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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 3, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. tough questions for both theresa may and jeremy corbyn, as they face a television audience of voters. my my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today, so how can that be fair? we will put more money into the nhs but there isn't a magic money tree. would aallow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and say we better start talking? of course not. of course i would not do that. good morning, it's saturday 3rd june. ariana grande returns to manchester and visits children in hospital who were injured in the arena bombing. hope for ovarian cancer patients, as the early trial of a new drug
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shows promising results. in sport, european club football's biggest night in sport, european club football's biggest night. home fans will be hoping gareth bale gets to play at some point in the champions league final. and ben has the weather. good morning. we have swept away the warmth and humidity from the last couple of days. a fresher weekend ahead with spells of sunshine and a few passing showers, all the details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may and jeremy corbyn have faced tough questions from a tv audience, just days before the general election. they were challenged separately in a special edition of question time in york. mrs may faced uncomfortable questions about nhs funding. while mr corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use the uk's nuclear deterrent. our political correspondent vicky young was there. they came here hoping to persuade people that they have what it takes to lead the country. no one expected an easy
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ride but from the start it was clear that this would be a testing evening. theresa may was accused of being untrustworthy, of changing her mind on calling an election and on policies like social care. others were angry about funding for schools and hospitals. my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today so how can that be fair? we have had to take some hard choice across the public sector in relation to public sector pay restraint. we did that because of the decisions we had to take to bring public spending under control because it wasn't under control under the last labour government. brexit is why theresa may says she called this election. she said she was determined to deliver. we take this opportunity of brexit, new trade deals around the rest of the world, actually seeing how we can build a more prosperous, stronger and fairer britain. i think we can do that and i think we can do that because i believe in britain and i believe in the british people. forjeremy corbyn, this was a chance
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to prove he's ready to take the topjob in politics. he was unapologetic about plans to raise taxes for companies and higher earners. where are the skilled workers going to come from tomorrow? where are going to be the consumers of tomorrow? i think it's time that we looked at inequality in our society and used public investment in order to improve services and give real chances to everybody. poverty is a waste. but mr corbyn had his most difficult moment when he was pressed to say whether he'd ever use nuclear weapons to defend britain? would you allow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and then say, oh, we better start talking? you would be too late? you would have to do it first. of course not. the general election is less than a week away is less than a week away and this was a great opportunity for voters to see both the people
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who want to be prime minister. yes, setting out their vision, but also coming under real pressure over policies and both hope that this will be the moment when the public swings behind them. one of theresa may's most senior ministers has said a future conservative government would not raise income tax — even for high earners. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, told the daily telegraph that the party was not in the business of punishing people for getting on. our political correspondent leila nathoo is in westminster for us this morning. is this a deliberate change of policy or clarification of policy or signal, what do we read into it?” think it's a clarification. there was no mention of this in the conservative manifesto. the only thing mentioned on tax in the tory ma nifesto thing mentioned on tax in the tory manifesto was not raising vat so that left room, left the door open for rises in national insurance and income tax. you will remember david cameron under the conservatives under him had promised not to raise
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any of them, vat, income tax or national insurance. but theresa may had left that out from her ma nifesto, had left that out from her manifesto, perhaps to give the conservatives some flexibility on taxation as the chancellor philip hammond had suggested but obviously the uncertainty about whether income tax would be raised for higher earners, the core tory support base, was troubling for the conservative party and they've now decided to put out a signal, i think it is a signal, not a pledge or promise, but a signal which is why it's not there in plaque and white in the ma nifesto, in plaque and white in the manifesto, not to raise income tax for higher earners. they are also trying to say they're not planning to put up income tax for any wage bracket but labour are seizing on this saying this shows that lower and middle income earners will only be protected under labour. i think from the conservatives today certainly a signal to their core support base to try and make sure they turn out. what other signals can we expect this weekend, five days to go. absolutely, there will
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bea days to go. absolutely, there will be a frantic race this weekend to try and tour key constituencies and capitalise on the other parties‘ wea k capitalise on the other parties‘ weak spots to maximise this weekend as the last one of the campaign. thank you very much. the singer ariana grande has visited fans in hospital who were injured in the terror attack at her manchester concert. the star spent time with youngsters at the royal manchester children's hospital in a surprise appearance ahead of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow. simonjones reports. in about five minutes, we will be speaking to lily harrison's dad adam about that visit by ariana grande. an early and small scale trial of a new drug to combat ovarian cancer has shown promising results according to researchers. charities have called it an important step in treating a cancer with few drug options. developed by the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden nhs foundation trust,
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the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part in the trial. statins — which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol — could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%, according to a new study. scientists in china who analysed research involving 200,000 women, found patients who took the drug were less likely to see their cancer return. charities have welcomed the news but say more clinical trials are needed. the consumer group which is calling on british airways to create an automatic compensation system for passengers affected by serious flight delays and cancellations. it comes a week after a major it failure caused hundreds of the airline's flights to be grounded. the company says it has already taken steps to process claims as speedily as possible. meanwhile, british airways cabin crew have voted for four more days of strike action starting onjune 16th.
