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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 3, 2017 7:00am-8:00am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. tough questions for both theresa may and jeremy corbyn, as they face a television audience of voters. my my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today. how can that be fair was to mark we will put more money into the nhs but there is no magic money tree. would you allow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and then start talking? any second stands in which someone talking? any second stands in which someone is prepared to use a nuclear weapon is disastrous to the whole planet. good morning, it's saturday the 3rd ofjune. ariana grande returns to manchester and visits children in hospital who were injured in the arena bombing. hope for ovarian cancer patients, as the early trial of a new drug shows promising results. in sport, it's the biggest prize in european club football,
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and cardiff is preparing to host the final of the champions league betweenjuventus and real madrid, for whom, welsh star gareth bale is hoping to play. meanwhile, i've been getting to grips with the post war sport of cycle speedway. as a new production of annie opens in london — we hearfrom its star miranda hart about her west end debut. suddenly doing something new when you are known for other things was intimidating. now i love it. i totally love it. and ben has the weather. good morning. we swept away the warmth and humidity from the last few days. others: fresh weekend ahead with spells of sunshine, a few passing showers and details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may and jeremy corbyn have
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faced tough questions from a tv audience, just days before the general election. they were challenged separately in a special edition of question time in york. mrs may faced uncomfortable questions about nhs funding. while mr corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use the uk's nuclear deterrent. our political correspondent vicky young was there. they came here hoping to persuade people that they have what it takes to lead the country. no—one expected an easy ride but from the start it was clear that this would be a testing evening. theresa may was accused of being untrustworthy, of changing her mind on calling an election and on policies such as social care. others were angry about funding for schools and hospitals. my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today. how can that be fair? we have had to take hard choices across the public sector in relation to public sector pay restraint.
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we did that because of the decisions we had to take to bring public spending under control because it was not under control under the previous labour government. brexit is why theresa may said she called this election. she said she was determined to deliver. we take this opportunity of brexit, new trade deals around the rest of the world, seeing how we can build a prosperous stronger and fairer britain. i think we can do that and i think we can do that because i believe in britain and the british people. forjeremy corbyn, this was a chance to prove he was ready to take the topjob in politics. he was unapologetic about plans to raise taxes for companies and higher earners. where will the skilled workers come from tomorrow? where are the consumers of tomorrow? i think it's time that we looked at inequality in our society and used public investment in order to improve services and give real chances to everybody. poverty is a waste.
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butjeremy corbyn had his most difficult moment when he was pressed to say whether or not he would ever use nuclear weapons. would you allow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and then start talking? it will be too late. no, of course not. the general election is less than one week away. this was a great opportunity for voters to see both the people who want to be prime minister, setting out their vision but coming under real pressure over policies. hoping that this will be the moment when the public swings behind them. one of theresa may's most senior ministers has said a future conservative government would not raise income tax — even for high earners. the conservative manifesto did not rule out an increase but the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, told the daily telegraph that the party was "not in the business of punishing people for getting on". our political correspondent leila nathoo is in westminster for us this morning. is this another reversal in policy?
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i think it is a signal. because there has not been clarity on this issue of whether the conservatives would raise income tax. as you say it was not explicit in their ma nifesto. it was not explicit in their manifesto. their only manifesto pledge was to not raise vat. previously, the conservatives under david cameron had promised not to raise national insurance in contact oi’ raise national insurance in contact or vat so the tax triple lock, as it was called. theresa may, i think now sending a signal, really, to her core supporters to try and ensure that they turn out and to reassure them that actually she is not going to raise income tax for higher earners. labour says this is not as explicit for lower and middle—income earners. they say that only the lower and middle income earners can
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be saved from tax rises under them. it was clarification later from the conservatives saying they have no plans to raise tax. this is a signal, not a plans to raise tax. this is a signal, nota promise, mind you, to the conservative base. only five days left until the election day. what can we expect over the weekend? this is the final push. all parties will maximise the time. whistlestop tours of constituencies. labour are campaigning against the plans of theresa may for social care and they are talking about her plans for winter fuel allowance means testing. the liberal democrats are also trying to attack the conservatives on the social care plane. i think there will be plenty of attacking there will be plenty of attacking the other party weak spots as well as trying to get the core messages across with just days to go. the singer ariana grande has visited fans in hospital who were injured in the terror attack at her manchester concert. the star spent time with youngsters at the royal manchester children's hospital in a surprise appearance
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ahead of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow. simonjones reports. the smiles say it all. fans like this eight—year—old lily harrison who was still recovering from her injuries in hospital, greeting the singer who means so much to them. the children had been getting ready for bed when the star arrived unexpectedly, bringing gifts and signing autographs. there were thanks as well for the nurses. and tomorrow she will perform at a concert to raise funds for the victims and their families. the 22 lives lost have been remembered at saint ann's square which has become the focal point for those wish to pay tribute, to contemplate and to grieve. the manchester city council says that this may be the last weekend the flowers remain in place as it needs to look at relocating them respectfully. it will now consider setting up a permanent memorial in the city. it is a must.
