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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 3, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 5pm: the prime minister insists it's her firm intention to cut taxes, but declined to give any guarantees. what people will know when they go to vote on thursday is that it is the conservative party that always has been, is and always will be, a low tax party. jeremy corbyn accuses the conservatives of being in disarray over their tax plans. 1 minister said they're not going to give any tax rises, and can't answer questions about tax rises for the rest the population, and can't a nswer rest the population, and can't answer questions about funding social care. ariana grande makes a surprise visit to fans injured in the terror attack at her concert last week — ahead of her benefit concert tomorrow evening. the deputy leader of afghanistan, abdullah abdullah, survives a bomb
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attack at a funeral in the capital kabul— at least seven people were killed and many more injured. also in this hour...advancements in cancer treatments. one of the largest clinical trials produces ‘powerful results‘ for prostate cancer patients. and for ovarian cancer patients — a new drug shrinks ovarian tumours in an early trial. theresa may has insisted that conservative party policy on income tax has not changed. one of her senior cabinet colleagues had suggested that the tax would not go up, even for higher earners. the tory manifesto does not include a promise on income tax, but in a newspaper interview the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, said the only way people could be sure of not
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paying more tax was to vote conservative. meanwhile, the labour leader jeremy corbyn has accused the conservatives of being in chaos over their tax plans. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports the last push to win over undecided voters and shore up support among the tory base. theresa may forced to clarify the conservatives‘ tax policy this morning after senior cabinet members suggested income tax rises would be off the table. our position on tax hasn‘t changed. we‘ve set that out in the manifesto. what people will know when they go to vote on thursday is that it is the conservative party that always has been, is and always will be, a low tax party, and it is ourfirm intention to reduce taxes for ordinary working families. her manifesto only ruled out increasing vat, claiming the conservatives‘ intention was to keep taxes
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as low as possible. but with no firm promise on income tax, the defence secretary used a newspaper interview to signal high earners would not pay more. and his cabinet colleague gave a similar reassurance last night. you can confirm then what michael fallon told the telegraph — there will be no increase in income tax under this conservative parliament if you win, is that correct? we are a party that has already taken four million of the lowest paid out of tax. no increase in income tax, is that what you are going to pledge now with one week to go? we will bear down on taxation and we have absolutely no plans to raise income tax. how you doing, you all right? i am now i've met you! jeremy corbyn says only those at the top will pay more tax under labour, but low and middle income earners will be protected. he accused the tories of being in chaos. one minister says they are going to give no more tax rises, indeed, possibly tax reductions for the very wealthiest, then they cannot answer the question about tax rises
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for the rest of the population. then they cannot answer questions about funding social care. let us be clear, what labour are offering is no tax rises or national insurance rises or vat rises for 95% of the population, an increase in corporation tax and some other tax increases at the top end to pay for social care, improving our nhs and properly funding our education system and our schools. after the conservatives‘ wobble in the polls, calming nerves about tax rises is a reliable way to rally core supporters. theresa may and her opponents have just five days left to make sure their messages get through. leila nathoo, bbc news. our reporter travelling withjeremy corbyn is danjohnson — he joins us now from beeston in nottinghamshire. nottinghamshire is a labour
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heartlands. parts of nottinghamshire but not this seat, this is a conservative held seat but1 that jeremy corbyn would very much like to win back. that‘s why he has been campaigning here today, that‘s why he is giving a speech just now, wrapping up in the community centre here. hundreds of people have turned out to hear him and they couldn‘t all fit out to hear him and they couldn‘t allfit in, so out to hear him and they couldn‘t all fit in, so he hasjust finished julius reach inside the community centre. and see people leaving now, and they were expecting him to come outside and get some of his teacher against the benefit of these who came to see him but didn‘t send the building. he made a point to that he keeps doing these rallies and people keeps doing these rallies and people keep turning up in different parts of the country, to hear his message. these are mostly natural labour supporters who would have voted labour anyway. the real challenge for him is whether he can punch through and connect with people in constituencies like this, he may have voted conservative last time that may be thinking about changing this time. it‘s by getting the votes
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of those people that he will win constituencies like this. the main issue labour has seized on today, partly talking about social care because they think that is an issue where the conservatives are weak, but also seized on that issue about income tax increases being ruled out. but theresa may failing to go that far when she was asked whether she had plans to increase income tax. labour are saying the conservatives are in chaos and confusion over their tax plans. certainly not something jeremy corbyn could be accused of. he has been very clear that he wants to increase corporation tax and income tax for the top 5% of earners. he says that‘s the only way to fund public services in the way to fund public services in the way to fund public services in the way to fund public services and awaited as needed to make britain a fairer place. his message getting through to people here in the suburbs of nottingham, but the challenge him is to make that message reach a wider audience and convince all he can fund the plan is in place. thank you. in scotland, the leader
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of the scottish national party, nicola sturgeon, is undertaking a tour of 30 constituencies by helicopter. scotland‘s first minister took to the skies in the final weekend of election campaigning, and is visiting six key constituencies over the course of saturday. the snp won 56 of the 59 seats in scotland in the 2015 general election, a record result which polls suggest they will struggle to match this time round. speaking to the bbc mrs sturgeon, said that she would be willing to enter into a coalition with the labour party in the event of a hung parliament. well, i have always said if the arithmetic and love it, i would want the snp to be part of its aggressive alternative to a tory government, a progressive alternative that invest in public services and protected tensions and policies lifting people out of poverty, but i think the polls in the rest of the uk still suggest the tories will win this