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a huge police and security operation is being deployed across cardiff as the city prepares for the champions league final. more than 170,000 football fans are due to visit the welsh capital this weekend for the match between real madrid and juventus. south wales police say 6,000 police officers will be deployed in the city. increased security at high profile events ash way of life at the moment particularly after the terrorist attack at the concert in manchester. children being treated in hospital after the terrorist attack at an ariana grande concert in manchester got a surprise yesterday when the singer popped in for a visit. she's back in the city for a benefit gig tomorrow to raise money for the victims‘ families, and spent a few hours last night chatting and posing for photographs with youngsters who'd been injured
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in the blast. one of them was 8—year—old lily harrison. her dad adam is with us now. good morning. thank you for coming in. no problem. how is lily to start with? if you asked me last tuesday probably not so good. but since last night she'sjust probably not so good. but since last night she's just on cloud nine. really chomping at the bit for tomorrow, really excited. look at that picture. that's why, is it, that's the best medicine she could have hoped for? yeah, she was so nervous, she said i think i might need to go to the toilet, she was that excited. we were the last room on the ward she came to visit, so the excitement was building. then she came skipping in and as you can see, she's made up. one of the best things that we are able to talk to you about is the fact that lily's recovering and is cheerful and is on the road to recovery. i notice when you were coming in to the studio you
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we re you were coming in to the studio you were limping. how are you? we are doing well. could you tell us what happened? yeah, obviously after the explosion, my injuries have come in the aftermath of that, lily was blown to the floor, she had a wound to her back. as i saw her on the floor, i picked her up like a rugby ball and made a run for it, obviously being 16 stone myself and carrying lily's weight and running at speed downstairs, i met a guy's foot at the bottom and gone over on my ankle. i am a bit immobile. tell me what happened in terms of your proximity to the blast. you had hurried out, i understand, after the concert. yes, usually i am quite polite and as we are leaving the seating area i will say you go first. but lily was tired and hungry so first. but lily was tired and hungry soi first. but lily was tired and hungry so i wanted to get home and get her to sleep. i snaked my way through a gap, 9°t to sleep. i snaked my way through a gap, got on to the concourse and the
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last thing my partner said you are walking too fast and then that's when the explosion went. i was saying, you know, had it not been for me trying to make a hasty exit it could have been a lot worse. so we are very lucky. i probably say we we re we are very lucky. i probably say we were maybe, ten, fetch teen yards away, we were quite close. it pushed me forward. but, yeah, it's still... very surreal. we talked about the physical effect and how you and lily have been dealing with that. nearly two weeks on, what's it been like the last fortnight emotionally, coming to terms with what you have been through and what so many other families have been through? yeah, it was tough. lily went unconscious and in the car park she was almost like jelly, in the car park she was almost like jelly, it was a tough realisation that we thought we may have lost her. she came around 30 seconds later. i was patting her legs to see if she had a sense of feeling, she
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did, so from rock bottom, i wouldn't say euphoria but it was uplifting she was ok. since then the first three, four days afterwards she didn't really talk much. it was yes and no. but then she's really come round. obviously culminating last night, like i say she's ready to go, wa nts to night, like i say she's ready to go, wants to get home now and feels like she's a rock star now. as well as meeting ariana she's going to the concert tomorrow and you are as well? yes, ticketmaster were brilliant with us, we did leave it up brilliant with us, we did leave it up to lily, we will try to get tickets, if you decide you want to go: this is the issue, tell us how lily has been reacting to the idea ofa lily has been reacting to the idea of a big event. it isn't what children expect to happen. not at all, my partner and i took videos during the concert of lily singing
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along and to remind her she had a good time, do you want to watch back that you had a good time, she wasn't sure at first. but then as the week's gone on she's been listening to her playlist and again she's expressed wishes to go. after last night's visit i think she would disown me if i didn't take her on sunday. i think aran's team were brilliant. how is it going to work, because she is in hospital at the moment? she's looking like she can be discharged tomorrow or possibly today. my partner still has a wound but we are waiting for confirmation this morning whether they can put a dressing around it and they said she should be there until tuesday. lily needs to tick all the boxes, the final one is the psychological,
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physical issues looks well. she's running down the corridors of the hospital and, our heart is in our mouths, but who are we to tell her not to do that. tomorrow is what she needs at this point. exactly. she's really excited, after last night, to see her face last night and to see it tomorrow will be things where you think we are coming full circle again. looking forward to it. and she met prince william. she did, it was secretive. we were told it was confidential. i understand. it wasn't a photo, it was just a visit to meet with the families. yeah, she was a lucky girl. she's been in an environment and her life has been turned completely on its head, and as you explained how she's coming to terms with this, what does it mean meeting someone like ariana grande and prince william and knowing she's going back into the real world so to speak after? we were worried at
