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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 3, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. tough questions for both theresa may and jeremy corbyn, as they face a television audience of voters. my my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i earn today. how can that be fair? will you allow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us? it will be too late to start talking them. the prime minister was forced to defend the government's record public spending, while mr corbyn denied he would be weak on defence. we will put more money into the nhs but there is no magic money tree. any circumstance where someone is prepared to use a nuclear weapon is disastrous for the entire planet. good morning, it's saturday the third ofjune.
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also ahead: ariana grande returns to manchester and visits children in hospital, injured in the arena bombing. hope for ovarian cancer patients, as the early trial of a new drug shows promising results. in sport, it's the biggest prize in european club football, and cardiff is preparing to host the final of the champions league betweenjuventus and real madrid, for whom, welsh star gareth bale is hoping to play on home soil. meanwhile, i've been getting to grips with the post war sport of cycle speedway. as a new production of annie opens in london — we hearfrom its star miranda hart about her west end debut. suddenly doing something new when you are known for other things was intimidating now i love it. i totally love it.
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and ben has the weather. good morning. we have swept away the warmth and humidity from the last few days. a cool and fresh weekend ahead with spells of sunshine, a few showers and the details coming up. first, our main story. theresa may and jeremy corbyn have faced tough questions from a tv audience, just days before the general election. they were challenged separately in a special edition of question time in york. mrs may faced uncomfortable questions about nhs funding. while mr corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use the uk's nuclear deterrent. our political correspondent vicky young was there. they came here hoping to persuade people that they have what it takes to lead the country. no—one expected an easy ride but from the start it was clear that this would be a testing evening. theresa may was accused of being untrustworthy, of
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changing her mind on calling an election had on policies such as social care. others were angry about funding for schools and hospitals. my funding for schools and hospitals. my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today. how can that be fair? we have had to ta ke can that be fair? we have had to take hard choices across the public sector in relation to pay restraint. we did that because of the decisions we had to take to bring public spending under control as it was not under control under the previous labour government. brexit is why theresa may said she called this election. she said she was determined to deliver. we take this opportunity of brexit, new trade deals around the rest of the world, seeing how we can build a prosperous stronger and fairer britain. i think we can do that and i think we can do that because i believe in britain and the british people. forjeremy corbyn, this was a chance to prove he was ready to take the top job in politics. he was unapologetic about plans to raise taxes for companies
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and higher earners. where will skilled workers come from tomorrow? where are the consumers of tomorrow? i think we looked at our society and used public investment in order to improve services and give real chances to everybody. poverty is a waste. but jeremy corbyn had his most difficult moment when he was pressed to say whether or not he would ever use nuclear weapons. would you allow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and then start talking? it will be too late. no, of course not. the general election is less than one week away. this was a great opportunity for voters to see both the people will wa nt to voters to see both the people will want to be brymon is a full setting out their vision but coming under real pressure over policies. but hope that this will be the moment when the public swings behind them. one of theresa may's most senior ministers has said a future conservative government would not raise income tax — even for high earners.
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the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, told the daily telegraph the party was "not in the business of punishing people for getting on". labour has already said it would increase income tax rates to 45 pence in the pound for those earning more than £80,000. the singer ariana grande has visited fans in hospital who were injured in the terror attack at her manchester concert. the star spent time with youngsters at the royal manchester children's hospital in a surprise appearance ahead of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow. simonjones reports. the smiles say it all. fans like this eight—year—old girl who was still recovering from her injuries in hospital, reading the singer who means so much to them. the children had been getting ready for bed when the star arrived unexpectedly, bringing gifts and signing autographs. there were thanks as
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well for the nurses. and tomorrow she will perform at a concert to raise funds for the victims and theirfamilies. the raise funds for the victims and their families. the 22 lives are lost have been at saint ann ‘s square which has become the focal point for those wish to pay tribute, to contemplate and to grieve. the manchester city council says that this may be the last weekend the flowers remain in place as it needs to look at relocating them respectively. it will now consider setting up a permanent memorial in the city. it is a must. the 22 who died... just have to have something thatis died... just have to have something that is a testament to what happened. i think people will want to come for ever, just to pay their respects, really because, as i say, it should not have happened and they we re it should not have happened and they were babies, won't they? and should have been the night of their life and it wasn't. it is sad. a big
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heart was all of the names on the date of birth of all of them would bea date of birth of all of them would be a good idea. alongside the remembrance, the police operation goes on. last night a car was taken away which they say could be significant to their investigation. police will be out again in force for tomorrow's concert. just after eight we will be speaking to lily harrison's dad adam about that encounter with ariana grande. a new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described as very promising after a small clinical trial. charities have called it an important step in treating a cancer with few drug options. developed by the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden nhs foundation trust, the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part in the trial. the drug enters a cell exactly like