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the 22 who died... just have to have something that is a testament to what happened. i think people will want to come for ever, just to pay their respects, really because, as i say, it should not have happened and they were babies, won't they? and should have been the night of their life and it wasn't. it is sad. a big heart with all of the names on the date of birth of all of them would be a good idea. alongside the remembrance, the police operation goes on. last night a car was taken away which they say could be significant to their investigation. police will be out again in force for tomorrow's concert. just after eight o'clock we will be speaking to lily harrison's dad adam about that visit by ariana grande statins — which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol —
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a new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described promising after a small clinical trial. it has been called an important step in treating the cancer which at the moment has few drug options for. the drug shrunken tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part in the trial. statins — which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol — could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%, according to a new study. scientists in china who analysed research involving 200,000 women, found patients who took the drug were less likely to see their cancer return. charities have welcomed the news but say more clinical trials are needed. the consumer group which is calling on british airways to create an automatic compensation system for passengers affected by serious flight delays and cancellations.
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it comes a week after a major it failure caused hundreds of the airline's flights to be grounded. the company says it has already taken steps to process claims as speedily as possible. meanwhile british airways cabin crew have voted for four more days of strike action starting on june 16th. a huge police and security operation is being deployed across cardiff, as the city prepares for the champions league final. more than 170,000 football fans are due to visit the welsh capital this weekend for the match between real madrid and juventus. our wales correspondent, tomos morgan, is there. security is important so let's talk to our correspondent about that. a glorious morning fare. fans of is that quite excited about this match.
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the big picture is, and it is timely, that security is of utmost importance. the players will not be witnessing these beautiful conditions when they play the national stadium of wales later on. the roof will be closed. it is closed for security reasons. as i was walking through town earlier to get to this location and as the juventus fans will witness there is a significant security presence here on the grounds this morning. as you mentioned. there are 1500 additional police officers in cardiff for this event and there are steel fences around the centre of cardiff. the main roads right in the centre have been blocked off and there is no way for any vehicle to get into this location. this was always going to bea location. this was always going to be a huge security operation even before the atrocities that we saw recently in manchester. this operation was always going to be in place but up on thursday the
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football association of wales said that this was now the largest security operation that has ever been put in place for a sporting eventin been put in place for a sporting event in the uk. all of that has been put in place, of course, to make certain that what happens in the stadium runs as smoothly as possible this evening. if you think that's a big competition, you ain't seen nothing yet. forget football — spelling is even more intense... it's been the annual spelling bee in america. david eades picks up the story. could you repeat the word? from 11 million entrants, a 12 hourfinal and it all came down to this one word. marocain. and with victory,... how do you spell dumbstruck? you could be forgiven for thinking it
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mattered less to the 12—year—old girl and more to herfather. spelling bee is an institution in the united states and a monopoly for indian—americans. this was the 13th time in a row an indian—american took the trophy. how difficult can it be? he was the showman this year. cocky does not always mean correct. and when this young boy stumbled over this word the game was up. so the trophy, the kudos and the $40,000 first prize goes to this young girl. it leaves the rest of us trailing the wake of junior genius. here is one more for you. can you spell inadequate? are you trying to spell and
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inadequate? your spelling of that word was inadequate stock we have a list of far more confiscated works to test later. ben will keep us up today the weather. the 1a minutes past seven. theresa may and jeremy corbyn have faced a grilling from a live tv audience on a range of issues from public spending to brexit and defence. jon trickett is a cabinet minister —— shadow cabinet minister, and joins us from leeds. as far as your leaderjeremy corbyn is concerned, there are some things thatjust won't go away, are there? trident, and his preparedness or not to press the nuclear button, that seems to dog him at the end of this campaign. well, i think those are the questions that the conservatives are
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trying to put in front of us, and it is quite right that the questions are asked. look, labour is a patriot it party and have no doubt about it, if this country comes under attack, labour will defend our country. they should be no doubting anybody‘s mind thatis should be no doubting anybody‘s mind that is what we will do. we think there are areas where we are exposed, for example, there are not enough police any more, and we also think the border force needs more people. we are promising to employ an extra 500 people. people coming in and out of the country are not being checked. it is a way for terrorists are coming. this defence issueis terrorists are coming. this defence issue is big and complicated, but we will defend our country if we come under attack, make a mistake about it. it is notjust the conservatives putting this to mr corbyn. members of the audience repeatedly put it to him. that was one of the big issues they wanted explained from him. it is reconciling the fact that, yes, he stuck to his guns, well, let's not use the word guns, but he is adamantly against the use of nuclear
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weapons throughout his political life. what is the point in having a deterrent? it is only a deterrent if you say you are prepared to use it, isn't it? let's think for a minute about nuclear weapons. throughout the whole of human history that have been wars, but the weapons that were designed to be used on a battlefield against enemy combatants, the thing about nuclear weapons is, inevitably, they will be used to kill hundreds of thousands of individual citizens or innocent people, and that is the difference between nuclear weapons and all the others. so these weapons are immoral. the world accepts that. we have to find a way of getting rid of them overtime. i think whatjeremy is concerned about is the morale to you of a weapon being used against oui’ you of a weapon being used against our citizens. —— morale at it. there are enough nuclear weapons in the well to destroy the entire planet. we need a realistic land to find a way out of the mess that the world has got ourselves into. —— realistic plan. make no mistake about it,