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first, she's only eight, i think she's one of one —— one of the youngest on the ward. we were being delicate with her. we are proud as pa rents delicate with her. we are proud as parents she's shown the amount of courage, not to be biased, she's carried us through this week. she's come on so strong. carried us through this week. she's come on so strong. we have not doubted her since. not one person is going tojudge you doubted her since. not one person is going to judge you for being proud of your little girl. not at all. absolutely you should be. we are delighted she's recovering and we wish you a great time tomorrow. hope her discharge goes ahead as planned. fingers crossed. thank you so much. ben has the weather this morning. good morning. it's not looking too bad this morning, many places have seen sunrises like that. it's not all sunshine today, good spells of sunshine but also some showers
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beginning to pop up especially in northern and western areas. we still have cloud to clear from eastern parts of england, the odd spot of rain here, that will scoot off to the north sea. things will brighten up the north sea. things will brighten up and spells of sunshine but showers pushing in from the west, especially for northern ireland and scotla nd especially for northern ireland and scotland some of the showers will be heavy and slow moving. rain in a short space of time with lightning and thunder. a cooler, fresher feel, as well. this evening the showers will continue for a time across northern ireland and scotland. they will tend to ease then and for about all parts it will be a dry night with clear spells. a fairly cool night, nothing exceptional. towns and cities around 9—11. tomorrow we do it all again essentially. sunshine and showers, more showers than today across northern england. northern ireland and scotland having a few heavy showers and clouding over with rain across the south—west of england, wales and parts of the midlands later. again a cooler feel but get into sunshine, 16—20 won't feel too bad. but get into sunshine, 16—20 won't
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feel too had. a change into monday, looks like we will see wet weather pushing in from the west, potentially heavy rain and strong winds. highs of 14—20. back to you two. theresa may and jeremy corbyn faced a series of hostile questions last night as part of a question time special. but which leader came out top? with just five days until polling, let's get a progress report from katy balls, political correspondent for the spectator and daily mirror associate editor kevin maguire. morning to both of you. katy, let's start with you, who won?|j morning to both of you. katy, let's start with you, who won? i think theresa may put in a solid performance and probably one of her best of the campaign so far. after a difficult week or so she managed to find a positive message finally and i think find a positive message finally and ithinka find a positive message finally and i think a lot of conservatives who we re i think a lot of conservatives who were worried about her will feel more assured. kevin, i suspect you
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we re more assured. kevin, i suspect you were not say she won?|j more assured. kevin, i suspect you were not say she won? i agree the audience was terrific asking the right questions. she may have steadied the tory ship but she was defensive on the record when questioned about cuts and mental health too. she didn't look the commanding figure she started the campaign as. the story of this campaign, we don't know where it will end, we will find out next friday when we wake up, but the story is she's gone down and jeremy corbyn's gone up. did you see in jeremy corbyn last night a prime minister to be, somebody is who could be in downing street in a week's time, has he convinced people of that? i think he has convinced some, yes. he has changed opinions. they're seeing corbyn uncut rather thana they're seeing corbyn uncut rather than a distorted view. where he had problems was on triedent. he was under sustained fire and questioning on that. nobody believes he would ever press a button, a nuclear. i
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think that's a good thing and i am worried about leaders who would do that. nevertheless, he lost the argument in his own party which is why labour's committed to renewing trident. will that issue, a fact he wouldn't press the button, will that crystallise fears in the minds of some voters? a lot of people on social media have been saying theresa may might have done all the right things, said the right policy things, but was lacking emotional intelligence, a lack of empathy with people in the audience, she doesn't connect? i think i don't think it was... we heard a lot about the repeated lines, she seemed to have fire in her belly for a change. when a woman asked about work allowance and was visibly upset i think theresa may was very, managed to reach out with her, reach out to her feelings and say she was sorry about
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what happened and that was an emotional response that we hadn't seen before. do you thinkjeremy corbyn has done much better than you expected him to do? yeah, i think so, definitely. he started off with low expectations, though, that he's kept surprising us. but he was very strong on monday in the channel a—sky interview and last night he struggled a lot more. i thought the format would work in his favour because the crowd seemed pro him but actually he struggled and couldn't avoid questions so when he was asked about trident, the audience didn't like the first answer and kept going for him and it meant he was hammered on defence. what did last night teach us overall, let's keep the personalities and your own politics out of this, but what did we learn, what did it reveal for both of them? ?if what did it reveal for both of them? ? if you had been following the campaign you wouldn't learn anything new, people are tuning in now and elections aren't won or lost by the
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party faithful, they're won or lost with floating voters, can you attract the people who might be sympathetic to you but have concerns? with theresa may and i don't think she's particularly empath thetic, i think she has the personality of a tin of paint. jeremy corbyn is offering change, it's whether it is change you want and change that reassures you. did you feel we learned anything new, katy? | you feel we learned anything new, katy? i don't think we learned that much new. we saw both the leaders going back to the subjects they're most comfortable on and theresa may returning to brexit which is what she said she called this election for and the topic she's still co mforta ble for and the topic she's still comfortable on. we heard talk about the economy and labour's magic money tree. one of the most cutting questions is when a member asked jeremy corbyn if labour's manifesto is really a letter to santa? i don't think it solved labour's credible issue. that magic money tree i am