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election. but it‘s no longer inevitable but theresa may increases her majority. as she‘s been exposed throughout this campaign as being weak, evasive, no answers to basic questions. you‘ve got pollsters now saying whether or not she increases her majority could come down to the outcome here in scotland, so let‘s not throw theresa may a lifeline by boosting her majority. that is that scotland‘s interest ist, get strong snp mps to the house of commons we can continue to stand up for scotla nd can continue to stand up for scotland and stand up for the kind of country we want to be. the liberal democrats have unveiled a poster attacking the conservative‘s social care plans. the image was revealed in westminster. the poster features a picture of theresa may with the caption ‘hash tag dementiatax. don‘t bet your house on it‘. the former ukip leader nigel farage has been on the campaign trail in essex and kent. mr farage visited the constituency he lost in 2015 — south thanet. his trip comes a day after his opponent, conservative candidate craig mackinlay, was been charged with allegedly overspending in the 2015 general election campaign. mr mackinlay denies any wrongdoing. police investigating the manchester
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suicide bombing have made a seventeenth arrest. a 24—year—old man was detained in the rusholme area of the city. 11 men are currently in custody. ariana grande, the singer whose concert was targeted by the bomb, has visited some of her injured fans. anisa kadri reports. ariana grande turned up just as these fans, injured in last month‘s bomb attack, were getting ready for bed. the star‘s surprise visit to the royal manchester children‘s hospital left eight—year—old lily harrison feeling like a rock star, according to her dad. our room is at the end of the ward corridor, and she was working her way up. we were the last to be seen. i think i was as nervous as lily. her hands were shaking.
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she said she might need to go to the toilet, she didn‘t know what to do and she was really nervous. and then she came skipping onto our ward. she was brilliant. preparations are under way for tomorrow‘s concert for those who died at ariana grande‘s gig. she will perform at the old trafford cricket ground alongside other big names including take that, katy perry and justin bieber. and those at her gig were offered free tickets. lily expressed a wish to go. we didn‘t force it. we said if you want to go, we will make sure you get tickets. but if we get to the venue or we are on the way there and you say you don‘t want to go, we are more than happy to bring you home. it‘s whatever she wants. last night, an emotional robbie williams dedicated his classic song angels to the victims. saint ann‘s square has become the focal point
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of tributes in the city. manchester city council said this may be the last weekend the flowers remain here. it says it will now consider setting up a permanent memorial. the police investigation continues as they try to trace the bomber salman abedi‘s last movements. they have arrested another man, who is being held on suspicion of violating anti—terror laws. the victims were offered this moment of comfort by superstar ariana grande. it has been shared with more than 100 million of her followers on instagram. anisa kadri, bbc news. the minister has insisted that conservatives is not tax has not changed. meanwhile jeremy corbyn conservatives is not tax has not changed. meanwhilejeremy corbyn has accused the conservatives tax band of being in chaos, and has urged the
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party to publish them in school. arianna grandi has visited herfans in hospital who were injured in the bombing at manchester concert. she spent time talking to dan and posing for photographs. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good evening. andy murray produced some of his best tennis of the year so some of his best tennis of the year so far to reach the last 16 of the french open, after beating in 1 night and cultural in straight sets in the 3rd much deceit. the 1st set, a marathon, and are 23 minutes married to in a tie—break. heated the 2nd set 7— 5 and then didn‘t dropa game the 2nd set 7— 5 and then didn‘t drop a game and 3rd as he booked his place in the 11th round against neitherjohn isner patina. by reaching the last 16, took as much chance south african kevin anderson to 5 sets. kevin
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anderson, a top—10 playerfor being hampered by a series of injuries, proved too strong fragments. people now meet the 24th team us open champion george in the 11th round. british and irish lions somewhat laboured to win in the 1st much a picture of new zealand the jet lag and lack of preparation time, after only writing on wednesday. alliance expects to win handsomely against a provincial barbarians 15 but need it a 2nd—half try from england wing anthony watson to give them the lead which they only just anthony watson to give them the lead which they onlyjust held on to in the end. finished 13 points to 7. 3 tests against the all blacks. for us the most important thing was the result and getting that are off to a good start, and we can go away knowing that there are number of things thrust of and some positives there in terms of the opportunities as chances we did create. knowing we
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have to be better at finishing things. wings of eagles provide a stunning late charge to win the derby at epsom. the a0 outsider past 7 horses in the last a00 metres to the favourites to the line. just what these pictures. here he is as he comes in the final few stages. but with a white cap, the purple striped arms. for his 1—shot. find his run perfectly to give aidan o‘brien a 1—2 in the race. predatory 3rd. the finally where sri lanka‘s creditors are to chase down south africa in the 1st much of their champions to the campaign. south africa in bat 1st had failed to make the most of a promising start. hashim amla scoring his 25th century in odi cricket. in reply, schleicher started well, too, but a moments of brilliance from the staff at
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wincanton, ab de villiers, including that stunning catch. drew ryder reduced to 1a9— 5 with 2a overs remaining. coming up on sports day, we will be in cardiff, looking ahead to the champions league final. that‘s all for now. an early and small scale trial of a new drug to combat ovarian cancer has shown "promising results", according to researchers. the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part. here‘s our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson. marianne heath has advanced ovarian cancer. there are very few drugs to treat this type of cancer, and the ones that exist can no longer help her. so she says when she was asked to take part in a trial fora new drug, shejumped at the chance. well, i decided to go on the trial because there were no other way out for me, there were no options presented so it was the trial orjust radiotherapy, so i decided to do the trial first.