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while nuclear weapons are there, we are going to rearm, that is the labour party position. but that is what people are saying. why spend those billions of pounds on something if you say that you are not repaired to use it? i know we have been through this loads of times, but it is one of those issues which highlights the conflict, in a way, between whojeremy corbyn is, the party he leads, and the position he wants to hold. that is what voters are wrestling with. well, each person will consider the whole range of issues before us, but the labour party is committed to renewing trident. that is our position. i moved a resolution some yea rs position. i moved a resolution some years ago personally about it. i suggested that the whole world should be moving towards disarmament. by the way, we have a legal obligation to disarm, across the whole world, and britain will try to do that. we will defend ourselves. there can be no doubt about that whatsoever. i thought the whole debate last night was very interesting. in a way, i think the
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stars were the audience. you are right. they ask difficult and probing questions. that was right, because democracy has come alive. it has come alive because the parties are offering very different ways forward for our country. i think it is amazing, if you are sitting on a train or sitting in the pub, people are talking about politics for the first time in a long time. are talking about politics for the first time in a long timelj are talking about politics for the first time in a long time. i was in a labour marginal seat this week, doing a peaceful radio 4, and lots of people said, they like what they have seen ofjeremy corbyn in this campaign, he has grown on them, they made positive remarks about him. but time and time again i heard, even labour voters saying to me, at the end of the day i am still not sure about him. i am not sure he is a prime minister. you know that there are prime minister. you know that there a re lots of prime minister. you know that there are lots of the pullout there, even though they might like him, even though they might like him, even though they might have warmed to him, theyjust cannot get out of that final hurdle of voting him into downing street. well, look. jeremy corbyn is somebody who really received a huge amount of abuse and
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a lot of attacks from all kinds of sources in the last 18 months. people didn't get to know him until the last few weeks when the election started. and the thing is, he has been prepared to go anywhere and speak to anybody at any time. there has been another leader, as well, mrs may, and she is like a submarine. she disappears for weeks on end when there is trouble and then occasionally reappears. that isn't me saying that. david cameron, the prime minister, said she is like a submarine, a politician who disappears. the trick is she has never engaged with the public through this campaign. people have to make a choice, what kind of leader do we want? a modern leader who is prepared to mix with people and listen to what they say and act, or somebody who is promote and cold and wooden? somebody who is really not very clear about what policies are? ithink not very clear about what policies are? i think people are focusing both in germany but also want theresa may. i think they are warming to him, but they will continue to do so in the rest of the campaign. jon trickett, thank you. on friday morning we will know. five
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days left. thank you. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. i cannot promise you it will all be glorious. my hint is to watch the first two minutes of this. then turn away. if you cut me short i will not get to the end and you will not have to look at the bad bit. we can do itself does not look too bad. a mixture of sunshine and showers. some wet and windy weather to come for the start of next week. decent weather to get out and about today and tomorrow some sunny spells. bear in mind they will be passing downpours as well. this weather front, this band of cloud swept through overnight. it brought thunderstorms across parts the south—east yesterday. they are mostly cleared away now but still lingering across eastern and south—eastern parts of england. some residual cloud, some mist and murk, some spots of rain here. a slice of sunshine and some showers beginning to pack in from the north—west. these showers will be heaviest around the middle part of the day
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for northern ireland. they will be turning heavier in the middle of the afternoon in scotland. here they can be quite slow—moving, especially in the north—east, where they will be light. some thunder and lightning and a lot of rain in a short space of time. some sunny spells between showers. a few sunny spells creeping into england, at things should be largely dry this afternoon. a fresher feel than we have had recently. so pleasant in the sunshine. one to make showers trundling across wales and the south—west this afternoon. these should push away to the eastern into the evening. for the big match in cardiff tonight, the final between juventus and real madrid, it should be fine, late sunshine but it will start to cool off a bit as the match goes on. showers continuing for a time across northern ireland scotla nd time across northern ireland scotland but generally it will turn into a scotland but generally it will turn intoa dry scotland but generally it will turn into a dry night with clear spells. temperatures in towns and cities 9— 11. into tomorrow, essentially we do it all again. sunshine and showers, probably more than today across northern england, especially in the morning. showers get going in the
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afternoon again for northern ireland scotland. then things cloud over a bid for the and wales, showery rain moving in here as well. temperatures again, cooler and fresher, 16— 20 degrees. i've got time, so i'm going to have to press a button and show you what happens on monday. areas of low pressure swarming out west will push in, bringing heavy bursts of rain and potentially some strong winds as well. well, he has to be truthful. next time we will cut him off. we'll get the controller. it is 7:22am. there were celebrations around the world when the paris climate change agreement was signed two years ago. it was hailed as a major step forward in tackling global greenhouse gas emissions. but the news that president trump is withdrawing from the agreement has been widely criticised by world leaders and those in the scientific community. 194 other countries have committed to the deal, which pledged to cut carbon emissions, and limit the rise in the global average temperature to 2 degrees celsius by the year 2100.
