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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 6, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning from a special edition of breakfast. with just 48 hours until the uk goes to the polls, we've invited some of you to join us for breakfast with a panel of experts ready to take your questions. we will be discussing social care, health, education, we will be talking about the things we want to talking about the things we want to talk about. steph is here with the brea kfast va n talk about. steph is here with the breakfast van as well. and i'm back on home soil with the breakfast butty van and some voters who'll be asking our experts their questions about the economy. there is a brilliant atmosphere down here this morning. good morning. we wa nt here this morning. good morning. we
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want you to get in touch from home as well. we will answer as many as we possibly can. i will be giving you a bit of a behind—the—scenes tour. we will return to the tension a few minutes. —— tent in a few minutes. good morning — it's tuesday sixth june. this morning's headlines.. questions asked as to why police and security services downgraded their inquiries into the past of one of the london bridge attackers. khuram butt had been under investigation by counter—terrorism officers and mi5. thousands of gathered for a vigil to remember the victims of saturday night's attack. a minutes silence will be held across the country later this morning. in sport, the former newcastle united midfielder cheick tiote dies at the age of 30. his old boss steve mcclaren said he had the "most beautiful smile in football".
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good morning from the blue peter garden where it is raining. we have a lot of friends this morning over central eastern and northern areas and in particular some of that heavy and in particular some of that heavy and persistent with localised flooding issues. behind that, a lot of showers blowing quickly through an gusty wind. i will have more detail and a quarter of an hour. we can tell you it is a little windy here in the breakfast tent. good morning and thank you forjoining us. morning and thank you forjoining us. thank you to our invited audience who will be here all morning. it is a hive of activity here outside our studio. we have the van, sandwiches on the table and people already having a robust discussion. we will be discussing so meeting this morning and, importantly, trying to get your questions answered. we have the reality check, a howl of experts,
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rachel from live outside is over there. and we also have a breakfast bar! good morning to you all. we will have one expert live on facebook and finally, steph is home with the breakfast van! our task is to help you to decide in 48 hours we go to the polls. if you are undecided, please send us questions. we are trying to get to answer as many as we can over the next 75 minutes. we will keep you updated but first, let's tell you what else is going on. first, our main story. scotland yard is facing questions over a decision to downgrade a previous inquiry into one of the three men behind the london bridge attack. it's been revealed that one of the attackers, khuram butt, was investigated by counter—terrorism officers and mi5 two years ago. seven people were killed and dozens injured in the incident on saturday night. nick quraishi reports. as the investigation into saturday night's attack continues at a fast
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pace, seven women and five men arrested in barking on sunday have been released by police without charge, leaving the focus firmly on the three attackers. this is the face of one of them. 27—year—old khuram butt was well known to the police and mi5 as an extremist. though they insist there was nothing to suggest he was planning an attack and downgraded their inquiry into his activities. documentary voiceover: the group display the black flag of islam. he featured in a channel 4 documentary last year about radical islamists in britain. twice, people in his barking neighbourhood reported the pakistani—born father of two to the authorities. in recent years, he worked at kentucky fried chicken and was a customer services adviser at transport for london. less is known about the second attacker, 30—year—old rachid redouane, also from barking and claimed to be of moroccan—libyan descent.
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police are yet to confirm the identity of the third attacker. yesterday evening, a vigil took place as londoners came together for a dignified show of solidarity. among the victims, 30—year—old christine archibald who had moved to europe from canada to be with herfiance. she died in his arms. james mcmullan's family are struggling to come to terms with the news his bankcard was found on a body outside a london bridge pub. while our pain will never diminish, it is important for us to all carry on with our lives in direct opposition to those who would try to destroy us. a minute's silence will be held at 11:00 this morning as the uk reflects on a third terror attack in less than three months. nick quraishi, bbc news. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at london bridge for us this morning. tim, is there a feeling it's business as usual in the capital today?
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the court and is still in place however and there are a few events happening across the day? that is correct. the station has opened and commuters are making their way through. the cordon behind me are still in place. the tarpaulin is the spot where the truck came to an end after it careered across london bridge. forensic teams are still doing their work and gathering what evidence they can. i! doing their work and gathering what evidence they can. 11 o'clock this morning a minutes silence to be held right across the country. from nine o'clock here in this area a book of condolences will be opened. that will be at southwark council headquarters to those who wish to sign it. i will take you around here because barriers have now been installed on london bridge as they have been on westminster and waterloo bridges as well. there have been questions asked about why that had not been done before but it is hoped that it will bring a certain
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additional sense of security to people who make their way across the bridge on this very wet morning. you can see behind me the flowers are still here, laid as a mark of respect to those who lost their lives on saturday night. thank you, tim. we'll speak to the mayor of london, sadiq khan, at ten past seven. the brother of the manchester suicide bomber, salman abedi, has been released without charge by police. ismail abedi, who's 23, was detained in the city the day after the attack on the manchester arena. 18 people have so far been detained as part of the investigation, ten are still in custody. the terror attacks in london and manchester mean that security is featuring heavily in the final days of campaigning before thursday's general election. our political correspondent chris mason is at our big breakfast tent. what are the parties saying about who will keep us safest chris? absolutely. who would have thought
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that a few weeks ago when the prime minister said that this is the election about brexit, the question of brexit which will dominate the news is featured now and again in this campaign but it has not dominated it in the way that they may have thought. inevitably, the focus is on national security, not least because the prime minister has some tough questions coming her way because of the job she did before. she was a secretary for six years under david cameron and there are many questions, particularly around theissue many questions, particularly around the issue of police numbers. you look at the facts and the facts are that police numbers, and that is relatively small proportion of police to carry guns, has fallen since 2010. conservatives say they are working to address that in the number of armed police will creep up but there are intense questions now from labour and from the liberal democrats and the s&p and they are all saying that the government had made mistakes, that the
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conservatives made mistakes. i don't think you can expect those questions to continue until polling stations open. —— i do think you can expect those questions to continue. the clock is ticking now. tradition dictates that at this stage of a political campaign that political leaders wish to show how keen now for our votes by dashing around the country. that may explain a little bit of a lull in the first part of today before they charge all the way through until the tail end of tomorrow. a few announcements, the conservatives are talking about having a trade commissioner and a board of trade to manage the process of brexit. there they are again trying to shift back to the territory that they feel comfortable on. looking ahead into the diary today, all of the main party leaders are doing our lot of dashing about. thank you very much. see later on in the morning. nine minutes past six
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now. both the liberal democrat leader, tim farron, and leader of the snp, nicola sturgeon, have warned against a "knee—jerk" reaction to the london bridge attack. facing a studio audience in edinburgh last night, mr farron said there was no evidence to support a widening of surveillance powers. while nicola sturgeon warned against reforms that could "undermine our own freedoms". ido i do know that we are much safer if we invest in police and in our security services. an additional 300 million that we will put into policing will make us safer. the cuts made by theresa may have not made a safer.. we must make sure that in our determination to keep the population safe we do not start to undermine alan freeds and civil liberty because these are part of what makes us who we are. we should always listen carefully to what police and security services say but
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police and security services say but police and security services say but police and security services have wide—ranging powers police and security services have wide— ranging powers already. the boss of british airways' parent company says that human error caused last week's it meltdown that led to travel chaos for 75,000 passengers. willie walsh said an engineer disconnected a power supply, with the major damage caused by a surge when it was reconnected. he's promised to make the findings of an independent investigation public. the opening day of the trial of the us comedian and actor, bill cosby, has heard from a prosecution witness who says he drugged and sexually assaulted her nearly twenty years ago. dozens of other women also accuse the 79—year—old entertainer of sexual assault. mr cosby denies any wrongdoing. tributes have been ——. tributes have been paid to the acclaimed author and poet helen dunmore, who died yesterday at the age of 64. the award—winning writer only revealed she was suffering
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from cancer in march. she spoke to us last year about how her own life had inspired her recent novel ‘exposure'. i was iwasa i was a child of the 1950s and at the point when this book opens i would have been seven. i can remember a different world of coal fires and chilly mornings in the bedroom which had no heating. i put all that into the characters and i have wa nted all that into the characters and i have wanted also to create the feeling that these people do not feeling that these people do not feel secure. time now was 12 minutes past six and two days to go until polls open. things are a little different this morning here a wreckers. both have a look at the tent. it is all more than tent, really, isn't it? it is wonderful. just below the studio where charlie is on what we call the plaza. we have set quite a big task today. we wa nt to a nswer have set quite a big task today. we want to answer as many questions as we possibly can ahead of the general
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election. we have a wonderful audience here, experts as well. you can use our hash tag, e—mail us all talk to us on our facebook page. let's introduce you to some guests here. what is your name and where do you here. what is your name and where do you come here. what is your name and where do you come from? i am lorraine from edinburgh. frank. diane. david from sheffield. what is the key issue for you, lorraine? i have made up my mind. the key issue is that scotland is not getting a voice in the brexit process. 0k we will try and deal with that. brexit was my key issue in getting a stronger mandate to theresa may but now it is security. we have been talking to you, land, before brexit in fact. what is your priority now? it is still brexit because it has its tentacles in everything. it is wide—ranging.
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foster carer and better care for children. i would like to know what they would do about that. fracking in yorkshire and putting more into renewable energy. and, quickly, who he has already made up their mind? interesting. thank you. let's talk toa interesting. thank you. let's talk to a couple of people and you will know one of them, chris mason. i have always wanted to stand behind a brea kfast have always wanted to stand behind a breakfast bar with you guys. chris, what do you think? it has been an interesting and intense campaign. what have been the defining issues? interestingly, things have shifted. when the prime minister caught us by surprise and suddenly said out of nowhere letters have an election, after spending months and she did not want one, she said was about brexit. actually, when you look at these, i have been waiting these around, the manifestoes for three of the parties. when you look at the conservative manifesto, 80 pages, 15
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references to brexit. so it features but it is not massive and it has not dominated in the conservatives are not ina dominated in the conservatives are not in a huge amount to flesh out how they will go about the negotiations. inevitably, because of manchester and london bridge, there isa manchester and london bridge, there is a huge focus on national security. the prime minister is being held to account for her record as prime minister and home secretary as prime minister and home secretary as well. we will talk about that in detail later on. i would like to introduce you as well to helen from the institute for this all studies. —— fiscal studies. cost has been at the heart of everything? yes, because the two main parties really disagree about how much they want the government to spend. the conservatives want to prioritise getting borrowing down and continue cutting the size of the state. the labour party wants a larger state, so they would raise taxes and have a big estate. it is a choice about how much money to
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spend. we will be speaking about all of that later. thank you. carol is here as well. lovely to see you. you will tell us about the weather, i can probably tell you, chile? chile and wet! good morning to my guest, alison and say it, thank you the coming down. you disappointed about this weather? it is like scotland, it is a home away from home. steady on! it is not going to get that much better, sadly. home. steady on! it is not going to get that much better, sadlylj home. steady on! it is not going to get that much better, sadly. i am from london, so... well, that is put in much the forecast, because today the forecast is a wet and windy one. some of the rain will be heavy and persistent as it moves east north—east and it will be accompanied by some other gusty winds as well as gales in some coastal areas. we start the forecast at nine o'clock in scotland. quite a bit of rain around and the wind getting lighter by nine o'clock. temperatures between 11 degrees and 13 degrees. across northern england, a wet start to the day. the wind not
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as strong here, but as we go south, and get into the midlands and parts of the south—east, gusty winds. the heinz field reigns, the isle of wight and parts of hampshire heading towards south—east england, it is a dry picture. —— behind the reins. the rain will continue to clear from wales but we will have at first you hours yet. the south of wales ripening upa hours yet. the south of wales ripening up a bit, but very windy close to the coast. —— brightening. we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers. the strongest winds today will be across wales and southern england. especially around the coast, where we are looking at gales in the irish sea, the bristol channel, the english channel and south—western approaches. it does mean that the showers will rattle through quickly. meanwhile, the rain carrying on across central and eastern scotland and also parts of eastern scotland and also parts of eastern england in particular. if you are stuck under the rain it is going to feel pretty cool. through
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deceiving the rain continues to advance east north—east, so we will still have it across parts of scotla nd still have it across parts of scotland and north—east england. —— through this evening. dry weather follows behind, with some clear skies. temperatures roughly 11— 14. tomorrow morning we will still have that rain. slowly moving north—east, eventually clearing most of scotland. a temporary respite, as most of us enjoy the dry weather and some sunshine. however, most of us will have another weather front by the end of the day, showing this weather coming into the south—west and bringing more rain. the wind in the south will change direction towards the south, so we will not feel as cold, whereas in the north it will still be a northerly. thursday, that weather front will continue to move steadily north across england, wales and northern ireland, eventually getting into scotland. behind it will be some showers. ahead of it they will be bright skies and showers. i then temperatures will be reaching 20 celsius. all in all, not too bad. we
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can live without? yes, that is a british summer, really. that is how it is looking. back to you. thank you. the first thing i want to get to the heart of his education. so many of you will be getting up and perhaps getting your children to school. perhaps you are teachers. it is really an issue key for so many people. i have four teaches you. i will come to you in a moment, and will come to you in a moment, and will also be speaking to education is -- will also be speaking to education is —— education correspondent. education is devolved, so wales and scotland both run their own education budgets and systems. john maguire has been to one school in south bristol to hear from staff and parents there. some are is in full swing at parson street primary school in bristol. during break time in the staffroom, there is a quiet anger. we do work
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ina there is a quiet anger. we do work in a school where children come from deprived backgrounds, and they necessarily get to go to museums or art galleries or go on those amazing moments that they should be able to get as a child. even the free opportunities that are available in education for visits, you need to hire a coach, that is another expense that can't be managed. it is almost thing is limited to walking distance, lots of the time, to save on transport. in previous years, the first graders have always had a ta in their class to support them, because they are only five and six years old. they need that 1—to—1 support. that is not going to be there next year, which i think is shocking. i am becoming a statistic of leaving after three years. you are leaving? yeah, very sadly. when i had to do my resignation, even the head said, i couldn't teach today, i couldn't teach under these conditions. it shows how tricky it is. what will you do? i don't know. i don't know. i am a teacher, but i
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am exhausted. i need to regain some work and life balance for myself. yeah. we will do our best for these children because that is why we came into education. sir there children because that is why we came into education. sirthere is children because that is why we came into education. sir there is a feeling of, yes, anger. there is a feeling of, yes, anger. there is a feeling of, yes, anger. there is a feeling of sadness, et cetera. but there is also a feeling of resilience, and we will actually get on with it, you know. the government says school funding at england is at record levels, £40 billion and rising. a new formula will distribute money to schools more thermal —— fairly. but costs are increasing to. teaches you say they will lose more than £540 per pupil. i cannot afford the staff librarian in more. the head here is bristol's representative for the teachers union. he argues that the lack of money is writing hard. we do feel anger and frustration. we feel that it is time the government, whoever they may be, stop and listen to the profession when we are telling you, we cannot make it work. we cannot
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sustain the level of cuts we are facing and still deliver what you are asking us to deliver. some schools are asking parents for money to front trips or art and sport activities. most of us shouldn't have to make that choice. it should be provided by the state. it is a right. it is my children's right.|j don't know about the politics and stuff, but as a parent, when you see your teachers getting overstressed and overworked, you know full well that the children are going to be, like, 0k, why is this happening? if there is not enough support in the classrooms, what is going to happen to them? classrooms, what is going to happen to them ? those classrooms, what is going to happen to them? those four —year—olds and five —year—olds, they could be the next prime minister. it would be good to have a clear picture of where each party stands, so that when we are voting we can do a clear comparison between different parties. it is it is going to be challenging, some cuts do have to be made, and everybody has to work together to make it happen, but it has to be done fairly. branwenjeffreys, the bbc‘s education editor is here.
