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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 3, 2017 12:00am-12:31am BST

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this is bbc world news. these are the headlines. president trump's income is fighting in defence of his solution to dump the paris climate change deal. voices across a wide spectrum of bondage points. the president made a thoughtful and important decision. —— advantage points. in other news, with the uk general election less than a week away the british prime minister and the man who seeks to replace her have been facing in a live tv audience. also in the programme... miranda hart takes on the role of miss hannigan in the london stage
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reduction of annie. isn't she too likeable to be a villain? —— production of annie. hello and welcome to bbc world news. the white house has defended donald trump's decision to pull the us out of the paris climate agreement. officials say it is up to other world uses to sit down and negotiate a deal. speaking at the white house, scott pruitt refused to say whether climate change was a hoax and described withdrawing from the agreement as a brave decision. the president made a very brave decision yesterday. he put america's interests first with respect to environmental agreements. interests first with respect to environmentalagreements. i appreciate his fortitude and
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leadership in this matter. the discussion of the last few weeks has been one of thoughtful deliberation. he had many voices across a wide spectrum of points. the president made an important decision for the benefit of the country. some us cities and states have still said they will cut emissions despite the us withdrawal. americans don't need washington to meet our paris commitment. americans are not going to let washington stand in the way of fulfilling it. that is the message that mayers, governors and business leaders across united states have been sending. i want the world to know the us will meet our paris commitment. as the us withdraws, mr bloomberg, one of the
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world's richest men in the un climate change envoy has offered to step in and meet that cost from his own foundation. earlier i spoke to david willis about the opposition the president is facing at home. there has been outrage here as there has been across the world. also some support in the rust belt states. they potentially stand to benefit from donald trump's decision. there is evidence of a grass roots revolt, if you like. the governors from california, washington and new york have come together to pledge they will continue to aspire to the standards set out in the paris accord. more than 90 us mayors have said the same thing. one of them, the mayor of new york, has said he will now be looking to surpass the previous goals under the paris accord. it is possible that,
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unwittingly, donald trump in doing this might have given impetus to the move to reduce greenhouse gas emissions here in the united states. interestingly, a poll carried out by yale universities suggests 69% of americans in every state believes the us should continue to participate in the paris accord. and some talk that some states will try to cut their own emissions and that donald trump is open to negotiations but not the deal that was already signed. that is right. he's has said he is willing to negotiate, renegotiating the paris accord or forging a new agreement on climate control. that has not gone down well in europe. european leaders have said no thank you. there is no plan b. mrtrump very said no thank you. there is no plan b. mr trump very keen to show that,
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as far as he is concerned, the door is open to further talks on this issue. i, a country attacked by donald trump has benefited from the climate it agreement. it has said it remains committed to the deal. —— climate agreement. this was expected to be india's energy future when the prime minister came to power three yea rs prime minister came to power three years ago. cole and lots of it. he's said economic growth was the priority. the forecast was that i, already the third biggest producer of greenhouse gases in the world, with treble emissions within the next 15 years. but things have changed more quickly than anyone expected. suddenly, instead of coal being the first recourse, renewable
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energy becomes the first recourse. the price of renewable energy has fallen fast. while it was 14 rupees, 20 us cents for a unit of electricity and as fallen to 2.5 rupees for a unit of electricity. that makes renewable energy cost effective. last year, one of the world's biggest solar plants opened here. india needs to massively increase the amount of power it produces. 300 million indians still have no access to electricity and the average indian uses a tenth of the average indian uses a tenth of the power of an american. india's emissions will have to increase. because of technological changes and efficiencies these emissions will increase at a slower rate and will probably stop increasing faster and ata probably stop increasing faster and at a lower level than everybody
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expected they would a few years ago. it is not that the indian government has suddenly been converted to the green cause. this is about economic, not ideology. arguably that makes it more significant. because, if doing the right thing is the most profitable thing where people are far more likely to want to do it. with the uk general election less than a week away, the british prime minister, theresa may, and jeremy corbyn have been taking questions from a television studio audience. they were questioned separately after m rs they were questioned separately after mrs may refused to debate directly with other party leaders. our political correspondent gave us more from westminster. one of the odd things that is a debate but not to debate really. it was a sustained period of questioning by members of