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so far america has spent almost £780 million on the green climate fund which helps developing countries cope with the effects of climate change. those payments will now stop. alex pearce ease the director of the overseas development in situ. how much should we care that the united states has pulled out of the climate change agreement? obviously this is political ramifications, but in the sense that physically, how much difference, or monitor airily, sense that physically, how much difference, or monitorairily, how much difference will the withdrawal make? —— mightily. —— monteraily. much difference will the withdrawal make? —— mightily. —— monterailylj think that his abdication of responsibility on the paris agreement will have profound short—term and long—term effects. i was in africa last week, in uganda and kenya, and uganda and kenya are
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trying to grow out of poverty. they have signed up to the paris agreement which is basically them saying, we are going to grow, but we will try to grow down a greener path in the united states and the united kingdom. but in order to do that they need help. theatre for the united states has been the largest donor in supporting countries like kenya and uganda to grow, but to grow greener. # heretofore the united states. so that they do not contribute to the greenhouse gases warming the planet. president trump pulling back from these commitments and pulling out the rug from countries like kenya and uganda, thatis countries like kenya and uganda, that is going to give them a much harder choice to make stop if they end up building coal—fired power pla nts end up building coal—fired power plants instead of solar plants, that is not only going to affect things today, but those plans will be with us today, but those plans will be with us for 20, today, but those plans will be with us for20, 30, today, but those plans will be with us for 20, 30, a0 years. today, but those plans will be with us for 20, 30, 40 years. do you think is decision to take america out will weaken the resolve of those kinds of countries, to keep going? thinking, if america is not going to do it, why should we bother?|j absolutely do it, why should we bother?” absolutely think it will. keeping up
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with commitments like paris is not just a case of going to paris and signing an agreement. this is actually a process of daily decision—making. people have to look at the trade—offs. if they are without the type of support, the political support, that america provides, as well as the financial support, then there are likely to be lots of countries and lots of decisions that are made which will ta ke decisions that are made which will take us in the wrong direction. but there are 194 countries signed up, and china is one of them, which was a lwa ys and china is one of them, which was always a big sticking point when it came to china recognising its contribution to elution and to environment will change. ashraf pollution. is that not enough. how dependent of these countries and the well have to be on the us? the us is still the second largest polluter in the world. first of all, its own paris commitments are critical to reducing the amount of greenhouse gases. although there are many cities and states and businesses in the united states which say that they are still going to meet their
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paris commitments, if the federal government in the united states does not support that trend towards less pollution and greener energy, then it will mean more pollution for the planet. there is increasing drought, increasing warming, all over the place. in the last 16 years we have had if dean of those years being the hottest on record. —— 15 of those yea rs. hottest on record. —— 15 of those years. so what the us does today and what it does in the future actually really matters. we are going to talk to you again later in the programme, with somebody who is a supporter of donald trump, and believes that he has done the right thing, and we can have a debate about that later on.” look forward to that. it is 7:26am. building flood defences can be a complex and expensive task, but scientists say they have found an army of expert engineers from the continent willing to do it for free: european beavers. they are controversial with farmers who say they damage fields, but as our environment analyst roger harrabin reports, their re—introduction could help clean up polluted water. in an ordinary devon field, signs of
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the extraordinary. a toilet, and electrified fence powered by solar. this site is a scientific experiment on reintroducing beavers. in six yea rs, on reintroducing beavers. in six years, a pairof on reintroducing beavers. in six years, a pair of sharp tooth beavers has re—engineered this would land into a whitland. they fell the willow trees to lie horizontally because they like to chew the bark off the vertical sprouts. their stick and have recreated the sort of landscape that existed for beavers we re landscape that existed for beavers were hunted to extinction. —— stick dam recreated. this is another of the ponds created by beavers. this demonstrates how much they can re—engineer the landscape. i am, it looks like there is grass growing out of the ground. wrong. this is a beaver stick dam, right underneath me. the place has been shaped by the teeth of rodents. these are beta