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i want to pick up on one of those questions, the last one they are from nikki, talking about how cuts will have to be made by whoever gets in. she wants to know where the political parties stand, on education and on budgets. political parties stand, on education and on budgetsm political parties stand, on education and on budgets. it is really confusing. they are all offering cash. but what really cou nts offering cash. but what really counts for schools is how much they end up with per child to spend at the end of the day. like any other employer, schools have to pay bills, national insurance, pay, pensions. when you look at the figures, when they have taken all of that out, broadly it means that the conservative figures would add up to about 2.8% less, a cut by the end of the next parliament. labour would redress some of the cuts and it would be a slight gain, 1.6% better. the lib dems wouldn't reverse the cuts that have already happened, but they say they would make sure that no more happen from now on. so three quite different offers from the parties. standstill from the lib
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dems, a little bit extra from labour, and a real terms cuts per pupilfrom the labour, and a real terms cuts per pupil from the conservative arty.|j am sitting next to four teaches. i will come back to this in more detail in about 20 minutes time also. is that what is going to sway your vote, how much your school will get? is that what it will be? it could be, possibly. indeed, yes. i think for most of us it is about teacher workloads as well. which we heard about in our report, as well. you find it tough? indeed. the marking workload, i say to the staff it is the marking, that is what i hear all the time, and the work—life balance. will it sway your vote? it will sway my vote. the impact on our pupils, yes, it will sway my vote. just making sure that we have a fair system for all, i think, notjust for the few. an arbitrator stage of the 11 would be a terrible thing as well. —— arbitrary test age of 11.
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before we go to the news where you are, iwill before we go to the news where you are, i will come over here to speak toa are, i will come over here to speak to a guests from newsround. we will of course be speaking about security. i want to introduce you to another guest, david. he is a cartoonist. during the morning you are going to be the ranks for us, and sort of talking about some of theissues and sort of talking about some of the issues and what people are talking about? going to be drawing for us. yes, capturing the atmosphere. it is a fantastic atmosphere. it is a fantastic atmosphere so far. thank you. if you wa nt atmosphere so far. thank you. if you want questions answered from home, please get in touch with jane. she is behind me. i know she is already talking to people. right now, let's find out about the news, the weather and travel wherever you are watching us and travel wherever you are watching us this morning. see you in a moment. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. social media companies including google, facebook and twitter say they‘ re investing significant resources in fighting the spread of extremism. their comments follow saturday's attack at london bridge
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and subsequent calls from the prime ministerfor a crack down on extremist material. but there are warnings that tighter controls on our cyberspace might not be such a good thing. well, regulation is something you need to do carefully. you need to understand that you are not creating incentives to do the wrong thing, to remove people's free speech, rather than just removing terrorist content. you need to be confident that you are not upsetting delicate balance here. it's emerged that one of the terrorists in the attack on london bridge at the weekend used to distribute leaflets expressing extremist views on the streets near east london mosque. 27—year—old khuram butt from nearby barking wasn't a member of the mosque, which has actively excluded extremists from its premises and worked closely with police. so, we have had people who actually
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come to the mosque and wants to impose themselves and the kind of ideology or their kind of thinking, particularly with young people, which is a very narrow and skewed view. we have had to say, no, this is not what islam teaches. we need to be inclusive. and in connection to the death of the killers, over 100 imams and religious leaders have taken the unprecedented decision not to perform funeral prayers for any of the attackers. let's have a look at the travel situation now. if we look at the keyboard we can see it is a good service on all lines this tuesday morning. —— tube board. the police cordoned remains in place around borough market. avoid that area if you can. nearby southwark street is closed east of southwark street is closed east of southwark bridge. as for london bridge station itself, that is open, at the borough high street entrance is closed at the moment. now let's take a look at the weather. good morning. a damp start this
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morning. there was rain overnight and it is windy. 0ne morning. there was rain overnight and it is windy. one or two bright spells around one not last long. it will stay wet and windy through the course of the morning. wet weather pushing in from the west, accompanied by a strong westerly wind. it is a gusty winds that will stay with us throughout the afternoon. further west it could turn more showery and a bit brighter later on today. further east you will probably hang onto that cloud. quite cool as well, 16— 18 celsius is the maximum temperature in today. these showers will continue into the evening, maybe some brighter spells before the sunsets. those showers will gradually become fewer and further in between. still breezy overnight, the minimum temperature dropping down to 11 or 12 celsius. a brighter start tomorrow. a brief respite. a dry red light of day, with some sunshine and rain. more rain overnight wednesday into thursday, staying unsettled as we head into the weekend. the temperature just makes a slight recovery. the metropolitan police
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have defended their decision to downgrade an enquiry into one of the men who carried out saturday's terror attack. more on that on bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt here in the studio, and louise minchin outside on the piazza. we don't have an aim for the tent yet but it is need. we are calling it the big breakfast ten this morning. inside we have experts and voters and this morning we give people a chance to ask questions in the final days before the general election vote. if you have any question you wish answered we have bbc correspondent and expert is there to answer all number of issues. coming up now to 630 and the main stories this morning... scotland yard is facing questions over a decision to downgrade a previous inquiry into one of the three men behind the london bridge attack.
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its been revealed that one of the attackers, khuram butt, was investigated by counter—terrorism officers and m15 two years ago. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at london bridge for us this morning. can you tell is through a little bit of these questions over what the authorities knew about one of the attackers? that is right. coren was known to m15 —— khuram butt and appeared ina known to m15 —— khuram butt and appeared in a documentary a few yea rs appeared in a documentary a few years ago. but the assistant commissioner said that the police had to prioritise resources and suspect who they believed were preparing an attack or providing active support for one. they said that he simply did not fall into the category when he was last investigated. so, as you say, uncomfortable questions but that is their response. in none of the
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attackers have been named, khuram butt is one, rachid redouane is the other. he was unknown to police. police are gathering more information about his life. he lived in ireland fora information about his life. he lived in ireland for a short while. and we expect at some point today or tomorrow for the third attacker to be named as well. as you can see behind me, forensics teams are carrying on their work by the scene of the attack. the blue tarpaulin is where the van ended its journey after careering across london bridge. a lot of work to be done and, as you say, questions to be a nswered and, as you say, questions to be answered as well. the issue of security is dominating the final days of campaigning before thursday's election. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn has accused theresa may of overseeing a 19,000 fall in police numbers as home secretary. but the prime minister says she protected the amount of counter—terror police. the liberal democrats would spend £17 billion on repairing schools and hospitals if they gain power. the party's health spokesperson norman lamb says they will give ten
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billion to the nhs to restore hospitals over the next five years, and seven billion to schools. out in the party's manifesto. the party's health spokesperson the state of our school estate and our nhs estate has deteriorated and it is now essential that we bring it up it is now essential that we bring it up to it is now essential that we bring it uptoa it is now essential that we bring it up to a proper standard, to ensure that within schools children get the teaching and the environment that they deserve, also, that there are hospitals and gp practices that are fit for purpose. a tiger that killed a keeper at a cambridgeshire zoo will not be put down, according to bosses. the decision not to destroy the animal has been "fully supported" by the family of rosa king, who died following the incident at hamerton zoo park. an investigation is ongoing into the 34—year—old's death,
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which was described by her workplace as a "freak accident". the boss of british airways' parent company says that human error caused last week's it meltdown that led to travel chaos for 75,000 passengers. willie walsh said an engineer disconnected a power supply, with the major damage caused by a surge when it was reconnected. he's promised to make the findings of an independent investigation public. one in every seven pounds spent at the supermarkets will be at a discount store within the next five years, according to new research into the uk grocery industry. the supermarket research organisation, the igd, also predicts that in the next few years nearly a quarter of british shoppers could be getting their groceries delivered by shopping online. those are the main stories this morning. sally is he now with sport. the story you will start with is a real tragedy for a young footballer. desperately sad. you can see a picture of him there. cheick tiote
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and newcastle picture of him there. cheick tiote a nd newcastle fa ns picture of him there. cheick tiote and newcastle fans will be aware of him because he was so popular during his time in the north—east. he scored one of the best go dumb goals you will ever likely to see. he died yesterday at the age of just 30. he collapsed during training at his new club. steve mcclaren led the tributes saying he was the toughest playing here that saw. but if he was smiling, he knew the world was ok. tiote, who was from the ivory coast, played in the north—east for seven yea rs. he was come tentative he was a warrior and could play. the intensity of his game and again that he wanted to play be ideal for the premier league and proved so. that is the kind of player that everybody wa nts. is the kind of player that everybody wants. he was a winner all the way through. andy murray thanked the crowd for turning out to watch the action at the french open, in spite of the recent terror attacks. murray reached the quarter—finals with a straight—sets win over russia's karen khachanov.