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upset, because i used that phrase for my family when i have lectured them at home. but the reason she doesn't go on about the deficit any more is they borrowed £52 billion la st more is they borrowed £52 billion last year, they piled up more national debt than every labour government. it won't be cleared until 2025. it's interesting, the debt hasn't really been an issue the way migration has been an issue because the conservative record on both is pretty poor. five days to go. quickly, what do you each expect we are going to see them concentrating on? i think brexit again. we know the strategist has taken more again. we know the strategist has ta ken more control after again. we know the strategist has taken more control after some wobbles, now it's going to be a disciplined message and we will hear about brexit and defence. kevin? brexit, yes, because it's a card they have to play but they'll also go full—on attack on jeremy corbyn. jeremy corbyn will say, look, he will use that slogan for the many,
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not the few. are you doing well or could britain do better, let's be ambitious for britain, he will push the change. she will push the fear. thank you very much. looking behind you, maybe that's it, maybe that's the magic money tree behind you!|j am the magic money tree behind you!” am going to give it a shake then! thank you both very much indeed. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. the guardian's northern editor helen pidd is here to tell us what's caught her eye. interesting to pick up on this conversation as well. we were talking about how the audience was really engaged and fiery. punchy. what was interesting afterwards on bbc news channel was the coverage with some of of the politicians and that fire was reflected a little bit. there was a particular exchange
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with labour and the conservatives. it was about food banks i think. let's have a look. 40% pay it was about food banks i think. let's have a look. 4096 pay cut since 2010 and are using food banks. he has never used a food bank. actually... take that back. let's sort this out. take that back. i wa nt to sort this out. take that back. i want to hear you just pointed in my face. let's hear from jeremy corbyn. this is what he had to say about that nuclear deterrent. poor simon there, half—journalist, half—referee, i think that was his role! what was your feeling coming away from the debate, it didn't feel anyone was saying there was an outright winner or someone has proven themselves to be a strong and worthy leader? no, but jeremy corbyn seemed very confident and calm and
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didn't get rattled. theresa may, her eyes we re didn't get rattled. theresa may, her eyes were kind of, bulging, she was definitely under pressure. there was a nurse who asked a question and she said that her wage packet was the same now as it was in 2009. theresa may gave an answer about how the public accept that in these times we have to make hard decisions but i think you ask a average person do you think they think nurses should be properly paid and the average person would say of course, they shouldn't be earning the same amount as eight years ago. we will talk to iain duncan smith later. we have spoken to a representative from the labour party. we will keep talking about that debate. let's move on from politics for now. this piece in the mirror today, we were talking about the concert with ariana grande. people applying for tickets when they weren't even there. grande. people applying for tickets when they weren't even therem beggars belief. there is always one
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or two wrong—uns as we would say in manchester who might chance it. but for 10,000 people who weren't at that concert to claim they were so they don't have to pay £50, all of which the profits are going to family family which the profits are going to familyfamily and which the profits are going to family family and victims of the bomb attack, it's staggering. the mirror reports that the police are looking into whether any criminal offences have been committed by those fraudulently applying for free tickets and they've vowed to crack down on those who do not deserve the free tickets. i certainly support that. if little girls like adam's daughter who was on before, if she's brave enough, lily, yeah, to go back toa brave enough, lily, yeah, to go back to a concert to watch her idol, these are the people who should be getting tickets and not chancers off the internet. the police might prosecute people who wrongly tried to claim tickets. too right. why have you picked this story about a young girl, a schoolgirl who ran away with her teacher?”
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young girl, a schoolgirl who ran away with her teacher? i remember this story and i think a lot of viewers probably will. it was a 15—year—old girl and her 30—year—old teacher, and in september 2012 they tried to elone from their homes in sussex and went to france and it was front pages of all the newspapers the search to find them, they were found by french police, he was put on trial and sent to jail. what's interesting about this interview which originally comes from cosmopolitan magazine, it's told from the viewpoint of the former schoolgirl. she's 19 now. she says she doesn't regret the affair. she knows it was dangerous and damaged them both. she also acknowledges in this is that she started it. with a lot of people that's not going to wash, they will say she was 15, he wash, they will say she was 15, he was ina wash, they will say she was 15, he was in a position of responsibility. she says she approached him on twitter and i know there is a lot of schools that don't allow teachers to have public social media profiles because it makes it easier for
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teenagers who might have some infatuation to get in touch and this is how this started. survival of the fittest as dating sites evolve. yes, this is an interview with the owner ofa this is an interview with the owner of a dating website e harmony, talking about how they fine tune how to watch people. tlaer talking about fitness trackers to see if they're the sporting fanatics they claim to be and also to find people with a compatible level of activity on the weekend. a lot of people lie on dating profiles, they have pictures of themselves looking extremely sporty and athletic and what they really do is watch football on a sunday afternoon. find out if your pulse rate is compatible? exactly. i wish we both had one. our pulse rates are very compatible, i am sure. equally fit. that's scary,
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that kind of intrusion really. yes. or level of scrutiny. helen, thank you very much for now. headlines are coming up. see you shortly. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. coming up before nine, ben's got the weather.