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folic acid or vitamin b nine. the difference is it does not involve getting into normal selves. that is why this drug attacks the tumour and you see an encouraging tumour response but you do not see side—effects like diarrhoea, hair loss or susceptibility to infections as you see another chemotherapy patients. —— in other chemotherapy patients. statins — which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol — could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%, according to a new study. scientists in china who analysed research involving 200,000 women, found patients who took the drug were less likely to see their cancer return. charities have welcomed the news but say more clinical trials are needed. the consumer group which is calling on british airways to create an automatic compensation system for passengers who are affected
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by serious flight—delays and cancellations. it comes a week after a major it failure caused hundreds of the airline's flights to be grounded. here's our business correspondent joe lynam. the images of the week from ba. we rear passengers waiting for flights, some of which ended up being cancelled. the compensation bill could exceed £100 million for the airline. ba says it will treat customers fairly and refund legitimate expenses but consumer advocates say that is not enough. in advocates say that is not enough. in a letter to the chief executive it says it compensation should be automatic for patients out passengers out of pocket. they should not have to apply directly to airlines for a refund. an automated system would seem time and money for ba as well is prevent companies from making profit from misery of others. people are entitled to money but they are not given it automatically. passengers are often not realising what they are entitled to. the airlines compete compensation because they know what's what you we re because they know what's what you were wrong and what you are entitled
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to and we think that should be the rules. there are other sectors in energy and water where you are automatically paid compensation if you do not receive servers. in response, ba said it had put additional resources into its call centres to process claims quickly as possible. one group that is not out of pocket are investors in ba's pa rent of pocket are investors in ba's parent company and. its shares were up parent company and. its shares were up this week despite the whirlwind you are by customers. —— despite the world end you would by customers. over 174 balls fans are due in cardiff this weekend. good morning, thomas. the sun is shining and there isa thomas. the sun is shining and there is a real concern and focus on security. what will be an amazing match, won't it? a beautiful morning
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here today that, actually, the players playing in the national stadium later on this evening will not be witnessing these conditions as the roof has been closed in cardiff for security reasons. i was walking through the centre of town to get here this morning and you can see the huge police presence on the street. 1500 additional officers from neighbouring forces have come in to help in this operation. today they are as offences around the centre of cardiff and the roads have been blocked off so there are expected to be delays for people coming in and leaving. they ask fans to arrive at least two hours before into the stadium as there will be additional security checks. this was a lwa ys additional security checks. this was always going to be a massive security operation for card of before the atrocities in manchester but last thursday just gone before the atrocities in manchester but last thursdayjust gone now, the football association of wales confirmed that this was the largest scale security operation for any of its sporting events in the uk. many
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people looking forward. thank you very much. and if you thought that was a big competition, you have seen nothing yet. the main competition this weekend is spelling. ok... it matters. it mattered to the competitors of an annual spelling bee in america. we have been taking a look. could you repeat the word? from 11 million entrants, a 12 hour final and it all came down to this one word. m a r 0 seat a i n. and how do you spell dumbstruck? you could be forgiven for thinking it mattered less to the 12—year—old girland more to mattered less to the 12—year—old girl and more to herfather. mattered less to the 12—year—old girl and more to her father. this is an institution in the united states and a monopoly for indian americans. this was the 13th time in the world and indian—american took the trophy.
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how difficult can it be? he was the showman this year. cockie does not a lwa ys showman this year. cockie does not always mean correct. and when this young boy stumbled over this world the game was up. so the trophy the kudos and the $40,000 first prize goes to this young girl. it leaves the rest of australian the wake of junior genius. here is one more for you. can you spell inadequate? did you. can you spell inadequate? did you know the meaning of those words? no, i had trouble with the definitions. did you know what's mogollon was? it is an archaeological culture of indigenous people. and the other will work? it
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was a type of grass. not only do both of us not know how to spell these words, we'd had not even heard of them. this is call my bluff at 14 minutes past six. the saturday morning papers, let's have a quick look. the debate finished at ten o'clock last night so many papers are struggling to get it on the front page. the guardian managed on a later edition. they said the prime minister faulted a later edition. they said the prime ministerfaulted as she a later edition. they said the prime minister faulted as she was challenged over her record on public services. but most of the online pundits seem to think that both candidates scored hits and misses last night. in scotland yesterday, with will looking at this story. nicola sturgeon saying she will help jeremy corbyn. there is talk of if there is a coalition or if the snp needs tojoin there is a coalition or if the snp needs to join hands with the labour party and the snp will shore up the jeremy corbyn government if there is an inconclusive election result is