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the trial, run by the institute of cancer research and the royal marsden, aimed to test the safety of the new drug known as onx—0801. it involved just 15 women, all with advanced ovarian cancer. the result — tumours shrank significantly in almost half of the women over the course of five weeks. one of the fantastic things about this new drug that‘s being developed here is that it has so few side—effects compared to traditional chemotherapy. and that‘s because it specifically targets cancer cells, leaving healthy cells unharmed. this drug attacks the tumour, and you see very encouraging tumour responses, but you don‘t see the common side—effects like hair loss or sore mouth or diarrhoea or susceptibility to infections as seen with other chemotherapeutic agents. but the scientists are urging caution. they say it was a very small study,
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and it‘s too early to know whether the success could be replicated in a larger group of patients. they now want to plan the next phase of the trial. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. researchers have also been testing a new combination of hormone therapies, for prostate cancer. they say it has increased survival rates by more than a third. cancer research uk — which organised the trial — believes the findings could transform the treatment of the disease. joining me now via webcam to talk about both these developments is dr aine mccarthy — senior science information officer at cancer research uk. she‘s in chicago where these advances are being presented. you‘re in chicago at the . these are exciting advances. let‘s start off with the ovarian cancer. ovarian cancer is known as a silent
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killerfor a reason, so this new drug that you have been discussing, when is it best to be used? what the research has looked at was, could this drug be used to treat women who have an advanced stage of ovarian cancer? women for whom there are no other treatment options. any research which find and identifies potential new treatment for cancer, particularly when it is in the later stages, certainly is something to be excited about. the researchers themselves say, however, we need to be cautious because it was a very small scale trial. how does it work and why does it work? what‘s so special about this drug? what the research has found was that this drug can mimic how another molecule gets into cancer cells, and when it gets into cancer cells, and when it gets into cancer cells, and when it gets in there it damages the dna so much that the cells can‘t grow and they can‘t replicate and make copies of themselves. essentially it kills the cancer cells. why was the trial
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groups of small? it is only 15 women. the trial was what we call a phase 1 trial, and the partners of these phases or to 1st test if a drug is safe to use. all those 1 clinical trials to recruit small numbers of patients. they won‘t test, is the drug is safe? calling on from this, if they show it is safe to use in people, they will then carry out larger clinical trials to see if it works and what benefits it can ring to these patients. it‘s not unusualfor a phase 1 clinical trial to have so few patients. is turning to this breakthrough in the treatment of prostate cancer as well, and to benefit most from this? it is a combination of 2 drugs, is how it works. is it early or late stage prostate cancer? the researchers looked at a group of men who have what we call high risk prostate cancer, some men who aren‘t risk of
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the cancer spreading or who are at risk of having their treatment may be not work as well. they lived in this group of men and found that when they combined the normal treatments, where they reduce hormones, combined with another drug, it greatly improved survival compared to just the hormone therapy on its own. and fortunately we will have to leave it there. exciting news, thank you very much. —— u nfortu nately. back to the election now — and in northern ireland next week‘s vote will make the fourth time voters have gone to the polls in 13 months. butjust how much does identity shape the vote? chris buckler is in belfast: throughout the uk, background really matters when it comes to politics. it is why people vote, they want to ensure that they are represented. perhaps background and and identity,
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it may be matter is here more in northern ireland than anywhere else in the uk. although patrick will stand sometimes into division. that‘s been reflected in concerns and communities and also in culture. to understand politics and how people vote in northern ireland, you have to understand just how important identity is. that is expressed in a whole range of ways like music, dancing, all kinds of culture. most people here regard themselves are coming from one of two traditions. they see themselves as either british or irish. those roots run very deep. the reality is that traditions like this, they are important both politically and personally. it does indeed, chris. being part of a band allows me to stand up for what i believe in and make sure our heritage and tradition never goes away. and heritage and tradition are important for all communities. most protestants vote for unionist candidates and catholics for irish nationalists. but that is not always the case.