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and we have the champions league preview. it isn't entirely positive, the weather. but there is some sunshine... but first, a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may and jeremy corbyn have faced tough questions from a tv audience, just days before the general election. they were challenged separately in a special edition of question time in york. mrs may faced uncomfortable questions about nhs funding. while mr corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use the uk's nuclear deterrent. more from that debate has the programme goes on. one of theresa may's most senior ministers has said a future conservative government would not raise income tax — even for high earners. the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, told the daily telegraph the party was "not in the business of punishing people for getting on". labour has already said it would increase income tax rates to 45 pence in the pound for those earning more than 80,000 pounds. the pop star ariana grande has made a surprise visit to fans in hospital who were injured in the terror attack at her manchester concert. the singer spent time
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chatting to patients and posing for photographs at the royal manchester children's hospital ahead of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow in aid of the victims‘ families. a new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described as very promising after a small clinical trial. charities have called it an important step in treating a cancer with few drug options. developed by the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden nhs foundation trust, the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part in the trial. statins — which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol — could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%, according to a new study. scientists in china who analysed research involving 200,000 women, found patients who took the drug were less likely to see their cancer return. charities have welcomed the news but say more clinical trials are needed. the consumer group which is calling
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on british airways to create an automatic compensation system for passengers affected by serious flight delays and cancellations. it comes a week after a major it failure caused hundreds of the airline's flights to be grounded. the company says it has already taken steps to process claims as speedily as possible. meanwhile british airways cabin crew have voted for four more days of strike action starting onjune 16th. those are the main stories this morning. mike has all of the sport... good morning. good morning. in a few minutes it all begins for the british and irish lions. they signed the autographs, there has been rain. one of the most difficult place names i've had to spell and then pronounce. it is the most northern city in new
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zealand which is where the lions will take off —— kick off in a few moments time. here we have some pictures of them in their huddle on the pitch. it's a very volcanic city there. up against the provincial barbarians. nine new caps, the first of six warm up matches ahead of the first test in three weeks' time. a chance for the team to send out a warning and for players to book a place in the test team. sam warburton is captaining the side. cardiff is hosting european club football's, biggest night, of the season — the champions league final. a lot of speculation on whether welsh star gareth bales will get to play for real madrid againstjuventus.olly
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foster looks ahead. real madrid and juventus fans have travelled here in their tens of thousands. cardiff has welcomed two giants of european football for what could be a classic. it will be great. if we win it is going to be the best experience in my life. we have a balanced team, we are confident we can win. if we win it is going to be the best experience in my life. we have a balanced team, we are confident we can win. for us to defeat juventus... real madrid always win the finals. to win, real have to get past the goalkeeper. he has never won the trophy. at 39, the goalkeeper knows it may be his last chance. in a season when british teams again fell short in europe, at least one british player has reached the final. a homecoming for gareth bale. the trouble is he is unlikely to start for real madrid. he's at the heart of the marketing, he is plastered all over town. but he has not actually been in the madrid team for about six weeks because of injury. it is disappointing, especially in his hometown but i think he would probably get his head around it.
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if he doesn't start, he will come on and make an impact on what he does and that 20 minutes or half an hour, maybe even longer in extra time. he is a special player who can score all types of goals. giggs won with both of them. he won the champions league in 2008 and the fa cup here in 2004. a teenage scoring star then, he has developed into an icon of the game. a brand that is still a serial winner. a man for the grand occasion. that is what tonight promises to be. the president of the football's european governing body has told the bbc that britain deserves to host a world cup ‘in the near future'. aleksander seferin says he hopes the tournament will be held in europe in 2030. they are absolutely capable of
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organising it from an organisational point of view, from an infrastructure point of view but it isa infrastructure point of view but it is a decision not only from the fa but the government. but you know everything about british football. so they deserve to have a world cup in the near future. it was a positive evening for northern ireland as they beat new zealand1—0 in belfast last night. the friendly had been organised as michael o'neill‘s side warm up for next week's world cup qualifier in azerbaijan. the only goal of the game, was the first international goal, for ross county's liam boyce...the scottish premiership's leading scorer. lam i am pleased with what we got from the game. we won the game. that's important, great folly to get his excellent goal. slightly disappointed we only added to the 1-0. disappointed we only added to the 1—0. physically it was a challenge, a demanding game which is what we wanted. as i said, it leaves us in a
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good place in terms of what we have and one week of preparation to go and one week of preparation to go and play in baku. england all rounder chris woakes has been ruled out of the rest of the champions trophy, due to a side strain, he picked it up early on in the opening match of the tournament. england are unlikely to name his replacement, until this afternoon, after the england lions match, that's the cricket match, which involves two of the possible candidates: steve finn and tom curran. at the french open, britain's andy murray and kyle edmund are in action later today... while defending mens champion novak djokovic is through to the fourth round, but he had to fight for it. argentine diego schwartzman, the world number 41, took djokovic, to five sets yesterday. the world number two though had enough, to see out the victory... a much easier ride for rafael nadal. the nine—time champion at roland garros through in straight sets against his opponent dropping only one
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game, in the entire match. the defending women's champion, garbine muguruza, is safely into the fourth round. she beat yulia putinseva, in straight sets. just one game in rugby league's super league last night. two tries from adam cuthbertson helped leeds rhinos beat strugglers leigh centurions, by 22 points to 14. leeds up to third. it grew up in the bomb sites of britain, after the second world war, and is once again now proving to be, one of the fastest growing cycling sports at grass roots. it is cycle speedway and as the british team, arrive in poland today, as they build up to the world championship later this year, i've been to train at coventry to see what it's all about. no brakes, no gears. just dirt and plenty of guts. and cycle speedway is accessible to all ages, even if you are five. like lucy. it is a little bit slippery. i love it because i like it. it is cycling at its purest, really. it is rough, ready and raw. it took off in the rubble
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of bombsites after the second world war. only a bomb site, a bunch of kids having fun. but here is where stars of speed are born. sit back and see if you can spot a champion of tomorrow. one day the crowd will roar so the children who learnt it all the hard way on a cycle speedway. it started after the war on the bombsites and, you know, a load of kids with nothing to do. decided to make like a speedway. it boomed. tracks were absolutely everywhere. as cities were rebuilt in the post—war years, the cycle speedway tracks disappeared. but now purpose—built ones like this one in coventry have brought it back as a cheaper and safer alternative to motor speedway. there are leagues again and the world championships in australia later this year.