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sticks. you can see the teeth marks where they have cut them off the tree. they use these to create the dams, and the way that they have manipulated the site has been dramatic. we have had a whole range of different species coming in, bats, amphibians, lots of wetland plants. it has been incredible. this site used to have 11 clumps of frogspawn. since the dams appeared, there are 681 clumps. the frogs are food for grass snakes and herons. then there is the benefit to soil and water quality, monitored ibis equipment. what we are looking at here is the quality of the water entering the beaver site. as we can see from this sample taken at the end of the last ready —— heavy rainfall event, there is lots of soil and water. it is leading this farmland. downstream, with all the beaver dams, we see much cleaner water. the beaver dams have filtered the water and captured all the soil running from the farm. we see much
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better water quality downstream. this is not without controversy. in scotland, where beavers have brought back, some landowners have angrily complained that they have damaged farmland, trees and water courses. the nfu fear unintended consequences of beaver reintroduction but they say they are awaiting the formal publication of results from the devon trial site. we return to the wetla nds devon trial site. we return to the wetlands at dusk. here is a treat. email beaver has come out of hiding. —— the mail beaver. what a fantastic privilege. i have just —— the mail beaver. what a fantastic privilege. i havejust seen my first beaver. they have not had a sighting like this to 18 months. he seems com pletely like this to 18 months. he seems completely unafraid. the scientists working here say the beavers have not just improved water quality. they have also helped to protect downstrea m they have also helped to protect downstream areas from flooding by slowing heavy rainfall with their dams. they want creatures like this reintroduced nationwide. not all are convinced, at the beavers here are making their own watery case. will
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hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. coming up before eight, ben has the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may and jeremy corbyn have faced tough questions from a tv audience, just days before the general election. they were challenged separately in a special edition of question time in york. mrs may faced uncomfortable questions about nhs funding. while mr corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use the uk's nuclear deterrent.
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the pop star ariana grande has made a surprise visit to fans in hospital who were injured in the terror attack at her manchester concert. the singer spent time chatting to patients and posing for photographs at the royal manchester child ren's hospital ahead of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow in aid of the victims‘ families. one of theresa may's most senior ministers has said a future conservative government would not raise income tax — even for high earners. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, told the daily telegraph the party was "not in the business of punishing people for getting on". labour has already said it would increase income tax rates to 45—pence in the pound for those earning more than £80,000. a new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described as very promising after a small clinical trial. charities have called it an important step in treating a cancer with few drug options.
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developed by the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden nhs foundation trust, the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part in the trial. the consumer group which is calling on british airways to create an automatic compensation system for passengers affected by serious flight delays and cancellations. it comes a week after a major it failure caused hundreds of the airline's flights to be grounded. the company says it has already taken steps to process claims as speedily as possible. meanwhile british airways cabin crew have voted for four more days of strike action starting on june 16th. you might would be here and we have delivered. he will deliver us in his call for the winner of the champions league. juventus, going for a
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back—to—back win. gareth bale, of course it is home soilfor him. but he won't start but he must play, at some point. change the game with 20 minutes to go or something. this evening, the biggest match in european club football, the champions league final, will be played at the principality stadium in cardiff. security is tight of course following last week's attack in manchester, as thousands of real madrid and juventus fans arrive across the city. a former wales international and champions league winner, thinks cardiff is ready to host such an event. it isa it is a great stadium in the middle of the city. a real buzz around not only cardiff but wales in general to host a champions league final and to host a champions league final and to host first is a good one with juventus and real madrid is great. so many big games and league cup
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finals have been played here as well and it is a tremendous venue. the president, of the football's european governing body, has told the bbc, that britain deserves, to host a world cup ‘in the near future'. aleksander seferin, says he hopes the tournament will be held in europe in 2030. they are absolutely capable of organising is from an organisational point of view from infrastructure point of view from infrastructure point of view and, of course, it is a decision notjust the fa but the government and all the others. but this you know everything about english or british football so... they deserve to have a world cup in the near future. it was a positive evening for northern ireland as they beat new zealand1—0 in belfast last night. the friendly had been organised as michael o'neill‘s side warm up for next week's world cup qualifier in azerbaijan. the only goal of the game, came from the scottish premiership's leading scorer: ross county's, liam boyce.