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that she she would not necessarily be part of a coalition but progressive issue by issue talks. trying to get to the bottom of the daily telegraph story for you later, the tory tax pledge with suggestions overnight from boris jens, johnson that they make pledge more strongly than they have done in the manifesto but they will not do it via income tax. if not, where will the money come from? we will be talking to a former secretary at around ten past eight about that. it is quarter past six. and the weather is glorious ahead of the champions league match. ben, good morning. will it be like that for everyone? y-e-s. well, y—e—s. well, not that simple. there is some nice weather, some spells of sunshine, but one or two match ours
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as well. having said that, for many it will be a lovely start. this picture is from our weather watcher in st ives, cornwall. as i mentioned, there will be some passing showers to content with. one thing we have lost is the warmth and humidity over the past few days, swept away by a weather front. as band of cloud, which brought some of the thunderstorms yesterday. the cloud still hanging around for the time being across parts of eastern and south—eastern england. yorkshire, lincolnshire, east anglia and the south—east will have a disappointing start with some cloud, outbreaks of ah chee rain and the odd heavy burst. —— patchy rain. we can odd heavy burst. —— patchy rain. we ca n start odd heavy burst. —— patchy rain. we can start the day with a slice of sunshine further north, a bit chilly, perhaps the odd fog patches well. fine for much of scotland. extra cloud the eastern and north—eastern areas and northern ireland. that is summed extra showers showing their hands across western scotland and northern ireland. —— notice some extra showers. these will pep up later in the day, and we could see heavy thundery downpours in scotland. we
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will lose the patchy rain from the south—east, so things will improve here. lots of dry weather across england and wales generally. temperatures down on where they have been. so for the big match in cardiff tonight, even to services real madrid, the champions league final, it should be fine. let sunshine, temperatures dipping away as the match goes on. we will see a few hours of sunshine for a time, leading us into a dry night for nearly everybody, with temperatures in towns and cities dipping to around 8— 11. tomorrow it is another day of sunshine and showers. more of the same in many ways. many places starting dry. the showers get going across parts of northern england, northern ireland and scotland. late in the day it will cloud of red for the south—west and wales with some showery rain here as well. temperatures cool around fresher than recently. not feeling too bad in the sunshine, 16— 20 degrees. i have to briefly show you what happens as we head into the start of next week it has things look like
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they will turn much more unsettled from the west. areas of low pressure swarming and ready to bring us somewhat, potentially quite windy weather as we had on through monday. that rain will sweep in from the south—west, potentially with some strong winds as well. for the weekend, not looking too bad. a mix of sunshine and showers. lets down saturday and sunday, that doesn't look so nice. it is 6:18am. it's now time to joinjames king and ben brown for the film review. they're taking a look at the latest cinema releases, including wonder woman and after the storm. hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. taking us through this week's cinema releases as james king. james, what do you have for us? a globetrotting week this week. from america via ancient greece, we have dc‘s new superhero
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blockbuster wonder woman. and from japan, the quiet and pensive drama after the storm. and from france and switzerland, stop motion animation, my switzerland, stop motion animation, my life as a courgette. if nothing else, that is one of the best titles of the year, isn't it? it certainly is, it is intriguing. let's begin with wonder woman. it has had some pretty good reviews, actually. yes, a good ours. we had a bit more than eclipse of wonder woman last year in batman versus superman, a fairly painful experience, but she was good in it. then she is going to bejust this week later on this year, again with batman and batman and superman and various other superheroes. this is her on her own, a stand—alone movie directed by pattyjenkins. it is an origin story, so where did she come from? she has never referred to as wonder woman in the movie, she is diana prince. we hear about are up ringing on this remote, magical
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island created ivy ancient greeks, run by these amazonian warrior women. we learn about her involvement in the first world war. this is gal gadot, she is with chris pyne, an american pilot and despite a crash lands on this magical island where she lives, and is taken prisoner. —— chris pine. where she lives, and is taken prisoner. -- chris pine. my, uh... my name is steve trevor, pilot, american expeditionary forces. that is all i am at liberty to say. assigned to british intelligence. what the hell is this thing? the compels you to reveal the truth. what the hell is this thing? the compels you to reveal the truthfi is really hot. what is your mission? whoever you are, you more danger than you think. what is your mission? i am a spy. i am a spy. i
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ama mission? i am a spy. i am a spy. i am a spy. i suppose we are used to seeing all the male superheroes. superman and iron man and so on. but this is a female superhero. it feels different and refreshing because of that. also with pattyjenkins, a female director, as well. having said that, a lot of it, and part of the reason i enjoyed it, is that it feels quite old —fashioned the reason i enjoyed it, is that it feels quite old—fashioned and traditional. what i mean by that is that it has this refreshing lack of cynicism. i remember in the 19805 and early 19905 when some of what u5 as were not things to be embarrassed about. they were full of fun, happiness, joy, rather campy. thi5 i5 happiness, joy, rather campy. thi5 is like that. certainly a lot of dc comic book movies like suicide squad from last year, they have been pretty cynical and pretty moody and fairly miserable. they have done very well but they haven't exactly been full of fun. wonder woman is fun. and it feels like stand—alone movie, that doesn't particular connect to anything else. it doesn't
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particular connect to the rest of the dc world. it has, 5hock horror, a beginning and a middle and an end. and it makes sense. if you don't like it movies, if you have never seen another comic movie, you could watch this and still enjoy it. i think that is why people love it so much. we also have a japanese film, after the storm. yes, written and directed by hirokazu koreeda. he is a great filmmaker of family dramas. our little sister i5 a great filmmaker of family dramas. our little sister is a few years old, it is well worth seeing. thi5 one is about a writer who is washed up. he had some early success but in his up. he had some early success but in hi5 middle up. he had some early success but in his middle ages he is struggling to write again, and actually use gambling more than he is writing. he i5a gambling more than he is writing. he is a strange from his son and his ex—wife. he has a difficult relationship with his mother. they are brought together in his mother's flat one night while they are sheltering from a tornado. it does ta ke sheltering from a tornado. it does take quite a while to get to that point and certainly for maybe the first half—hour you do wonder where this is going. but actually, i think that meandering quality tyre5 i5