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he'll play kei nishikori next — but his thoughts were clearly elsewhere. this is something that has affected, you know, large parts of europe and all over the world and, obviously, i wa nt all over the world and, obviously, i want things to keep getting better andi want things to keep getting better and i appreciate everyone still coming out to support the tennis and creating a fantastic atmosphere. i am grateful i can come and perform in front of you. england's cricketers can book a semi—final spot in the champions trophy today, if they beat new zealand in cardiff. they will be without chris woakes, who's been ruled out with a side strain. it has been a blow to us. he sets the tone and is a genuine all—rounder. we are lucky we have three of them. when you lose one it leaves a dent. hopefully the player
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called in can do thejob. sir ben ainslie's land rover b.a.r team are struggling in the america's cup challenger semi—finals in bermuda. they're 2—0 down to new zealand after damaging a wing in the first race and being forced to forfeit the second. it's a best—of—nine series. the pressure really is on. chris froome finished safely in the peleton on the second stage of the criterium du dauphine in france. it was a day for the sprinters into arlanc, with frenchman arnaud demare taking the stage win. froome should excel later in the week, in the climbing and time trial stages. getting ready, of course, for the tour to france coming up. now, what you think of the tent outside the building? i enjoy being inside in the warm and the dry and so many brave people are outside. there is, just on the piazza outside. it is a giant marquee. lew is inside because
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this morning we have a special programme, picking up a lot of the issues that people have questions about. questions they want answered about. questions they want answered about the general election. honestly, it is warming up down here, isn't it? it is wonderful. here we are in our big breakfast tent, trying to get questions and said ahead of the general election. 48 hours to go. we touched on education in the last half—hour and wa nt to education in the last half—hour and want to keep talking about that. raj, you worry teacher in an inner city school. you have a particular question? i teach in an inner-city school. my concern is around the proposed budget cuts and the impact they will have on our pupils who are living in an area where in the same stretch of road there are housing estates a nd stretch of road there are housing estates and houses valued under 900,000. what are their life chances in the future? the promises they are
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making in terms of cash that they put into the school system but it sounds to me that what you are worried about is how the cake will be sliced up. there are plans to give inner—city schools a smaller share of the cake so that schools in towns and rural areas can get a bigger slice. all the parties, as a result of campaigning that there has been from teachers and from parents, are saying, they are now saying there will be no cash loses as a result of those plans to share our money differently between cities and rural areas. i don't know if you find that reassuring at all. in terms of what is proposed and what happens and the impacts on the stu d e nts happens and the impacts on the students is something different. how long does that promise good for? that is what you need answered. kate, i know you are a first—time
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voter, about to be a student. what would you like to get answered? 0bviously would you like to get answered? obviously i will be going to university in september so my main concern is if labour do get into government, will be completely scrap tuition fees or will there be some form of graduate tax? something that we need to be decided afterwards? there are different offerings on political parties? there are. labour say they would raise corporation tax and raise tax on high earners in order to scrap tuition fees. and, actually, during the course of the election they said that they would also write off the these poor people like yourself who start this year because it will take awhile for any changes to go through. is the biggest election promise that labour is making. a very expensive one, around £11 billion. you may not know their ukip and the greens are also saying they would like to scrap
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tuition fees as well. it is notjust labour making this promise. the conservatives and lib dems and what their thoughts? they would like to keep the as it is right now. the fees at the moment are £9,250 per year but, of course, one reassuring thing, maybe, is that only around one quarter of students will have to fully pay off their loans because you have to earn a certain amount before you start paying it off. i'd like to move over here. during the election, i don't know of any of you looked at the bbc reality check that this is one of the people who work on it. and i know... i know it that gregory has a question that chris can answer. my question is that from the prospective of the working poor family what would you prefer? a free brea kfast family what would you prefer? a free breakfast or a free lunch? this is the conservative proposal to scrap free school lunches. if you look at
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the cost, the tories will save a lot more money by scrapping lunches than they would be by introducing brea kfast. they would be by introducing breakfast. the implication is that if it would cost more than you would save more money by having that free school lunch. as you probably know, many educationalists and people like fellow british jamie many educationalists and people like fellow britishjamie 0liver saying scrapping free school lunches is a bad idea. ithink scrapping free school lunches is a bad idea. i think it is partly because many children... if you are on for a free breakfast that is before school. will the kids be there at that time? whereas at lunchtime, everybody is there. the tories are saying that they will save 650 million quid by scrapping school lunches and they will invested elsewhere in the system. from the perspective as you put the question of a struggling family, it is probably going to save you more money and be more advantageous to you to have that free school lunch than to have the option of a free school breakfast. and, greek, you are teaching? i am ahead of school. so, what... how do you see how food
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and... this comes down to is on the very basic, how it affects students and their performances? there is a link between nutrition and brain development. in terms of finances, i would suggest that a working poor family would far prefer to have a free school lunch under the universal free school meals deal rather than a free breakfast which they could provide for a lower cost at home. the if you have two or three children and you pay for their lunches over a month, that is significant. do you think there are children coming to your school who have not even breakfast? certainly. it could be because it is a poor family choices or poverty but significantly, family choices. we do have a breakfast club at school where children can access breakfast for £1 a day. very interesting. thank you both very much. let me show you around this fantastic... it
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is not attend, it is more like a cafe. 0ther is not attend, it is more like a cafe. other things we will talk about this morning include cost of living. we have many colleagues from across the bbc. newsround will be helping out on the weather a little bit later. other things we will discuss, radio 5 though they are! hello, rachel! she is broadcasting with us this morning as well. behind us with us this morning as well. behind us through the drizzle we have the brea kfast va n us through the drizzle we have the breakfast van and i think, i am hoping that steph has brought me a special guest. she has been promising big things. right now i can tell you that the weather here is pretty chilly and windy. some rain abouta is pretty chilly and windy. some rain about a carol has the proper details. she is in the van. good morning everybody. we are looking up a bit ofa morning everybody. we are looking up a bit of a can hear and morning everybody. we are looking up a bit ofa can hearand it morning everybody. we are looking up a bit of a can hear and it is going quite well. i just a bit of a can hear and it is going quite well. ijust hope the firefighters are on standby. get the camera in there now, get out! that
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is not a good look, i will be honest. after the meal we is not a good look, i will be honest. after the mealwe had last night, you can talk... what is going on? i have sorted out the special guest for you. if you wander down there you will be able to see just who it is. i'll get on with the bacon. as lewis saying it is windy and also wait here this morning. in fa ct and also wait here this morning. in fact not just here, and also wait here this morning. in fact notjust here, across many parts of the uk that is the case. wet and windy sums up the forecast quite nicely. if you start the forecast this morning at nine a.m. well, we had a lot of rain across scotla nd well, we had a lot of rain across scotland and that bridge around about 11 to 13 celsius. light winds north of the country in the same across northern england. light winds. a lot of rain and a rain continues as we push down towards the midlands. although the east
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anglia itself we are looking at largely dry picture. ijust need to ta ke largely dry picture. ijust need to take the soft that it... across southern areas again we have quite a lot of rain around. as we move from the isle of wight to the south—west of england it is drier and it is brighter but there are showers. the wind will be a feature of the weather for you today. we also have the rain continuing eastwards, southern parts of wales again drying up southern parts of wales again drying up northern ireland the rain has gone through already but there will be showers as we go through the course of the day. the rain will be moving east and north—east through the day and some of that will be heavy and persistent, the rest moderate. behind it, a lot are showers. it will be windy across parts of england and wales, especially in strong winds at that so the showers will rattle through quite quickly but there will be frequent. exposure on the irish sea coastline and the bristol channel, we are looking at their hills. so as we are looking at their hills. so as we head on through the course of the
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evening and overnight you will find that the rain will continue to edge up that the rain will continue to edge up into north—east england and central and eastern parts of scotland. behind it, some clearer skies coming through. temperatures roughly 11— 15 degrees overnight stop not particularly cold night stop not particularly cold night stop then for tomorrow we still have rain to start the day across the north—east of england. and, also across parts of scotland. it will slowly move north eastwards and eventually clear most of scotland. then we have a bit of a respite a lot of dry weather and sunshine. that will be temporary because the next weather front comes in from the south—west. that introduces rain and the other thing is the wind will change direction along with the weather front tomorrow. change to a moulded direction. the weatherfront moves northwards taking rain through england wales, northern ireland and eventually getting up into scotland. heading behind it there will be a few showers and highs up to 20. steph is back now. i had to take the
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bacon off. iamso i am so pleased we have a brilliant professional here. we have nancy from bake 0ff. professional here. we have nancy from bake off. do you reckon?‘ professional here. we have nancy from bake off. do you reckon? a wee bit burnt, maybe. it is well done, carol. american style. i will leave you to it. i have to do some serious business, i will leave you to it. we have been taking this butty van around the country, serving up some decent food. we now have the professional in there, nancy, helping us. we have in getting questions answered about the economy. we will be doing more about this morning. some of our guests are here, helen millerfrom this morning. some of our guests are here, helen miller from the this morning. some of our guests are here, helen millerfrom the iss this morning. some of our guests are here, helen miller from the iss was here, helen miller from the iss was here earlier, she can answer some of
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the questions. frank, for you, tell us the questions. frank, for you, tell us about your work? you do lots of different jobs, us about your work? you do lots of differentjobs, don't us about your work? you do lots of different jobs, don't you? us about your work? you do lots of different jobs, don't you ?|j us about your work? you do lots of different jobs, don't you? iwas made redundant last year so i became self—employed. i do three days a week selling contract sales and contract cleaning. if you need your premise is clean, just give me a ring. iam premise is clean, just give me a ring. i am a professional santa claus and a coronation street extra. do you do cleaning as santa claus? that could be the december promotion. i like that idea. tell us your question. i will be voting conservative. 0ne your question. i will be voting conservative. one of the things i cannot understand about the tories, why does corporation tax have to be so low? the other parties are suggesting it should increase, and i agree with them. even if it is higher, apparently we will still be a lot lower than the rest of the g7. what is the possession?” a lot lower than the rest of the g7. what is the possession? i think many people share that question. the thing about corporation tax is basically it is a trade—off. we can
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raise quite a lot of money if we cut corporation tax rates, like labour would like to do. —— raise corporation tax rates. the concern is that if you put it up you get lower investment. firms in the uk will have less incentive to invest in foreign firms will not want to come here as much. but you are right, we would still have a low tax rate compared internationally. basically, you are trading of weather you want to raise that money and spend it on other stuff, or do you want to cut corporation tax and make the uk a more attractive location. there is no magic answer. voters have to pick which one they think is right. what are your thoughts on that? i still think it could be higher. at a time when we are still looking to raise money through taxation without affecting individuals, i think corporation tax could take an increase. and alison, you're an entrepreneur. tell us about your business and what you are interested in? i am the entrepreneur's godmother. i work
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with start—ups and owner managed businesses to teach them to cell, because if they do not cell they do not have a business. i believe that if the uk does not export more, we will get the same cash that re cycles. will get the same cash that re cycle 5. i will get the same cash that recycles. i notice some good government programmes at the moment to bring money in, especially from countries like china. lots of our manufacturing went to china. they love all things british. what are they going to do to support entrepreneurs in our country? the honest answer is that governments have a hard time trying to do things that specifically boosts entrepreneurship. what they often do just give lower tax rates to small businesses and business owners. that can cause problems if some people get lower tax rates and others don't. we can see that in the giddy economy. what they do is look for areas that have robinson try to fix them. things are export financing, maybe things like financing in general. parties have not in specific about what they want to do but what they should be doing is saying, what are the barriers to small business, let's try to fix
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those? yes, definitely. the other thing with exporting, it is not necessarily services, but it is quite expensive to get your website translated or to be able to do things in different languages, sol think support from government for things like that would be absolutely fantastic. it is interesting, isn't it, because lots of people want things that cost money, essentially, because all of this will cost money. the other side of this is, if businesses are growing they will be paying more tax. that is how we will bring down the national debt. exactly. it is the big choice we always face. everybody wants more stuff, we have to pay for it. you either cut money elsewhere or raise more taxes. when you raise tax, you try to work out which taxes you can raise without affecting how big the economy gets. the bigger the pipe, the better off we all are. everybody, thank you. i am well up for sa nta everybody, thank you. i am well up for santa claus cleaning the house at christmas. what do you think, lou? at christmas. what do you think, lou ? santa cleaning at christmas. what do you think, lou? santa cleaning your house at christmas? what a marvellous idea. you will
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have somebody to clean the butty van as well. let's not talk about how messy the butty van is! new line another thing we are trying to do today is to talk about trying to get your questions as well, it jayne about trying to get your questions as well, itjayne here is about trying to get your questions as well, it jayne here is across the social media. what are people saying today? first things first, there is a hit ofa today? first things first, there is a hit of a gazebo—gate debate. are you underselling it? it is not attend. it is a breakfast cafe. most people in social media think it is a gazebo. that's not the point. chris masonjoins us. we have gazebo. that's not the point. chris mason joins us. we have lots of questions to get through. 0n facebook, ronnie says, with more cuts and austerity, how can police and security forces keep us safe? that is the essential question of the election campaign right now. it will probably dominate all the way to polling day. that is the very
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question being asked by the opposition parties in the direction of the conservatives, not least because theresa may was home secretary before she became prime minister, and police officer numbers in imminent wales have fallen over those last few years. —— in england and wales. that is a massive question, because politicians are so aware there is no bigger responsibility they have been trying to keep us safe. of course. test asks, why is the nhs in crisis? —— tess. she also asks why so many people are relying on food banks. good question. a big question that the opposition parties are putting towards the conservatives. there have been lots of cuts, we have reported that on breakfast over the la st reported that on breakfast over the last few years, especially around social security and welfare payments, benefit payments. the government thinks it is important to shake up the system to encourage more people into work, but it is an awkward question for the conservatives, because we have all seen conservatives, because we have all seen those spots in the supermarket
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where we can leave things to hand over to food banks and that sort of thing. the conservatives would you keen, if they win, to do something about it. maggie asks on twitter, how much are the tories planning to spend on grammar schools? and what impact will this have on local education authority schools? a similar theme from rhiannon, a single mother in the vale of glamorgan. she says that her school is charging full fees at the moment and she is concerned about funding. 0n breakfast, i have been looking through the manifestoes, reading them all. conservatives are keen, theresa may is keen to see more grammar schools in england. they will make the argument that they will make the argument that they will not take money away from other schools. 0n will not take money away from other schools. on that the of school funding, a really tricky one, the conservatives make the arjun and that there is more money going into schools and there ever has been before. —— the argument about. that is true, but there are also more pupils, said the amount per pupil has been squeezed. land tax, garden tax, if you people are asking about
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this. we will have the answers in the next hour. helen miller is with us, she is a tax expert. chris is doing research as well. will has askedif doing research as well. will has asked if he can have a chip butty. ijust had a sneak preview and i do not think there are any chip butties. this is the first time i have had a good look at the butty van and! have had a good look at the butty van and i disappointed to see the level of bacon that carol has been cooking. fellow, steph. and hello, special guests. good to see you. let's look at carol's bacon. what would you give out out of ten, nancy? the silence says it all.m is pretty basic, frying bacon, steph. don't blame me for this! of this was carol. i've been doing all right, me. i am delighted nancy is here. i have been following you very closely over the last couple of weeks in the breakfast butty van van. we need to send her some way,
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don't we? my house, maybe. yeah, because you are brilliant at it. i have no skill when it comes to cooking. what we are trying to do today, as was improved steph‘s cooking, we are trying to get all your questions answered. send them into jayne and we will focus on lots of things in the next two and a half hours or so. there isjust 48 hours to go until we go to the polls. if you are undecided, watch us here on brea kfast you are undecided, watch us here on breakfast this morning. if you want more information, watch us here on brea kfast, more information, watch us here on breakfast, and if you want questions as well, get in touch. we will be backin as well, get in touch. we will be back ina as well, get in touch. we will be back in a couple of minutes. right now, the news, travel and the weather from wherever you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. social media companies including google, facebook and twitter say they‘ re investing significant resources in fighting the spread of extremism. their comments follow saturday's attack at london bridge and subsequent calls from the prime ministerfor a crack down on extremist material.
