theresa may, why would you let this candidate go ahead with this cloud hanging over him. we'll be back in york shortly. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the prime minister has been defending her decision not to sign a joint letter of protest with france and germany after president trump pulls out of the paris climate accord.
5:01 pm
police investigating the manchester bomb attack find a car they say may be "significant" to their inquiry. and will wonder woman smash the box office? we'll have that and the rest of this week's top releases with james king in the film review. it's 5 o'clock —— we're in the city of york —— with just six days to polling day —— where later this evening theresa may and jeremy corbyn will both take part —— in the bbc question time leader's special. and it takes place less than 2a hours after donald trump's decision ——
5:02 pm
to take america out of the paris climate treaty. mrs may has been accused by opponents of a ‘pathetic‘ response, she said she was ‘disappointed' whilejeremy corbyn said the decision was ‘reckless and dangerous‘. we'll have more on that in a moment. but mrs may had to deal with another issue earlier today —— when craig mackinlay —— the conservative candidate in south thanet in kent was charged with offences —— relating to his election expenses two years ago. two other conservative party workers will also faces charges. the conservative party says the allegations are unfounded. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has more details. craig mackinlay. it was one of the big conservative wins in the last general election, stopping nigel farage in south thanet. their candidate, craig mackinlay, won byjust under 3000 votes after talking during the campaign of all the support he had had from big name politicians.
5:03 pm
we have brought many powerful members of the government team down here to show that i am part of a very strong team. but today, craig mackinlay, who is standing for re—election, was charged with making a false declaration of the money he spent on his campaign. also charged was his agent, nathan grey, and marion little, a conservative party headquarters campaign specialist accused of aiding and abetting the other two. this was the moment nigel farage found out about the charges as he was out campaigning this morning. you'rejoking? oh, my good lord. right, that is big news. craig mackinlay has just been charged. once again, it is bad judgment from theresa may. why on earth would you allow someone to go ahead as a general election candidate when this cloud was clearly hanging over him? there will be questions. it was not the big name politicians that all passed through south thanet two years ago that have led to this case.
5:04 pm
it was the thousands of pounds spent on hotels for party activists, disclosed by channel 4 news. these were picked up by the national party and put on their expenses return. but police have been investigating whether, in fact, they should have been entered on craig mackinlay‘s local campaign expenses. an investigation has now led to him being charged. the conservative party continues to believe that these allegations are unfounded. craig mackinlay is innocent until proven guilty and he remains our candidate. craig mackinlay has said he will continue to fight for re—election. standing in this general election while accused of declaring false expenses in the last. daniel sandford, bbc news. here we are in york and just over three hours' time jeremy here we are in york and just over three hours' timejeremy corbyn and theresa may will be taking part in question time and will not be
5:05 pm
appearing at the same time by the way. each will take questions from the studio audience in separate terms. vicky young is with me, let's talk about the challenge for both leaders, theresa may, what other challengers fare well in this section takes place? this is coming after her not taking part in the leaders debate and she faced a backlash over that, lots of people saying she was running scared and it allowed the labour party to say she was not prepared to defend her record. she has been in the circumstance coming in, people thought she was the front runner but there has been criticism about the campaign that they have run, it was about strong and stable leadership and the u—turn on manifesto hasn't helped. people have found she has had difficulty getting her views gci’oss had difficulty getting her views across and not sounding human enough if you like. this is her chance the
5:06 pm
night to put that right. she can be the leader who will take the country through brexit but maybe showing empathy to people in the audience and this is the point. these are the voters in front of asking the questions, not leaders shouting over each other and coming up with sound bites, you have to engage with the audience at these things. six days until polling day, what challenges doesjeremy until polling day, what challenges does jeremy corbyn until polling day, what challenges doesjeremy corbyn have an engaging? he looks like he has been getting more comfortable. it probably helped to did the debate on wednesday he would have prepped for that, he would have prepped for that, he would have prepped for that, he would have that experience. for him of course it's harder in a sense because he doesn't have a record to defend but he will have to talk about how he can be the next prime minister. these questions about leadership, suitability have been the most tricky for him, that is what will come up for him. he will talk about his manifesto and his promises but again it is the point