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in reality, there are cross community candidates but even that phrase, "cross community," gives you an idea that there are two separate communities according to a lot of people and that is expressed in a lot of ways. for example, sport. there are different teams supported by both communities and indeed, also different sports played by protestants and catholics, but at the same time, there is an awful lot that is shared right across what some people see as a divide, paddy. definitely. i believe in the north of ireland that both cultures should be respected equally. not one is greater than the other. i do believe that the nhs and education, especially the recent cuts should be looked at in more detail. that is a political theme in common between the two. beyond that, looking at culture, you can see all things in common, between ulster scots dancers and irish dancers, between flute bands and irish traditional musicians. society has a lot that it shares. but sometimes it can be
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difficult for politicians to see across what is seen as a traditional divide. sometimes culture can be a real dividing point, particularly between units and nationalists, unionists and republicans. is a huge row at the moment between the democratic unionist party and chant fame, you have fallen out of love with each other. part of the irish language. when you take a look at culture, it isa dividing when you take a look at culture, it is a dividing line. sometimes that can be poisonous. you can be a great bridge as well. i‘m sure those who listen to the music there couldn‘t tell you it was an orange tune, and irish tune, and ostriches. this entire dispute with the dup is about sharing. the dup will not power share ina sharing. the dup will not power share in a fair and equitable manner. they will not share this society, this island. they don‘t wa nt society, this island. they don‘t want those who are gay to be allowed
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to marry those they love. they don‘t wa nt to marry those they love. they don‘t want those 2 is putts to speak irish to have the same rights as a welsh speaker. there is no irish language act here. sinn fein stood up to that earlier this year, the legacy of discrimination, that inequality, and said culture can be bridged between us, politics can be abridged, the dup need to stand up and end this history of discrimination. iyer we didn‘t buy the dup onto the channel today but they said no 1 was available. nonetheless, they would probably say they are in a position where they are defending the rights and feelings of their voters. they don‘t want to take away from the irish line which, theyjust don‘t feel and irish line which act is something that is needed here. feel and irish line which act is something that is needed harem you dare say that you are gay person ina you dare say that you are gay person in a store or brighton, that we do respect rights that you are not allowed to marry, or you tried in dublin, you would be laughed out of court. in cardiff and amber, if you say to someone who speaks welsh or gaelic, you‘re right will be protected under law, you would be
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laughed out of court. the dup need to move into 2017. on top of all this is the refusal to take part in debates. mummy get back into talks after the selection, those are about try to form a government again, but we can‘t do it with a partner who believes in the. this is a general election but there is a chance of another assembly election. negotiations will be tough to get a deal by the end ofjune. double absolutely, that it can be done. but we can‘t go back into government ever again with someone who believes ina ever again with someone who believes in a culture of inequality and discolouration. you get the impression of how bitter the selection is a northern ireland and how difficult those relationships are between the 2 big parties, sinn fein and the dup. somewhat and windy weather on the
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way for some of us at the start of next week. we can now sunshine and showers. pleasant and a son, now sunshine and showers. doesn‘t understand, cool underneath these building clouds, producing some heavier downpours in places. especially scotland and northern ireland, with some developing in england and wales. if you were going out this evening, you may need an umbrella as he had out. when you come home, most of the showers will have faded away. clear skies overnight but showers continuing into the northern isles. under clear skies, temperatures dipping away, turning chilly away from larger towns and cities. single figures in the countryside. some sports getting close to freezing. for patches developing. into tomorrow morning, most developing. into tomorrow morning, m ost pla ces developing. into tomorrow morning, most places with a blue sky start but showers get going quite readily across parts of wales in south—west england. scotland, northern ireland, northern in winds, the odd heavy1 around. fundraising threader is during the day. this is for club in the afternoon. does it about 3 scotla nd the afternoon. does it about 3 scotland and northern ireland will
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be this showers, heavy, hungary, the risk of pale. quite breezy as well. this is ever with showers, not eve ryo ne this is ever with showers, not everyone will see them. and improving picture in wales into the afternoon, north—west england too. gradually pushing down across parts of east anglia and south—east england, going into being clean. until then, looking mainly dry. england, going into being clean. untilthen, looking mainly dry. most places with temperatures in the teens. a gradual movement had showers towards southeast on sunday evening tending to fizzle out. some rain moving into northern ireland overnight and into monday. then the weather pattern completely changes. 2 areas coming in, taking a band of rain. bp to the south. the wind is picking up as well. somewhat weather at the certificate last. when strengthening, perhaps even severe gales in part to south. a lot of uncertainty about this system, but manager tuesday, the could be some
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disruption in places from wind or rain. some pretty miserable weather for a time. all travel conditions. gradually clearing eastwards through tuesday to leave a quieter wednesday. there could be some disruption. we will keep you updated. good evening. jeremy corbyn has accused the conservatives of being in "complete chaos" over their tax policy. it comes after theresa may avoided repeating comments made by a senior colleague, who told a newspaper there would be no income tax rises under a conservative government. there would be no income tax rises with more, our political correspondent, iain watson. senior correspondent, iain watson. conservatives, includi defence senior conservatives, including the defence secretary and foreign secretary, have been sending out a strong message to their core voters. if you are worried that income tax might rise if we are elected, don‘t be full to bid is not our intention. the conservative manifesto is
