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tv   The Travel Show  BBC News  June 3, 2017 5:30am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines: theresa may and jeremy corbyn have been facing questions from voters in the final televised debate before next week's general election. mrs may stressed that she was the best person to lead brexit negotiations and mr corbyn promised a left—wing alternative to the government's planned spending cuts. elected leaders of several american states and cities, including california and new york, have pledged to meet greenhouse gas emission targets regardless of president trump's announcement that he will withdraw the united states from the paris agreement on combatting climate change. the new leader of the biggest party in ireland's coalition government, fine gael, is leo varadkar — the son of an indian immigrant who is ireland's first openly gay minister. aged 38, he is set to become ireland's youngest prime minister in a few weeks‘ time. now let's take a brief look at some of this morning's front pages.
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we start with the mirror which leads with the conservative candidate for south thanet, craig mackinlay, being charged with breaking electoral law. the tories have said the allegations are unfounded. the election is also the main story on the express — with snp leader nicola sturgeon saying she'd be willing to enter coalition talks with labour, if the result is inconclusive. the mail cites research, which suggests statins can dramatically cut the risk of dying from breast cancer. the telegraph says defence secretary michael fallon has pledged high earners won't face an income tax increase, if the conservatives remain in power after the election. and the guardian says labour has accused the tories of using fake news ads to attackjeremy corbyn. now on bbc news, time
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for the travel show. this week on the travel show i am in a city that spans two continents and 3000 years of history. also on this week was make travel show, we are shaking things up in singapore. we are ata shaking things up in singapore. we are at a bar in london where the stereo costs more than a house.“ you like music it will blow your mind. and our global guru chap -- tackles the choice of rail, road or plane. take the train. istanbul really is a city like no
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other. on the banks of the mighty bosporus strait, it was founded over greeks, who named it by zandi. later, the romans made the capital of their eastern empire, changing its name to constantinople in honour of the emperor constant time. for over 500 years it was the seat of power could assault on civil the ottoman empire. built at the crossroads of europe and asia, it is tu rkey‘s crossroads of europe and asia, it is turkey's largest and best—known city. i got in on the redeye flight, which is 11 hours from singapore, but had a bit of a rest and i'm ready to explore the city. i'm going to meet up with a man called seddah, who promises to take me around. wohling a spate of terrorist attacks and a failed military coup, 3016 was dubbed the year that tourists forgot
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turkey. traditionally around 10 million people visit istanbul every year, but those numbers have fallen drastically. now the city is keen to do all it can to reassure tourists and entice them back. how are you? you must be seddah. to meet you. what do you plan to me? we will be exploring the city, going to some of the major sites, trying some different turkish foods. and also a hamam, which is a turkish bar. you like to freshen up? i think that would be good, i have a five dock shadow. —— five o'clock. tucked down many sidestreets in istanbul you will find plenty of old school barbours like this one, where you can geta barbours like this one, where you can get a haircut are a traditional shave with a cutthroat razor and hot towel, all at a knockdown price. dating back to the days when many homes in istanbul had no running water, they are still popular with the locals who come here to meet, socialise and freshen up. this is
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the bit i get worried about. now, this is something i haven't experienced. a nostril haircut. so this is the way to take the little has that you probably can't even see. “— has that you probably can't even see. —— little hairs. he is burning the hair in the years. i can smell it! much better. a brand—new man. as the centre of the ottoman empire for around 500 years, istanbul's wealth and influence grew, and each new ruler or salt and was keen to leave his mark on the city. —— sultan. seddah has offered to show me perhaps the most impressive. this
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is the mosque of sulemain. sulemain was the ottoman emperor who ruled for 47 years. this is the biggest imperial mosque in istanbul. this mosque was financed by the sultan. they were all built in seven years. this stands on the slopes of the hill, so from most parts of the city, you can see this mosque. napoleon once said that if all the world were one country, then this city would hear its capital. running through the heart of istanbul is the mighty bosporus. on one side sits europe, on the other, asia. for thousands of years, it has carried cargo and passengers between the two, and also served as a gateway between the black sea and the mediterranean, making this one of the most important stretches of water in the world. and a nice view, as well. yes. tragically, it was
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here on the banks of the bosporus that terrorists struck on new year's eve, 2016, when they attacked an open—air nightclub. it was just the latest in a series of incidents that should confidence and badly affect the city's already struggling tourist industry. but seddah says he is hopeful things will improve. well, those very unfortunate attacks made everybody scared, you know? it scared us as well. it scared the people who were thinking of coming here. the only way i think we can ove 1120 m e here. the only way i think we can overcome this is to not be scared, and continue our lives. that will be the first art in point, i think for things to get better. —— starting point. istanbul is not the only capital city that has suffered a downturn because of terrorism. hotels and downturn because of terrorism. hotels a nd restau ra nts downturn because of terrorism. hotels and restaurants in paris were badly affected following a spate of attacks on there which kept tourists away, although things are slowly improving. people here in istanbul