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ultimately its real power. it is a film that takes things 5lowly, it allows characters to blossom 5lowly, it allows us to get to know them slowly. and it is the antithesis, really, the hyperactive block u5. slowly. and it is the antithesis, really, the hyperactive block us. it i5 really, the hyperactive block us. it is very much a slow character piece. it reminded me a little bit, oddly perhaps, of some michael lee films. it has that domestic setting, that kitchensink setting. humour and drama. it is a character driven film rather than a plot driven film. mode5t, definitely, but actually really moving. you mentioned the great title, my life as a courgette. ye5, great title, my life as a courgette. yes, all my life as a zucchini if you are in america. it is about a boy sent to a foster home with other orphans whose age. yes, stop motion animation. thi5 orphans whose age. yes, stop motion animation. this was oscar—nominated this year, alongside zootropoli5, which one. to get to that was amazing, because this was a small film, a french and swiss coproduction, 66 minutes. that is
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how long it is. really small—scale stuff. to get oscar—nominated wa5 amazing. like you said, a boy goe5 into a foster home. i saw it with subtitles but the clip we have here i5 dubbed. subtitles but the clip we have here is dubbed. how old are you, son? nine. so can you tell me a little bit about your mother? uh... she really liked to drink beer. her mashed potatoes were always good and sometimes we had fun. 0k. not always? so, where is your father? here. hmm. it has made's chick on it too, my mum always said that mother like chips, so put one on them. 0k. iam going like chips, so put one on them. 0k. i am going to take you to a really
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nice place with other children who are like you. kids who have no mum or dad. does it work? it really does. heartbreaking, actually. but uplifting. it is not a film about how miserable it is to be in care. there is misery in the film, of course there is. but ultimately it i5 course there is. but ultimately it is about the friendships that this character makes. courgette i5 is about the friendships that this character makes. courgette is his nickname. the friendships he makes, the relationships he has, why it was a great place for him to go to. it i5 a great place for him to go to. it is actually quite uplifting. i was think that children's films should have darkness and pain in them, and thatis have darkness and pain in them, and that is in that, but ultimately it i5a that is in that, but ultimately it is a feelgood movie. and 66 minutes? it packs a lot in. people often complain of films are too long, but i wonder if people complain this is too short. it is a possibility, because you will be paying the same amount of money. but it shows that if you are economical with your screenplay and write a brilliant story you can pack a lot in, even with a short running time. i have
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seen films that are to three hours and have much lessened and in this movie. let's talk about best out at the moment. there were previews of this last weekend, stephen fry wrote the book on which this is based, and he did a question—and—answer se55ion in lots of seminars he did a question—and—answer session in lots of seminars with roger allen, the lead actor in this. he plays the title character, really, because the title character is likened to a hippo. he is this rotund, boozy writer and poet investigating some rather strange goings on at a stately home. he is the reason to watch it. roger allen isa the reason to watch it. roger allen is a fantastic actor and he has some outrageous lines in this. he is definitely not pc, but by the end of the movie he is rather heroic andy rather admire his common sense. certainly there are some jawdropping lines, somejawdropping dialogue. he is having a whale of a time, just this doozy, couldn't care less kind of guy. of course the film itself, the plot is hardly edge of your seat stuff. it is a movie to watch because of that league formance. mixed reviews, but you recommend it?
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i recommend it because of that lead performance. he is so much fun to spend time with. stephen fry wrote the book in 1994 and he said, you know what, i like this character so much i want to revisit him because he does have so many great lines. all right, your best dvd the moment? yes, so this is the founder, it is about raymond crocs, the man who in the 19505 and 19605 turned mcdonald's into the big franchise, the multinational franchise that it is now. and it stars michael keaton, there was a bit of an oscar buzz about this when it was announced, but actually a couple of things happen. the release they changed which didn't help things, and people watch the movie and said, well, michael keaton is brilliant but actually this guy doesn't seem that likeable. he doesn't really seem that nice. it's got great reviews andi that nice. it's got great reviews and i would give it a great review, but the problem with this film is, do you want to watch two hours about someone who doesn't actually seem that likeable layperson? i think it is very interest wise, had driven and determine he was to make this
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restored into a big success, but he is not someone you are going to think, he is a real big hero. —— restau ra nt think, he is a real big hero. —— restaurant into a big success. people do like success stories and how people create things, though, like steve jobs. yes, and in that film he was not lovable all the way through. i do recommend it. lots of people missed it in the cinema, i recommend it for the small screen. there is that slight issue about it. michael keaton is back on form with spotlight and bird pav man. he is brilliant at this because he can do those grey areas where he is playing people who are not obvious or clear—cut. people who are not obvious or clear-cut. great stuff. thank you for being with us. that is it for this week. thank you so much for watching the film review. goodbye to now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. coming up before seven, ben has the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may and jeremy corbyn have faced tough questions from a tv audience, just days before the general election. they were challenged separately in a special edition of question time in york.