5:07 pm
unlike when we get there at press conferences and they take the microphone away from us, that doesn't happen here, the person who asks a question gets another chance which makes it much trickier. thank you vicky young. there will be lots of commentators and bloggers along with some party representatives in the so—called spin room where the battle of the party message will be played out during and after the event. try to settle some kind of narrative. my colleague simon mccoy is there. thank you. the moment things are warming up on a lot of bbc people talking to other people. to my left is harry gracia of bbc leeds talking to our very own laura greensburg. a lot of interest in the hours, with me sam lister now, what other
5:08 pm
questions that you think will cause the biggest problems for the leaders tonight? it'll be interesting, we are here at in the glorious city of york and one of the questions theresa may has faced frequently during this campaign is about the cost of living. but also social care, that has been a controversial issue and four jeremy care, that has been a controversial issue and fourjeremy corbyn it is about where's the money coming from to fulfil all of his promises. history tells us this is the toughest audience of all things can get quite difficult. for ed miliband this was a very tricky moments, it was a turning point, he had been riding higher than expected and in the last week he really struggled. he had the question time audience grilling him and he made the slipway he saidi grilling him and he made the slipway he said i don't think we spent too much before the last crash which really dented him and damaged him. explain what happened in the immediate aftermath of the debate
5:09 pm
because this turns into a nest of fibre as every choice to get the message across. this is a spin room, it is an american is a mad we have adopted. both teams will send their top people and they will put their people through to say how it went, they will pick up the floors of the other candidates and will be really trying to go frit and put their message out there to the journalists gathered here and obviously the westminster lobby and journalists from all over the country in the world will be here today. we will speak to you later thank you. 45 minutes for each of the leaders and theresa may and then jeremy corbyn but perhaps the toughest audience of all is of course the voters themselves. so that's what the experts think, what about the viewers? and tonight there'll be full coverage of the leaders' question time and the build—up here on bbc news from 8pm —— theresa may and jeremy corbyn taking audience questions —— let's speak now to two guests with direct experience of preparing for
5:10 pm
this kind of event —— tom baldwin —— former head of media strategy for labour's ed miliband —— and sean worth —— an adviser to david cameron when he was prime minister. tom festival talus little bit about the few hours that lead up to an event like this? —— festival talus. few hours that lead up to an event like this? -- festivaltalus. this is different to the ones before, it is different to the ones before, it is not a lavatorial contest against someone likejeremy is not a lavatorial contest against someone like jeremy paxman is not a lavatorial contest against someone likejeremy paxman or a row with several other leaders, this is what the americans call a town hall format. if they are going to rehearse anything in the last few hours it is how you deal with members of the public, how you listen to their questions, talking to them directly, you're not trying to them directly, you're not trying to score points like you might do off another politician, you are trying to show empathy and also above all, not slip up. indeed and sean ona above all, not slip up. indeed and sean on a point i'm thinking you have to build into the strategy the kind of personality that your leader has and that has a bearing on the
5:11 pm
way you approach it? it is difficult to project what people ask to be honest nowadays, there is nothing like being grilled by a proper professionaljournalist like yourself that will put a politician in discomfort and really pick at the weaknesses and things that are not quite clear. the guys at the show tonight have taken questions from the general public but have obviously selected the ones that they think will really test them so i think we will get questions for theresa may and social care, questions forjeremy corbyn and the ira, ithink questions forjeremy corbyn and the ira, i think it'll be a tough format the night. it suits theresa may in a way because it is not a head—to—head withjeremy way because it is not a head—to—head with jeremy corbyn by the expectation would be if you look at the poll ratings that she would beat him in that it in fairnessjeremy corbyn is a very good public speaker
5:12 pm
and a very good debater so this is a good format for the prime minister. we will see what happens tonight. just a sense from both of you and i will go to tom first on the kind of depth of detail in what's you can prepare for awkward questions, the kind of questions you might think would cause a potential problem, to what extent can you rehearse that? they will be pretty well prepared for that. they will know a lot of the substance, at this stage it is about putting a final gloss on it which is making sure they deal with members of the audience are they really should know the figures. admittedly after the first event jeremy corbyn went on woman's hour and did not know the cost of social ca re and did not know the cost of social care but what has been impressive in this campaign is his thick skin, other politicians would have locked themselves in a room after the