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we are trying to reinvent it a little bit and add some flair. really trying to get people involved from all age groups. it is far more accessible and not so worrying about being on the back of a motorbike. it also makes it easier to turn up and pay a couple of quid, hire a bike and enter a race. this is where the nerves kick in. this is the position you need to adopt for the maximum speed up to the first corner. cut up there, trying to come inside. ooh, sometimes... nearly at the fence. it is fast and explosive with four riders competing over four laps. they say in this sport it is first or dirt and most races are won as you skid around the corners. it is a little frightening because you do not know if you will fall. you just want to get
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the inside of people and overtake them. i get quite aggressive. it is full contact. and you either come out on the right side or the wrong side. indeed, the whole british championship was won on the very last bend last season. i was ten yards away from being a champion. i was happy with second. it can certainly hurt when your dreams end up in the dirt. ican i can definitely recommend it, it is great fun racing around in the dirt. slippy, spiky rod lucy was saying. did you get scabs on your knees?” managed to stay on! speedway club zaha managed to stay on! speedway club za ha a cross managed to stay on! speedway club zaha across the country . the favourites was in the race this afternoon is naggers. put your
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money on naggers. what are the odds? 4-1. that money on naggers. what are the odds? 4—1. that isn't bad, i will take that. thank you, mike. let's move on! good luck later. theresa may and jeremy corbyn took part in a question time special last night, but with most pundits scoring the contest as a draw, maybe the real winners were the studio audience who certainly gave the leaders a rough ride. with just five days until polling, let's talk to iain duncan smith, the former work and pensions secretary, he's in our central london newsroom. thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us this morning. pleasure. let's get straight into it, we interviewed jon trickett, shadow cabinet office minister this morning. unsurprisingly, he thoughtjeremy corbyn came out on top. what he did say was that he was talking about
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theresa may's personality and how she came across. there has been a lot of criticism and analysis of this. he said that she is someone who is remote, cold and wooden. and unclear about what our policies are. how concerned are you that this is an image people are taking from the debate? i don't figure they did. i, and many others, watched or listened. i listened to it last night more than i washed it as i was on the radio at the time but others watched it. i do not agree —— i watched it. i do not agree —— i watched it. i do not agree —— i watched it. theresa may tries to give you straight answers which is important but the whole debate yesterday, the most important point, both faced tough questioning and you are right, these things are better because actually you get proper questions from the audience and the audience don't like it if you evade them. the biggest issue at the election will be the choice between the two said people had to decide who they think is actually competent
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to do thejob. who they think is actually competent to do the job. that is what it boils down to. last night he said that he thought his man did well, actually i thought his man did well, actually i thought his man faced the biggest moment in the campaign when he was specifically asked on three or four occasions if you have a nuclear deterrent, and you spend all of that money on it, will you ever use it in any circumstance? it became absolutely apparent as he tried to evade the all agricola answer that he is not going to use it —— he tried to abate the answer. why have it and spend billions on it, you yourself will never use it, corbyn, everybody knows that, so it is not a deterrent but an expensive white elephant. only if they believe you will use it, made clear by the defence secretary days ago... that is the critical issue. it's about assembling in front of the audience which was a critical moment, it gets to the character of the individual.