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hope that the introduction of a new tourist police force will hope to rebuild confidence in a number of hotels are also offering substantial discounts during courage travellers to return. this is the spice market, built on the 16th century, for the trading of spices. i can smell that spice in the hour. it is making me a bit hungry, actually. let me introduce you to my friend here. she is going to introduce you to traditional turkish cheeses. is going to introduce you to traditional turkish cheeseslj is going to introduce you to traditional turkish cheeses. i will see you soon, then. 0k. traditional turkish cheeses. i will see you soon, then. ok. this place is packed, isn't it? yes, it is always packed. look at the choice. and all of this is from turkey, is it? these are all from turkey, different regions. they are from different regions. they are from different cities, they all have different cities, they all have different textures, different tastes. this is our main staple for breakfast. this is our most
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favourite cheese. so breakfast cheese, i would favourite cheese. so breakfast cheese, iwould imagine favourite cheese. so breakfast cheese, i would imagine it being a little bit easier, lighter? we are never lighter with cheese, no. totally wrong! this next she's actually reminds me of parmesan or something like that. —— cheese. actually reminds me of parmesan or something like that. -- cheese. this one was made injuly, when we had a south—west wind. one was made injuly, when we had a south-west wind. it is just one was made injuly, when we had a south-west wind. it isjust a little details. just changing the profiles. this one is usually made around springtime. they are made exactly the same, but they have different texture, different tastes. this is probably one of my favourites, actually. you should eat this with some crunchy bread. yeah, a bit of olive oil. some olives, perhaps. perhaps, why not. to make those, even. when in rome. yes, when in rome. when in istanbul. as my day comes to an end here in istanbul, seddah tells me he has one
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last treat in store for me. we are off to one of the oldest turkish baths, or hamams in the city. this is rather grand. first opened in the 16th century, it is built on a site that dates back to roman times. beautiful. the first thing you really notice is that fit this in there. —— thickness in the air. it is so humid in here. cold water! he has got what looks to be a pillow sack and has just filled it with soapy water. once you squeeze it out, these subs come out. i have enjoyed my day here in istanbul. its history, food and
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culture are remarkable. but for me, it is perhaps its location which makes it special. on the border between europe and asia, there is undeniably something beguiling about a place that has seen so much change during its almost 3000 years of history, but remains unique whatever current problems it may face. next on the travel show, the first ina next on the travel show, the first in a series of films exploring the food and drink of my hometown, singapore. we are starting with a taste of its most famous drink, the singapore sling. my name is leslie. i am the
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resident historian of raffles hotel. i have been with this hotel for 45 yea rs. i have been with this hotel for 45 years. singapore was founded by raffles a nd years. singapore was founded by raffles and we were under british administration as a british colony. most of the british air came to raffles hotel for their meals and drinks. they were meeting here very often. the young british men would sit under the veranda, drinking their whiskeys or virgin and tonics. at the british ladies were not supposed to be seen drinking alcoholic averages in public. the bartender saw this and said, i must do something for the ladies. he finally reached the conclusion that he would takejim, cherry liquor,
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pineapplejuice, limejuice, he would takejim, cherry liquor, pineapple juice, lime juice, a he would takejim, cherry liquor, pineapplejuice, limejuice, a dash of bitters, and he used the grenadine to give it a pink hue. it was created in 1915. wejust celebrated the 100 anniversary in 2015. -- celebrated the 100 anniversary in 2015. —— hundreds. it is a camouflage drink, you know? because of the grenadine, it has a sweet taste. still to come on this week's travel show, we are pulling the plug on modern tech to listen to music the old—fashioned way. modern tech to listen to music the old-fashioned way. this is like i have just flown first class. why would i want to go back to economy now? welcome to the part of the show that
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looks at your questions and getting the best out of trouble. coming up, memphis to new orleans by train, plane, or automobile. and the best european city break at christmas. but first, jon kay asks... even though mauritius is south of the equator, it is at its best in the northern summer. and it is easily combined with south africa, thanks to frequent flights from london and johannesburg. but i think mozambique is also very accessible and equally rewarding. the eastern boundary of
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the kruger national park is the frontier between zambia and mozambique. head for maputo, then up the coast to see some of the best of the coast to see some of the best of the beaches on the indian ocean. accommodation is improving all the time, and prices up pleasingly low. michelle ables asks... —— abels. take the train. the distance between these two cities is almost 400 miles. you would imagine there would be direct flights between the two cities, but i can't find any. a connection at atlanta would involve a big detour. the road journey is straightforward, south along the i55 freeway and take six or seven hours.