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the public, 45 minutes to each leader. that is something that is usual in these circumstances. mrs may has been focusing on brexit and negotiations to leave the eu. that is what she wanted to push tonight. you have to be prepared to go in there and recognising we are not going to get a bad deal. you talk all the time about a bad deal you will not act set. can you explain what in your mind would be a bad deal? on the one hand you have politicians in europe, some of whom are talking about punishing the uk for leading the eu. what they want to see in terms of that punishment isa to see in terms of that punishment is a bad deal for that you have politicians in the united kingdom who are willing to accept any deal. they would be accepting the worst possible deal at the highest possible deal at the highest possible price. mrs may was pressed on other domestic issues. there were
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awkward moments for her. she was asked about pay and about the process of applying for benefits and for disability benefits. she was not terribly happy with those questions. quite awkward to deal with. when jeremy corbyn‘s turn came, he focused solely on the refusal of mrs may to debate him directly.” focused solely on the refusal of mrs may to debate him directly. i am very sorry. this is not a debate, it isa very sorry. this is not a debate, it is a series of questions. it is a shame the prime minister has not taken part in the debate. we are very clear on brexit. a referendum took place, decision was reached, we are leaving the european union. secondly, we will immediately legislate in office to guarantee rights of eu nationals to remain in this country. secondly, we will negotiate with the european union to guarantee trade access to european
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markets and the conditions we have achieved through eu membership. it is crucial. a few wobbly moments for mr corbyn. he was pressed on allegations of anti—semitism within the labour party. also pressed hard on nuclear weapons and whether he would be prepared to use them at any time. his own view is at odds with his party. that is something he has had to handle. that keeps coming up during the campaign and he does not have a convincing answer. they say you cannot win an election with the tv appearances but you can lose one. that did not happen tonight but awkward moments on both sides. that did not happen tonight but awkward moments on both sidesm you are substantially in the lead you are substantially in the lead you do not agree to debate to opponents because there are only downsides. that is true notjust here but elsewhere. neither of them fell flat on their faces. there were put off their stride a little bit
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now and again. they will feel it is a good job done in terms of not missing out. whether it changes any minds in terms of next thursday is a different question. what next on the political trail? it is the last push. they will be crisscrossing the country trying to hammer home messages. you cannot do much new in terms of messaging. it takes a long time. to sink in. mrs may concentrating on brexit and issues of leadership. jeremy corbyn of the labour party concentrated on public services which is where labour is a lwa ys services which is where labour is always relatively strong. the poll is frankly are a bit over the place but they still suggest mrs may is in pole position. how big does she win if she wins? if it is not big enough, a party will not thank her for having called this election. now for having called this election. now for a look at some of the other main
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stories. police in germany have evacuated a music festival taking place in a western city because of fears of a possible terrorist attack. the festival draws tens of thousands of fans and is scheduled to run until sunday. police said they could not rule out the possibility of an attack. anti—government protests are continuing in northern morocco. the latest protests and a man was charged with threatening national security. it is the worst unrest in morocco for several years. a group of children conceived through ivf have won the right to have the doctor at the sperm bank tested. they believe he is their biological father. he is expected of having replaced the sperm with his own. he
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could have fathered around 60 children. ireland boss mike openly 93v children. ireland boss mike openly gay minister is now set to become the youngest leader in europe as ireland's next prime minister. he was voted in as leader of fine gael. he is expected to take over from end kenny in the next few weeks. leo is a new face of modern ireland. the son ofan a new face of modern ireland. the son of an immigrant, openly gay and four months he has been favourite to become this country's new prime minister. he set out his vision of leadership amid a sea of science. minister. he set out his vision of leadership amid a sea of scienceli leadership amid a sea of science.” think if my election has shown
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anything, it is that prejudice has no hold in this republic. and so every proud parent in ireland today can dream big dreams for their children. every boy and girl can know there is no limit to their ambitions, their possibilities, if they are given opportunities. leo varadkar‘s father was a doctor. he emigrated from india and married a nurse. he came out as gay following the introduction of same—sex marriage. he celebrated the yes vote on stage, a sign of social change in what many called catholic ireland. he is not one of these high—fiving types. that is not what is always needed. councillors know what is in him and that is steel and
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determination. the irish economy may have emerged from the time the bank crises and bailouts but brexit poses its own challenges. as head of minority government, leo varadkar is likely to find his leadership is tested sooner rather than later. stay with us here on bbc news. still to come... at least five people have been killed in the afghan capital after police opened fire on protesters angry at deteriorating security. in their biggest international is porting spectacle ever seen, many people have taken part in sporting events to help poverty in africa.