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mrs may faced uncomfortable questions about nhs funding. while mr corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use the uk's nuclear deterrent. one of theresa may's most senior ministers has said a future conservative government would not raise income tax — even for high earners. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, told the daily telegraph the party was "not in the business of punishing people for getting on". labour has already said it would increase income tax rates to 45—pence in the pound for those earning more than £80,000. the pop star ariana grande has made a surprise visit to fans in hospital who were injured in the terror attack at her manchester concert. the singer spent time chatting to patients and posing for photographs at the royal manchester child ren's hospital ahead of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow in aid of the victims‘ families. a new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described as very promising
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after a small clinical trial. charities have called it an important step in treating a cancer with few drug options. developed by the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden nhs foundation trust, the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part in the trial. statins — which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol — could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%, according to a new study. scientists in china who analysed research involving 200,000 women, found patients who took the drug were less likely to see their cancer return. charities have welcomed the news but say more clinical trials are needed. are you a strong speller? do you know when i comes after e and how many cs there are in accommodation? are you a good speller? two. two
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cs. it's on the autocue... are you a good speller? two. two cs. it's on the autocue. .. i almost got away with it. a 12—year—old girl from california has won the us national spelling bee after a tense 12—hour final. ananya vinay correctly spelled the word marocain — a type of dress fabric — to defeat rohan rajeev and win over £30,000. she says she will split the money with her younger brother. she had to spell about 200 words get that. it will go through some of them later. how was your spelling, mike? isn't there a rhyme about when i comes before e? there are exceptions, however. test later. i would like that. sure we do now?
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committee? i think that is enough for now. talking now about the champions league final in cardiff will gareth bale la? it probably will not start. but he is fit. is a spanish journalist walking from madrid to cardiff. he is in somewhere in bristol at the moment. he will be singing, that is how you recognise him. whether bale plays or not, real madrid, are aiming to become the first team since 1990 to win back to back champions league finals. so it could be a historic night in cardiff. they face the italian heavyweights, juventus, whom the madrid manager zinedine zidane used to play for. olly foster looks ahead. real madrid and juventus fans have
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travelled here in their tens of thousands. cardiff has welcomed to the giants of european football for what could be a classic. it will be great. if you win it is going to be the best experience in my life. we have a balanced teams were confident we can win. for us to defeat juventus... real madrid we can win. for us to defeat juventus. .. real madrid always we can win. for us to defeat juventus... real madrid always win the finals. at 39, the goalkeeper knows it may be his last chance. in a season when british teams again fell short in europe at least one british player has reached the final. a homecoming for gareth bale. the trouble is he is unlikely to start or real madrid. he may be at
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the heart of the market into this final. he is plastered all over town. but he has not actually been in the madrid team for about six weeks because of injury. it is disappointing, especially in his hometown but i think it would probably get his head around it if he doesn't start he will come on and make an impact on what he does and that 20 minutes or half an hour, maybe even longer in extra time. he isa maybe even longer in extra time. he is a special player who can score all types of goals. he won the champions league in 2008 and the fa cup here in 2004. a teenage scoring star than he has developed into an icon of the game. a brand that is still a serial winner. a man to the grand occasion. that is what tonight promises to be. it was a positive evening for northern ireland as they beat new zealand1—0 in belfast last night. the friendly had been organised as michael o'neill‘s side warm up for next week's world cup qualifier in azerbaijan. the only goal of the game,
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came from the scottish premiership's leading scorer: ross county's, liam boyce. in just a couple of hours, the british and irish lions will kick off their tour of new zealand with a match against the provincial barbarians, in whangarei. head coach warren gatland, has named a starting fifteen, largely made up, of those who were in camp together before the tour, with captain sam warburton part of an all—welsh back—row. the provincial barbarians' number 10, is bryn gatland, a 22—year—old who has represented the auckland blues, and is the son of the lions boss. he can probably expect to make a few tackles on the weekend but we have not spoken too much about the game and he is excited about the opportunity, if he does get a chance to play against us looking forward to play against us looking forward to seeing how he goes. england all rounder chris woakes has been ruled out of the rest of the champions trophy, due to a side strain, he picked up in the opening match of the tournament.