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nowhere near as explicit. is it being rewritten? our position on tax has not changed. we have set it out in the manifesto. what people will know when they‘ve vote on thursday, it is the conservative party who a lwa ys it is the conservative party who always has and is a low tax party. it is our intention to reduce taxes for ordinary working families. what does the conservative manifesto say on tax question at the last election david cameron promise not to increase income tax, national insurance or vat. the 2017 ma nifesto, insurance or vat. the 2017 manifesto, only the pledge on vat remains. promising to raise the level at which people pay the standard and higher amount of tax would also amount to a reduction. theresa may could have tough brexit talks ahead. there is no pledge not to increase income tax was that she
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and her colleagues are talking about tax today because they want to refocus attention in this campaign about what would happen if a labour chancellor moves into number 11 downing street. how are you doing? all right? i am now i have downing street. how are you doing? all right? lam now i have met downing street. how are you doing? all right? i am now i have met you. labour says the policy of making the better off and big businesses pay more is popular and the conservatives lack clarity. there is chaos going on at the top of the government full. what labour is offering is no tax rises or insurance rises or vat rises. an increase in corporation tax and some other tax increases at the top end to pay for social care. theresa may could be finding it is more convivial to talk about tax and social careful that she and her collea g u es social careful that she and her colleagues are trying to stir the enthusiasm of traditional voters by saying instincts on taxation are the same. iain watsonjoins me now. same. can see whyjeremy corbyn has said
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it i can see whyjeremy corbyn has said it is chaos. michael fallon was asked about the conservative plans on income tax. he was indicating that people did not have to worry about tax rises. borisjohnson said no plans to increase income tax. the conservative manifesto is not that explicit. opposition politicians are attacking it. what is happening is something slightly different. the voices are slightly discordant. the conservative party is trying to move the agenda back onto tax and safer territory in the last few days of the campaign for that it looks as if theresa may had political credit to burn. those polls are beginning too narrow for that now she has to give a clear signal to some conservative supporters, not to stay at home. come out and back us. ariana grande, the singer whose
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concert was the target of the manchester bomb, has visited injured fans in hospital. has visited injured tomorrow she‘ll be joined by other stars of the music world, in a charity concert in aid of victims and their families. from manchester, philip norton reports. helping to mend broken hearts and shattered lives. pop star ariana grande visiting young fans who were injured in the suicide bomb attack at her concert less than two weeks ago. at her concert less she posted a photo of her visit to royal manchester children‘s hospital on instagram with a simple heart. royal manchester children‘s hospital among those she visited, eight—year—old fan lily harrison. she suffered spinal injuries in the blast at manchester arena. our room was the last room on the ward of the corridor. how she was working her way up it. on the ward of the corridor. we were the last ones to be seen. on the ward of the corridor. i think i was probably just as nervous as lily. her hands were shaking. just as nervous as lily. she said, i think i might need to go to the toilet. i don‘t know what to do. to go to the toilet. i‘m really nervous. to go to the toilet. and then, yeah, shejust came skipping onto our ward. she was brilliant. skipping onto our ward.
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there‘s been an outpouring of love for the 22 victims who died in the blast last month. for the 22 victims who died ariana grande has returned to the uk for a benefit concert in manchester tomorrow night and many of those injured, including lily, are hoping to be there. injured, including lily, lily sort of expressed a wish to go. injured, including lily, we didn‘t want to force her. injured, including lily, we said, if you want to go, we‘ll make sure you‘ve got tickets. if we get to the venue, or are on the way to the venue, and you say you don‘t want to go, we‘re more than happy to bring you home. we‘re more than happy it‘s whatever she wants. we‘re more than happy proceeds from the concert will go towards that we love manchester emergency fund, set up by manchester city council and the british red cross to support grieving families and victims of the bombing. to support grieving families preparations are now well under way. to support grieving families a huge stage and tight security is in place. an effort that would normally take months of planning being completed within days. take months of planning this is where the eyes of the world will be focused tomorrow night. millions of people will watch
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as ariana grande isjoined on stage by the likes of coldplay, take that and katy perry. this concert will be broadcast tomorrow in 50 countries around the world. tomorrow in 50 countries —— to more than 50. a night of unity, remembrance and a shared love of music. the deputy leader of afghanistan, abdullah abdullah, has survived a bomb attack at a funeral in the capital, kabul. at least seven people were killed, and over a hundred injured, in the explosions. and over a hundred injured, the funeral was taking place of the son of a prominent politician. he was killed yesterday during clashes between demonstrators and police. during clashes between a major clinical trial has found that thousands of men being treated for advanced prostate cancer could benefit from taking an existing treatment much earlier. could benefit from taking cancer research uk found that combining the drug, abiraterone, with another drug used in the initial phase of hormone therapy cuts the risk of dying by nearly a0%.
