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tv   Election Questions  BBC News  June 5, 2017 1:30am-2:01am BST

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police. 20,000 police officers have been lost since 2010. that has to be addressed. it is notjust about police numbers, but police themselves. we set priorities for local policing. i know police officers cannot be in every place at every moment. they required the wonderful tradition we have in this country, policing by consent. we need intelligence from the community. i want to see that front and centre in the theresa may review. you actually called the prevent strategy xenophobic. why is it xenophobic? it is xenophobic because it is alienating communities. we need to be clear that those tarnishing the muslim committee with these atrocities, this was not the muslim community, this was not the muslim community, this is a perversion of islam is. —— community. i am sorry you said rubbish, i disagree with you. we will get to you in a moment and you
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can question him. it is alienating the very communities we need to be building bridges with. if you are building bridges with. if you are building afamily building bridges with. if you are building a family and you are worried about i , what can you ,what can you do? , what can you do? will you bring it to the authorities' attention? we need evidence —based approach is. there is no clear answer as to why people become radicalised. we are just getting to the bottom of it. theresa may raised the issue of changing the whole strategy. the first question. following the attack la st first question. following the attack last night, should we be armed to protect ourselves? the answer is... knee—jerk reactions are not the best way to respond in a context like this. it is good the prime minister has started to talk about reviewing the strategy. we have armed police officers on the street. the question we have to face in this election,
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will we elect a government that will look at these issues about whether we arm police officers further? my instinct is let us see what comes out of this incident. the police reacted quickly in this example would be but we do need to arm all of our police, but let's see what happens. does anyone want to come in on the back of whatjonathan bartley has said in response to what he calls no knee—jerk reactions? you we re calls no knee—jerk reactions? you were booing at the beginning. calls no knee—jerk reactions? you were booing at the beginninglj don't think it is a knee—jerk reaction. the bbc two years ago carried out a survey of muslims in this country. two. they said 76% of muslims in this country supports terrorist attacks in this country and hold our rant democracy in contempt. —— own. it needs to be sorted. i am not familiar with that
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survey. there are liberties and freedoms in this country i am passionate about protecting. i think thatis passionate about protecting. i think that is what the terrorist want to do away with and that is what they wa nt do away with and that is what they want to attack to be when it comes to having a knee—jerk reaction which is to suddenly clamped down on civil liberties... donald trump elected in america. having someone of that calibre elected in this country, it is out of the question. what could they do with powers to clamp down on civil liberties? why have the green party not supported the terrorist legislation put forward by the government over the years? you are not prepared to take any action, are you? we are very much about scrutinising the government's plans and see what we are doing. that is what we have done. when you have groups like liberty and the national union of teachers and civil society groups coming forward saying this is not working and lawyers are saying
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this is an attack on civil liberties. we have to be led by them and represent them. so you would not be in favour, for example, for taking away safe spaces on the internet for extremists to publish some of their hateful ideology. two issues come up about this. politicians sometimes get nervous about technology, because they don't know much about it. do you include yourself in that? i do include myself in that. we need to call providers of these services, platforms like facebook, also publishes, we need to call them to account. we need to see details of what they kick down and when they ta ke what they kick down and when they take it down. theresa may talked about that in her speech. 26% of about that in her speech. 2696 of muslims agree with whatever. that is a large amount of people to be it is getting bigger by the minute. in 35
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yea rs, getting bigger by the minute. in 35 years, people are going to be shocked, the muslim population, they will be the majority in this country. if we have two children and they have ten... that is a lot of assumptions. this is a perversion of islam. it is not a problem muslims have to deal with, it is a problem we all have to deal with. look. i live in an area that is diverse. i live in an area that is diverse. i live close to two mosques. i spend a lot of time going to them and talking to people. there are people in those mosques that hate what is going on as much as i do. i worry for their children as much as my children. but 7496! you still have 26% of muslims that agree with islamic state and killing...|j 26% of muslims that agree with islamic state and killing... ijust do not accept that. another question from the lady in the front row to be
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i have to say that first and foremost i completely empathise with people is fear of terrorism,.. this is not something restricted to a religion. islamic state is indoctrinating criminal people to act ina indoctrinating criminal people to act in a way affecting our society 110w. act in a way affecting our society now. but it is dangerous to apply a rigid frameworkjust now. but it is dangerous to apply a rigid framework just to now. but it is dangerous to apply a rigid frameworkjust to one religion when in norway future politicians we re when in norway future politicians were murdered and no one called him a terrorist because his skin is white. thank you very much for that important point. 0ne white. thank you very much for that important point. one in four referrals in counter—terrorism procedures are from the far right terrorists. was 10 cox's murder a