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woakes only played, two overs, of thursday's win, over bangladesh before the injury. england are unlikely to name his replacement, until this afternoon, after the england lions match, which involves two of the possible candidates: steve finn and tom curran. some better news for england though, because elsewhere in their group, the match between australia and new zealand ended in a draw — after rain forced the match to be abandoned. that means england now need only one more win to guarantee a place in the champions trophy semi—finals. at the french open, britain's andy murray and kyle edmund are in action later today while defending mens champion novak djokovic is through to the fourth round, but he had to fight for it. argentine diego schwartzman, the world number 41, took djokovic, to five sets yesterday. the world number two though had enough, to see out the victory. a much easier ride for rafael nadal. the nine—time champions at roland garros through in straight sets against, nikoloz basilashvili, dropping only one game, in the entire match. the defending women's champion,
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garbine muguruza, is safely into the fourth round. she beat yulia putintseva, in straight sets. it's a big day in the racing calendar with the derby at epsom. there was a surprise on day one of the meeting where enable, ridden by frankie dettori, won the oaks. john gosden's filly was a 6—1 shot for the mile—and—a—half classic, run in driving rain, after a thunderstorm hit the track just minutes before the start. odds—on favourite rhododendron finished second. it grew up in the bomb sites of britain, after the second world war, and is once again now proving to be, one of the fastest growing cycling sports at grass roots. it is cycle speedway and as the british team, arrive in poland today, as they build up to the world championship later this year, i've been to train at coventry to see what it's all about. no brakes, no gearsjust dirt and
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plenty of guts. and cycle speedway is accessible to all ages, even if you are five. like lucy. it is a little bit slippery. i love it because i dislike it. it is cycling at its purest, really. it is rough, ready and raw. it took off in the rubble of bombsites after the second world war. only a bomb site, a bunch of kids having fun. but here is where stars of speed are born. sit back and see if you can spot a champion of tomorrow. one day the crowd will rule so the children who learnt it all the hard way on a cycle speedway. it started after the war on the bombsites and, you know, a load of kids with nothing to do. decided to make like a speedway. it
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boomed. tracks were absolutely everywhere. as cities were rebuilt in the post—war years, the cycle speedway tracks disappeared. but now purpose—built ones like this one in coventry have brought it back as a cheaper and safer alternative to motor speedway. there are leagues again and the world championships in australia later this year. we are trying to reinvent it a little bit and add some flair. really trying to get people involved from all age groups. it is far more accessible and not so worrying about being on the back of a motorbike. it also makes it easier to turn up and pay a couple of quid, hire a bike and enter a race. this is where the nerves kick in. this is the position you need to adopt for the maximum speed up to the first corner. cut up there, trying to come inside.
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ooh sometimes... nearly at the fence. it is fast and explosive with four riders competing over four labs. they say in this sport it is first ordirtand labs. they say in this sport it is first or dirt and most races are won as you skid around the corners. first or dirt and most races are won as you skid around the cornersm isa as you skid around the cornersm is a little frightening because you do not know where if you will fall. you just want to get the inside of people and overtake them.|j you just want to get the inside of people and overtake them. i get quite aggressive. it is full contact. and you either come out on the right side or the wrong side. indeed, the whole british championship was won on the very last bend last season. i was ten yards away from being a champion. i was happy with second. it can certainly hurt when your dreams and up certainly hurt when your dreams and up in the dirt. how incredible, to
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go the whole season and have decided on the final bend. cycling at its purest form. talking about the difference about that and the velodrome. these are free will bikes unlike the ones in the velodrome. no gears, no brakes. it is the purest cheapest dirtiest bikes because they are so raw and simple. when you are doing it, did you feel you are co nsta ntly doing it, did you feel you are constantly leaning doing it, did you feel you are co nsta ntly lea ni ng left. doing it, did you feel you are constantly leaning left. it is a small track. that is part of it, when you go around the bend.|j suppose that is why thrives in the inner city. you just don't need a lot of base. thank you very much. she's become one of britain's biggest stars after appearing in miranda and call the midwife. now the actor miranda hart is making her west end debut in a new production of annie. she's playing miss hannigan — the infamous orphanage manager — in the musical which first opened in america 40 years ago. our arts editor, will gompertz has been to meet miranda and three of her co—stars as they prepare
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for next week's opening night. # it's a hard knock life... the show may be called annie that this particular west end reduction is all about around. it is a vulnerable place when you are the face on the poster. you think if people are wanting to knock me down. there is that fear. we are very good at celebrating success, we prefer to pick on the things we are not good at. does it feel like this is a content rich story? kind. you can relate to it with orphans. there will always be orphans in the world like people in syria and the it is kind of putting old—fashioned stories into today's life. # it's a
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ha rd stories into today's life. # it's a hard knock life... who has got the worst american accent? oh, that is a harsh question! probably me. worst american accent? oh, that is a harsh question! probably melj worst american accent? oh, that is a harsh question! probably me. i was going to say that! that is a great idea. basically call them, i am moving on. miranda made her name with a sitcom she is now a star. what advice does she have? being yourself and doing things out guided and having fun and not getting caught up with any trappings of fate, wanting to be about fame or money because that does bring you happiness. there has been discussion of veranda coming back.|j happiness. there has been discussion of veranda coming back. i like the idea of miranda and gary being married. it could be a sitcom. don't get married. i am not. married. it could be a sitcom. don't get married. lam not. i married. it could be a sitcom. don't get married. i am not. i am married. it could be a sitcom. don't get married. lam not. lam best man. i miss my sitcom family and the