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but there are warnings that tighter controls on our cyberspace might not be such a good thing. well, regulation is something you need to do carefully. you need to understand that you are not creating incentives to do the wrong thing, to remove people's free speech, rather than just removing terrorist content. you need to be confident that you are not upsetting delicate balance here. it's emerged that one of the terrorists in the attack on london bridge at the weekend used to distribute leaflets expressing extremist views on the streets near east london mosque. 27—year—old khuram butt from nearby barking wasn't a member of the mosque, which has actively excluded extremists from its premises and worked closely with police. so, we have had people who actually come to the mosque and wants to impose themselves and the kind of ideology or their kind of thinking, particularly with young people, which is a very narrow and skewed view. we have had to say, no, this is not what islam teaches.
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we need to be inclusive. and in connection to the death of the killers, over 100 imams and religious leaders have taken the unprecedented decision not to perform funeral prayers for any of the attackers. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the central line has severe delays because of a tree which has fallen on the track near white city station. elsewhere, a good service on all city lines. the police cordoned remains in place around our market. a void that area if you can. southwark street just nearby market. a void that area if you can. southwark streetjust nearby is closed. london bridge station itself is open but be borough high street entrance and exit is close. good morning. a damp start this morning. there was rain overnight
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and it is windy. one or two bright spells around one not last long. it will stay wet and windy through the course of the morning. wet weather pushing in from the west, accompanied by a strong westerly wind. gusty winds will stay with us throughout the afternoon. further west it could turn more showery and a bit brighter later on today. further east you will probably hang onto that cloud. quite cool as well, 16—18 celsius is the maximum temperature today. these showers will continue into the evening, maybe some brighter spells before the sunsets. those showers will gradually become fewer and further in between. still breezy overnight, the minimum temperature dropping down to 11 or 12 celsius. a brighter start tomorrow. a brief respite. a drier day, with some sunshine and rain. more rain overnight wednesday into thursday, staying unsettled as we head into the weekend. the temperature just makes a slight recovery. we have some interesting information
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for you regarding the general election in half an hour's time. join us then. to you in the next hour, specifically we will be discussing social care and security in light of what has happened in the uk in the last two weeks or so. it is important that you join in the conversation. steph is also here and she has brought back home the brea kfast she has brought back home the breakfast van. yes, it is back on home soil after it was data of the uk. i will be talking to voters in getting their questions about the economy. a brilliant atmosphere down here this morning but we want you to get involved from wherever you are. you can contact us on our social media hub, we will be answering as many questions as we can making sure they get answered. give you a sense as well of what is going on behind the scenes. we will return to the tent in a few minutes. good morning — it's tuesday sixth june. this morning's headlines:
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questions asked as to why police and security services downgraded their inquiries into the past of one of the london bridge attackers. khuram butt had been under investigation by counter—terrorism officers and m15. thousands of gathered for a vigil to remember the victims of saturday night's attack. a minutes silence will be held across the country later this morning. in sport, the former newcastle united midfielder cheick tiote dies at the age of 30. his old boss steve mcclaren said he had the "most beautiful smile in football". and carol has come indoors from the slightly wet jarka. it is wet outside. many parts of the country this morning we have heavy and persistent rain moving east north eastwards. behind it there will be showers blowing through quickly on gusty wind. more details in 15 minutes. first, our main story.
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we will bring you the headlines on the latest on the terror attack a little later on. we also speak to siddique khan, in about ten minutes time. let's go to the wii is now, she is outside and you can see the giantand she is outside and you can see the giant and there. —— siddique khan. there is a lot going on inside. —— sadiq khan. this is a bbc breakfast special edition today, 48 hours ahead of us going to the polls. good morning, everyone. welcome to my world. they have had to get up at 430 in the morning but i get up at 330. lovely to see you. it is important that you are involved today. we are discussing education, social care, security. charlie mentioned in the next few minutes that we will be speaking to sadiq khan we want to get involved and put questions to a panel of experts. we
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have bbc reality check here and we also, have rachel bird from 5 live. we also have a wonderful cartoon is too has been quite hard this morning. he will give us a little... i don't know, a visual summary later on, won't you? we have a breakfast bar... i'm making the camera people walk backwards, there told me that i now have to walk backwards. and we would not be called pleat unless the bbc breakfast sofa was down here with us. we have so much information. get in touch on social media and ask your questions. we will put it to experts here throughout the morning. first, however, we need to know about the news. scotland yard is facing questions over a decision to downgrade a previous inquiry into one of the three men behind the london bridge attack.
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it's been revealed that one of the attackers, khuram butt, was investigated by counter—terrorism officers and m15 two years ago. seven people were killed and dozens injured in the incident on saturday night. nick quraishi reports. as the investigation into saturday night's attack continues at a fast pace, seven women and five men arrested in barking on sunday have been released by police without charge, leaving the focus firmly on the three attackers. this is the face of one of them. 27—year—old khuram butt was well known to the police and m15 as an extremist. though they insist there was nothing to suggest he was planning an attack and downgraded their inquiry into his activities. documentary voiceover: the group display the black flag of islam. he featured in a channel 4 documentary last year about radical islamists in britain. twice, people in his barking neighbourhood reported the pakistani—born father of two to the authorities. in recent years, he worked at kentucky fried chicken and was a customer services adviser
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at transport for london. less is known about the second attacker, 30—year—old rachid redouane, also from barking and claimed to be of moroccan—libyan descent. police are yet to confirm the identity of the third attacker. yesterday evening, a vigil took place as londoners came together for a dignified show of solidarity. among the victims, 30—year—old christine archibald who had moved to europe from canada to be with herfiance. she died in his arms. james mcmullan's family are struggling to come to terms with the news his bankcard was found on a body outside a london bridge pub. while our pain will never diminish, it is important for us to all carry on with our lives in direct opposition to those who would try to destroy us. a minute's silence will be held at 11:00 this morning as the uk
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reflects on a third terror attack in less than three months. nick quraishi, bbc news. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at london bridge for us this morning. we will hear from him shortly at first let's go to new scotland yard. nick, more is emerging about one of the attackers and just what the authorities knew and when. indeed. it seems that they knew quite a lot. this is khuram butt, a 27—year—old father of two who had links to a banned islamist group whose leader was well known to police and m15. in fa ct, was well known to police and m15. in fact, concern was raised and made to the antiterrorism hotline in 2015 about him, khuram butt. 0ne mother
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in his area raised concern that he may be radicalising her children. despite this, scotland yard is saying that they have some 3000 britishjohn hardy saying that they have some 3000 british john hardy is, saying that they have some 3000 britishjohn hardy is, 500 —— jihadis. in their words he was moved to the lower echelons of this investigation. we should find out more information about the third attacker today at once it emerges from scotland yard. straight at him now who is near the scene of the attack. tim, we understand that, of course, there was a vigil last night and a minutes silence and other events today? i am still at the end of london bridge. the police cordon is still behind me and the blue tarpaulin shows where the van ended its journey across the bridge on saturday night forensics teams are still at work. from nine a.m. this morning commuters were making their
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way from london bridge station and they can do so if they wish to pay their respects in a book of condolences. at 11 o'clock, and nationwide minute silence. there is a sense of normality returning here. london bridge station is open, even if some entrances are closed. if we swing around on this wet morning you can see computers “— swing around on this wet morning you can see computers —— commuters making their way across london bridge and you can see some barriers which have been newly put up there as well as they have been on some other bridges as well, london, waterloo and westminster bridges, the idea being that hopefully they will potentially stop a van making its way onto the pavement as happened with deadly effect on saturday night. behind me, flowers growing in numberas saturday night. behind me, flowers growing in number as people pay their respect to those who passed away on saturday. thank you to those of you. a reminderfor us for the coming up in a few minutes time we will be speaking to the mayor of
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london, sadiq khan. the brother of the manchester suicide bomber, salman abedi, has been released without charge by police. he's 23, and was detained in the city the day after the attack on the manchester arena. 18 people have so far been detained as part of the investigation, ten are still in custody. the terror attacks in london and manchester mean that security is featuring heavily in the final days of campaigning before thursday's general election. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is at our —— here with me now. this is not being comfortable territory for any major party. this is not being comfortable territory for any major partym has not. the main reason is the most obvious — politicians wear this very heavily, this whole idea that before you get on to anything else, all the conversations about school and whatnot in the usual fare of politics, who have held office where
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heavily the idea that they are responsible for our safety. in the context of the terror threat they are well aware that they know they cannot stop everything. theyjust need to stop as much as they possibly can. so, yeah, in these last few days of the campaign a huge focus on national security. 0n the one hand you have plenty of criticism of the conservatives and theresa may in particular as former home secretary over her record on security, particularly around police officer numbers in the number of armed police. those numbers have gone down since 2010 but are creeping back up now as far as armed police in england and wales are concerned. and the repercussions for labour around the extent to which they would be perceived to be good custodians, as the government, over things like the police and security, particularly given what the likes of jeremy corbyn and joe mcdonald have said in the past. both the liberal democrat leader, tim farron, and leader of the snp, nicola sturgeon, have warned against a "knee—jerk" reaction
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to the london bridge attack. facing a studio audience in edinburgh last night, mr farron said there was no evidence to support a widening of surveillance powers. while nicola sturgeon warned against reforms that could "undermine our own freedoms". i do know that we are much safer if we invest in police and in our security services. an additional 300 million that we will put into policing will make us safer. the cuts made by theresa may have not made us safer.. we must make sure that in our determination to keep the population safe we do not start to undermine our freedoms and civil liberty because these are part of what makes us who we are. we should always listen carefully to what police and security services say. we can speak now to sadiq khan. thank you for your time this
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morning. could we have your thoughts, please, i know you are attending events yesterday evening, your thoughts around those moments? could i say, speaking as the mayor of london, and as a londoner, it is difficult to articulate the grief and the anger we feel. we are also a city that is resolute and determined and our hearts as londoners with the families of all those by the horrific attack on saturday night. the reason why we are angry is because these three terrorists deliberately targeted innocent londoners and visitors, enjoying a saturday night out. personally, as a patriotic british muslim i am angry because these three terrorist are using a perverse and poisonous interpretation of the face i belong to to justify their actions. it is not in my name. it has nothing to do with the religion i belong to. but
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we are as a city have faced terror attacks before and we will carry on and show a dignified united response that our community and our city will not be divided. it is hard at the moment because the emotions you discuss at the moment separate from the important business of the general election and the ongoing enquiries. we know more detail now about khuram butt, one of those involved. we know he had crossed the radar. he had been investigated for a period of time. we also know now that he worked for transport for london. that is the overseeing body of the buses and trains and tube network throughout london. what concerns to you have at this point that what we are learning about him and the roles that he had and why more was not done. the police and