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taunting which led to scuffles, scuffles to fighting and fighting to full—scale riot as with all fans broke out after area. the whole world will mourn the deaths. here's the father of the indian people. aye the father of the indian people. aye the oprah winfrey show comes to an end. the chat show has made her one of the richest people on the planet. ginger spice has announced she has left the spice girls. i don't believe it. not jeremy left the spice girls. i don't believe it. notjeremy hanley well. why? this is bbc news. the headlines: their head of the us environmental protection agency, scott pruett, has
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said president trump's vision does not mean disengagement. with the uk general election less than a week away, the british prime minister and the man who seeks to replace her have faced a live television audience. mrs may refused to direct debate. when donald trump announced the decision to pull out of the paris climate accord where he justified it by saying he had been elected to represent the citizens of pittsburgh and not paris. the city's hit back, saying pittsburgh's stood with the world. our north america correspondent has been to pittsburgh to gauge reaction. pittsburgh, pennsylvania, twinned by the president with paris, maybe for its alliterative allure. this morning it was not hard to find citizens delighted by the decision.” was not hard to find citizens delighted by the decision. i think the president is trying to do everything he can which is good for
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the american people and that is what i like. it is about time that people put america first. he is doing it and showing up all of these agreements that are not fair for the united states when it is time they renegotiated and become fair. united states when it is time they renegotiated and become fainm united states when it is time they renegotiated and become fair. it was known as steel city, a manufacturing capital often shrouded in smoke. now it has remade itself as a hi—tech hub. it is the place where google is testing its driverless cars. you we re testing its driverless cars. you were in paris. i was one of the american representatives. resurgence has been based on green friendly policies. he has hit back on donald trump. his decision to withdraw is not only bad for the american
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economy but it weakens us as well. the slogan, make america great again reverberated most strongly. donald trump and not be president might not for the support he received in the rust belt states. they have become the critical battle ground. many voters here believe that the global anger over his paris decision offers proof of his determination to fight on their behalf. at this derelict steel plant we found something unexpected. the old economy meeting venue. employees from google on a day out learning about this region's industrial past. della mcgregor paris accord was to help stimulate the economy. green industries are really the future of the region. this industry is not. the post paris question for the us economy, is donald trump trying to revive old,
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declining industries in a way that impedes the development of the new? at least five people have died after police opened fire on demonstrators in the afghan capital, kabul. police used live bullets and tear gas to disperse the crowd. police fired water cannon and live bullets as protesters approached the presidential palace in kabul. it sells just metres from the site of wednesday's huge explosion. earlier in the day crowds had gathered, chantin in the day crowds had gathered, chant in slogans, calling on the president to resign and demanding will be done to prevent such attacks. there has been a lot of angerfrom the attacks. there has been a lot of anger from the crowd all day directed at anyone and everyone they hold responsible for the bloodshed.
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pakistan and the militant network, who they allege were responsible, the international forces for not providing enough security and the afg ha n providing enough security and the afghan government. some of those protesting were demanding the execution of a number of prisoners. the officials say it is hard to tell who is an attacker and who is not. they should come out into the street with us and i will show them. they should start by executing the prisoners they have. the protest began peacefully. five people were shot by police as clashes erupted between protesters and the authorities. look what they have done to us! they have shot matters. they have killed us in terrorist attacks. why should i be afraid to die today? there is real anger here at the deteriorating situation.