5:13 pm
interview, he came out and said it is not a problem and that has contributed to the dynamic of this campaign which means theresa may goes into night with the pressure on her. she is still in the lead but somehow she has to reassert control, she doesn't need a game changer but has to use this to show she is on top of her game and has to try to re—establish and strengthen stability which dissolved in front of us in the last few weeks. your thoughts then on the potential problems and picking up on tom ‘s point if there is a confidence issue and how that can be shown as well. this format is of benefit to jeremy corbyn, the issue for the conservative party, when they call the general election theresa may was at the height of a popularity in jeremy corbyn was at the low point
5:14 pm
of tears, it can only go one way and the trends will converge. it is like a boxing match between mike tyson and mr bean, no one would route for mike tyson in that. this will hope to reason maybe it's because there is not an expectation that she will be so much better than him and in this reality she probably won't be. asi this reality she probably won't be. as i saidjeremy this reality she probably won't be. as i said jeremy corbyn is a very good debater and is a good campaign so the amount you can prepare, the weaknesses that jeremy corbyn has had is on the numbers and his personal character, theresa may it has been her manifesto commie u—turns, social care, not huge tax but there has been the question and tonight theresa may willjust be looking for a solid performance,
5:15 pm
corbin has everything to gain for this. intriguing from both of you. throughjust over this. intriguing from both of you. through just over three hours to go. thank you for your thoughts. so that's what the experts think, what about the viewers? let'sjoin sophie long who is in a cafe in york. thanks very much. i'm in the centre of york along the banks of the river ata of york along the banks of the river at a wine bar and there has been debate ahead of the programme tonight, let's huge juicy. debate ahead of the programme tonight, let's hugejuicy. have you enjoyed the campaign? yes. what about a enjoyed the campaign? yes. what abouta campaign? enjoyed the campaign? yes. what about a campaign? she shot herself in the trying to hurt old age pensioners, i want to ask her why she thinks it is for our friends who
5:16 pm
owfi a she thinks it is for our friends who own a £150,000 house to have their sun left at 100,004 my wife and i who own a £450,000 house that if we get dementia, we have 100,000 left and it cost us 350,000 and our friends cost 50. you don't think thatis friends cost 50. you don't think that is fair? it is not fair at all. i would normally vote for ukip but i will vote for her to keep the nutcase out. you work at this wine barand nutcase out. you work at this wine bar and you have a different perspective, you are a little bit younger in your 20s, have you been following the campaign? yes ivan following the campaign? yes ivan following labour jeremy corbyn. following the campaign? yes ivan following labourjeremy corbyn. my main concern is the nhs, i don't wa nt main concern is the nhs, i don't want it to be sold or privatise and i wanted to be accessible and beneficial. you are looking for questions on that tonight? what about you joe? i think labour has come out with a manifesto that has been fully budgeted and jeremy
5:17 pm
corbyn is a leader is relatable and actually wants to spend the time to get to know voters. in terms of the debates do you think it was important she wasn't there on wednesday, does that bother you? she should've been there. what do you quys should've been there. what do you guys think? i thought she should have turned up originally but having seen the left—wing audience that the bbc had chosen she did the right thing by not turning up. supposedly cyber that it wasn't as it turned out with my bbc things. what about you? i'm looking for the immigration and the effect it is having on the nhs. i worked all my live, paid my insurance, people come into this country, going to the hospital and get anything they want, don't pay a penny and they go back to where they have come from. we have to leave it
5:18 pm
there, thank you for letting me interrupt. just a few ideas of what other people will be looking at the night. some very interesting views there. and tonight there'll be full coverage of the leaders' question time and the build—up here on bbc news from 8pm — theresa may and jeremy corbyn taking audience questions, chaired by david dimbleby. the event is live at 8.30pm. we will start our coverage at eight. that is it from york for now. thank you indeed. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the prime minister has been defending her decision to not sign a letter of protest to president trump that he pulled out of the paris climate accord. theresa may said she made it clear to president trump during a telephone call, that the uk wanted the us to stay within the agreement.