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pleased with what we got from the game. we won the game which was important and greater for liam to get his goal. disappointed that we did not add to the final score. physically was a challenging and demanding game which was what we wa nted demanding game which was what we wanted and, as i said, it leaves us ina good wanted and, as i said, it leaves us in a good place in terms of what we have now and in terms of preparation to play next week. the new british english lions the provincial barbarians number 10 is
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interesting, ben gatlin, a 22—year—old was played to the auckland blues and is the son of the lions boss. he can probably expect to make a few tackles on the weekend but we have not spoken too much about the game and he is excited about the opportunity, if he does get a chance to play against us looking forward to seeing how he goes. england all rounder chris woakes has been ruled out of the rest of the champions trophy, due to a side strain, he picked up in the opening match of the tournament. woakes only played, two overs, of thursday's win, over bangladesh before the injury. england are unlikely to name his replacement, until this afternoon, after the england lions match, which involves two of the possible candidates: steve finn and tom curran. at the french open, britain's andy murray and kyle edmund are in action later today while defending mens champion novak djokovic is through to the fourth round, but he had to fight for it. argentine diego schwartzman, the world number 41, took djokovic, to five sets yesterday. the world number two though had
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enough, to see out the victory. a much easier ride for rafael nadal. the nine—time champions at roland garros through in straight sets against, nikoloz basilashvili, dropping only one game, in the entire match. the defending women's champion, garbine muguruza, is safely into the fourth round. she beat yulia putintseva, in straight sets. can you spell that players name?” know it ends with the letter eyes. let's get back to rugby league. it is more straightforward. two tries helped leads rhinos defeat lee centurions. so for leads, it takes
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them to third. it grew up in the bomb sites of britain, after the second world war, and is once again now proving to be, one of the fastest growing cycling sports at grass roots. it is cycle speedway and as the british team, arrive in poland today, as they build up to the world championship later this year, i've been to train at coventry to see what it's all about. no brakes, no gears. just dirt and plenty of guts. and cycle speedway is accessible to all ages, even if you are five. like lucy. it is a little bit slippery. i love it because i like it. it is cycling at its purest, really. it is rough, ready and raw. it took off in the rubble of bombsites after the second really trying to get people involved from all age groups. it is far more accessible and not so worrying about being on the back of a motorbike. it also makes it easier to turn up and pay a couple of quid,
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hire a bike and enter a race. this is where the nerves kick in. this is the position you need to adopt for the maximum speed up to the first corner. cut up there, trying to come inside. ooh, sometimes... nearly at the fence. it is fast and explosive with four riders competing over four laps. they say in this sport it is first or dirt and most races are won as you skid around the corners. it is a little frightening because you do not know if you will fall. you just want to get the inside of people and overtake them. i get quite aggressive. it is full contact. and you either come out on the right side or the wrong side. indeed, the whole british
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championship was won on the very last bend last season. i was ten yards away from being a champion. i was happy with second. it can certainly hurt when your dreams end up in the dirt. so if you would like a taste of speedway without a motorbike it is a very accessible form it does look dangerous. it would really hurt if i fell off even though i was not going fast. and the epsom derby is in here today's. under certain race with a horse we should all back, naggers. it's not your horse, is it? no. no. thank you, mike.
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she's become one of britain's biggest stars after appearing in miranda and call the midwife. now the actor miranda hart is making her west end debut in a new production of annie. she's playing miss hannigan — the infamous orphanage manager — in the musical which first opened in america 40 years ago. our arts editor, will gompertz has been to meet miranda and three of her co—stars as they prepare for next week's opening night. # it's a hard knock life... the show may be called annie but this particular west end production is all about miranda. it is a vulnerable place when you are the face on the poster. you think "are people wanting to knock me down?" there is that fear. we are not very good at celebrating success, we prefer to pick on the things we are not good at. does it feel like this is a contemporary story?