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terrorists. was 10 cox's murder a terror incident? yes. it was done to inspire terror. another subject after this. islam has been here for 600 years. it hasn't been a problem for 600 years. i am more 600 years. it hasn't been a problem for 600 years. lam more interested in your view on saudi arabia and the wahhabi influence and arms sales.|j think foreign policy has been raised byjeremy corbyn and i think we need to ta ke byjeremy corbyn and i think we need to take that into account. yes, i wa nt to to take that into account. yes, i want to see to make the green party wood and commercial arms sales to saudi arabia. clapping. but the green party has been against pretty well every foreign intervention. you would not even support the idea of a drone taking out an extremistjihadi if they were british somewhere aboard. —— abroad. if they were british somewhere aboard. -- abroad. that could be illegal. you have to go buy a
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case—by—case basis. those incidents do not happen in isolation. they have consequences far beyond that particular act and someone may replace them. but you would not support, if you had information... depends on the situation. the next question. so, your party is proposing a four—day working week. what i want to know is what evidence do you have this will benefit the economy? it is a great question and iam glad economy? it is a great question and i am glad you flagged it because it is something we need to talk about in this election because it is very short—term. we need to look at the long—term. automation in 20— 30—40 yea rs long—term. automation in 20— 30—40 years that will take away millions ofjobs to be what is interesting is we work and people will be watching this at home with that rising feeling in their stomach right now they have to go into work tomorrow morning on monday. think about that. you might not have to have that with me in government. how much would it cost? we want to phase it in over a long time. amazon is already talking
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about doing it to be france is going toa35 about doing it to be france is going to a 35 hour week. flexible working. it won't happen overnight, but 100 yea rs it won't happen overnight, but 100 years ago, gerald ford, he said let's have a five—day week, not a six—day week. let's have a five—day week, not a six-day week. when you said it will not happen in a... it will... slightly different, 100 years? are people voting for something that will not happen? we need a bigger question about the economy. it will not happen overnight. but if companies say we have the lowest productivity in europe, we work the longest hours, we are racking up a huge bill for the nhs in terms of stress and substance abuse because of overworking, it doesn't have to be like this. we need to think in new ways and have that session. does anyone favour a four—day week? do people in the audience think it is affordable? back to that point about automation. this started 40 years ago. back when i started work, there
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we re ago. back when i started work, there were jobs for typing. now it is all done on a word processor to be going forward , done on a word processor to be going forward, we cannot create any more jobs. they are being taken by technology and robots. they build most of the car now. can you tell me where these jobs are supposed to be coming from in the future? we will ta ke coming from in the future? we will take a few more comments and then we will answer that. the gentleman in the first row. do you think increased income will be a way forward ? increased income will be a way forward? the idea is getting through. it is an idea that has come. universal basic income. we can fix the welfare state which was set up fix the welfare state which was set up in1945 aftera fix the welfare state which was set up in 1945 after a different set of assumptions. we are seeing a real attack on the welfare state by the government, dismantling it. on the other side it is not fit for purpose in many senses because of the assumptions it was based on. people are going to food banks because of
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problems with the benefits. how much would be? it depends on how much progressive taxation you want... you mean how much you want. who would pay for this? two it would be a change in the welfare state. in 0ntario, change in the welfare state. in ontario, canada, places on the continent, they are doing this. that is how you have to do this. iain duncan smith talk about universal credit. he fell 6—7 years behind schedule. you need to work out how it is affordable and do it. you are talking about a four—day week, but this country is run like a small business. who will compensate small businesses having to pay the same wages but with less activity? the idea is you get more productivity per worker when you don't work such long hours. that is why companies are thinking this is a good thing. there is a bigger question to. 30 yea rs there is a bigger question to. 30 years ago when i was growing up not
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so long ago, we were told we would have huge growth in wages and be able to work less hours. we have had wealth and automation, but there is growing inequality. it does not have to be that way. clapping. how do you explain the high levels of employment? there are criticisms that it may not be the right kind of employment. are you saying high levels of employment are not desirable? that is what we have. look at what we have at the moment. zero—hours contracts, look at what we have at the moment. zero— hours contracts, really low wages, insecure employment, access to tribunal is taken away because we cannot afford to go to them. what will happen with brexit? potentially with this government they will use it as an opportunity to once again have a fresh assault on the rights of workers. we are in a new age of insecurity. we have to do something different. do you know what, there