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security services focus rightly on the investigation from the attack on saturday night. not unreasonably, these questions are being asked and iam sure these questions are being asked and i am sure the police will look into what they knew and what they could have done, what they did do and if anything could be done differently. i think it is premature, i am not privy to the facts, to draw conclusions. what i do know is that police and security services keep under review hundreds of our fellow citizens and others in this country. there are a number of people, in the tens of thousands, who are under consideration. what we need to do is make sure that we ask these questions of police and security services and that they respond and a nswer services and that they respond and answer the legitimate questions we have. people will understand your caution. i know this is an election issue and you are a labour politician. to this issue of the numbers of police... can you say categorically that if
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police in the metropolitan area which is clearly your area of interest, if there were more offices available, would that be better in terms of the security? yes. can i declare, the responsibility for the attack on saturday night live had the three terrorists. nobody else is responsible. —— saturday night lies with the three terrorists. the police have lost over £600 million over the last years. that is a big cut. 0ver over the last years. that is a big cut. over the next four years, the current conservative government has plans to cut a further £400 million and on top of that, they are changing the police funding formula which means we could lose a further £700 million. that is £1.7 billion. we have worked out that if they carry through with their plans, we could be losing between 3000 and
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12,000 additional offices. it is not sustainable. 0ne 12,000 additional offices. it is not sustainable. one of the first things idid as sustainable. one of the first things i did as the mayor of london was to prove a further 600 armed officers in london because i recognise that have a significant one —— number of highly trained officers is to prevent terrorism. can i be clear, under renewed theresa may government, london will be less under a new renewed theresa may government as a consequence of our new policing budget we will have fewer police officers. one of the ways we counter terrorism is by fantastic police in the community. members of the community, of all backgrounds, report intelligence to police officers in the community. they pass it on and it helps keep us safe. there is no doubt that fewer police officers means we are in more danger. can ijust ask police officers means we are in more danger. can i just ask you finally, we don't have much time. donald
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trump's comments. but his wonder at this stage, given what's happened, is he welcome in london? that is a visit that is going to happen. what is your message this morning? when theresa may one invited him on a state visit to our country, at a time when he was proposing a travel ban on muslims, changing the american policy on refugees, i thought it was inappropriate for us to be rolling out the red carpet for donald trump. nothing has changed my mind. so that's a no, he's not welcome, as far as the mayor of london is concerned. of course, we should have cordial relations with our closest ally. of course we have special relationship. 0ne our closest ally. of course we have special relationship. one of the things about a special relationship, it's like best mates. you stand shoulder to shoulder to them in times of adversity that you call them out when they are wrong and there are some things that donald trump is wrong about and in no
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circumstances, i'm not in favour of a state visit. mayor of london, siddique khan, thank you for your time this morning. —— sadiq khan. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather — and she's here in the studio. is it raining out there? yes and for a wee while yet. this morning, many of us seeing rain, heavy and persistent. this is a weather watchers chip from yesterday. a lot of cloud around and a lot of low pressure. it is drifting northwards and eastwood, taking its reign with it as it does so. if you are travelling, watch out for the persistent rain. it will be coupled with high winds. there is the risk of localised flooding will stop the rain will continue moving eastwards and northwards. gusty winds across wales and much of england. as the rain continues to drift north—east, you will find the showers behind it
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will rattle through quite quickly but the rain will be ensconce, even at nine o'clock, in the likes of the midlands, the south—east, not quite across norfolk and suffolk but the other side of it seeing some sunshine, some brightness and also the showers. drifting out of wales, still across north—west england, and as we push still across north—west england, and as we push across still across north—west england, and as we push across northern ireland, we are looking at the extra sunshine and showers but a lot of rain across scotland. here, the wind is lighter. for the rest of the day, we are looking at gale force gusts around the bristol channel, south—western approaches and the english channel. the very windy inland. as i mentioned, the rain is persistent. temperature wise, 12— 18 but if you are stuck under the rain, regardless of the temperature, it will feel pretty cool. through this evening and overnight, the rain continues to and overnight, the rain continues to a grand north and eastwards so it will be become confined to parts of scotland. behind that, still quite
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breezy, not particularly cold. temperatures are around ten or 11. perhaps a little bit higher. then as we move through wednesday, it do have that rain still across parts of scotla nd have that rain still across parts of scotland and also northern england. that will eventually, slowly, mind you, push off into the north sea. behind it, a bit of respite, a bit of dry weather, still windy. later in the day, the next system is coming in from the south—west, introducing more rain. a change of wind direction, coming from the south—west so that is a milder direction than coming from the north. it is still coming from the north. it is still coming from the north so it will feel cooler there. as we head into thursday, the rain coming in from the south—west continues to advance steadily northwards through england, wales, northern ireland and getting into scotland. still blustery but temperatures picking up at a roundabout 20 celsius. louise, i hope you are managing to stay dry outside. thanks, carol.
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i have been here for a couple of hours. we feeling a little bit cold this morning? yes. but we do not mind, do we? what we are trying to do is answer your questions. we are just outside the studio. we have so many questions to answer. chairs are hard to come by. thank you for saving that chair, i will borrow it. i'm going to talk about social care. it is who pays for us when we get older, who looks after us, all of those issues. i know, having talked about is this it is really at the heart of this for so many people. have a specific question that you hope will be answered. monica and philip, what is your concern? we are retired and we own our own home. and we have children. we want to know what's going to happen, if and when,
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we have to go into care? what happens to our house? what happens to what's left after they had taken what needs to be paid for. while we appreciate everything needs to be paid for in life, and we are prepared to pay our way, but we want to know our kids are going to be left something. and that has been one of the issues. what can you tell them? it proved controversial with them? it proved controversial with the conservatives having to change their pledge a few days after the ma nifesto their pledge a few days after the manifesto was published. the big issue has been, should there be a cap on what you have to pay for your ca re cap on what you have to pay for your care home should you need that service. this was pledged by the conservatives in 2015 and then they decided not to do it. after that,
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the state would help you with the fees. this is assuming you have assets above £23,000. if you don't, you get support from the local authority. labour and the lib dems have pledged to that cap and the conservatives did only after the controversy initially because things get compensated. if you need care in your own home, currently the money in your house is not taken into consideration. the conservatives say it should be that they will raise the amount to 100,000. that in itself has issues. but this issue of the cap of what you would have to pay has been a big debate in that campaign. is this clearer for you? a bit but obviously i would like to know why theresa may didn't think this out before she made the announcement. graham, you have had your personal experience of care? my
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wife was going through dementia in 2009. finally, after a lot of delay in getting the diagnosis. there we got through the process of having our assets assessed. i must say, the support got from the county council was phenomenal. the people that came and did the assessment for us were extremely helpful. some of the money that was mentioned, £23,000 was made quite clear them. so you have had to pay out money essentially? yes. so if it was hundreds out in pounds, would that be easier for you? leigh yes. quite right. when you start out in the system, you don't know how long you will be funding careful. list of outlaid a mac policy as well. can you make it clear what they offer is? —— can you say what labour's policy is. the amount you would have to pay out... in terms of
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funding in the social care, labour said that they will put 2 billion per year more into the system, under by higher tax on business and higher income tax. that is a clear pledge. the other parties have slightly different of reasons that there is? —— but they reads a —— vet is a question mark. before we go to the news when everybody else is, thank you very much indeed. thank you very much. good to speak to you. coming up much. good to speak to you. coming up in the next half an hour or so, other things we will be talking about is security, we have the bbc reality check. we have beenjoined by people from the bbc newsround. you will be helping us out with the weather a bit later which is fantastic. 0bviously, of course, and glad to see steff is sitting on the
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sofa chatting which is marvellous that she will be talking more about the economy, costs and all the rest of it, budget as well, a little bit later. we have other special things for you here this morning and we will be back with plenty more here from the gazebo tent. i would like to call it the bbc breakfast cafe. we will find out exactly what is ecstatic at your part of the uk and what we have is a special bulletin from your local bbc team. we will see you in a couple of minutes. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. there's only two more days of campaigning left now before all of us here in london all cast our votes in the general election. 0ur political editor tim donovan has been looking at the key election issues for the capital. not least the way london's been reacting to the events of saturday night. notjust an act of terror to hurt and strike fear that won many think was intended to disrupt the
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democratic process. it is one theme are now hard to escape in this campaign. people ‘s minds will be on security, on policing, on how different communities and rub along together but it is impossible to work out, to anticipate, how this will affect the way people vote. during the campaign, tory cuts to schools and hospitals have also featured, as has the impact of labour's tax plans on a city where most high earners are concentrated. this election has also brought a lot of talk about tactics, tactical withdrawals in particular. this is even then, in a constituency currently held by labour by 274 boats. the green party withdrew, they didn't stand a candidate here because they want to help the programme an labour candidates —— eling. the former mayor campaigning here at east where they leave
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sentiment is strongest in the city. while the current mayor says only labour kent deliver the capital needs. —— can deliver. what we know this is already an labour dominated city but it really is hard to tell so there are many variables. yes, the terror threat, but also brexit. though the parties themselves may have shifted their own expectations and targets. both leaders chose this horror of eling to campaign in that neither otherwise have focused on the capital —— bara. —— labour is feeling more and the tories are less confident than they were. —— borough. london has been named as the museum
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capital of the world. four of them made the top 20, the british museum, the tate modern and the national history museum. they were all there is between them, they attracted more than 20 million visitors. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good service on the tube apart from the central line because of the tree on the track at white city. a look at the roads and the police cordon remains in place around borough market, so avoid that area if you can. while southwark street is closed east of southwark bridge. as for london bridge station — its open but the borough high street entrance — is closed. now let's take a look at the weather. take a raincoat. the hood that you don't like wearing. i will be back in halfan don't like wearing. i will be back in half an hour. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt here in the studio, and
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louise minchin outside on the piazza. were holding a special event this morning, a different sort of show with questions being asked by members of the public about the general election in 48 hours time. we are answering questions, we have teams of bbc correspondent and experts down there. time is now down 731. scotland yard has defended a decision to downgrade an inquiry into one of the three men behind the london bridge attack. seven people were killed and dozens wounded in the incident on saturday night. its been revealed that one of the attackers, khuram butt, was investigated by counter—terrorism officers and m15 two years ago. the issue of security is dominating the final days of campaigning before thursday's election. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn has accused theresa may of overseeing a 19,000 fall in police numbers as home secretary. but the prime minister says she protected the amount of counter—terror police.