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officials say the country is doing all it can. we know we are fighting more than 20 international terrorist groups injapan. we are fighting the biggest terrorism. with the number of security forces we have, we are still doing very good. afghanistan often sees violence in the holy month of ramadan. and more attacks in the coming weeks. just before we 90, in the coming weeks. just before we go, it has been delighting family audiences on stage and screen. now annie is about to open in london's west end. this time around miss hannigan is being played by miranda hart. we have been to meet the three
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annie ‘s as they prepare for next week's opening night. the the show might be called annie but this particular west and production is all about miranda. it is quite a vulnerable place when you are the face on the poster. you think, are people wanting to knock me down? there is that thing. you're not very good at celebrating in this country, people. they preferred to pick on things they are not good at. does it feel in anyway a contemporary story? kind of. you can kind of relate to it with orphans. there are always going to be orphans in the world and a couple in syria and stuff. old—fashioned stories in today's's life. who has got the worst american
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accent? that is a harsh question. probably me. i was going to say that. yes, no, i'm fine. that is a great idea. basically, i am that. yes, no, i'm fine. that is a great idea. basically, iam moving on. miranda hart made her name in a sitcom. what advice does she have to give? having fun and not getting caught in any trappings of wanting it to be about fame or money. that doesn't bring you happiness. in the newspapers today there has been talk of miranda coming back.” newspapers today there has been talk of miranda coming back. i like the idea possibly of miranda and gary being married and that could possibly be a sitcom. don't get
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married. i possibly be a sitcom. don't get married. lam possibly be a sitcom. don't get married. i am the best man.” possibly be a sitcom. don't get married. i am the best man. i miss that character and that family but whether i will start writing it again, i don't know. she has plenty to be getting on with, not least living her dream and starring in this west and musical. the rebirth of annie the musical. a reminder of our top story which focuses on news from america where the former mayor of new york says cities and businesses across united states of america are determined to meet their commitments to fight climate change. that, of course, despite president trump's decision to withdraw from the paris accord. plenty more on the website about that plus an analysis from our correspondents across america. this is abc news. —— bbc news. a mixture of sunny spells and
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showers. friday was notjust as straightforward as you can see why i'm going back to friday in a second. it started well enough and then looking a bit threatening. many of you were getting tied up with the weather front which had of you were getting tied up with the weatherfront which had pressure of you were getting tied up with the weather front which had pressure are on the western flank but warm, moist, muggy air turning on the western flank but warm, moist, muggy airturning into thunderstorms in parts of east anglia and the south—east. that is why many of you ended up looking like that. there was localised flooding due to the heavy downpours. the muggy air was still there. remnants of the old weather front producing rain across the north—eastern parts of england. in the west we have the finest conditions to start the day. one or two showers from the word go. they are there through the western side of scotland. out towards the east we
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still get the overhang of cloud and the remnants of friday's weather. rather murky conditions on the eastern side of the pennines and the eastern side of the pennines and the eastern side of scotland as well. on through the day let's see how things are shaping up. a lot of shows and weddings planned. as we get on through the day, the bulk of the showers will be found across central parts of scotland and northern ireland. fewer showers across the western side of england and wales as well. all the while, the merc drifting up the eastern shores. eventually the east of england will improve as the bulk of the cloud and showery rain comes to lie across the eastern side of scotland. that is saturday. into sunday, and i think it isa saturday. into sunday, and i think it is a fairly quiet start for central and eastern parts. later on we will bring more in the way of shari raine into the south west and
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parts of wales perhaps. a slightly fresher feel to the day. not, parts of wales perhaps. a slightly fresherfeel to the day. not, but two —— some of the gusts of wind easily in excess of 50 miles an hour. here we are as far ahead as tuesday. a slightly simplified area of low pressure still providing a showery regime across all parts of the british isles. a coolerfeel as well considering the wind is between the west and north west. bad at all. hope you can enjoy, goodbye. this is bbc news, the headlines...
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the head of the us environmental protection agency, scott pruitt, said president trump's decision to exit the paris climate accord does not mean disengagement. he said world leaders could decide whether to negotiate a new deal. the former new york mayor michael bloomberg said americans will meet their commitments on climate change, and said cities, states and companies we re said cities, states and companies were coming together and washington would not stop them. the son of an indian immigrant who is ireland's first openly gay minister is now set to become its prime minister. the over that coal is elected as the biggest party in ireland's coalition government. a dutch court ruled dna tests can be carried out on items belonging to a dead doctor in a case brought by people conceived at a fertility clinic. —— leo varadkar. now on bbc news, asian network's big election debate.
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