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it‘s normally used when other hormone treatments have failed. with all the sport, here‘s john watson at the bbc sport centre. many john watson at the bbc sport centre. thanks. the lions many thanks. the british and irish lions rugby union ‘s team —— rugby union team have made a winning start for the killer is the first game in a ten match tour which culminate in three tests against the world champion. the fireworks were limited to the pre—match build—up for the taking ona to the pre—match build—up for the taking on a barbarians side featuring students, painters and builders should have been easy for the fastly experienced lions. things got off to a stuttering start with jonny sexton missing a penalty before landing the first points of the tour for that there were also brittle at the back. the bar bars fell short at their first attempt but went into the lead. to rub salt
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into the head coach‘s winscombe his son added to the hosts total. greg laidlaw took over kicking duties but the lions could not science the lands. —— silence the lambs. sexton came off and anthony watson was set up for the try and then converting. farrell might wings of eagles provided a stunning late charge to win the derby at epsom. a stunning late charge the a0 to 1 outsider passed seven horses in the last 100 metres to beat the favourites to the line. horses in the last 100 metres we
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horses in the last 100 metres can cross to join lee wales. we can cross to join lee foster in wales. the gates are open for that there has been a huge security operation under way in the city. extra cordons in the city. many more fa ns extra cordons in the city. many more fans than there are tickets for the final. gareth bale, the welsh hero, on his homecoming with real madrid. he will probably not start. he has been out injured for six weeks. he will be on the bench. we are madrid can call on cristiano ronaldo. buffon said it would be a fairy tale to win the one pub he has never won.
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he is likely to be a very busy man this evening. commentary on radio five live. but that‘s all your sport for now. five live. there‘s more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel, we are back with the late news at quarter to ten — now on bbc1 its time for the news where you are. goodbye. for the news where you are. this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. theresa may has said the conservatives policy on tax hasn‘t changed after the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, appeared to make commitments which go further than the tory election manifesto. he said in a newspaper interview that taxes wouldn‘t rise if the tories won the general election — even for high earners. the manifesto pledge is to keep taxes "as low as possible". labour has said the top 5% of earners will pay more tax. speaking a little earlier, the chancellor, philip hammond, reaffirmed the party‘s position on the issue. well, our position on tax hasn‘t changed, we are a party that believes in lower taxation, the conservatives will always be
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the party of low tax. all the other parties believe in raising taxes — not as a necessity but as a policy objective, raising taxes. judge us on our track record — we‘ve taken four million people out of income tax altogether, we‘ve reduced income tax for 31 million people, and we‘ve made a pledge in our manifesto to go on raising the threshold at which people start paying income tax to £12,500, and the threshold at which they start paying higher rate tax to £50,000. that will take still more people out of tax altogether. jeremy corbyn has accused the conservatives‘ tax plans of being in chaos and urged the party to publish them in full ahead of next week‘s election. after talking to pensioners in lincoln, mr corbyn told reporters the tories couldn‘t answer questions about their tax or social—care plans. i think there's complete chaos going on at the top of the government.
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one minister says they're going to give no more tax rises, indeed possibly tax reductions for the very wealthiest, then they can't answer the question about tax rises for the rest of the population, then they can't answer the question about funding social care. let's be clear — what labour are offering is no tax rises or national insurance rises for vat rises for 95% of the population, and increasing corporation tax and some other tax increases at the top end to pay for social care, improving our nhs, properly funding our education system and those schools. the us secretary of defence says the us will not accept beijing‘s militarisation of artificial islands it occupies in the south china sea. but james mattis, speaking at an international policy forum in singapore, added he is encouraged by china‘s attempts to help contain pyongyang. from singapore, karishma vaswani reports. from the moment the us secretary
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of defence, james mattis, touched down in singapore, all eyes on what he might say to reassure his peers in this region that america hasn‘t turned its back on asia. and for the most part, secretary mattis didn‘t disappoint. speaking to a packed audience of defence ministers, government officials and international experts, he outlined the us‘s priority in the region — containing north korea. the most urgent and dangerous threat to peace and security in the asia—pacific is north korea. its nuclear weapons programme is maturing as a threat to all. in recent weeks, pyongyang has fired several missile tests, bringing the total of missile tests this year to nine. the regime‘s leader, kimjong—un, says that its nuclear programme is defensive and intended to counter us aggression. the us has been leaning on beijing —
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north korea‘s powerful ally — to persuade pyongyang to give up its nuclear programme and secretary mattis reminded china of its responsibilities in his speech. ultimately, we believe china will come to recognise north korea as a strategic liability, not an asset. it is therefore imperative that we do our part, each of us, to fulfil our obligations and work together to support our shared goal of the denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. meanwhile, secretary mattis also stressed that china cannot continue with its militarisation of islands in the south china sea and warned beijing that it must abide by the international rule of law in the contested waters. but he struck a positive note on us—china relations as well, saying that while competition between the two countries may occur, conflict is not inevitable. karishma vaswani, bbc news, singapore. the headlines on bbc news: the prime minister has insisted
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that the conservative position on tax hasn‘t changed, and that she‘s hoping to lower taxes. jeremy corbyn has accused the conservatives‘ tax plans of being "in chaos" and has urged the party to publish them in full. ariana grande has visited fans in hospital who were injured in the bombing at her concert. she spent time talking to them and posing for photographs. the consumer group which is calling on british airways to create an automatic compensation system for passengers affected by serious flight passengers affected by serious flight delays and cancellations. it comes one week after a major it failure caused hundreds of flights to be grounded. here isjoe lynam. the images of the week for ba. passengers waiting for flights, some of which ended up being cancelled.