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character but whether that means i will start writing again, i do not know. she does have plenty to get on with. not least spending the summer living her dream and starring in this west end musical. that has going to be on your brain all day. i do like the song, however. by the end of the day you won't, i will sing however. by the end of the day you won't, iwill sing it however. by the end of the day you won't, i will sing it to you. that doesn't look like a hard knock weather day. i wish i could think of a number pun now. yes, a lovely start in many places today. a sunny start in those spots. through the day we will see one or two showers starting to develop. some of those could be on the heavy side. one thing we haven't lost is all the warmth and humidity we had over the last couple of days. it has been swept away by this
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stripe of clouds, a weather front which has moved through. thunderstorms across parts of the south—east yesterday. the remnants of this front still hanging on a path —— across parts of yorkshire and east anglia. a bit of patchy rain here for a time. a nice slice of sunshine before showers start to march in from the north—west. some of these showers will really be on the heavy side. showers probably have used in the middle part of the day for northern ireland. it will be in the middle part of the afternoon that the showers turned heavy across scotland. some of these could contain rumbles of thunder. lots of rain ina contain rumbles of thunder. lots of rain in a short space of time. the showers could be slow—moving across north—eastern parts of scotland. 12 showers the northern england. it should be largely dry this afternoon across the east midlands and east anglia, down into the south—east. 3122, not too bad in the sunshine, but not assume human as yesterday. a few showers into the afternoon. quite hit and miss in east wales and the south—west, but they should clear away as we head into the first pa rt clear away as we head into the first part of the evening. the big match in cardiff tonight, the champions league final, it should be fine,
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some late sunshine, but it will turn cooler as the match goes on. it is going to turn into a fairly cool night for many of us. they largely dry night as well. showers will continue for a time across northern ireland scotland but even here they will fade away. and cities, 9— 11 degrees. tomorrow, essentially we do it all again. another day of sunshine and showers. a few more showers across northern england tomorrow. northern ireland scotland seeing heavy showers, clouding over a bit for the south—west and wales late in the day, with some showery rain starting to develop. temperature wise we're looking at highs 16— 20 degrees. still that's slightly cooler and fresher feel. you might not want to think about the start of the new wheat just yet but i have to show you this because things are going to change, turning much more unsettled from the western areas of low pressure piling in, bringing wet and potentially windy weather for some of us on monday. you don't have to show us that. you just don't. it is not his fault, i must remember, it is never their fault. it's 6:47 and you're
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watching breakfast. now it's time for click. this week the team is at the hay literature festival. summer is on the way and, well, it wouldn't be a british summer without a visit to a good old fashioned festival. no, not that one. much better. known as the town of books, hay—on—wye, in wales, is the location of the hay festival. it's a literary mecca, an annual gathering of artists, authors, daleks and, yep, even royals. it's even been called the woodstock of the mind by none other
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than former us president bill clinton. this year it's the 30th hay festival and the line—up is pretty stellar. well, for the second year in a row, we've been invited to share some of our favourite experiences and show off some really good tech, all in front of a real, live audience of actual people. what could possibly go wrong? a packed tent waited, all that we had to do was wow them! applause. we have robots falling over, experiments in haptic feedback and demos in binaural sound, but that was nothing compared to the climax — a click—created wavy, shouty game built using artificial intelligence. in the meantime, it can't have have escaped your attention that around the uk things are getting a touch political. as the general election looms, those politicians are using increasingly sophisticated techniques in order to learn more about us. the advertising reach of facebook
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has long been an open secret, but now it's something the political parties are getting in on too. in fact, both the trump campaign and the leave.eu groups credited facebook as being a vital part of their electioneering. we know that the personal details that you give to social networks allow them to send you relevant, targeted content, and it goes much deeper thanjust your basic demographics. there are now data analytics companies claiming to be able to micro—target and micro—tweak messages for individual readers, playing to their biases and fears. if you know the personality of the people you're targeting, you can nuance your messaging to resonate more effectively with those key audience groups. what's also emerging is that political parties have been
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using this data to reach potential voters, on a very granular level. so who is being targeted on facebook and how? well, until now, there's been nothing around to analyse any of this, but the snap general election galvanised louis knight—webb and sam jeffers to develop who targets me, a plug—in to tell each of us how we're being targeted. when you install the plug—in for the first time, it asks for your age, your gender and your location, and then it starts scouring your facebook feed looking for adverts with a political message. so once you've installed the plug—in, it works in the background to extract the whole advert that you see on your newsfeed. so it pulls out the headline, the subtitle, any related videos, any images, any links. we also get the reaction — so how many likes, how many comments, how many shares — so we can see which messages are getting the most traction.