5:19 pm
meanwhile, in brussels, the eu and china have beenjoining forces, to send a message to the world that they stand by the paris agreement. from brussels, our correspondent damian grammaticas. in the fight against global warming, and just hours after donald trump retreated, enter new leaders — the eu and china. apart from the us, these are the world's other two economic heavyweights, prompted by president trump to act in concert. what we're seeing here with this joint reaction to donald trump's statement is striking, not just for the swiftness, but also for the message it sends, at a time when the us under president trump is withdrawing from global leadership on climate change, instantly the eu and china are stepping in to take up that mantle. it's a striking global change which could herald a decline in us influence. so at this special summit in brussels, the eu and china are making a joint declaration, they will not abandon
5:20 pm
the paris agreement, the opposite. they're committed to it. today we are stepping up with china. which means today, china and the european union are aligned on the need for international solutions. we are convinced that the decision yesterday by the united states to lead the paris agreement is a big mistake. when president trump announced his decision last night, he said paris was a bad dealfor the us. but this deal—maker won't be able to re—negotiate, say eu countries, who have issued their own coordinated condemnation. a single statement signed by germany, france and italy. angela merkel today called the us decision "regrettable", and added she was holding back her real feelings. translation: the decision can and will not stop all of us dedicated to the protection of our planet earth, quite the opposite.
5:21 pm
we, in germany, in europe, and in the world, are more determined than ever to pull our strength to face one of the challenges of humankind. theresa may did not sign the joint letter with europe's other g7 members, that prompted this scathing attack from jeremy corbyn today. given the chance to present a united front for our international partners, she has instead opted for silent, and once again, subservience to donald trump. it's a dereliction of both her duty to this country, and our duty to our planet. downing street says the prime minister did not act together with other european nations because she spoke directly to president trump last night to tell him she supports the paris deal. i've made the uk's position on the paris agreement very clear. we remain committed to the paris agreement, it's an important international agreement on climate change. i made the uk's position clear to president trump last week at the g7 meeting,
5:22 pm
as did the other g7 leaders, and i made the uk's position clear to president trump last night. canada and japan have not signed that letter, neither has the uk, but we all have the same view that we remain committed to the paris agreement. in brussels, the eu and china have been prompted to take a stand because they share the belief that fighting climate change makes both environmental and economic sense. and the eu says it put it on the right side of history. damien grammaticas, bbc news, brussels. erik solheim is the head of un environment programme —— we can speak to him now via webcam from oslo. thanks for being with us, your reaction first of all to this decision to pull out of the paris accord? it's obviously a setback and a negative development that maybe not as bad as many people think
5:23 pm
because as we have seen china and europe and others will take up the ma ntle europe and others will take up the mantle and provide the global leadership and from the united states itself we see number of big companies and cities, citizens and may is coming out with incredible support. he did campaign on this issue, the message of america first, he is simply fulfilling the promise that he made to american voters?|j think that he made to american voters?” think no one has anyone against the slogan america first, the chinese leaders put china first, it is not america first that america alone, we need global leadership and china and europe will provide that. in the united states, the governor of california and the meret pittsburgh's and the big companies in american capitalism, microsoft, google, they all came out against the decision but much more
5:24 pm
importantly they will tell the world we will move the head —— ahead to renewable energies whatever the cost. mr champs are staying in the paris accord would undermine the american economy, undermine american jobs, and put the country at a disadvantage with other countries in the world, what is your response to that? it is exactly the opposite and at this stage there are 400,000 jobs in the solar industry, 70,000 in coal and hardly any investor will believe you can revive the coal industry, everybody understands that everybody is rapidly moving into renewable energy. these days there isa renewable energy. these days there is a lot more energy coming from solar and wind from oil, and coal combined. if trump is able to slow down a seven allusion in the united states, at the end of the day the losers will be the american people,
5:25 pm
those who lost out to the industrial revolution, those who lost out to the digital revolution, those who lose out to the renewable revolution would simply losejobs. lose out to the renewable revolution would simply lose jobs. thank you eric, head of the united nations of oui’ eric, head of the united nations of our thank you. bomb disposal experts have arrived in rusholme where a cordon round a car which police describe as of ‘significant interest‘ is being investigated in relation to the manchester attack. meanwhile two of the bomber‘s cousins have told the bbc they had no idea salman abedi was planning his attack. our home affairs correspondentjune kelly reports from manchester. a potentially significant development in this investigation say the police. they are focusing on a nissan micra found in rusholme in manchester. people have been moved out of the area, including an accommodation block which is part of manchester royal infirmary. but a visit to the hospital by prince william has gone ahead. new images have been released of salman abedi as he moved around
5:26 pm
the city he was preparing to attack. he was back in manchester four days before he committed mass murder. he has been captured on cctv with his blue suitcase, which police are still searching for. two of his cousins have been released after being questioned for a week. their younger brother is still being held. it is not easy being connected to 22 lost innocent lives. and the fact that the person that did this is related to us by blood is something that will stay with me the rest of my life. looking at the relationship i have had with salman, it was a close relationship. but for him to betray the image of the family in that way, which was out of order, to be honest. involving 22 innocent people. traumatised by it, to be honest. it is shocking. abz forjani‘s barbershop was one of a number of addresses searched. salman abedi was here in february for a haircut.