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the compensation bill could exceed £100 million for the airline. ba says it will treat customers fairly and refund legitimate expenses, but consumer advocates say that is not enough. in a letter to the chief executive, which says compensation should be automatic for passengers out of pocket. it says they should not have to apply directly to airlines for a refund. it says an automated system would save time and money for ba as well as prevent companies from making profit from the misery of others. people are entitled to money, but they are not given it automatically. passengers often do not realise what they are entitled to. the airlines can easily pay compensation because they know what flight you were on and what you are entitled to and we think that should be the rules. in other sectors, in energy and water, you are automatically paid compensation if you do not receive services. in response, ba said it had put additional resources into its call centres to process claims quickly as possible. one group that is not out of pocket are investors in ba‘s
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parent company, iag. its shares were up this week despite the woe endured by customers. joe lynam, bbc news. now on bbc news, it‘s time for meet the author. ukraine in the winter of 19a1, jews being herded up and taken away, families pulled apart. and among the invading germans, a strain of horror and guilty understanding among some of the men who‘ve been given the awful task. rachel seiffert‘s new novel, a boy in winter, stretches over only three days, through which you encounter all the emotions of the time, horror and instinct for survival, family loyalty, above all perhaps, bravery. welcome. what made you decide to go back to territory that you‘ve explored
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as a novelist before, namely the events in the holocaust? well, my first novel covered that territory. to be honest, it‘s quite personal. i‘m of german heritage. and although i thought it was very important to write about, i wasn‘t in a hurry to return to it. however, the times being what they are, i have felt myself finding parallels with the 1930s in current events far too often. and just by coincidence, i was writing another novel entirely, in fact, and by coincidence, i ended up reading a case study of a man who was a german engineer and who did not hold with the nazis. he regarded the nazis‘ rise to power with dismay. in fact, he did all he could to avoid the draft.
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the way he avoided the draft was to use his engineering qualifications to get himself stationed with the construction corps. that‘s really the mainspring of the story. and of course, the germans, more than one, get caught up in this position and find themselves as participants, agents of oppression, of a kind that presumably they had grown up never expecting to confront. absolutely. and i thought that was the character and the situation, both lending themselves so well to my preoccu pations. what would you do, if you were a person like that, who had done all they could to avoid involvement in what you considered to be a crime, only to find yourself in an even worse crime, unfolding behind the lines? it takes great courage not to just go along. absolutely. although not all of my characters show courage. indeed, they don‘t.
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i suppose it‘s fair to say that you find it easier to get into the mind of someone who‘s facing extinction, the need for preservation, than it is to get inside the mind of someone who decides that they have got to go along with this horrendous policy, which they‘re charged with executing? yes, and this is definitely a novel which i could not have written as a younger woman. it‘s an accumulation of reading and research, and thinking. it is almost 20 years since my first novel, which was about the holocaust, and this is really the culmination of a lot of thought since then, and a lot of reading. what have you discovered in writing it? i don‘t mean factually and historically, but in yourself. my goodness, what a question. i think what i really... i knew this before, but i really see it now, is that it wasn‘t evil that made the holocaust, it was people. humans with all their blind spots, and they‘re creatures of their time, are capable through thoughtlessness,
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through lack of perspective, and through cowardice, of doing great, great harm. you say you‘ve found parallels with the ‘30s of all kinds with what‘s happening around yesterday, what kind of parallels, apart from the obvious one that has a lot of violence in it? the first thing that happened to germanjews was that they had the protection of the law removed from them. and i see, although we have not done this in such aggressive terms in this country, we have over a period of years removed protection of the law from various people who live here. and as soon as the tenet of the times is less benign, those people are at risk. i‘m a child of foreigners, neither of my parents ever took british citizenship. my mother was german, my father was australian. i, just by dint of being
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born here, i‘m a brit. i have a british passport. children of my children‘s generation, children who were born on the same street as my children, two parents who are both foreign, do not have that any longer. and as soon as, now brexit‘s been triggered, and as soon as anything shifts any further to the right, i worry for those people. this book is a book about a tragedy, and it shows people behaving very badly, but it shows people who find reserves of courage. and in a way, it's a very hopeful story. yes. from the perspective of the young people. of the children. and also there is otto pohl, he‘s a middle—aged man, who finds great questions asked of him. and he does his best, not always the right thing, but he does his best. and i do think i do find hope in humanity as well as fear. what are the advantages of writing a story which is so compressed in terms of time? everything happens in three days.