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is the money, but it is in the wrong hands. it takes the political will to make something happen. clapping. the gentleman here. the 35 hour week in france has been done for some yea rs. in france has been done for some years. the new president in france, emmanuel macron, wants to stop it. why will it be successful here? emmanuel macron, wants to stop it. why will it be successful here ?|j emmanuel macron, wants to stop it. why will it be successful here? i am not familiar with what emmanuel macron said about the 35 hour working week and what his reasons are for it. the idea of the working week being shorter is that there is a lot of wealth that we have not seen a lot of wealth that we have not seenin a lot of wealth that we have not seen in this room. big corporations are making excess profits. corporation tax is going lower and low and they are getting more and more of the pie. we cannot see the benefits. we can have good jobs. that is the important thing the green party is also saying we need to transition the economy down the resilient local economies with money flowing through them rather than
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being sucked out by multinationals. the majority of the money saved flowing in the local economy but when it goes to a chain store it leaves the local economy. it makes sense to do this in the face of legalisation. you are talking about creating good jobs, and we all want them, but what will be green party do to create these? how will a four—day week as opposed to a five—day week create good jobs? it is good in opposition to say that. but what will you do? rate question. how do you create good jobs? —— great. renewable energy revolution and green industrial strategies. we can generate over six times, six times, our annual electricity consumptionjust times, our annual electricity consumption just from offshore renewables. were going to put a £30
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billion subsidy into nuclear power generating in the long—term 800 job. take that subsidy and put it into renewable energy and rejuvenate the uk and create tens of thousands, not hundreds of thousands, of newjobs. a five—day working week? why not push up the living wage. have you talked to business about these? you get savings from a living wage because you get less in work benefits, increased tax and that money could be circulated to support businesses. the next question from mitchell. you mentioned you want subsidies for nuclear power that is not contribute to climate change so
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how can you justify wanting to be green when we have a perfect solution generating huge amount of power? it is not really a perfect solution when you think about the massive investment. locking into a deal that for years to come it is already more expensive than offshore wind. it keeps control in a small place and makes us security wise quite vulnerable. will it be great like in my local community, you have a community project like brixton sola, get a return, you put solar panels generating clean energy and goes back into the community and profits put into it shall asian and cutting fuel property. that makes sense. “—
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cutting fuel property. that makes sense. —— the community. cutting fuel property. that makes sense. -- the community. one of the biggest problems for voters is the energy bills are going up and they do not like green subsidies on their bills. that is alive. from the pit of hell. £6 billion this government subsidises the fuel. every time the wholesale price of energy goes up, they put up their prices. they do not drop their prices when it goes down. we were told robert says asian was going to cut the bills. it has not. time to bring back into public ownership. cheering and applause. you say it is cheaper to go renewable but is it any where near as nuclear power? the mass amounts
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of power we need because we cannot ask everybody to change their lives. when it stops being windy we don't get wind power, but we can all is smashed a couple of atoms into each other. with the greatest respect, thatis other. with the greatest respect, that is a 20th century argument. every house and community can be a powerhouse. i went to visit cardiff bay where we could have used of the bay to create a... you use the water to create as much power. it does not talk about consistency. you drop water when you need it. how much would it cost? could not give you a figure at the top of my head. you develop policy that you haven't
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costed. at another note is in front of me but i can happily look it up. it is the right thing to do it in terms of accountability. it is not a pa na cea , terms of accountability. it is not a panacea, it is something we should be moving towards. let's look at germany, we know it gives back to the community. donald trump has pulled america out of the paris agreement, an agreement which was volu nta ry. agreement, an agreement which was voluntary. clear where you stand on that issue. what is the point of those international agreements? the point of the paris agreement and when you had theresa may on the debate on the details of the conversation with donald trump, i think that is such a weak, weak leadership. cheering and applause. donald said eye leaving the paris
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agreement but we are not. what would you have done. i cannot repeat it here. but i think you have to say this is totally an excerpt of all. it is economically bilic at, scientific, politically illiterate. we have to work with other countries if we are to get those commitments. it sets a direction for local business and for those people making the transition. it was the big corporations that went to trump and said you are throwing us of course. if we are going to make this transition we need american involvement at the table. the next question is whether the green party can enact any of the proposals in the manifesto. should green party
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voters vote labour to stop the conservatives winning a majority? your progressive alliance has died on its feet. in 30 feet around the country we have stood aside. i proud that we look beyond tribal politics and we believe we should act in the interest of the country. applause . you know what, in this election, where there is a green candidate, i wa nt where there is a green candidate, i want you to be voting green because i think we are at fault in the road. paul nuttall is taking the country, even though he does not have an mps in westminster, it is taking the country down the wrong road. they are pursuing an extreme brexit which will take us in the wrong direction. the country which is inward looking. if you want an inclusive vision standing upfor if you want an inclusive vision standing up for freedom if you want an inclusive vision standing up forfreedom of movement and making decisions about nuclear