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kind of. you can relate to it with orphans. there will always be orphans in the world like people in syria and it is kind of putting old—fashioned stories into today's life. # it's a hard knock life... who has got the worst american accent? oh, that is a harsh question! probably me. i was going to say that! that is a great idea. basically call pickfords, i am moving on. miranda made her name with a sitcom. she is now a star. what advice does she have? being yourself and doing things outside it and having fun and not getting caught up with any trappings of fame, wanting to be about fame or money because that does not
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bring you happiness. there has been discussion of miranda coming back. i like the idea of miranda and gary being married. it could be a sitcom. don't get married. i'm not. i'm best man. i miss my sitcom family and the character but whether that means i will start writing again, i do not know. she does have plenty to get on with. not least spending the summer living her dream and starring in this west end musical. lovely. we keep saying you will be on our mind all day, that song. with the bucket and the mop? let's talk now to ben and find out what is happening with the weather this morning. iam pleased happening with the weather this morning. i am pleased we are going over to you now because i am happy
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you are not trying to sing with a mop and bucket. i think we try to do that once and i said no, that is my answerforever. it is not all good news if you like dry weather but not looking too bad to start for this weather watcher in wales. there will be sunshine through the day but there will also be showers in northern and western areas you can already see the showers showing their hand out west, but in between, a nice slice of sunshine. plenty of fine weather through this morning and into the afternoon. things brightening up across east anglia and the south—east, but the showers will get going through the afternoon, especially across northern ireland and scotland. the heaviest around lunchtime for northern ireland, then the middle of the afternoon for scotland. these showers will be slow—moving, especially up to the north—east, where the winds will be
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fairly light, with rumbles of thunder and flashes of lightning, lots of rain in a short space of time. while two showers creeping into northern england. east anger and the south—east should be dry at, and the south—east should be dry at, a fresher feel than we have had lately, although temperatures of 21 or22, lately, although temperatures of 21 or 22, not feeling bad in the sunshine. a few showers trundling across wales and the south—west. they will be quite hit and miss and should be gone by the time you get to this evening for the big match in cardiff. the champions final should be fine, temperatures beginning to dip away as the match goes on. it should turn into a cool night, wherever you are. showers continue wherever you are. showers continue where you are across northern ireland and scotland, most places ending a drive through the early hours of sunday morning. temperatures around 9— 11 degrees. tomorrow we do it all again. a day of sunshine and showers. a fine start for most. more showers than today, across northern england, especially in the morning. northern ireland and scotland, more showers will get going and it will cloud overfor will get going and it will cloud over for the south—western parts of wales was showery rain late in the
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day. temperatures still down on where they have in the pleasant enoughin where they have in the pleasant enough in the sunshine, 16— 20 degrees. a quick once at the start of next week, areas will change, low pressure gathering out west and threatening to throw frontal systems in across the country. bands of ram with potentially some strong winds as well. make the most of your sunshine if you do get to see it. now it's time for newswatch, and this week, samira ahmed hears complaints about the audience at this week's election debate programme. hello, and welcome to newswatch. later on the programme... cheering and applause. jeremy corbyn's comments went down well at wednesday's election debate but was that because the audience was not representative or did the bbc just handle the programme wrongly? and where these pictures of the manchester bomber out shopping, worthy of the attention they received on bbc news? first, election campaigns are often defined by actual or perceived
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blunders but politicians caught on camera or microphone and replayed endlessly, increasingly so in the social media age. after diane abbott's difficulties with numbers, during a radio interview a couple of weeks ago, jeremy corbyn had this encounter on tuesday, with emma barnett on woman's hour. how much will it cost to provide unmea ns—tested childcare for 1.3 million children. it will cost... it will obviously cost a lot to do so, we accept that... i presume you have the figures? yes, i do. so how much will it cost? i will give you the figure in a moment. you do not know it? you are logging into your ipad, here. you've announcing a major policy and if you do not know how much it all costs? the labour leader's failure to recall the cost of his proposal to extend free childcare in england featured prominently on bbc news
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throught the day, leading the three bbc1 bulletins, but many viewers felt that too much was being made of a mere memory lapse, with will tolley emailing... meanwhile, john maynard twitted this question... another viewer, fiona mckenzie, recorded her thoughts for us on video. on tuesday, we had the perfect illustration of the differential treatment of labour and the conservatives. headline news on all the broadcast media becausejeremy corbyn forgot a figure. compare that to the treatment of philip hammond, chancellor of the exchequer, who on the today programme got his figures for hs2 out by £20 billion.
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coverage might have been balanced if they'd mention that labour had a fully costed manifesto, whereas the tories manifesto was totally uncosted. another election controversy followed on wednesday, after a bbc1 debate featuring representatives of the seven main parties, including jeremy corbyn and home secretary amber rudd, in the place of the absent prime minister. and i was thinking how chaotic it would be if they all got together, formed a coalition... it was a rumbustious affair, which at times, felt some viewers, itself degenerated into chaos. denise kingsley told us she found debates like that... and derek edge agreed... more contentious though
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was the reaction of the audience put together by the polling company, comres, who were commissioned by the bbc. here's how a couple of comments ofjeremy corbyn's went down. have you seen people sleeping around our stations, have you seen them? cheering and applause. have you seen the level... jeremy i need to answer that... jeremy corbyn can you respond to that point... 300,000 people elected me to lead this party and i'm very proud to lead this party... cheering and applause. when amber rudd spoke, though, the audience responded in a less enthusiastic way. we have made a clear decision to make sure that we protect the poorest in our society... you have not. ..which means the pensioners will be protected.