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but it is not one of the great american drives, and when you arrive in yourlimbs american drives, and when you arrive in your limbs covered the parking can be challenging. so i recommend the train south at 6:50am any data you like. you would arrive atjust under nine hours later. —— new o rlea ns. under nine hours later. —— new orleans. you can experience the marvellous american railroad frizell is $49, available on most days, if you book in advance. —— forjust $49. mrs shaker asks... amsterdam is my choice, because of the wonderful rijksmuseum. christmas day is an excellent time to see the collection
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without the usual crowds, and for my money, the finest distillation of the golden age on the planet, with rembrandt‘s nightwatch getting price place. many shops will be close on christmas day, but in all the usual tourist areas, most cafes and restau ra nt tourist areas, most cafes and restaurant will be open. intel is getting there, amsterdam has excellent links from across europe. and you also can travel around happily. dutch railways operates the same basic schedule every day of the year. whether you watching in london 01’ year. whether you watching in london or mogadishu, e—mail us at... and i will do my best to find you the best deal. goodbye —— could to now, and the next.
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finally, on the travel show, we all used to storing and streaming endless amounts of music on our phones. but we look for places in london where the records take centre stage. when i am not on the travel show, i do this on monday to friday. i play songs in talk in between. the music that i play comes from a server. music that i play comes from a server. their attacks are there, but i hardly use. on my way into the radio show, elicited musical my phone. but today, aimed am there to meet some people who believe that music should be appreciated and enjoyed the fashion way. —— there are some deck. —— the old—fashioned
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way. is the old technology really better than the new? this is —— this is gearbox records. -- this is gearbox records. all this couldn't work. we are producing sounds from analogue and from digital, which are really the best one can do at the moment. so we are mixing the best of ancient and modern to greet sound. mixing the best of ancient and modem to greet sound. normally, you hit it was a final is best for sound quality. when we do a plant between analogue and digital in here, almost analogue and digital in here, almost a body can tell the difference. the music sounds a little bow together. digital is quite crystalline, and immediately quite beguiling, but over time, i think it is easier to listen to. i am my way now to a place in kings cross, with a
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classic bitter vinyl, as well, because i have heard that this place has got a money is no object to its attitude —— money is no object attitude —— money is no object attitude to it sound system. i had to check it out. we went into this with a no, me ‘s approach. it is going to improve the sound, we will going to improve the sound, we will go for it. that is that every level. —— nothing is too expensive approach. the equipment is off the scale. it is in deep audiophile territory. you are unlikely to hear or see anything like this in public, but if you like music, it will blow your mind. if you close your eyes
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and just focus on one of the instruments, or you can hearjust that in absolute clarity. it is like you could move your way around through the band. this is like i have just flown first class. why would i want to go back to economy, now? ijust would i want to go back to economy, now? i just express would i want to go back to economy, now? ijust express the good life. i do want to go back. just leave me here. now, ialways do want to go back. just leave me here. now, i always think that music is best when it is a shared experience. you think of a concert ora experience. you think of a concert or a nightclub da nazol. experience. you think of a concert or a nightclub danazol. nothing
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beats it. but there are a bunch of people they get together in one of london's coolest neighbourhoods and listen to an entire album on final from start to finish. —— dancehall. i love vinyl. i been collecting records for either want italy tell you how many decades, but for long time. i wouldn't say it is all about audio. it is always about the music first and foremost. people want to come here to listen to what their favourite outings or one they don't even know, because they want to spirited a different way, get behind it, get its context, and have a shared listening experience with other people. they also want to take time out of their week where they can sit back, telephone off, and just listen to music. i often listen to music that has a lot of memory for me from when i was growing up.