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weapons, vote for the green party. this is what is at stake. why are the other parties not be on progressive alliance ? the other parties not be on progressive alliance? no one has signed up to it. you're standing outside in about 30 seats. it is the point in. i wrote tojeremy corbyn, nigel ty roush but they did not reciprocate. —— nigel farage. i proud we showed that the leadership. how big a problem is it that your proposals in many ways are so similartojeremy proposals in many ways are so similar to jeremy corbyn's? there proposals in many ways are so similar tojeremy corbyn's? there is a common ground. most of it. no, not most of it. proportionate representation. why is is spending £110 million renewing nuclear weapons which is said he would never
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use which we could be giving a kiss of life to the nhs. you cannot tackle a pollution and... y 80 standing aside? we believe in this current contest, this government would decide bad for the future of britain that we although painful need to do it. your polling figures are extremely low. you are not cutting through. we know what is happening in this election. it is a very tactical. a broken system which pushes towards the two parties. when you have an extreme situation, with this government pursuing an extreme path, and to his credit, jeremy corbyn's bold manifesto shakes up the debate. we were the only ones saying is derry is necessary and now
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labour is also saying it. -- posterity. someone sits in bristol, very marginal. i respect some of the policies but it seems so close that voting labour seems the reasonable thing to do. you can vote with your heart there. as greens, we will work with labour if there is a minority labour government where the risk common ground. in real life, when you seek common ground you work with other people to further the common interest and i do not know why he would you not do it in politics. does that mean if you have mps you would push a proportional representation system? when you get green mps in parliament, we would
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hold conservatives to account. if it isa hold conservatives to account. if it is a labour, we would push them towards the bold ideas like the four—day week, scrapping trident, if you want a vote that matters you vote green. given that the green party are not going to be forming the next government, what different will it make to have some extra mps? i will say probably i will not be walking into ten downing st on the night. thank you for being a realistic. it's a thousand 15, under afair realistic. it's a thousand 15, under a fair voting system, we would have had 24 — imagine 24 caroline lucas, it would shake up politics. by your
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logic, and i support it in part, how many ukip would we have? logic, and i support it in part, how many ukip would we have ?|j logic, and i support it in part, how many ukip would we have? i am a democrat. we are at the antithesis to ukip. if you want to finish ukip forever vote green. that is all we have time for. johnathan bartley, please show your appreciation. cheering and applause. thank you johnathan bartley to. that brings us to the end of our elections programmes. it listening to say good night from bristol. —— leads me to
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say. hello there. you're probably wondering weather summer has gone because unsettled weather this week, some spells of rain, heavy at times and often accompanied with strong and gusty winds. some drier interludes and it may turn warmer later in the week. 0urfirst area of rain is coming from this developing cloud here and that's been pushing rain across northern ireland, that's heading its way into scotland, should move through and things brighten to bring showers, a dull start, though, for northern ireland. rain developing more widely in northern england, especially wales and the south—east, showery outbreaks developing as the wind picks up in other eastern parts of england too. into the afternoon across scotland we're going to find some sunshine but also some showers. these could be heavy, possibly thundery too, and we should get brighter skies allowing some showers to develop in northern ireland. but a cool, wet day for the north—west england, for wales and the south—west as well. as you head your way to the midlands, east anglia and the south—east, some brief warmth before showery outbreaks develop more and more
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in the afternoon but the wetter weather likely to be further west in wales, as much as 80 millimetres of rain during monday and monday night. that wetter weather moving slowly north and east but at the same time the winds continue to strengthen, especially in the south—west. so as we head into tuesday we will start with these sorts of temperatures, ten or 11 degrees, but quite a wet start for many eastern parts of the uk. we're left with one area of low pressure driving the heaviest rain up into scotland. this weather front should take the rain away from eastern england fairly quickly on tuesday, although the rain could linger for a while in northern england, the wettest weather is going to be in scotland, especially in the east. elsewhere, some really gusty winds, strong to gale force winds, driving in a mixture of sunshine and also some heavy and blustery
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showers with the possibility of hail and thunder. that area of low pressure, the centre of which is going to be across eastern areas of scotland, will continue to feed the rain in here and very tightly packed isobars, so very windy still in scotland and northern england in particular on wednesday, the rain in the north—east of scotland but otherwise a brief, drier and brighter spell of weather before more rain arrives later on from the south—west. welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in north america and around the globe. my name is kasia madera. our top story this hour: new details of the terror attack that killed seven and injured many more here in the heart of london. eight minutes after the terror began, police shot dead the attackers. so, who were they and why did they strike? world leaders express support for london. the australian prime minister calls it the "cruel, new reality." and in manchester, the scene
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of the previous uk attack, a tribute concert with some of the world's biggest stars.

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