5:27 pm
the brothers say they have not seen him since that time. early this week, the bomb squad was at a house in the area now cordoned off. detectives say salman abedi came to the house in the days before the attack. ten men remain in custody. a lot of arrests have been made and more are anticipated. we have not finished yet. there is a long way to go with the investigation. when it comes to warnings about abedi, police say they can find no record of calls to the anti—terrorist hotline. june kelly, bbc news, manchester. 0ur correspondent fiona trott is in south manchester near to where the suspect vehicle was found. what is the latest? in the past few moments are truckers arrived here, we suspect that that will take the white nissan micra away for further examinations. you can probably see
5:28 pm
in the background, there is another white shark next to it, that has been used by bomb disposal experts who are examining the car in the last hour or so. let me explain a bit about the significance of that whichjune bit about the significance of that which june hinted on bit about the significance of that whichjune hinted on an her reports. this is known as the curry mile, a road of restaurants and student houses, this is where police carried out how searches as part of their enquiry, they‘re asking people to come forward today as well... inaudible inaudible , who could drive it, who could see it, a huge chord and in place are many people out of their homes for over five hours now. many people out of their homes for overfive hours now. thank you. meanwhile prince william has been visiting manchester —
5:29 pm
speaking to some of the medical staff who‘ve treated victims of the bombing. he spent the morning talking to some of the police officers and first responders who were first to arrive at the scene of the ariana grande concert, before signing a book of condolence in the city‘s cathedral. he then went to meet some of the young survivors of the arena attack who are being treated at the manchester royal infirmary. this is bbc news at five — coming up. we‘ll be putting your questions to the shadow energy secretary barry gardiner. and as wonder woman returns to our screens, james king will be taking a look at that and all the latest releases in the film review. time for a look at the weather. the weekend looking good for most of us, today a bit mixed, thunderstorms
5:30 pm
across the south—east, some downpours in london and in east anglia over the next few hours or so. anglia over the next few hours or so. big downpours on the way but all we can headline a good one, sunshine and if you don‘t mind a shower or two, it‘s looking fine. a lot of cloud around the country and especially across south—eastern areas, vicious downpours and a lot of rain in a short amount of time and even flash flooding on major highways across the south east and in the anglia. the weather will be improving as we go through the night, still some bits and pieces of rain around and clearer skies developing across many western and northern parts. here quite chilly, dessert town and city temperatures, it could be as chilly as five. start offa it could be as chilly as five. start off a bit cloudy tomorrow with spots off a bit cloudy tomorrow with spots of rain across eastern areas but as isaid of rain across eastern areas but as i said the weekend is some showers around in western and north—western areas but fresher here, 18, in
5:31 pm
londonjust over 20. hello again. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: conservative candidate for south thanet, craig mackinlay, and two party workers are charged over expenses claimed during the 2015 campaign. well, the conservative party continues to believe that these allegations are unfounded — he's innocent until proven gulity and remains our candidate. it comes on the day that theresa may and jeremy corbyn will face questions from an audience this evening in york, with six days to polling day. the prime minister has been defending her decision not to sign a joint letter of protest with france and germany after president trump pulls out of the paris climate accord. police investigating the manchester bomb attack have evacuated residents in the rusholme area of the city after finding a car they say may be "significant" to their inquiry. those are our latest headlines.