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we'll speak to the foreign secretary borisjohnson about this in around ten minutes time. nicola sturgeon, has warned against a "knee—jerk" reaction to the london bridge attack in the latest leaders debate. scotland's first minister told a question time audience that she would listen very carefully to any request for more powers but said these were already extensive and warned against undermining civil liberties. we must make sure that in our determination to keep the popular eastern safer we do not undermine our own freedoms and civil liberties. this is part of what makes us who we are. we should listen carefully to the police and security services but they already have a fairly wide ranging powers. a tiger that killed a keeper at a cambridgeshire zoo will not be put down. the decision not to destroy the animal has been "fully supported" by the family
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of rosa king, who died in the incident at hamerton zoo park. an investigation is ongoing into the 34—year—old's death, which was described by the zoo as a "freak accident". one in every seven pounds spent at supermarkets will be at discount stores like aldi and lidl within the next five years, according to new research. the food industry research organisation, the igd, also predicts that in the next few years nearly a quarter of british shoppers could be getting their groceries delivered by ordering online. coming up in about ten minutes carol will be here with the weather. right now, however, we have sport. good morning. sad news this morning about one of the toughest footballers that newcastle united fa ns footballers that newcastle united fans have ever seen play. former newcastle united midfielder cheick tiote died yesterday, aged just 30. he collapsed in training with his new club, beijing enterprises. tiote's former manager steve mclaren led the tributes,
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saying he was the toughest player he'd ever seen — but if he was smiling, he knew the world was ok. tiote, who was from the ivory coast, played in the north—east for seven yea rs. cheick was competitive he was a warrior and could play. the tempo and intensity of his game and the game the tempo and intensity of his game and the game that he wanted to play would be ideal for the premier league and proved so. that is the kind of player that everybody wa nts. he was a winner all the way through. most days we are talking about security issues at the moment and in sport, of course, it is at the top of the everybody‘s mind. the french open is going on at the moment and andy murray has thanked the crowd for turning up to watch the action. murray reached the quarter—finals with a straight—sets win over russia's karen khachanov. he'll play kei nishikori next but his thoughts were clearly elsewhere. this is something that has affected, you know, large parts of europe and all over the world and, obviously, i want things to keep
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getting better and i appreciate everyone still coming out to support the tennis and creating a fantastic atmosphere. i am grateful i can come and perform in front of you. the british and irish lions head coach has named a different sides of the tour of new zealand. eight all blacks are in the auckland blues side tomorrow and the coach hopes that those selected for the match tomorrow will use the match to try and force their way into the test side. there is intensity in training today and those 15 players to see it as opportunity for them themselves. they were not part of the first game and, you know, ithink was they were not part of the first game and, you know, i think was great that we the tour off to a win but for those 15 who start on wednesday, they will think they have a chance now to get out there and perform and
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be the super rugby side and put themselves into contention. chris froome finished safely in the peleton on the second stage of the criterium du dauphine in france. it was a day for the sprinters into arlanc, with frenchman arnaud demare taking the stage win. froome should excel later in the week, in the climbing and time trial stages. sir ben ainslie's land rover b.a.r team are struggling in the america's cup challenger semi—finals in bermuda. they're 2—0 down to new zealand after damaging a wing in the first race and being forced to forfeit the second. it's a best—of—nine series. the pressure really is on. whoever gets to five races gets through to the final and they will then, of course, compete for the america's cup. huge pressure but if there is anyone who can handle the pressure, we have seen there is anyone who can handle the pressure, we have seen him do that so many times, haven't we in
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0lympics... he do that so many times, haven't we in 0lympics. .. he has do that so many times, haven't we in 0lympics... he has pulled around literally quite a few times. nautical phrase? it probably is. he is steering the ship into calm waters. it is a hugely technical problem for them at the moment. have repairs to do. a brilliant technical tea m repairs to do. a brilliant technical team working 24 hours a day to fix it. he is confident. he has given an interview saying he is confident that they can fix it in time and they have a good chance in the semifinal. the time now is 737. two days to go until the election and security is a key campaign issue. following the terror attacks in london and manchester, jeremy corbyn claims theresa may is responsible for a cut to police in numbers. the prime minister has accused labour of opposing shoot to kill power. is borisjohnsonjoins us opposing shoot to kill power. is boris johnson joins us now. opposing shoot to kill power. is borisjohnsonjoins us now. thank you very much for your time this morning, mrjohnson. could you pick up morning, mrjohnson. could you pick up on morning, mrjohnson. could you pick upona morning, mrjohnson. could you pick up on a few lines emerging in
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connection with the london attack? khuram butt, we understand now, was on the radar of m15 and had been investigated. because of the investigation they underwent he was deemed to be low risk and went back down in terms of priority. many people are confused by this because he was very high profile. he was on television alongside a known terrorist organiser who is now jailed. people will be wondering should there be a rescaling of who is at risk and who was not at risk? could you tell us what questions are being asked by security services about how those people are deemed to be the risk they are. it is important to stress that the police on the night did an outstanding job in dealing with those terrorist when i worked with security services as mayor of london as they did for many yea rs, mayor of london as they did for many years, i found they were fantastic and did an incrediblejob of giving
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us and did an incrediblejob of giving us safer. people are understandably right to look at the photographs in the papers today and the tv show that this guy was in and ask what happened? how did this person slipped through the net in the way that he seems to have done? i cannot really comment much on that because there is a live and ongoing investigation. i think, there is a live and ongoing investigation. ithink,1.i there is a live and ongoing investigation. i think, 1.1 would make for our viewers is very important as we look at this issue and we think about policing, we don't take the focus of responsibility away from the people who did it come from the terrorists. whenjeremy who did it come from the terrorists. when jeremy corbyn who did it come from the terrorists. whenjeremy corbyn says it is all a function of police numbers, i have to say i think that is, first of all, that is wrong. police numbers in london have remained high and, secondly, we protected police budgets in 2015 and the labour
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party, as i recall, wanted to cut them by 10%. that argument detracts from the responsibility of these scumbags of what they have done and we should not allow that to happen. a point well made. people do understand that and they know that responsibility lies elsewhere. the questions remain about police numbers. would you agree that protecting police forces and getting more officers pounding the streets is more crucial than ever?” certainly think that you need to have a strong and robust, financed police department and that is what we have had in london during my time. it is up to the current mayor to provide financing for it. we make huge savings by getting rid of surplus buildings, by reorganising things. we can numbers at 30 2000. we put another 1900 officers into the counterterrorism side of things,
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into m15 and other security services and into gchq. there is an increase in the counterterrorism budget of about 30%. your point about neighbourhood policing is also a good one but, as i say, the numbers in london have been kept high. the issueis in london have been kept high. the issue is how do you stop these people being radicalised ? issue is how do you stop these people being radicalised? what more can we do? with these internet companies that allow this filth and brainwashing styles to circulate over the airwaves. how can we crack down on it? how can we work with communities? work with. .. down on it? how can we work with communities? work with... am afraid, obviously, particularly the muslim community, to drive out discounts. to get them to crack down on the people who are either on the pathway to radicalisation or who have already been radicalised. we need to step up. if i may... am afraid to say, we need a twin track policy. we
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need to be tough on our counterterrorism measures and it is disappointing thatjeremy counterterrorism measures and it is disappointing that jeremy corbyn should attack the government of the policing he himself has said he is opposed to the shoot to kill policy that was invaluable in saving people ‘s lives on saturday. and, secondly, it is bizarre that we are being attacked by the labour party over counterterrorism measures when jeremy corbyn has won as a badge of pride that in 30 years in parliament he has opposed every single counterterrorism measure. everybody, as you are aware, is counterterrorism measure. everybody, as you are aware, is under scrutiny because of things they have said in the past and you are no different in that respect, are you? i was looking at... there was a november 2015 evening standard front page. quotes from you. do not risk the safety of london with police cuts. at which point you are pleading, as i
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understand, tell me more, with theresa may, the then home secretary who was rejecting your calls for more police. now you are backing her making cuts to the police.” more police. now you are backing her making cuts to the police. i think people will remember that tariq and icame to people will remember that tariq and i came to a very good agreement and iam i came to a very good agreement and i am grateful to herfor her foresight and wisdom that allowed us to keep police numbers at 30 2000. that has been invaluable. 0ver that period, crime overall has come down quite substantially. but, you know... as i say, to start attacking the government over so—called police cuts when, obviously, we protected the budget and labour wanted to cut them by 10%, it is really extraordinary when you consider that diane abbott, who is standing to be our home secretary, is somebody who not onlyjoined jeremy corbyn in
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opposing every counterterrorism measure but has freely said that all these islamist groups, as far as she's concerned, could be full of moderates and therefore cannot be banned. ijust moderates and therefore cannot be banned. i just think moderates and therefore cannot be banned. ijust think it is extraordinary to think that she could actually be in charge of counterterrorism of police, of sigley services and of keeping us safe. one must question, briefly, we spoke to max remake this morning who clearly has the job that you used to have and he has made it quite plain, has been explicit the donald trump, the president of the united states, is not welcome in london at this time, given his comments. we use it on that? i don't want to interpose myself into any controversy between the mayor of london and donald trump. i remember having those myself in the past. what i will say is that i think it is entirely right
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that sadiq khan, as mayor of the greatest city on earth should reassure his public and his citizens about the presence of armed police on the streets. he was making a sensible point and was entirely right to do so. the key for your time this morning, boris. the time now is 745. time for the weather. it is raining across many parts and it's not just rang. it is raining across many parts and it's notjust rang. it is also windy. the rain strengthening through the day, touching gale force across some of our coastlines. low pressure is firmly in charge of the weather. you can see all of the weather. you can see all of the weather fronts attached to it. it is moving northwards and eastwards, bringing rain with it. watch out for travelling. it could lead to tricky travelling. it could lead to tricky travelling conditions. you can find out more on your local radio station. as we had through the morning, this is the status quo. we have a lot of rain across scotland
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and northern england. showers are coming in behind. at nine o'clock, thatis coming in behind. at nine o'clock, that is the pick shelf. if you are in the rain, it feels cooler. —— picture. the wind is in the rain, it feels cooler. —— picture. the wind is picking in the rain, it feels cooler. —— picture. the wind is picking up, particularly close to the coastline as live across wales, the rain will continue to drift eastwards. for scotland, still a lot of rain. a fairly wet day across parts of scotla nd fairly wet day across parts of scotland and northern england. through the day, the rain slowly at france's eastwards and north eastwards. the rain strengthens and even inland, it will be a gusty day. the showers will be blown along quite quickly in the wind. with the exposure through the irish sea, the bristol channel, will english channel, you are looking at gales. temperatures, 18. we have had the rain across england and scotland. it
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would be a particularly cold night. temperatures 9— 11 celsius. ‘s tomorrow morning, we start off with the rain. parts of north—east england. courtesy of the low pressure drifting off down into the north sea. then we have another system waiting in the wings. start wet and windy in the north—east and that moves slowly away into the north sea. behind it, a lot of dry weather, sunshine. still quite lost three. and then you can see the next system bringing in more rain of northern ireland. the wind direction will change towards southerly site went feel particularly cold. and then as we had through, it will eventually get into scotland. some showers ahead of it, showers behind it and still clear in the north, 10— 12. about 20 in the south. that's
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how it is looking weatherwise. i like the way you have gone inside, carol. we are out in the rain. good morning everyone! good morning! loving your style. you guys have been finding out about the election. tiffany, you had a great question.” asked why doesn't the queen just choose who is going to be prime minister rather than having this big election and then a got told, even though the queen gets her face around the postcards and stuff... and all the money and things. - §7 ——
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the its”? f” boast , ~ the it"? 7... boast draw? —— have the most amount of boast draw? —— most amount of votes. gt motorsport of the smaller parties? yes. —— do you team up with the small parties. thank you very much, guys, small parties. thank you very much, guys, great questions. those are the burning issues of young people who aren't able who are.... to vote in this week election — but let's talk to some young people who are.... there have been too many cuts within
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the public service and the police. there is a lot of reactive policing and not enough proactive policing. the parties need to understand that and increase the number of police on the beat. lets chat with laura. something maybe not be made clear enough. labour wants to raise a lot more money to increase spending in the public sector and that includes more money for schools, more money for the police. they want to raise the public '5 pay cap —— public sector. the conservatives want to prohibit that. more public services means more health services, schools, education, lots of us can use but of course, that means we pay more taxes to fund that. on the level of taxation, we have a clear choice between the main parties labour
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wants to spend more and raise more money from taxes to do that.” wants to spend more and raise more money from taxes to do that. i know, josh homme you are talking earlier with me. you are nifty went able to vote in a referendum? yes, i really wa nted vote in a referendum? yes, i really wanted to vote. i want to know how it will affect my generation and india particular students. it will affect my generation and india particularstudents. i it will affect my generation and india particular students. i really wa nt to india particular students. i really want to travel and all how inclusive the eu is. —— in particular. want to travel and all how inclusive the eu is. -- in particular. kenny? wrecks it is an important issue in this election. —— brexit. it is not just about voting for the party but to hold that party to account. to make sure we get the best possible options. this is a negotiation process. everybody can promise
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whatever they want, however, whoever wins on the ninth, to make sure they do what you want them to do. the nature of the trade deal isn't yet clear. despite this being a brexit election, we haven't heard what the parties will do. the other key thing you mentioned, the range of policies on offer by the main parties have different impacts on different generations. there's lots of stuff in there for young people, education. but on key issues like working age welfare, both main parties are pressing ahead with more cuts and part of that is that young parties that make young people are less lucky to vote. if more of your generation go out to vote like they did in the scottish referendum and the brexit referendum, the more we
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all likely to have then is going forward. there is the fact that there are so many buzzwords out there. it is hard to know what to think. one of the things that i have been able to make the internet my job, i have been able to be specific about what i talk about. politicians say strong and stable rather than red white and blue wrecks it. rather than what they will do to do with theissue than what they will do to do with the issue first of its problematic. —— brexit. the issue first of its problematic. -- brexit. kenny. it's a big problem for everybody. lots of ‘s words that don't really mean anything. all i can don't really mean anything. all i ca n stress don't really mean anything. all i can stress to people, going to research this stuff. —— lots of buzz words. even the bbc have their sight, you can go and look at issues you care about. to you know what, kenny, that is exactly what i had to
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do next. the bbc manifesto information, you can get all of the details on all of the parties online. do have a look at that. louise! i love how you manage to fit six people out. clearlyjust to keep warm as well. you we are in a bbc brea kfast warm as well. you we are in a bbc breakfast cafe. there is a lot of argument on social media today. good morning. it's so lovely to you to be pa rt morning. it's so lovely to you to be part of this. so many getting in touch. jane has been busy all morning. jayne, you're looking at the comments from viewers this morning. what have you had come in — what questions have you got? johnin john in reding says it is a canape. anyway, those are questions coming in which is absolutely brilliant. if you get in touch on facebook, twitter but let me introduce our social media guy. brad is helpfully
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holding up the side because it keeps blowing over in the wind. we are all a bit chilly. ijust saw a chap walking by wearing flippers. jan says labour wants to cut university fees for students in england. how will it be funded? they plan to pay for their most expensive from us, around £11.2 million when you roll in what they want to do with maintenance grants, by restoring the corporation tax. also put potentially taxing higher income earners questions have been raised about whether in the long—term, getting that much money from corporation tax will be sustainable wood companies start altering their
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behaviour to start avoiding the tax bill. --, behaviour to start avoiding the tax bill. ——, wood companies start altering their behaviour? they have been lead —— reading about labour's garden pack. this is meant people will pay more? there is a misunderstanding. it is woefully out of date. it is a funny system because we tax people in low value properties at a lower rate than high value properties. what labour are saying, they will look into other upgrading or changing to a land value tax whichjust upgrading or changing to a land value tax which just means rather than taxing you on the whole value of your property, including your house and your garden, they were tax you on the land underneath it. have they put a figure on it? no details yet. we have ran out of time. back to louise. so many more questions we
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will try and answer in the next 1.5 hours. we are also tried to keep warm. let's get the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. social media companies such as facebook, twitter and google say they are investing significant resources in fighting the spread of extremism. their comments follow saturday's attack at london bridge — and subsequent calls from the prime minister, for them to crack down on extremist material. but there are warnings — that tighter controls — on balance — might not be such a good thing. well, regulation is something you need to do carefully.