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let's talk about some of the policies with five days away, people wa nt to policies with five days away, people want to know about this. in the sunday telegraph, sir michael fallon is quoted as saying that there will be no rises in tax, if you vote conservative. people can be assured if they vote conservative, there will be no rise in tax for higher tax payers. can you confirm that? i am higher tax payers. can you confirm that? lam not higher tax payers. can you confirm that? i am not in government but my view is that is correct. he states what i think is obvious. the conservative party lovers tax. we have taken 31 million people out of tax —— lowers tax. and we raised the threshold on higher rate owners, so you do not enter the upper rate tax band until you earn £50,000. labour wants to reduce that so middle earners pay more in terms of tax later on. the conservatives want to lower taxation and corporation tax has been lowered to 17% by this
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government. and we want to see a lower. you said it was taken out the ma nifesto, lower. you said it was taken out the manifesto, theresa may dropped the triple tax lock. why would you take it out only to come back in and say there would be no tax rises? we are trying to get away with the ma nifesto, trying to get away with the manifesto, getting away from rather, the idea you set out every single thing in detail, saying we will not do this or that, then you get a large shopping list. the principles we re large shopping list. the principles were the conservative party seeks to lobby your taxes and the conservative party ends up with lower tax than anyone else. we will stick to that principle and the defence secretary said, as i understand in his interview, that the conservative party is not going to be raising taxes in the next parliament. the last thing small business owners need, which they are facing under the jeremy corbyn ma nifesto, facing under the jeremy corbyn manifesto, they do not need extra costs on them as we raise the minimum wage. you need to bring down taxes to give them the flexibility
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to pay the minimum wages and generate business. raising corporation tax, which is the real debate here, labour's manifesto wa nts to debate here, labour's manifesto wants to raise it to 26%, which will get rid ofjobs and lower wages and we wa nt get rid ofjobs and lower wages and we want to keep it low. do you want higher corporation tax or lower, which would help more businesses? theresa may put out the line "strong and stable leadership". if the economy, as well as brexit, people focus on that. you said a shopping list of things, many would put tax high up on the list but also economic stability. there is a lot of talk that the chancellor philip hammond will not be the chancellor if theresa may winds the election and amber rudd would be the chancellor. if theresa may and the conservatives are asking for strength and stability, surely there should be some guarantees or responds to say, we will stay with the status quo as it works, this is
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the status quo as it works, this is the team we have offered you? to be frank, shuffles happen again and again in government, and a labour or the conservatives, you move people around, you think some people are better than others. i don't know what will happen after the election, it is in the hands of the prime minister. gordon brown, david cameron and tony blair all did reshuffles. theresa may has not had a reshuffle since she came in, she is the prime minister will have the agenda which is being set out and the key point made by the defence secretary last night is no matter who is sitting, i have no issue about whether philip hammond sits there or not, the issue is the principal. the principle is the conservative party does not want to see taxes going up on those people who are not on higher earnings, and not really in a position to pay them. what we are seeing is a real debate in the next four days between what the labour party wants to do, which
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is to spend and borrow more which will cost you an taxes, or the conservative party who says we need to see through the plan, keeping taxes low so businesses set up here and it means yourjobs are secure. that is a big and critical debate with the black hole that sits in the labour manifesto of over 50 billion, which the ifs made clear, needs to be paid for. iain duncan smith, thank you for talking to us on bbc brea kfast. if you are heading out to do something active, ben has the weather forecast... good morning. it is one of those days where you look outside and think you will do something but bear in mind, that could change with a big downpour that comes overhead. it will turn into a day, and a weekend, sunny spells and showers. looking at recent satellite pictures, fair amounts of cloud in east anglia and the south—east, this is an old weather from moving its the south—east, this is an old weatherfrom moving its way the south—east, this is an old weather from moving its way through and will continue to move through as
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we go through the morning. cool and fresh conditions but bright, good spells of sunshine but these showers are already on the march, pushing in across northern ireland, scotland, and western fringes of england and wales as well. this afternoon, northern ireland sees some heavy showers, the heaviest here probably around lunchtime. at this stage, by mid—afternoon, they are likely to be across scotland where they are slow—moving, with some thunder and lightning as well. some showers trickling into northern england, many places dry with sunshine. in east anglia and the south—east, it will be fine with sunny spells. 21 or 22 degrees, not as warm as yesterday. pleasant enough, showers across wales and southwest but they should be clear from across wales and southwest but they should be clearfrom cardiff across wales and southwest but they should be clear from cardiff by the evening. for the champions league final, that big match in cardiff, it will be dry with late sunshine, it will be dry with late sunshine, it will turn cool as the match goes on.