5:32 pm
time to catch up with the sport with holly hamilton. thanks. we start with the latest from the french open, where defending men‘s champion novak djokovic has made it into the fourth round in paris — but it was anything but easy. despite breaking diego schwartzman‘s serve early in the first set, djokovic saw himself broken twice as he fell a set down, 7—5. but he bounced back to take the second 6—3. the third though went the way of his opponent, the world number 41. djokovic wasn‘t having the best of days though, warned throughout the match about slow play and unsportsman—like conduct, leading to this exchange with the umpire. it didn‘t upset his rhythm too much as he levelled the match at 2—2, taking the fourth 6—1, and forcing a deciding set. with schwartzman struggling with a rib injury, the fifth set was comfortable enough for djokovic
5:33 pm
as he saw out the victory to move into the fourth round. meanwhile nine—time champion rafael nadal had no trouble moving into the fourth round with a comprehensive straight sets win over nikoloz basilashvili. he dropped just one game in the entire match, winning6—0,6—1,6—0, insidejust 90 minutes. bad news for belgium‘s tenth seed david goffin though. he‘s out of the tournament after retiring hurt in his third round match
5:34 pm
against argentina‘s horacio zeballos. goffin was leading 5—4 in the first set when he slipped chasing a ball, and looked like he jammed his foot in the rolled up covers. he could now be a doubt for wimbledon which starts in four weeks. in the women‘s draw, the defending champion, in a match that featured 11 breaks of serve in the 20 games played, the spaniard eventually won 7—5, 6—2 against putinseva of kazakhstan. england all rounder chris woakes has been ruled out of the rest of the champions trophy, due to a side strain he picked up
5:35 pm
yesterday in the first two overs of the win over bangladesh. england are unlikely to name his replacement until tomorrow afternoon, after the england lions match, which involves two of the possible candidates: steve finn and tom curran. australia need 235 runs from 33 overs to beat new zealand in their rain affected first match of the champions trophy. bad weather has caused several delays at edgbaston where the black caps posted a disappointing target. ryan giggs has played down rumours connecting him with the managerial va ca ncy connecting him with the managerial vacancy at sunderland. you get linked a lot. 0ver vacancy at sunderland. you get linked a lot. over the past year i have been linked to a lot of clubs but in the effort is waiting for that right club and what you feel would be right for you. especially for me. there was a surprise at epsom... enable, ridden by frankie dettori, won the oaks. john gosden‘s filly was a 6—1 shot
5:36 pm
for the mile—and—a—half classic run in driving rain, after a thunderstorm hit the track just minutes before the start. 0dds—on favourite rhododendron finished second. that‘s the sport for no. you can keep up—to—date on the website and i will more in sportsday at half past six. thank you. not long to go now before polling day, and throughout the election campaign we‘ve been asking for your questions to put to politicians from the main parties. over the last couple of weeks we‘ve heard from the conservatives, liberal democrats and snp. today it‘s labour‘s turn, and i‘m joined by the shadow secretary for international trade, barry gardiner, who also speaks on climate change issues. thank you very much for answering the viewers‘ questions. i will start with one of my own, since you do speak on climate change, which is very much in the news at the moment, president trump‘s controversial decision to pull out of the paris accord. what are your thoughts on that? it is deeply shocking and he did flag it up beforehand. i think what is extraordinary is the way our prime minister has not responded properly and really it rated him for
5:37 pm
him. what is the point of the special relationship unless you use it to actually exercise special influence. she has failed to do that by refusing tojoin in influence. she has failed to do that by refusing to join in with other leaders in condemning this action. ultimately, of course, i think the great thing is american business has responded so positively and said, look, it doesn‘t matter what he is saying about the federal programme. we are getting on and we will deliver this. we know it is the future and we will work with the states, governors, the city mayors and we will deliver, and that is the real positive we should take away. 0 nto real positive we should take away. 0nto the viewers‘ questions coming to us by text, twitter, e—mail and facebook, let‘s run through a small selection. i am confused by labour‘s sta nce selection. i am confused by labour‘s stance on brexit. what will brexit look like under labour government? 0k, look like under labour government? ok, the first thing that will be different to the way the conservatives are approaching the brexit negotiations, we will see
5:38 pm
that the 3 million people living and working in this country from europe, that they will be guaranteed their rights to stay here. that is important. both because it is morally the right thing to do, and also because economically it is absolutely in our best interests, they are running ourfactories, companies, working in ourfields and in our businesses, and of course many of them are operating in our health service and other public services. so it would be stupid to do anything else, but we would also look at that as a way of resetting the relationship between ourselves and the other 27 countries, so that the negotiations, instead of having this rancorous relationship between oui’ this rancorous relationship between our government and there is, so it actually begins from a point of partnership. the other key thing we will do is we will determine the negotiations on the basis of the best economic interest of this country. the conservatives have said they will determine the negotiations