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you need to understand that you are not creating incentives to do the wrong thing, to remove people's free speech, rather than just removing terrorist content. you need to be confident that you are not upsetting delicate balance here. it's emerged that one of the terrorists in the attack at the weekend — used to distribute leaflets expressing extremist views on the streets outside east london mosque. 27—year—old khurram butt from nearby barking, wasn't a member of the mosque — which has actively excluded extremists from its premises — and worked closely with police. so, we have had people who actually come to the mosque and wants to impose themselves and the kind of ideology or their kind of thinking, particularly with young people, which is a very narrow and skewed view. we have had to say, no, this is not what islam teaches. we need to be inclusive. and in connection to the death of the killers, over 100 imams and religious leaders, have taken the unprecedented decision not to perform funeral prayers for any of the attackers. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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good service on the tube apart from the central line because of the tree on the track at white city. a look at the roads and the police cordon remains in place around borough market, so avoid that area if you can. while southwark street is closed east of southwark bridge. as for london bridge station — it's open but the borough high street entrance — is closed. now let's take a look at the weather. good morning. a damp start this morning. there was rain overnight and it is windy. one or two bright spells around one not last long. it will stay wet and windy through the course of the morning. wet weather pushing in from the west, accompanied by a strong westerly wind. it is a gusty winds that will stay with us throughout the afternoon. further west it could turn more
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showery and a bit brighter later on today. further east you will probably hang onto that cloud. quite cool as well, 16— 18 celsius is the maximum temperature in today. these showers will continue into the evening, maybe some brighter spells before the sunsets. those showers will gradually become fewer and further in between. still breezy overnight, the minimum temperature dropping down to 11 or 12 celsius. a brighter start tomorrow. a brief respite. a dry red light of day, with some sunshine and rain. more rain overnight wednesday into thursday, staying unsettled as we head into the weekend. the temperature just makes a slight recovery. —— dry and brighter. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning from a special edition of breakfast. what we are trying to set out to do in next hour and a half is answer of your questions ahead of the general election. we go to the polls in just
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48 hours. if you are undecided, if you want more information, this is the place to be. we are outside of the place to be. we are outside of the studio in salford and we have a wonderful audience of bbc breakfast viewers. we will also be answering your questions. we're going to be talking about health over here. how are we feeling? are we loving it? it has gone a little bit chilly, but we are enjoying ourselves. we're talking about health, security, we will answer your questions. and steph has brought the bbc butty van home. at his back on home soil. i will be answering the questions of voters on the economy. brilliant atmosphere here. but we need you to get involved. keep sending your questions into the social media team. we will be reality checking everything, fact checking everything. keep the questions getting in. we will give you a sense of what is going on behind—the—scenes. we will be back in that big tent
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later on. good morning — it's tuesday 6th june. this morning's headlines... questions asked as to why police and security services downgraded their inquiries into the past of one of the london bridge attackers. khuram butt had been under investigation by counter—terrorism officers and m15. thousands have gathered for a vigil to remember the victims of saturday night's attack. a minute's silence will be held across the country later. in sport, the former newcastle united midfielder cheick tiote has died at the age of 30. his old boss steve mcclaren said he had the most beautiful smile in football. and carol has the weather. a pretty wet start for many parts of the uk.
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the rain moving northwards and north eastwards. behind it, sunshine and showers, the shower is going through quite quickly. that does mean that we are going to get some gusty wind as well. i will have more details on 15 minutes. i can tell you and everybody... good morning, thanks for joining everybody... good morning, thanks forjoining us. we know the weather in salford, it has closed in over the last couple of hours. good morning, thank you so much for joining us. what we are trying to do todayis joining us. what we are trying to do today is get to the bottom of your questions as many as we can get a nswered questions as many as we can get answered over what is remaining, the last hour and a quarter. we are in a tent, maybe a gazebo, i will call it the wreck‘s cafe. we have experts on call, we have somebody from reality check, you might have been checking it out about the election campaign. we are going to talk about security later. rachel from bbc radio 5 live is here. we have our own breakfast
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bar. the breakfast butty van is here, and steph has a special guest because i have been complaining about her standard of cooking over the last few weeks. most important, you get in touch. if you are undecided, if you want to know more information, bbc breakfast will try to tell you as much as we can this morning. we have also got our own cartoonist. i won't show you a picture of him because he isjust eating. he is trying to put together a visual impression of all of the things that we have been discussing. we wa nt things that we have been discussing. we want to get to the heart of the matter. we will keep you up—to—date with the weather. carol is here. charlie had all the latest news as well. first, our main story. scotland yard is facing questions over a decision to downgrade a previous inquiry into one of the three men behind the london bridge attack. it's been revealed that one of the attackers, khuram butt, was investigated by counter—terrorism officers and m15 two years ago. seven people were killed and dozens injured in the incident on saturday night.
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nick quraishi reports. sirens as the investigation into saturday night's attack continues at a fast pace, seven women and five men arrested in barking on sunday have been released by police without charge, leaving the focus firmly on the three attackers. this is the face of one of them. 27—year—old khuram butt was well—known to the police and m15 as an extremist, though they insist there was nothing to suggest he was planning an attack and downgraded their inquiry into his activities. the group display the black flag of islam... he featured in a channel 4 documentary last year about radical islamists in britain. twice, people in his barking neighbourhood reported the pakistani—born father of two to the authorities. in recent years he worked at kentucky fried chicken and was a customer services advisor at transport for london. less is known about the second attacker, 30—year—old rachid redouane, also from barking
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and claimed to be of moroccan—libyan descent. police are yet to confirm the identity of the third attacker. yesterday evening, a vigil took place as londoners came together for a dignified show of solidarity. among the victims, 30—year—old christine archibald, who had moved to europe from canada to be with herfiance. she died in his arms. james mcmullan's family are struggling to come to terms with the news his bank card was found on a body outside a london bridge pub. while our pain will never diminish, it is important for us to all carry on with our lives, in direct opposition to those that will try to destroy us. a minute's silence will be held at 11 o'clock this morning as the uk reflects on a third terror attack in less than three months. brea kfast‘s tim muffett
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is at london bridge for us this morning. let's talk about the downgrading of the inquiries, the investigation into one of the attackers. learning more about who knew what, and when? that is right. questions being asked this morning about who knew what, and when. also, a new image of koran but, one of the attackers, has come to light. it —— of koran but. it shows him working for transport for london. according to sources, he worked at a station. we expect the name of the third attacker to be released, if not today, then shortly after. as you can see, in the torrential rain, the cordon is still
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in place. london bridge is now open to traffic. a sense of normality is returning. you can see a large selection of flowers, as commuters have been paying their respects. barriers have been newly installed. they are hoping they would prevent a vehicle mounting the pavement, as it did with devastating effect on saturday night. the brother of the manchester suicide bomber salman abedi has been released without charge by police. ismail abedi, who's 23, was detained in the city the day after the attack on the manchester arena. 18 people have so far been detained as part of the investigation, ten are still in custody. the terror attacks in london and manchester have led to security featuring heavily in the final days of campaigning before thursday's general election. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is here. it has become the issue now, the
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election, security? it is dominating andi election, security? it is dominating and i think it will until polling day. it had been for the last fortnight, since what happened in manchester. a couple of other issues bubbled back into the campaign. those have effectively been wiped out. politicians were that responsible at the heavily, particularly those that have held office, to try to keep us safe. they realise that as their principal task. yet there is a recognition when they are facing a terror threat, when a country faces a terror threat, that there is a limit to what they can do. there is a focus today on police numbers and whether or not the government has done enough. the numbers in england and wales have fallen, as have the numbers of armed police officers. conservatives make the argument that the number of armed police officers is going up again and there are many more in training. we have a sense of that argument playing out this
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morning. here is the mayor of london. we could be losing between 3000 and 12,000 additional officers. that is not sustainable. 0ne 3000 and 12,000 additional officers. that is not sustainable. one of the first things i did as the mayor of london was to approve a further 600 armed officers in london. i recognise that having a significant numberof recognise that having a significant number of highly trained armed office rs number of highly trained armed officers is one of the ways we can prevent terrorists causing further harm to our city. you would expect party politics to play into this kind of discussion at any time, let alone when there is a general election 48 hours away. sidiq khan, a labour mayor of london, responding to policy by what has been a conservative government. here is borisjohnson. conservative government. here is boris johnson. when jeremy corbyn says it is all a function of police numbers, i have to say i think that is wrong. police numbers in london have remained high. secondly, we
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protected police budgets in 2015. the labour party, as i recall, wa nted the labour party, as i recall, wanted to cut them by 20%. all of that argument detracts from the responsibility of these scumbags, what they have done, and we should not allow that to happen. getting a getting a sense of the politicians dashing around the country trying to get us to the polling stations. well, he is not really involved in it, but donald trump has made a series of tweets about sadiq khan, and he is uncomfortable with the whole thing. he has been talking about it this morning? it is astonishing. we are well used to donald trump being able to surprise us, in terms of how he acts and how he acts on his twitter account. he is president of the united states,
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and yet he can rattle out tweets like he is barely giving it a moment's thought. he has been in a spat going on for a couple of days now with sadiq khan. 0riginally suggesting that he was effectively playing down the significance of what had happened at the weekend, when actually he was talking about reassuring surround police numbers. ina reassuring surround police numbers. in a statement, sadiq khan tried to push back, saying he had plenty to do without worrying about what the president is saying. he is now saying, to put it delicately, he would not be that disappointed if president trump was not to come to the uk on a state visit. that invite is out there, and it is still out there. the president is expected to come at some stage later this year. let's ta ke come at some stage later this year. let's take you through one or two other stories. a tiger that killed a keeper at a cambridgeshire zoo will not be put down. the decision not to destroy the animal has been "fully supported" by the family of rosa king, who died in the incident at hamerton zoo park. an investigation is ongoing
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into the 34—year—old's death, which was described by the zoo as a "freak accident". one in every seven pounds spent at supermarkets will be at discount stores like aldi and lidl within the next five years, according to new research. the food industry research organisation the igd also predicts that in the next few years nearly a quarter of british shoppers could be getting their groceries delivered by ordering online. carroll is in the studio. you have been outside a bit? i have been sent back out. it is raining outside, notjust in salford but across the uk. it is all courtesy of this area of low pressure. you can see the squeeze on the isobars, indicating that it is all so windy. with persistent rain and strong wind, some publications with travelling. do bear that in mind. through the course of this
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morning we hang on to all of this rainfor morning we hang on to all of this rain for scotland, northern england, parts of wales, the midlands, down into the south—east. gusty wind, not just with exposure, but also in land. behind the rain we see showers that will blow through quite quickly. for part of east anglia, still dry. you can see where we have all this rain. as we drift through hampshire, the isle of wight, through somerset, dorset and towards cornwall, back into dry conditions with showers. drying up across south wales. northern england in the rain, northern ireland out of the rain. the rain fairly ensconced across scotla nd the rain fairly ensconced across scotland and will remain so for much of the day. as we go through much of the day, it is drifting eastwards and north eastwards. heavy and persistent. behind it, showers. still very windy, the strongest winds in parts of the irish sea, the bristol channel, south western approaches, but also the english channel and around the north sea as
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well. if you are in the rain, regardless of temperatures, it will feel cool. in the sunshine, temperatures of up to 18, tempered by the wind. through this evening and overnight, the rain continues to advance across northern england and much of scotland. a blustery night. drier behind that band of rain with some clearer skies. not particularly cold. a temperature range of roughly nine to 11 celsius. we start tomorrow still with low pressure moving through the north sea, dragging this weather front with it. later on in the day we have another system coming our way. so, we start with the rain across parts of scotla nd with the rain across parts of scotland and northern england. that slowly pushes into the north sea. then a lot of sunshine and dry weather. still quite gusty. at the end of the date we have existed coming in across northern ireland, parts of wales and south—west england. note the change in wind direction from the south. that is a milder direction. that continues to
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migrate steadily northwards through england, wales, northern island. preceded by showers and followed by some showers. at least it is 20 celsius, a lot warmer than you will be feeling at the moment. welcome back to the bbc breakfast. welcome back to the bbc breakfast. we call it the tent, but it is more like a gazebo. we have been talking about so many questions. we're trying to get lots of information for you 48 hours ahead of the general election. you saw that sign, didn't you, health? i really want to doa didn't you, health? i really want to do a quick show of hands everybody. had has used the nhs in the last six months? hands up. who has used the nhs in the last month? pretty clear that most of us here. thank you very much indeed have in some form used the nhs. it's really, really key to so many things, isn't it, and one of the most important issues facing everyone when we go to the votes, that's newsround, they are on airat the votes, that's newsround, they are on air at the moment is the mind of the voters ahead of the election.