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normally, you might listen to a song or something, but to listen to an album from start to finish, and is really focus on that, that is a real treat. i think is good to listen to it with other people, too. that is why people go to live performances. is interesting to go to... isl why people go to live performances. is interesting to go to... is i go to the cinema, really, isn't it? 1967 was the completely transformative year 1967 was the completely tra nsformative year and rock 1967 was the completely transformative year and rock and p0p- transformative year and rock and pop. piper at the gates of dawn, named from the wind in the willows. —— wind. named from the wind in the willows. -- wind. just lately me go to a tasting restaurant for little flavours, you gathered together here to share in music and people are stimulator to their ears. tomorrow,
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i will be back, playing songs from a computer server. but as for today, i have never heard music sound quite so have never heard music sound quite so alive as it does on these records. i'm afraid that is all the time we have this week, the coming of next week, christa has two chile to visit a town gazetted by an earthquake and tsunami seven years ago, but has been rebuilt and reborn and is welcoming tourists. catch that if you can, but for me, and the rest of the travel show team here in turkey, it is goodbye. hello.
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we'll do the easy bit first and then i'll give you the forecast, which is probably the bit you're after, anyway. a mixture of sunny spells and showers. friday was notjust as straightforward. you'll see why go back to friday in a moment. it started well enough, then it started to look more threatening. that is probably because many of you were getting tied up with the weather front, which had fresher air on its western flank, but ahead of it, warm, moist, muggy air, which turned into thunderstorms in parts of east anglia and the south—east, which is why some of you and your day looking more like that. yes, there were some localised flooding, due to be heavy downpours. and that muggy air is still there to be had, as we start saturday across this south—eastern quarter. the remnants of the old weather front still producing some rain across north—eastern parts of england. and it's out through the west that we see the finest conditions of the day. one or two showers to start the day across the western—facing coasts and hills.
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and they're there, too, through the western side of scotland. but it is out towards the east that we saw that overhang of cloud, the remnants of friday's weather, if you like. still enough about the cloud to create murky conditions east of the pennines and on the eastern side of scotland, too. let's get you on through the day, and see how things will shape up. i know there are a lot of shows and weddings planned for tomorrow. as we get through the day, the bulk of the showers will be found across central and northern parts of scotland, through, northern ireland, too, and fewer showers, but still there to be had, across the western side of england and wales. that murk will just drift up the eastern shores and eventually, i think, the eastern side of england will improve as the bulk of that cloud and showery rain comes to lie there across the eastern side of scotland. so that's saturday. on into sunday, and i think it will be a quiet start for central
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and eastern parts, again. later on, i think we will see more showery rain in the south—west and into parts of wales, perhaps. and a slightly fresher feel through the day. this is monday. look at this. not one, two, but three areas of low pressure. this being the real driver of the weather. they could bring 50 millimetres of rain to you. so watch out for that dry start. it won't last like that across england and wales. in some of the gusts of wind easily in excess of 50 miles an hour. here we are as far ahead as tuesday. and a slightly simplified area of low pressure still providing a really showery regime across all parts of the british isles. and a coolerfeel, too, given that the wind is somewhere between the west and the north—west. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. tough questions for both theresa may and jeremy corbyn, as they face a television audience of voters. my
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my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i earn today. how can that be fair? will you allow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us? it will be too late to start talking them. the prime minister was forced to defend the government's record public spending, while mr corbyn denied he would be weak on defence. we will put more money into the nhs but there is no magic money tree. any circumstance where someone is prepared to use a nuclear weapon is disastrous for the entire planet.
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