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are they particularly clandestine messages, are they slightly subversive, are they even fake news? but how do data companies get the information in the first place? a lot of the quizzes you fill out on facebook or, you know, you open a survey, it asks your facebook profile to connect to it. sometimes you'll notice that there's a lot of permissions attached and as soon as you click yes, all of your data is mined, and it's then sold on to data brokers who then, eventually, sell it to the political parties for use in their campaigns. although facebook says it doesn't sell our information on, data brokers can overlay any details they mine from the site with other datasets that they have on people based on their email addresses. the next step after that of course is to find similar users that are using facebook and then target adverts, from that advertiser that supplied the email addresses, to those users. why did you choose facebook? it was a really wide demographic. there are just some people that you don't find on twitter. the very nature of the fact that i can't see your adverts, you can't see my adverts,
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means that this approach had to be applied to facebook. it's where the problem was. it's a first of its kind anywhere in the world on this scale, giving us citizens some transparency into what we're being shown, but how much can it really tell us? do you think that people wouldn't know that certain things are advert if they weren't using your software? a lot of the time people are scrolling through facebook and the adverts fit into this weird intersection of friend endorsement and advertising. it's quite easy to miss the adverts on facebook. so far, who targets me has some 6,700 users in 620 constituencies, and it's rising as we near polling day. on the down side, it's only as good as the data it's managed to crowd—source, so it isn't necessarily representative, and it also doesn't work with mobile facebook, but the results are interesting. so we're seeing a mixture of two things. we're seeing, firstly, a/b testing, which is where i try out two different messages
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with the same group. i see which one gets the best reaction and then i pursue that message. we're also seeing targeting, which is where i pick a particular demographic of people, and then i send a message that's tailored to them. so, for example, it might be young people targeted with register to vote. the data from who targets me is also being poured over by analysts at the london school of economics. one aspect of their research is collecting dark posts, ads which are here one day and gone the next. it gives us the ability to create a repository of those dark posts. so if promises are being made on facebook, in ads which will disappear the day after you use them, we should be able to go back to those after the election, look at them, evaluate them and maybe discuss them in the cold light of day. and the irony is that, as we demand more transparency
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from public bodies, the whole basis of political propaganda could be on the brink of a revolutionary change. what's interesting, i think, about the new environment is the potentialfor using paid advertising and other techniques to create individual propaganda bubbles around individual voters. and that's not about controlling the market as a whole, but it's about using smart targeted which, in a sense, creates such a compelling and overarching information environment for individual people that that in some ways constrains what they do and controls what they do. i think that's why some academic commentators and others are beginning to think some of this is a bit spooky. but politicians aren't the only ones with facebook on their minds. the social network was one of many topics on the very large brain of national treasure and tech geek stephen fry. i met up with him after he gave a lecture at the hay festival highlighting how he thinks the world is being changed by social media, aland automation.
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the very current conversation is whether facebook and platforms like them should actually be considered publishers? should they take responsibility for what ends up on the site? they are aware there is a problem, a serious problem. if 80%, some people have said, is the... you know, in proportion of people who get their news from facebook rather than from mainstream media, then surely it is incumbent upon someone who is providing 80% of their news sources to make sure that those news sources are not defamatory, blatant lies, propaganda, the wrong kind of, you know, insulting... i would posit there that a publisher is responsible for all the people that generate the content. yeah. they are employed by that publisher and facebook is clearly not that. yeah. so do we need a third definition, a third thing? exactly. i think there is a median sort of definition that it's not beyond the wit of lawyers of the right kind to find that. your presentation was a warning that
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people should prepare for the changes that are coming, for example, artificial intelligence and automation. i said that it was a sort of transformation of the workplace rather than... you know, it's an obsolescence of certain types ofjob, but that doesn't mean forced redundancy of millions of workers. i mentioned one of the pleasing things about al and robotics, and that is what's known as moravec‘s paradox, that what we're incredibly bad at, as individuals, machines tend to be very good at. complicated sums, rapid and incredible access of memory from a database of a kind that we could never do, sorting and swapping of information and cataloguing and things like that. but things we can do without even thinking, like walk across the room or pick up a glass and have a sip of water, machines are hopeless at that. but that's fine, because we don't want them to do that for us. where it gets difficult is in medium sort of servicejobs, i think.
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stephen fry, what is intelligence? well, you could go the etymological route, and you could say it is a means to read into. legere is read and inter, interleg, and that's pretty good, actually, reading into things. in other words, pattern recognition. just being able to see connections in things and people are talking about the moment that we arrive at agi, artificial general intelligence, and that's when the various types of pattern recognition, you know, numbers, data, you know, certain faces and things like that, they all come together so that they can be intelligent across these different things. if you've got an artificial intelligence that's good at that and another one that's good at that surely, just a collection of specialists of intelligences under one umbrella is a general intelligence. it doesn't have to be a breakthrough, itjust has to be a collection of specialists.
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yes. i think you're very right, spencer. i think that's very likely to be the way it goes. but maybe you give it something else, some other kind of instinct to do things. its reward is similar to our reward system which is really chemical, isn't it? it's tryptophan and serotonin and endorphins of various kinds that reward us and then we have a pain system to deter us, and there's nothing to stop us giving that to a machine. stephen, thank you so much for your time. such a pleasure. thank you for having us at your place. and keep clicking, i love it. that is it for this shortcut of click. the full—length version is on iplayer. you can follow us on facebook for loads of extra content as well. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. tough questions for both theresa may and jeremy corbyn, as they face a television audience of voters. my my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today. how can that be fair was to mark we will put more money into the nhs but there is no magic money tree. would
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you allow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and then start talking? any second stands in which someone is prepared to use a nuclear weapon is disastrous to the whole planet. good morning, it's saturday the 3rd ofjune. ariana grande returns to manchester and visits children in hospital who were injured in the arena bombing.
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