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nhs problems are complex and there are nhs problems are complex and there a re lots of nhs problems are complex and there are lots of debates about what might be the answer, so we asked two health workers which party think think is the best for them. they don't agree. let's have a lookment here is jayne mccubbin. in a training hospital in bradford two people who love the nhs. how do you do aislinn? i'm gordon maclean, recently retired consultant orthopaedic surgeon. two people who agree the nhs needs help. i'm a 33—year—old junior doctor working in cancer medicine. but who disagree about the best way to help this patient. the current government is cutting the nhs budgets on a historical level. that's not true, though, is it? it is absolutely is, please... sustainability and transformation partnerships, plans to close or merge one in six a&es across the country. the real amount of money actually being spent on the nhs has gone up and up and up.
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delayed transfers, delayed discharges, the numbers are soaring. it's unbelievable the crisis in the community. people died in my day too and it was as heartbreaking for us as young doctors and as young consultants as it is for you today. but the way in which you are unable to get people home, where they want to be, is entirely the fault of the last labour government. what you're failing to recognise, gordon, is that waiting lists went dramatically down, mortality went down, under the labour government. we've lost 50% of inpatient beds since the 80s this obsession with hospital bed numbers is utterly unfounded. you know, it's history. the patient wants to be at home. they do not want to be in a hospital bed. so opening more and more hospital beds is not the answer. go to manchester. they've taken over the whole
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of the healthcare from general practice, community care, the lot. manchester health service managers don't go whinging to whitehall, they sort it out in manchester for manchester's people. ask manchester what their deficit is, ok. there are huge, huge problems. you're talking about devolution, you're basically devolving responsibility for a crisis. the party i trust most to sort out the problem of the nhs now is the conservative party without any shadow of a doubt because they are trying to bring the control and the administration of delivery of care back to a local level. they absolutely cannot be trusted. jeremy hunt cannot be trusted. he has overseen a humanitarian crisis and what i'm seeing from the labour party — fund it properly, staff it properly, look at the pfi bill. none of that we're seeing in the conservative party manifesto. everything is not going to be fine with the nhs. i work in it.
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i see it every day. this election will be about whether or not the nhs exists in five years or not. 40 years ago, i felt very much the way aislinn does about the nhs. i was very worried about its future, but 40 years later, the british people have made the nhs work. they will always make the nhs work. gordon and aislinn are with us. i wa nt to gordon and aislinn are with us. i want to pick up with hugh pym, our bbc health editor. health is a devolved issue, isn't it? that's right. this general election debate on health is very much about the english health system because the elections are for westminster. westminster and the department of health run health for england. scotland, wales and northern ireland, health is devolved. their
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administrations don'ts have elections this time round. but spending decisions made at westminster always have a knock on effect in scotland, wales and northern ireland through the funding formula. so the money that's been talked about in this election campaign does have an indirect impact on those devolved administrations. and the key issue, and we saw you two talking about it is funding. layout the stall who is saying what on funding? the head of the nhs in england simon stevens said by 2020 health demand will outstrip the supply of money by £30 billion. so how do we fill that? so the government, the conservative government said just over £8 billion will come from government, but the rest has to come from efficiencies and finding savings elsewhere. so thatis and finding savings elsewhere. so that is the gap, the hole that's been talked about. this election campaign has seen pledges out to 2022, the conservatives have added a
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bit to that £8 billion. labour and the liberal democrats want to get the liberal democrats want to get the money quickerfrom the liberal democrats want to get the money quicker from year one or two. some of the health think—tanks and experts are saying none of them are and experts are saying none of them a re really and experts are saying none of them are really quite offering what's going to be needed. ok, have you two, i know you had a robust and good discussion. you still agree to sort of disagree, do you at this point? on a range of issues, yes. would that be fair aislinn. katie, we all talk about the nhs and we've just shown here, so many of us are users of the nhs. you've got a really positive story about the care that you and your family received? my little girl was diagnosed with a rare brain tumour in 2014. she under we nt rare brain tumour in 2014. she under went treatment in manchester. we could not fault the care that she had throughout the whole time being involved with the nhs. the encology
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ward in manchester, just a fantastic team. our story did not end the way we wanted to, gracie passed away backin we wanted to, gracie passed away back in march, but we had such a longer time with her than we expected to and just much better quality of life for a really long period of time. thank you. thank you for coming to tell us as well. i'm going to move over here as you do in a cafe. stand up hugh. we've got some more questions over here. good morning all. good morning. i know you've got a question that hugh, i hope, can answer for you. you've got a question that hugh, i hope, can answerfor you. tell us what it is. my question is what plans do the parties have, if any, for dealing with the gp recruitment and retention crisis that we're facing? well, all the parties do wa nt facing? well, all the parties do want to see more gps in place, but the question is a political party in government can't just flick a switch as you know only too well. training does take in the case of gps eight
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or nine years in total. so the conservatives have pledged 5,000 more gps by 2020 and then moving further beyond that over the next parliament. labour and the liberal democrats also want to invest more in recruitment. but it's going to ta ke in recruitment. but it's going to take time as i'm sure you would appreciate and actually the number of gps in england has fallen slightly over the last couple of years. so, at the moment, those gps aren't there to provide the care thatis aren't there to provide the care that is needed, but the parties say they do want to increase the workforce. so i suppose the proof of the pudding will be in whoever is in power and what they can deliver. you have got a similar question, your concern is have got a similar question, your concern is nurses, have got a similar question, your concern is nurses, isn't it? how do we make sure that we have people there. i'm a professor of nursing at sheffield hallam university and like many of the universities, our concern is from the political point of view, how do we ensure that people still want to go into health
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professions, we've introduced bursaries and people will be paying higher fees etcetera and that's the requirement that we have to make sure that we have the workforce to deliver health. what's your views on that? well, labour and the liberal democrats say they will reintroduce the bursaries which are due to be scrapped under current plans. that is the state paying for the cost of the fees and living costs the conservatives do make the point that their policy of changing the bursaries will actually increase the numberof bursaries will actually increase the number of places because if the government funds that, it is capped, whereas if you say that nurses have to pay tuition fees and borrow money like other students, more universities will offer more places. so, i suppose the question is what happens as that policy is allowed to develop over the next couple of years? we're going to have to move on. thank you very much indeed. lots more information on the bbc election hub if you want to go there. i'm
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trying to find steph. 0h, hub if you want to go there. i'm trying to find steph. oh, look at usual, she is back in the butty van. we have been over the country with the, but utty van, i have been told to put the bacon away and to concentrate on healthy. we've got nancy from bake 0ff. what's going on here? we have a fantastic healthy breakfast. five grams of sugar. that's all. i've got porridge oats here that have been soaked overnight in apple juice here that have been soaked overnight in applejuice and here that have been soaked overnight in apple juice and then shall ijust put it together? go on then. so i've got chopped up granny smith apple there. yes. right. just give that a little bit of a stir. yes. a few nuts. chopped nuts. i'm going to have to speed you up on this. get in there! fruit. strawberry. yoghurt.
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you can get the hints and tips online as well. nancy is putting them online. that's one of my challenges. right, that's my brea kfast challenges. right, that's my breakfast sorted. there you go, steph. let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. turbulent weather for early june, driven by an area of low pressure which is bringing notjust rain but also some strong wind, north—westerly indirection, and they are likely to catch gale force at times. the combination of the wind and rain means some tricky travelling conditions through the day, some disruption as possible, plenty of surface spray and localised flooding. again, strong wind. we have already seen gusts along the south and west coasts, in excess of 50 mph. they continue through the morning. a band of rain moving eastwards. behind it, some sunshine, but also some blustery and locally heavy and thundery showers. blowing through quickly on strong wind. a cool feeling day, highs between 12 and 18 celsius. the rain overnight continues to push its way
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north and eastwards. still taking its time. the showers will fade across england, wales and northern ireland to leave a mainly dry night. temperatures again easily in double figures, ten or 11 celsius, eight or nine across parts of scotland. the wind is slowly starting to ease down, as they will tomorrow as the area of low pressure finally starts to pull away. a brief spell of something dry and brighterfor much of the country but more low—pressure out to the west. tomorrow, still rain across eastern parts of scotland. much of the country dry and bright for a good part of the day. some spells of sunshine. screw the afternoon, cloud tending to increase and outbreaks of rain pushing into western areas. temperatures tomorrow at a little bit because the wind will be slightly lighter. we will see highs between 16 and 20 celsius for most. looking ahead to thursday, looking rather unsettled again. another speu rather unsettled again. another spell of rain starting to push in from the south—west. it looks like it will stay settled into the
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weekend. —— stay and settled into the weekend. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. could brazil get a third president in a year? amid claims of corruption, bribery and illegal funding we'll look at what next for the ailing economy. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday the 6th ofjune with ongoing protests, the stakes are huge for latin america's biggest economy
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— which is just recovering from two painful years of recession. we will talk you through what is at sta ke. also in the programme, one of the world's biggest coal mines gets the go ahead in australia. india's adani group says protests won't stop the $12 billion project.
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