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judge us on our record... audience laughter. 0k, 0k... we have cut the deficit. the following morning, the daily mail front page screamed of "fury and bias at bbc tv debate" and the foreign secretary boris johnson called the audience the most left—wing he had ever seen, describing the programme like this, on breakfast... it was a yammering cacophony of views, many of them left wing. even by the bbc‘s own standards, i think you would agree that that audience was notably to the left of many people in this country. what did newswatch viewers think? well, one of them, judy turner, joins me. now, judy, you watched the leaders debate, why did you contact newswatch? i was actually shocked by the audience reaction. i thought the jeering and the cheering of some people but the jeering of others
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was actually unacceptable. and it seemed to be that the audience was, at the least, at least 80%, left of centre in its bias and i thought that was completely unrepresentative of how the country votes. you raise firstly the issue of whether the audience make—up was unbalanced. and the polling organization, comres, put that whole audience together. let's hear what they said about this earlier in the week... the reality was, that the audience was scrupulously put together, and selected and verified, and i think a politician's clapometer is probably not the best way to judge how representative it is of the voting public, it is, actually, to open the bonnet, as it were, and to understand how that audience was put together. it is like constructing a giant 3—d jigsaw. you have to look at how representative — making sure it is representative of the 2015 result, making sure it's representative of the current voting attention, making sure it's representative of the people who voted remain and leave, and then make sure it's demographically representative as well, and i can tell you that it absolutely was. that's what the polling company say.
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but you have also raises a concern about the panellists themselves. what's your concern about the way that they came across and the kind of way that the debate worked? i do not understand why there were seven speakers there and a number of them are from very small parties. if you look at the way people voted, i think plaid cymru got 0.6% of the vote in 2015. and they all got an awful lot of air time, and i do not know whether the audience... they say that everyone was represented, was the conservative audience, was it 40 times the amount of plaid cymru, in the audience? ijust do not believe that the audience was actually representative of the country. you also spoke about the sense that perhaps five of these leaders were essentially ganging
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up on amber rudd. what could or should the bbc have done differently in how they handled the whole thing? it was very difficult. it descended into chaos. it was a shouting slangy match. i thought amber rudd actually did very well, under a lot of aggression. i think that the presenter should have stopped some of this shouting. i think perhaps the bbc should have thought about the format — seven speakers is too much. perhaps there should have been two presenters. perhaps there should have been ground rules at the beginning about not making personal attacks and not shouting over people. basically it was a complete turnoff. i know a number of people who just turned off the tv, to watch the other side. and i think it would put most people off politics. well, the bbc, we did ask them for someone to come and talk about these concerns. no one was available but we do have a statement and here it is... so, judy, that is what
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the bbc have had to say. in the end, a final word to you. what's your feeling and what message would you like to give the bbc? well, actually, i do not think that is correct. i do not think... i think that the militant side of the audience hijacked the whole programme. and i think it is happening more and more, and i think if there were a more central right wing viewers there then perhaps they did not want to speak up and be subjected to a barrage of abuse, just as emma barnett was last
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week in woman's hour, for asking a question that jeremy corbyn couldn't respond to. judy turner, thank you very much. finally, the aftermath of last week's bomb attack in manchester continues to attract news headlines, with some cctv footage of salman abedi heralded as a bbc exclusive, featuring at he top of monday's bbc1's bulletins. reporter: a young man in a hooded top, jogging pants and trainers, on his own, on a sunday morning shop. in this footage obtained by the bbc, he looks relaxed as he is captured on cctv browsing the shelves of the manchester convenience store. his till receipt shows he spent £8.74 and he bought almonds, tuna, scouring pads and airfresheners. staff in the shop believe this was salman abedi. some viewers told us they found the prominent use of these pictures to be voyeuristic and lacking in any significant news value. one of them, cristina white, recorded her thoughts on camera for us.
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i simply could not understand why that was considered to be major news and to warrant the main spot. of course, such a grave event needed extensive coverage but the coverage should have been news and not sensationalism. so many other things happened that week which were not mentioned or received very scant coverage — to name one, 26 people were killed on a bus in egypt and yet it was hardly mentioned. i felt really sad that taxpayers' money is used to fund public broadcasting that sometimes sinks to the level of tabloid journalism. thank you for all your comments this week. if you'd like to send us your opinions on bbc news and current affairs, or even appear in person on the programme, do please call us on 03700106676.
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you can also e—mail us. you can also post your comments on twitter and do have a look at our website. that's all from us. we are off air next week in the aftermath of the general election butjoin us again in a fortnight where we will be looking back at the campaign coverage. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. tough questions for both theresa may and jeremy corbyn, as they face a television audience of voters. my my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today, so how can that be fair? we will put more money into the nhs but there isn't a magic money tree. would aallow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and say we better
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start talking? of course not. of course i would not do that.

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