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as a writer, what does that give you? well, plot and character have to work together seamlessly. so it is a great balancing act, but it‘s exhilarating. and i also think it‘s grist to my narrative mill, in that i‘m most interested in the individual, and most interested at the point that push comes to shove. that‘s when humans reveal themselves in all their glory and horror. so those three days, they were very important to me. that compressed timescale, and the fact that history is rolling over all of these people. from a reader‘s perspective, i suppose what it does is it reminds you how much can happen in three days. that little span of time can be fantastically important. absolutely. and all of the groundwork laid by the nazis in the months preceding, and the years, in fact, they divided and ruled very effectively.
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and at points, when they come in with the ss, and execute what they wanted to execute all along, the groundwork has been laid, and people have been pitted against one another very effectively. and people say, this is what it was all about. this is what it was all about, now i know, and now, my goodness, i‘ve got to step up or run away. and it may be too late. do you think you‘ll go back to this territory yet again? i wouldn‘t discount it, but i feel like i‘ve written the book that is pertinent to now. pertinent to now, and also a very personal book. you must feel very deeply about some of these things. i do. and the writing of it is not so difficult, actually, as the talking about it afterwards. this is what i found with the dark room, my first novel, writing is a process of coming to an understanding, coming to love your characters, coming to empathise with them, and to write what feels true. and then talking about it afterwards is a whole other process. why do you find that difficult?
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because it‘s often not a conversation that is easy, and it‘s often not a conversation. you‘re often asked for your opinion, rather than it being an exchange, and that can be very disquieting. because it‘s not an opinion you‘re putting down on the page, it‘s explanation of feelings, i suppose, explosion of character. it‘s the explanation of humans, absolutely, rather than me, rachel seiffert, what do i think of a political situation. you are not writing a political tract. no. but you hope it might have at least as much power as one. yes, i do, i hope that it chimes with people. i hope people read it it chimes with people. and reflect on what it says about today in particular. rachel seiffert, author of a boy in winter, thank you very much. thank you. hello, somewhere down the windy
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weather on the way for some of us at the start of next week, we are into a weekend of sunshine and showers, pleasa nt a weekend of sunshine and showers, pleasant in the sun, cool underneath these building clouds, producing some heavy downpours in places, more especially for scotland and northern ireland as we look at the satellite picture from earlier. some have developed in england and wales, drifting further east, but if you are going out this evening you may need an umbrella, but when you come home most of the show as have faded away. showers continue into the northern isles overnight, under clear skies temperatures dipping away, quite chilly away from larger towns and city centres, single figures in the countryside, ireland and grabbing getting close to freezing. tomorrow morning, most places will have a blue sky start to
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the day, but showers getting going readily across wales and south—west england. further north, heavier ones around, some drifting further east across england and wales during the day. this is the picture at four o‘clock in the afternoon, dotted through scotland and northern ireland will be showers, heavy, thundery, a risk of hail, pleasant in the sunshine, cool with the showers, breezy as well, but as ever, not everyone will see them. improving picture in wales into the afternoon, in north—western england too, this will gradually pushed down across parts of east anglia and south—east england in the evening, until then mostly dry, temperatures in the teens. so the gradual movement of showers towards the south—east on sunday evening tending to fizzle out, some rain moving into northern ireland overnight, and that is as the weather pattern completely changes, two areas of low pressure will take rain through, moray low at the second developing area of low pressure to the south, and with that
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the wind is picking up as well. wet weather lasting longer in north—west england and wales, severe gales in parts of the south, a lot of uncertainty about this system, but as it continues monday into tuesday, some disruption in places from wind or rain, so some pretty miserable weather for a or rain, so some pretty miserable weatherfor a time, difficult travelling conditions. that will gradually clear eastwards during tuesday to leave a quiet wednesday. but with this weather system, there could be some disruption — we‘ll keep you updated. this is bbc news. the headlines at 6pm: the prime minister insists it‘s her firm intention to cut taxes, but declined to give any guarantees.
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what people will know when they go to vote on thursday is that it is the conservative party that always has been, is and always will be, a low tax party. jeremy corbyn accuses the conservatives of being in disarray over their tax plans. 1 minister said they‘re not going to give any tax rises, and can‘t answer questions about tax rises for the rest the population, and can‘t answer questions about funding social care. ariana grande makes a surprise visit to fans injured in the terror attack at her concert last week — ahead of her benefit ariana grande makes a surprise visit to fans injured in the terror attack
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