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a fairly cool night for many of us but mainly dry. showers fade away in northern ireland and scotland, although it may take a while to do so. temperatures of 9—11d, cool but not desperately called. tomorrow, we do it all again. more showers then today across northern england, and a lot of showers in northern ireland and scotland. clouding over in the south west and wales with the rain here late in the day. cool and fresh at 16 to 20 degrees here. but next, the start of the new week bring something a little different, low— pressure something a little different, low—pressure gathering and swarming out westwards, threatening to throw a band of rain across the country on monday. potentially wet and windy weather, not great considering we are now intojune, heavy rain with strong winds, temperatures of 40-20d. we strong winds, temperatures of 40—20d. we will look forward to that one, you two! studio: that's great,
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thank you so much(!) thank you. it has been a week british airways would like to forget after tens of thousands of its passengers had their travel plans disrupted by it problems last weekend. anyone whose flight was cancelled is entitled to a fixed amount of compensation under european commission rules, but the airline has been criticised for saying customers must submit a claim before any money is paid out. paul lewis is from bbc radio 4's money box programme. lets get down to the basics. if you are in that position or while waiting at heathrow last weekend and had to rebut, what are you entitled to, what are the basics? you are entitled to reimbursement if all reasonable expenses like hotels and taxes, anything like that, food, you get it all back which is right. it isn't your fault that you had to spend it. on top of that, you get fixed rates of compensation. they va ry fixed rates of compensation. they vary compared to the time that you are delayed and where you are going
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but those delayed for hours in many cases, it is in euros so it is 400 euros, about £350, or 600 euros which is about £525. that is per passenger. if there is a family of four, it is a considerable amount of money. that is a legal entitlement. but, you have to claim it. that is what is criticised at the moment, there are 75,000 passengers. some may have flown home and don't know about it, others will be tempted by claims management companies. you don't need one, it can be done easily yourself. isn't there confusion about where you go to claim it? there were suggestions on the british airways website that you get it for your insurance company?” think that pa confused expenses and extra compensation on top. even if
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they give you another flight three orfour hours they give you another flight three or four hours late, you get compensation —— ba. on the website is first to go to your insurer or travel agent. european law is absolutely clear that it is the airline, the carrier, who reimburses you and that is where you go for it. insurance only comes in in a very last resort, if you want reimbursement for staying in the savoy, and ba says no, we will pay for a holiday inn. your insurer may meet the gap, it may not in that case, but insurance isn't an issue. the airline must pay. that's good advice, thank you. you can hear more on ‘moneybox' from midday on bbc radio 4. it took all of britain's ingenuity and bravery to win the second world war — but a new book has revealed there were also a few more unusual things that helped us to victory. you will not find these in the gcse textbook! garlic flavoured chocolate
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and exploding animal droppings were amongst some of the bizarre inventions deployed to hoodwink and undermine the enemy. peter taylor is a historian and author of weird war two and joins us now. this was so amusing. i was getting some of the stories, some of the things that were being used. some of the things i heard off, like cows being painted...? during the blackout, some farmers painted stripes on their cows to make sure motorists did not drive into them. there were a lot of people having accidents in the cities, there were weird gadgets to help with that. and garlic flavoured chocolate? when we sent secret agents abroad it was essential that they blended imperfectly, meaning looking and sounding right, and acting right. the story was that there were concerns some agent sent to spain did not spell right because they we re did not spell right because they were not eating garlic and the british attitude at the time was
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that it was a noxious substance, people could not just that it was a noxious substance, people could notjust eat it. what about we put it didn't chocolate? make it nicer for the agents to eat it! so you smell like the locals? that was the idea! one of those misplaced kinds of ingenuity! did it work? i don't know! and exploding animal droppings? there were donkey droppings, mule droppings, they were sent out to resistant groups around occupied europe and you could blow up occupied europe and you could blow up enemy vehicles with these things, they would not see them. the original droppings were actually taken from london zoo and copied, then they were sent out. different droppings depending on the area of europe. no garlic involved in those! we need to ask how you discover these. there were so many things like putting something into hitler's food to make him less aggressive?” thought if they could put female hormones into his food it might make
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him less aggressive that there is a lot of misplaced ingenuity. where did you find all of these? a vast majority from the immense archives of the imperial war museum, i was lucky that they commissioned me to go and five what i could find. it was a combination of proper research and speaking to their historians and curators. and, some silly research which was just typing funny words into the database and seeing if anything came up. sausage, socks... sometimes something would come up and lead you somewhere. intriguing. it puts a smile on your face. what does this ingenuity tell us about the way that the war was fought, and the way that the war was fought, and the situation at the time? when you are ina the situation at the time? when you are in a such dark am all situation, this incredible ingenuity is something that comes to before. i think we like to think of it as being particularly british. it is incredible. some of this
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inventiveness and ingenuity was misplaced, these gadgets that never work, but i was always in awe of people's abilities. can you explain to mea people's abilities. can you explain to me a parachuting dog? paradogs? is that a real picture? yes. and they were given two months of training... basically being thrown out of things at various heights? they had to learn the right position in the air, front paws up, back paws down. for the normandy landings they we re down. for the normandy landings they were parachuted in with troops to help detect mines and traps and so forth, yes. did the dogs survive that? i think many of them did. it was a risky mission, certainly. and what more can you tell us? what is your favourite oddity?”
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what more can you tell us? what is your favourite oddity? i think it has to be the super—strength itching powder. it sounds like something from a joke shop! you could not make it up. it was sent to resistant grips with the idea they would put it in german soldiers and where to put them out of action but a p pa re ntly put them out of action but apparently it worked. at least one you —— u—boat was forced to go back to port as it was thought they had a strange skin disease. it sounds like it was a lot of fun to research. peter's book is called weird war two. we have the headlines injust a moment... hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty.
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tough questions for both theresa may and jeremy corbyn, as they face a television audience of voters. my wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what i am earning today, so how can that be fair? we will put more money into the nhs but there isn't a magic money tree. would you allow north korea or some idiot in iran to bomb us and say we better start talking? the idea of anyone ever using a nuclear weapon in the world is utterly appalling and terrible.

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