5:39 pm
with the primacy being for our immigration policy. we see the immigration policy. we see the immigration policy. we see the immigration policy should serve the economic policy, not the other way around. we will rattle through the rest of the questions. well labour be able to form a cabinet of suitably experienced ministers? i suppose a question about... are the people on your front bench team experienced enough? good lord, yes. i was experienced enough? good lord, yes. iwasa experienced enough? good lord, yes. i was a minister in the departments, in northern ireland, in the department of trade and industry, and also in the department for environment. look at someone like john healey, very experienced minister in local government, housing, sat in previous shadow cabinets and the cabinet, absolutely. we have the talent. no doubt about that. a question about tuition fees. if labour does scrap tuition fees. if labour does scrap tuition fees. if labour does scrap tuition fees will everyone who has already been to university have there is scrapped as well? that is from nathan. what we have absolutely
5:40 pm
said is anybody going up to university, and that includes those going up to university this year, evenif going up to university this year, even if we can‘t get the legislation passed in time, we would then make sure they also did not have two... we would compensate them or make it retrospective so they did not have to pay in the future. 0k, pretty clear. how well labour safeguard against industrial action? industrial action like we saw in the 70s in britain, the winter of discontent and so on, if there are more nationalised industries? the great thing about the way we want to see labour malicious developers we wa nt see labour malicious developers we want cooperation between management and unions, and actually increasingly management in british companies are doing just that —— we wa nt to companies are doing just that —— we want to see labour develop with cooperation between management and unions. i think it is a great idea.
5:41 pm
how long will it take for railways to be nationalised under labour? 0ne of your clear proposals. how long would that take? every few years each franchise will come to an end, and as they do that franchise will be reviewed them probably taken back into public accountability in that way. so it will take a long time. it will be a long process, but it will happen gradually. russell asks what are your plans for a land value tax? this has been put forward as a replacement for the council tax. what will that mean to the average house owner? this is something very much at the beginning of looking at this. it is not something that is a firm policy that we have determined we are going to do, but it is something that i think is really interesting. to see the way in which the land of this country is still, believe it or not, still owned by
5:42 pm
about the 500 great families that have owned the majority of land in this country for 1000 years. so if you have a garden you would have to pay more? no, ithink you have a garden you would have to pay more? no, i think what we are looking at is lined in terms of the great land—holdings and great estates —— land in terms of the great land—holdings and great estates. isn‘t it extraordinary that five trusts, like the duke of westminster, the duke of devonshire, five trusts actually own the bulk of london? all the properties are leasehold properties and actually they keep on getting revenues from these year after year. we will squeeze in two or questions. what is labour‘s policy on helping first—time buyers? very quickly tell us first—time buyers? very quickly tell us that. build houses. build homes. 1 million homes in the first labour government, over the five—year
5:43 pm
period. the problem is the cost of housing now is so high, and because there are fewer houses, fewer houses being built today than since the 19205 being built today than since the 1920s under the conservatives. i really is they, the party of homeownership, now have 200,000 fewer homeowners than there were when labour left office in 2010 —— the irony is that they, the party of homeownership. do you think this fear with people of incomes over £80,000 a year who already pay the most tax should have to pay any more? 9596 of people in this country will not pay any more income tax or national insurance contributions under a labour government. anyone earning over £80,000 a year is earning over £80,000 a year is earning about almost three times the average salary. i think for every pound that they earn over that £80,000, for them to be asked to
5:44 pm
contribute 5p extra is not actually a huge burden, and i think what we need is a fairer society. if that is able to produce more money for our schools, where we have seen the funding cut, if it is able to produce a better outcome for those pensioners who are seeing under the government, they want to take away the triple lock, if we can‘t guarantee that triple lock for pensioners, if it means there will be decent social care for people in old age, without them having their homes taken away from them, i think thatis homes taken away from them, i think that is a very small price for a very small number of people to pay to make our society fairer and more equal. barry gardiner, thank you so much for coming in to answer the viewers‘ questions, and one of mine as well. rapid-fire! yes, rapid—fire, but we got through them. that is barry gardiner, labour‘s shadow secretary for international trade. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines:
5:45 pm
conservative candidate for south thanet, craig mackinlay, and two party workers, are charged over expenses claimed during the 2015 campaign. jeremy corbyn has accused theresa may of "subservience" to president trump, by failing to join fellow european leaders

11 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on